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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 401)

Judge dismisses lawsuit from former Trump NSC aide over impeachment subpoena

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118153363001_6118158382001-vs Judge dismisses lawsuit from former Trump NSC aide over impeachment subpoena fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox news fnc/politics fnc Bill Mears article 5942b839-e26c-51f1-bce0-6ba39b1e1359

A federal judge in Washington has tossed out a lawsuit from former National Security Council aide Charles Kupperman, who had asked the courts to decide whether he had to comply with a House subpoena for his testimony in the congressional impeachment inquiry.

Judge Richard Leon late Monday dismissed the lawsuit as moot, concluding the House no longer had an interest in hearing from Kupperman. Kupperman’s former boss, ex-National Security Adviser John Bolton, also had refused to comply with a subpoena, saying he would not testify voluntarily.

“The House clearly has no intention of pursuing Kupperman, and his claims are thus moot,” Leon wrote.

EX-WHITE HOUSE OFFICIAL ASKS COURT WHETHER HE SHOULD TESTIFY IN HOUSE IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY

Kupperman, a former deputy national security adviser, had asked a court to decide whether he had to comply with the subpoena given that the White House had instructed him and other officials not to appear before a congressional investigation into Trump’s interactions with Ukraine.

The Democratic-controlled House, after conducting its inquiry, approved articles of impeachment against Trump earlier this month.

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Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has since held onto the articles, saying she wanted to ensure the Republican-controlled Senate would conduct a fair trial of the president.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118153363001_6118158382001-vs Judge dismisses lawsuit from former Trump NSC aide over impeachment subpoena fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox news fnc/politics fnc Bill Mears article 5942b839-e26c-51f1-bce0-6ba39b1e1359   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118153363001_6118158382001-vs Judge dismisses lawsuit from former Trump NSC aide over impeachment subpoena fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox news fnc/politics fnc Bill Mears article 5942b839-e26c-51f1-bce0-6ba39b1e1359

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Suspect in Monsey Stabbings Searched Online for ‘Hitler,’ Charges Say

In his journal, prosecutors said, he wrote about Hitler and “Nazi culture.” On his phone, he searched online for “why did Hitler hate the Jews” at least four times and looked for “prominent companies founded by Jews in America.”

On Monday, new details emerged about the man accused of stabbing five Jewish people at a Hanukkah celebration in the New York suburbs when federal prosecutors filed hate crime charges against him.

These details, according to a criminal complaint, could suggest what led the man, Grafton Thomas, to go on a bloody rampage on Saturday in Monsey, N.Y., a hamlet northwest of New York City with a large community of ultra-Orthodox Jews.

The charges against Mr. Thomas came as police departments across New York and New Jersey stepped up patrols in Jewish neighborhoods and dispatched officers in front of synagogues and yeshivas.

Read the Complaint: United States v. Grafton E. Thomas

Mr. Thomas is charged in the attack at a rabbi’s house in Monsey, N.Y.

Westlake Legal Group thumbnail Suspect in Monsey Stabbings Searched Online for ‘Hitler,’ Charges Say Thomas, Grafton E (1982- ) Synagogues Monsey (NY) Jews and Judaism Hasidism Hanukkah discrimination Crime and Criminals Brooklyn (NYC) Assaults anti-semitism   6 pages, 0.28 MB

The complaint was filed in Federal District Court in White Plains, N.Y., by the United States attorney’s office for the Southern District of New York. Mr. Thomas, wearing an orange prison jumpsuit, appeared in court shortly after 2:30 p.m. on Monday.

“Are you clear in your head?” Magistrate Judge Paul E. Davison asked him.

“Not clear, your honor,” said Mr. Thomas, who added that he needed rest.

Mr. Thomas’s family has said that he has a long history of mental illness, including schizophrenia.

But prosecutors, in the complaint, suggested that Mr. Thomas, who is from the nearby village of Greenwood Lake, N.Y., had a history of anti-Semitism. In one piece of writing, he used a phrase that investigators said appeared to reference the Black Hebrew Israelite movement, a fringe religious movement with offshoots that have been described as hate groups.

The assault in Monsey further rattled the Jewish community in the New York region after a series of anti-Semitic incidents in New York City last week and a deadly mass shooting in Jersey City, N.J., that targeted a kosher supermarket earlier in the month.

In an interview on Monday morning on NPR, the public radio network, Mayor Bill de Blasio said of the recent attacks: “We consider this a crisis. Really, there is a growing anti-Semitism problem in this whole country. It has taken a more and more violent form.”

In Rockland County, where the attack on Saturday took place, the county executive, Ed Day, announced on Monday that a private security firm would work with the police to provide armed guards to synagogues in Monsey.

“We cannot stand around and do nothing,” Mr. Day said. “We are taking proactive action in order to address the concerns, the fears that are out there.”

Rockland County has more than 300,000 people, and 31 percent of the population is Jewish, according to the state. It is believed to have one of the largest populations of ultra-Orthodox Jews outside of Israel.

In recent years, the area’s ultra-Orthodox population has grown as Hasidic families from New York City, priced out of their neighborhoods, have relocated there. Despite the distance, residents in both places retain close ties with one another.

The barrage of incidents has left Jewish neighborhoods feeling under siege during Hanukkah, a celebration of when Jews had defied aggressors to openly practice their faith.

“People are afraid to send their kids out to school,” said Benny Polatseck, 30, an Orthodox Jewish community activist who lives in Monsey.

The five victims of the attack at the home of the rabbi, Chaim Rottenberg, were taken to the hospital. Several were treated there and released. At least one victim remained in the hospital with a skull fracture, officials said.

Mr. Thomas, 38, was later arrested in Harlem, about 30 miles from Monsey, with blood on his clothes, officials said. According to the complaint, officers found both a machete and a bloody knife in his car.

On Sunday, Mr. Thomas pleaded not guilty to five counts of state charges of attempted murder and one count of first-degree burglary. In federal case, Mr. Thomas was charged on Monday with five counts — the attempted murder of each his five victims as they exercised their religious beliefs.

Geoffrey S. Berman, the United States attorney for the Southern District of New York, said in a statement that Mr. Thomas had “targeted his victims in the midst of a religious ceremony, transforming a joyous Hanukkah celebration into a scene of carnage and pain.”

If convicted on any of the counts, Mr. Thomas faces a maximum sentence of life in prison, federal prosecutors said. Under the law, if any of the victims dies as a result of his injuries, Mr. Thomas could face the death penalty.

The federal case is expected to take place before any state case, prosecutors said.

Mr. Thomas’s lawyer, Michael H. Sussman, told reporters at a news conference on Monday that he had asked the Rockland County district attorney to agree to have Mr. Thomas undergo a 30-day evaluation in a hospital.

Mr. Sussman said that earlier in the day, Mr. Thomas told him that a voice, or voices, in his head had commanded him to go to that location in Monsey and retrieve or destroy a piece of property.

“My impression is that the situation he found where he went in was not the situation he expected to find, and that may have been a trigger for him,” Mr. Sussman said at his office in Goshen, N.Y., flanked by Mr. Thomas’s mother, Kim Thomas, who is a nurse, and the family’s pastor, the Rev. Wendy Paige.

Mr. Sussman said Mr. Thomas suffered from psychosis and major depressive disorder, and had been prescribed several drugs.

Mr. Thomas had never spoken to either his mother or pastor about Jews or anti-Semitism, the lawyer and Ms. Paige said.

But prosecutors said in the federal complaint that investigators had found handwritten journals at Mr. Thomas’s home in which he expressed anti-Semitic views.

On one page, he questioned why people “mourned for anti-Semitism when there is Semitic genocide,” the complaint said.

According to the complaint, Mr. Thomas also appeared to make a reference to the Black Hebrew Israelite movement, a religious group to which officials also linked one of the attackers in the Jersey City shooting.

While the movement is not known for promoting violence, some of its offshoots have been described as hate groups by the Southern Poverty Law Center and the Anti-Defamation League, which track extremist organizations.

Officials have not linked the stabbings and the Jersey City shooting, and they have not established whether Mr. Thomas was a follower of the Black Hebrew Israelite movement.

The federal complaint also said Mr. Thomas had made online search queries suggesting anti-Semitic views as early as Nov. 9. In recent weeks, it said, he searched for “German Jewish Temples near me,” and “Zionist Temples” in Elizabeth, N.J., and in Staten Island.

On the day of the stabbings, Mr. Thomas’s phone browser was used to call up an article titled “New York City Increases Police Presence in Jewish Neighborhoods After Possible Anti-Semitic Attacks. Here’s What to Know,” the complaint said.

Mr. Cuomo said on Sunday that he had ordered the State Police’s hate crimes force to investigate the rampage. He also called the attack an “act of domestic terrorism,” the phrase that officials eventually used to describe the Jersey City shooting.

As of Sunday, New York City had seen a 23 percent rise in anti-Semitic hate crimes so far this year, according to police data.

Since the attack in Jersey City on Dec. 10, the New York Police Department had been deploying more officers to protect synagogues, the police commissioner, Dermot F. Shea, said.

After further anti-Semitic incidents, including the stabbings in Monsey, the department also stepped up patrols in some Brooklyn neighborhoods.

Kevin Armstrong, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, Rebecca Liebson and Ali Watkins contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Sudan sentences at least 27 to death for torturing, killing detained protester

A Sudanese court sentenced at least 27 members of the country’s intelligence service to death by hanging for the torture and death of a protester during demonstrations against then-President Omar al-Bashir.

The sentences, which can be appealed, were the first to be handed out since harsh government crackdowns on the protests that eventually led to the toppling of Bashit in April. More than 200 protesters were killed during the unrest that began in December 2018.

“We are now sure our revolution is continuing on the right path,” said protester Amna Mohammed.

US LAUNCHES DRONE STRIKES IN SOMALIA AFTER DEADLY CAR BOMBING

Westlake Legal Group AP19353502355752 Sudan sentences at least 27 to death for torturing, killing detained protester Louis Casiano fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/regions/africa fox news fnc/world fnc article 81c58b47-dda2-5e79-976b-612f52e6a11f

People gather last month as they celebrate first anniversary of mass protests that led to the ouster of former president and longtime autocrat Omar al-Bashir in Khartoum, Sudan. (AP Photo)

The death of Ahmed al-Khair, a school teacher, became a rallying cry during the four months of demonstrations against Bashir. Khair’s family said they were initially told he died of poisoning.

He was detained Jan. 31 in his hometown of Kassala and reported dead two days later. A state investigation determined he died of injuries from being beaten, Reuters reported.

“His death was an inevitable consequence of the beating and torture,” Judge al-Sadik al-Amin al-Fek said.

A TIMELINE OF KEY EVENTS IN SUDAN’S UNFINISHED REVOLUTION

Hundreds of people gathered outside the court in Omdurman for the sentence, with some waving the national flag and other holding photos of Khair.

“This day is a victory for justice, a victory for all Sudanese and a victory for the revolution,” Khair’s brother, Saad, told reporters after the verdict.

In addition to the death sentences, 13 were sentenced to prison terms and four were acquitted.

“With this ruling, the revolution will have paid off its debt to the martyrs a first time, to be followed as many times as the number of martyrs,” said a statement from the Sudanese Professionals Association, which spearheaded the protests against Bashir.

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The deposed ruler was jailed by the military after being removed from power for alleged corruption and money laundering. He is under indictment by the International Criminal Court on war crimes charges and genocide linked to his brutal suppression of the insurgency in the western province of Darfur in the early 2000s.

The military has refused to extradite him to The Hague.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19353502355752 Sudan sentences at least 27 to death for torturing, killing detained protester Louis Casiano fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/regions/africa fox news fnc/world fnc article 81c58b47-dda2-5e79-976b-612f52e6a11f   Westlake Legal Group AP19353502355752 Sudan sentences at least 27 to death for torturing, killing detained protester Louis Casiano fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/regions/africa fox news fnc/world fnc article 81c58b47-dda2-5e79-976b-612f52e6a11f

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Carlos Ghosn, Fallen Nissan Boss, Has Unexpectedly Left Japan

Westlake Legal Group 30ghosn1-facebookJumbo Carlos Ghosn, Fallen Nissan Boss, Has Unexpectedly Left Japan Securities and Commodities Violations Nissan Motor Co Ghosn, Carlos

Carlos Ghosn, the former chairman of Nissan who was facing charges of financial wrongdoing in Japan, has fled the country, a person with knowledge of the matter said.

Mr. Ghosn is currently in Beirut, Lebanon, said two people, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the matter was private.

He was arrested in November 2018, and accused of underreporting his compensation and shifting personal financial losses to Nissan. He has denied the charges.

Mr. Ghosn has been in and out of jail in Japan since his arrest, when he was initially held for more than 100 days. He was released after he posted bail of $9 million and agreed to strict conditions: He could not leave Tokyo, and his movements would be monitored. He was arrested again in April 2019, just after he announced plans to hold a news conference and speak publicly about his case.

Prosecutors imposed another condition for his release after the April arrest: Mr. Ghosn was forbidden from communicating with his wife, Carole. For seven months, the two did not speak a word to each other.

The case against Mr. Ghosn has garnered international attention and raised questions about the fairness of Japan’s justice system. Lawyers for the former executive say they have been unable to see reams of information Japanese prosecutors gathered from Nissan to build their case against Mr. Ghosn. Prosecutors, in turn, have argued that they are prevented from sharing some of the material the company gave them because it is “too sensitive.” The dispute over disclosure duties is pending before Japan’s highest court.

Mr. Ghosn was the architect of Nissan’s alliance with Mitsubishi Motors of Japan and Renault of France. Since his arrest, he has been removed as chairman of all three companies.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

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Iraq Condemns U.S. Airstrikes Against Iranian-Backed Militia

Westlake Legal Group ap_19364517222551-857c3bfd10d1dcfc1e866db2af0fd89366af3b44-s1100-c15 Iraq Condemns U.S. Airstrikes Against Iranian-Backed Militia

Fighters from the Kataeb Hezbollah militia inspect the destruction of their headquarters on Monday in the aftermath of a U.S. airstrike in Qaim, Iraq. AP hide caption

toggle caption

AP

Westlake Legal Group  Iraq Condemns U.S. Airstrikes Against Iranian-Backed Militia

Fighters from the Kataeb Hezbollah militia inspect the destruction of their headquarters on Monday in the aftermath of a U.S. airstrike in Qaim, Iraq.

AP

After the U.S. launched a series of airstrikes inside Iraq and Syria on an Iranian-backed militia, the Iraqi government has condemned the strikes as an attack on its sovereignty and said it would summon the U.S. ambassador. The U.S. launched the attack following a rocket strike Friday attributed to the Kataeb Hezbollah militia that killed a U.S. military contractor working with Iraqi and U.S. forces.

The KH militia, which is calling for retaliation, says that at least 25 of its fighters were killed in the strikes and dozens more were injured.

“We stress that Iraq is an independent country, and its internal security takes priority, and serious attention, and will not be allowed to become a battlefield, or a route for launching attacks,” Iraq’s Foreign Ministry said in a statement about what it planned to tell the U.S. ambassador.

It added that Iraq planned to discuss the future presence in Iraq of the U.S.-led coalition fighting ISIS.

KH and more than two dozen other Iranian-backed militias have a complicated position within Iraq. The paramilitary has fought against ISIS and is formally part of Iraq’s security forces — though U.S. officials have raised concerns about whether the Iraqi government actually has control over it and other Iranian-backed groups.

A U.S. State Department official said the latest military action was “designed to protect American forces and American citizens in Iraq, but it is also aimed at deterring Iran.”

As NPR’s Tom Bowman reported, this militia “has been for months now firing mortars and rockets at U.S. forces at locations throughout Iraq.” The U.S. government blames it for the recent attack on an Iraqi base near the city of Kirkuk in which a U.S. contractor was killed. The attack on the base used by U.S. and Iraqi forces, which involved more than 30 rockets, also injured four U.S. service members and two Iraqi troops, according to the Defense Department.

The U.S. military says it launched “precision defensive strikes” against three of the militia’s facilities in Iraq and two in Syria. Jonathan Hoffman, an assistant to the secretary of defense, said in a statement that the locations “included weapon storage facilities and command and control locations that KH uses to plan and execute attacks on [Operation Inherent Resolve] coalition forces.” Some of these led to large secondary explosions, as Bowman reported.

Hoffman stressed that KH has a strong link to Iran’s elite Quds Force and said it has received weapons and other support from Iran that it turned on coalition forces.

“The U.S. and its coalition partners fully respect Iraqi sovereignty, and support a strong and independent Iraq,” Hoffman stated. “The U.S., however, will not be deterred from exercising its right of self-defense.”

“Our battle with America and its mercenaries is now open to all possibilities,” KH said in a statement after the strikes, according to The Associated Press. “We have no alternative today other than confrontation and there is nothing that will prevent us from responding to this crime.”

Previous KH strikes had not caused serious injuries. But they were enough to worry U.S. officials. In May, as Bowman reported, “Secretary Mike Pompeo abruptly canceled a trip to Germany and flew to Baghdad because, I’m told, intelligence showed the possibility of a large attack on U.S. forces, presumably by these militias.” That threat did not materialize at the time.

Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul-Mahdi office’s said in a statement that he received a call from U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper shortly before the airstrikes and asked for them to be called off. Abdul-Mahdi decried the strikes as a unilateral act by the U.S.-led coalition that are considered a violation of Iraq’s sovereignty.

A State Department official told reporters that the U.S. is not worried about the potential consequences of the strikes. They added that it’s the Iraqi government’s “responsibility and duty to protect us, and they have not taken the appropriate steps to do so.” The State Department reports that there have been 11 attacks on Iraqi bases that host coalition forces in the last two months. “This obviously is a campaign,” the official said.

The Iranian Embassy also published a statement in Iraqi local media, calling the strikes against militias a violation of Iraqi sovereignty.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Suspect in Monsey Stabbings Searched Online for ‘Hitler,’ Charges Say

In his journal, prosecutors said, he wrote about Hitler and “Nazi culture.” On his phone, he searched online for “why did Hitler hate the Jews” at least four times and looked for “prominent companies founded by Jews in America.”

On Monday, new details emerged about the man accused of stabbing five Jewish people at a Hanukkah celebration in the New York suburbs when federal prosecutors filed hate crime charges against him.

These details, according to a criminal complaint, could suggest what led the man, Grafton Thomas, to go on a bloody rampage on Saturday in Monsey, N.Y., a hamlet northwest of New York City with a large community of ultra-Orthodox Jews.

The charges against Mr. Thomas came as police departments across New York and New Jersey stepped up patrols in Jewish neighborhoods and dispatched officers in front of synagogues and yeshivas.

Read the Complaint: United States v. Grafton E. Thomas

Mr. Thomas is charged in the attack at a rabbi’s house in Monsey, N.Y.

Westlake Legal Group thumbnail Suspect in Monsey Stabbings Searched Online for ‘Hitler,’ Charges Say Thomas, Grafton E (1982- ) Synagogues Monsey (NY) Jews and Judaism Hasidism Hanukkah discrimination Crime and Criminals Brooklyn (NYC) Assaults anti-semitism   6 pages, 0.28 MB

The complaint was filed in Federal District Court in White Plains, N.Y., by the United States attorney’s office for the Southern District of New York. Mr. Thomas, wearing an orange prison jumpsuit, appeared in court shortly after 2:30 p.m. on Monday.

“Are you clear in your head?” Magistrate Judge Paul E. Davison asked him.

“Not clear, your honor,” said Mr. Thomas, who added that he needed rest.

Mr. Thomas’s family has said that he has a long history of mental illness, including schizophrenia.

But prosecutors, in the complaint, suggested that Mr. Thomas, who is from the nearby village of Greenwood Lake, N.Y., had a history of anti-Semitism. In one piece of writing, he used a phrase that investigators said appeared to reference the Black Hebrew Israelite movement, a fringe religious movement with offshoots that have been described as hate groups.

The assault in Monsey further rattled the Jewish community in the New York region after a series of anti-Semitic incidents in New York City last week and a deadly mass shooting in Jersey City, N.J., that targeted a kosher supermarket earlier in the month.

In an interview on Monday morning on NPR, the public radio network, Mayor Bill de Blasio said of the recent attacks: “We consider this a crisis. Really, there is a growing anti-Semitism problem in this whole country. It has taken a more and more violent form.”

In Rockland County, where the attack on Saturday took place, the county executive, Ed Day, announced on Monday that a private security firm would work with the police to provide armed guards to synagogues in Monsey.

“We cannot stand around and do nothing,” Mr. Day said. “We are taking proactive action in order to address the concerns, the fears that are out there.”

Rockland County has more than 300,000 people, and 31 percent of the population is Jewish, according to the state. It is believed to have one of the largest populations of ultra-Orthodox Jews outside of Israel.

In recent years, the area’s ultra-Orthodox population has grown as Hasidic families from New York City, priced out of their neighborhoods, have relocated there. Despite the distance, residents in both places retain close ties with one another.

The barrage of incidents has left Jewish neighborhoods feeling under siege during Hanukkah, a celebration of when Jews had defied aggressors to openly practice their faith.

“People are afraid to send their kids out to school,” said Benny Polatseck, 30, an Orthodox Jewish community activist who lives in Monsey.

The five victims of the attack at the home of the rabbi, Chaim Rottenberg, were taken to the hospital. Several were treated there and released. At least one victim remained in the hospital with a skull fracture, officials said.

Mr. Thomas, 38, was later arrested in Harlem, about 30 miles from Monsey, with blood on his clothes, officials said. According to the complaint, officers found both a machete and a bloody knife in his car.

On Sunday, Mr. Thomas pleaded not guilty to five counts of state charges of attempted murder and one count of first-degree burglary. In federal case, Mr. Thomas was charged on Monday with five counts — the attempted murder of each his five victims as they exercised their religious beliefs.

Geoffrey S. Berman, the United States attorney for the Southern District of New York, said in a statement that Mr. Thomas had “targeted his victims in the midst of a religious ceremony, transforming a joyous Hanukkah celebration into a scene of carnage and pain.”

If convicted on any of the counts, Mr. Thomas faces a maximum sentence of life in prison, federal prosecutors said. Under the law, if any of the victims dies as a result of his injuries, Mr. Thomas could face the death penalty.

The federal case is expected to take place before any state case, prosecutors said.

Mr. Thomas’s lawyer, Michael H. Sussman, told reporters at a news conference on Monday that he had asked the Rockland County district attorney to agree to have Mr. Thomas undergo a 30-day evaluation in a hospital.

Mr. Sussman said that earlier in the day, Mr. Thomas told him that a voice, or voices, in his head had commanded him to go to that location in Monsey and retrieve or destroy a piece of property.

“My impression is that the situation he found where he went in was not the situation he expected to find, and that may have been a trigger for him,” Mr. Sussman said at his office in Goshen, N.Y., flanked by Mr. Thomas’s mother, Kim Thomas, who is a nurse, and the family’s pastor, the Rev. Wendy Paige.

Mr. Sussman said Mr. Thomas suffered from psychosis and major depressive disorder, and had been prescribed several drugs.

Mr. Thomas had never spoken to either his mother or pastor about Jews or anti-Semitism, the lawyer and Ms. Paige said.

But prosecutors said in the federal complaint that investigators had found handwritten journals at Mr. Thomas’s home in which he expressed anti-Semitic views.

On one page, he questioned why people “mourned for anti-Semitism when there is Semitic genocide,” the complaint said.

According to the complaint, Mr. Thomas also appeared to make a reference to the Black Hebrew Israelite movement, a religious group to which officials also linked one of the attackers in the Jersey City shooting.

While the movement is not known for promoting violence, some of its offshoots have been described as hate groups by the Southern Poverty Law Center and the Anti-Defamation League, which track extremist organizations.

Officials have not linked the stabbings and the Jersey City shooting, and they have not established whether Mr. Thomas was a follower of the Black Hebrew Israelite movement.

The federal complaint also said Mr. Thomas had made online search queries suggesting anti-Semitic views as early as Nov. 9. In recent weeks, it said, he searched for “German Jewish Temples near me,” and “Zionist Temples” in Elizabeth, N.J., and in Staten Island.

On the day of the stabbings, Mr. Thomas’s phone browser was used to call up an article titled “New York City Increases Police Presence in Jewish Neighborhoods After Possible Anti-Semitic Attacks. Here’s What to Know,” the complaint said.

Mr. Cuomo said on Sunday that he had ordered the State Police’s hate crimes force to investigate the rampage. He also called the attack an “act of domestic terrorism,” the phrase that officials eventually used to describe the Jersey City shooting.

As of Sunday, New York City had seen a 23 percent rise in anti-Semitic hate crimes so far this year, according to police data.

Since the attack in Jersey City on Dec. 10, the New York Police Department had been deploying more officers to protect synagogues, the police commissioner, Dermot F. Shea, said.

After further anti-Semitic incidents, including the stabbings in Monsey, the department also stepped up patrols in some Brooklyn neighborhoods.

Kevin Armstrong, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, Rebecca Liebson and Ali Watkins contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Bloomberg says he would sell company or put assets in blind trust if elected

MONTGOMERY, Ala. —  Democratic presidential candidate and multibillionaire business and media mogul Mike Bloomberg pledged Monday to divest from his company – or sell it off – if he wins the White House.

“I will put the company in line trust or sell it off right away,” Bloomberg said Monday while answering a question from Fox News following a campaign event in Alabama. “It would be absolutely wrong for me to have that company while I’m president and that will not be the case. Unequivocally.”

BLOOMBERG JABS AT BIDEN: ‘HE’S NEVER BEEN THE MANAGER OF AN ORGANIZATION’

The Bloomberg media company has an estimated valuation of $50 billion and generated $9.6 billion in revenue in fiscal 2017, according to Forbes. As its founder, he owns 88 percent of the company and has a personal net worth estimated around $47 billion.

The 77-year-old Bloomberg – a former three-term New York City mayor – first flirted with a 2020 White House run late last year.

During an interview with Radio Iowa a year ago, Bloomberg said if he ran for president, he would either sell the Bloomberg media company or place it in a blind trust. A blind trust is a financial arrangement by which a person cedes control, but not ownership, of business management to an independent trust to avoid conflicts of interest.

“But I think at my age, if selling it is possible, I would do that,” he said at the time. “At some point, you’re going to die anyway, so you want to do it before then.”

In March, with former Vice President Joe Biden gearing up for a presidential run, Bloomberg decided against launching a campaign because he felt he and the former vice president would split the center-left Democratic vote.

But late last month — with Biden battling other top-tier contenders Sens. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts as well as South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg — Bloomberg jumped into the race. He said that he was concerned none of the current candidates could defeat President Trump in next year’s election.

THE LATEST FROM FOX NEWS ON 2020 PRESIDENITAL CAMPAIGN

Days before he took office in January 2017, then President-elect Donald Trump mounted a stage in New York surrounded by a team of attorneys and stacks of manila envelopes and vowed to keep his many businesses separate from his presidency. But the Trumps have faced criticism in the ensuing three years that he failed to live up to his promise. And he’s facing multiple probes by the Democratic-controlled House of Representatives into whether his family-owned businesses are profiting from his presidency.

Westlake Legal Group 1ST-a-bloomberg-alabama-1-e1577744044442 Bloomberg says he would sell company or put assets in blind trust if elected Paul Steinhauser Kelly Phares fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc e9d4f956-b4c3-551f-b1aa-f3279ad89212 article

Democratic presidential candidate and former NYC Mayor Mike Bloomberg holds a campaign event in Montgomery, Alabama on Dec. 30, 2019. (Fox News).

Bloomberg was in Montgomery to roll out a maternal-health policy after meeting behind closed doors with experts in the field. In his remarks, Bloomberg criticized his rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination for not coming down to the south to talk about issues like maternal health.

“One candidate, the president, is making the crisis worse. But even my fellow Democrats are not spending time here or in places like Jackson, Miss., where I have been spending time across the south,” Bloomberg said.

Due to his late entry into the 2020 race, Bloomberg’s skipping the early primary and caucus voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina and instead is concentrating on the delegate-rich states that hold contests on Super Tuesday and beyond. Alabama holds its primary on Super Tuesday.

Bloomberg’s already spent more than $100 million of his own money to run campaign ads.

FOX Business’ Charlie Gasparino and Brittany De Lea contributed to this story

Westlake Legal Group 1ST-a-bloomberg-alabama-1-e1577744044442 Bloomberg says he would sell company or put assets in blind trust if elected Paul Steinhauser Kelly Phares fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc e9d4f956-b4c3-551f-b1aa-f3279ad89212 article   Westlake Legal Group 1ST-a-bloomberg-alabama-1-e1577744044442 Bloomberg says he would sell company or put assets in blind trust if elected Paul Steinhauser Kelly Phares fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc e9d4f956-b4c3-551f-b1aa-f3279ad89212 article

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Joe Biden Says He’s Open To A Republican Running Mate

Westlake Legal Group 5e0a68a1240000c31c5a494e Joe Biden Says He’s Open To A Republican Running Mate

EXETER, N.H. ― It seemed like an oddball question for former Vice President Joe Biden: Would he be open to having a Republican serve as his own vice president if he were the Democratic nominee? But during a routine campaign stop here on Monday, Biden’s answer was a bit surprising.

“The answer is, I would,” Biden said. “But I can’t think of one now.”

At the time, Biden’s response seemed to be taken more as a joke or rhetorical flourish, drawing laughs from the crowd gathered at Exeter’s historic town hall. But Biden immediately silenced the laughs.

“No, I’m serious,” he said. “No, here’s what I mean. Let me explain that. You know, there’s some really decent Republicans that are out there still. But here’s the problem right now, of the well-known ones, they’ve got to step up, you know what I mean?”

Biden again clarified that he wasn’t “being a wiseguy,” and that there are a lot of people who are qualified to be vice president.

While Biden made it clear he was open to the idea, the rest of his answer suggested that a Republican running mate ― like, say, former Ohio Gov. John Kasich ― would be a long shot.

Biden mentioned how a vice president needs to be “simpatico” with the president and how the two needed to be on “the same exact wavelength politically” to get things done. 

He said no president could handle the job anymore all by himself or herself, and he pointed to his experience as vice president to Barack Obama as the paradigm for a vice president’s responsibilities.

“When he gave me responsibility, he gave me total presidential authority. I could hire people, I could fire people, I could pick anyone from the administration to work with me,” Biden said. “I had complete control ― not a joke.”

That seems to be Biden’s idea of the proper relationship between a president and a vice president ― someone to whom the president can delegate responsibility and not worry about differing ideologies.

Even the theoretical openness to a GOP vice president, however, once again points to Biden’s long-held belief that Trump is an aberration from the Republican Party and not a product of it.

While Biden has moved away from stating that belief over the last month, he continues to tell voters he can work with Republicans. And his refusal to rule out a GOP running mate is more proof that he thinks his old relationships across the aisle are salvageable.

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Antonio Brown shades Steelers’ JuJu Smith-Schuster after his off year

Antonio Brown re-ignited his feud with Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver JuJu Smith-Schuster on Monday following the end of the 2019 regular season.

Brown took a shot at Smith-Schuster’s numbers for the season. Smith-Schuster finished with 42 catches for 552 yards and three touchdowns. But, he played only in 12 games due to injury.

“Boo Boo Shoester was ready under 500 U Bum learn some Respect,” Brown tweeted.

BEN ROETHLISBERGER SQUASHES RETIREMENT RUMORS ON TWITTER BUT FANS QUICKLY LEARN THEY’VE BEEN BLOCKED

Smith-Schuster was Brown’s understudy for two years when the All-Pro wide receiver was still with the Steelers. However, Brown requested a trade in March and was shipped to the Oakland Raiders.

He later was released by Oakland and found himself with the New England Patriots before that team cut him as well.

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The two standout receivers traded barbs with each other after Brown was traded. In April, Brown shared a direct message he received from Smith-Schuster when the young star was in college. Brown later deleted the post.

Smith-Schuster commented on the matter in two tweets.

“All I ever did was show that man love and respect from the moment I got to the league. I was genuinely happy for him too when he got traded to Oakland w/ a big contract, and now he takes shots at me on social media?

DENVER BRONCOS SECURITY GUARD INJURES ANKLE TRYING TO TAKE DOWN FIELD INVADER, CARTED OFF FIELD

“Crazy how big that ego got to be to take shots at people who show you love! Smh.”

Part of Smith-Schuster’s lack of production, aside from the injuries, could be who was throwing to him this season. The Steelers were forced to play Mason Rudolph and Devlin Hodges at points this season because Ben Roethlisberger was sidelined with an elbow injury.

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Smith-Schuster never received more than nine targets this season and didn’t catch more than seven passes in a single game.

The backup quarterbacks relied heavily on Diontae Johnson and James Washington through the season.

Westlake Legal Group Smith-Schuster_Brown_AP Antonio Brown shades Steelers' JuJu Smith-Schuster after his off year Ryan Gaydos fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/sports/nfl/pittsburgh-steelers fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/antonio-brown fox news fnc/sports fnc article 65f5b1cb-e302-561a-93f7-e3e37c08979f   Westlake Legal Group Smith-Schuster_Brown_AP Antonio Brown shades Steelers' JuJu Smith-Schuster after his off year Ryan Gaydos fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/sports/nfl/pittsburgh-steelers fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/antonio-brown fox news fnc/sports fnc article 65f5b1cb-e302-561a-93f7-e3e37c08979f

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Iraq Condemns U.S. Airstrikes Against Iran-Backed Militia

Westlake Legal Group ap_19364517222551-857c3bfd10d1dcfc1e866db2af0fd89366af3b44-s1100-c15 Iraq Condemns U.S. Airstrikes Against Iran-Backed Militia

Fighters from the Kataeb Hezbollah militia inspect the destruction of their headquarters on Monday in the aftermath of a U.S. airstrike in Qaim, Iraq. AP hide caption

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AP

Westlake Legal Group  Iraq Condemns U.S. Airstrikes Against Iran-Backed Militia

Fighters from the Kataeb Hezbollah militia inspect the destruction of their headquarters on Monday in the aftermath of a U.S. airstrike in Qaim, Iraq.

AP

After the U.S. launched a series of airstrikes inside Iraq and Syria on an Iran-backed militia, the Iraqi government has condemned the strikes as an attack on its sovereignty, and said it would summon the U.S. ambassador. The U.S. launched the attack following a rocket strike Friday attributed to Kataeb Hezbollah militia that killed a U.S. military contractor working with Iraqi and U.S. forces.

The KH militia, which is calling for retaliation, says at least 25 of its fighters were killed in the strikes, and dozens more were injured.

“We stress that Iraq is an independent country, and its internal security takes priority, and serious attention, and will not be allowed to become a battlefield, or a route for launching attacks,” Iraq’s Foreign Ministry said in a statement about what it planned to tell the U.S. ambassador.

It added that Iraq planned to discuss the future presence in Iraq of the U.S.-led coalition fighting ISIS.

KH and more than two dozen other Iran-backed militias have a complicated position within Iraq. The paramilitary has fought against ISIS and is formally part of Iraq’s security forces – though U.S. officials have raised concerns about whether the Iraqi government actually has control over it and other Iran-backed groups.

A U.S. State Department official said the latest military action was “designed to protect American forces and American citizens in Iraq, but it is also aimed at deterring Iran.”

As NPR’s Tom Bowman reported, this militia “has been for months now, firing mortars and rockets at U.S. forces at locations throughout Iraq.” The U.S. government blames it for the recent attack on an Iraqi base near the city of Kirkuk in which a U.S. contractor was killed. The attack on the base used by U.S. and Iraqi forces, which involved more than 30 rockets, also injured four U.S. service members and two Iraqi troops, according to the Defense Department.

The U.S. military says it launched “precision defensive strikes” against three of the militia’s facilities in Iraq and two in Syria. Jonathan Hoffman, an assistant to the Secretary of Defense, said in a statement that the locations “included weapon storage facilities and command and control locations that KH uses to plan and execute attacks on [Operation Inherent Resolve] coalition forces.” Some of these led to large secondary explosions, as Bowman reported.

Hoffman stressed that KH has a strong link to Iran’s elite Quds Force, and said it has received weapons and other support from Iran that it turned on coalition forces.

“The U.S. and its coalition partners fully respect Iraqi sovereignty, and support a strong and independent Iraq,” Hoffman stated. “The U.S., however, will not be deterred from exercising its right of self-defense.”

“Our battle with America and its mercenaries is now open to all possibilities,” KH said in a statement after the strikes, according to The Associated Press. “We have no alternative today other than confrontation and there is nothing that will prevent us from responding to this crime.”

Previous KH strikes had not caused serious injuries. But they were enough to worry U.S. officials. In May, as Bowman reported, “Secretary Mike Pompeo abruptly canceled a trip to Germany and flew to Baghdad because I’m told intelligence showed the possibility of a large attack on U.S. forces, presumably by these militias.” That threat did not materialize at the time.

Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul-Mahdi office’s said in a statement that he received a call from U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper shortly before the airstrikes, and asked for them to be called off. Abdul-Mahdi decried the strikes as a unilateral act by the U.S.-led coalition that are considered a violation of Iraq’s sovereignty.

A State Department official told reporters that the U.S. is not worried about the potential consequences of the strikes. They added that it’s the Iraqi government’s “responsibility and duty to protect us, and they have not taken the appropriate steps to do so.” The State Department reports that there have been 11 attacks on Iraqi bases that host coalition forces in the last two months. “This obviously is a campaign,” the official said.

The Iranian embassy also published a statement in Iraqi local media, calling the strikes against militias a violation of Iraqi sovereignty.

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