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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 402)

Trump Calls Turkey’s Syrian Offensive a ‘Bad Idea,’ But Opposes ‘Senseless Wars’

Westlake Legal Group merlin_162427434_6b81aae3-41d9-41c2-aa05-075aabae67e0-facebookJumbo Trump Calls Turkey’s Syrian Offensive a ‘Bad Idea,’ But Opposes ‘Senseless Wars’ United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces Turkey Trump, Donald J Syria Graham, Lindsey Cheney, Liz

WASHINGTON — President Trump on Wednesday called a Turkish military operation along the border with Syria “a bad idea” but reiterated his opposition to “endless, senseless wars,” striking a far milder tone than outraged members of Congress, foreign allies and officials in his own administration, who said the incursion must be stopped.

In a statement issued by the White House, Mr. Trump asserted that “Turkey has committed to protecting civilians, protecting religious minorities, including Christians, and ensuring no humanitarian crisis takes place.”

He said he was holding the country responsible for preventing the release of Islamic State fighters who are being held captive in the area and for ensuring “that ISIS does not reconstitute in any way, shape or form.”

But Mr. Trump limited his criticism of Turkey, making no mention of taking punitive action, while Republicans on Capitol Hill were sharply critical of Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, for following through with a plan he disclosed to Mr. Trump in a phone call on Sunday. And Pentagon officials privately expressed their anger over Mr. Trump’s sudden and unplanned shift in what had been American policy for years to oppose Turkey’s longtime desire to seize territory across its border with Syria.

Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, a close ally of Mr. Trump’s who often speaks and plays golf with the president, said in an interview that he had reached an agreement with Senator Chris Van Hollen, Democrat of Maryland, to offer “severe” sanctions legislation against Turkey, which Mr. Graham predicted would have “widespread bipartisan support.”

“What you’ll be seeing in the coming days is Congress filling in the vacuum,” Mr. Graham said, likening Mr. Trump’s posture to President Barack Obama’s deep-seated aversion to engagement in Syria. “Obama basically took a pass on Syria and the rest is history. We can’t afford to make that same mistake twice.”

In a joint statement, Mr. Graham and Mr. Van Hollen said their bill would punish senior Turkish government officials and ban American military transactions with Turkey. The measure would also impose sanctions on Turkey for its purchase of a sophisticated Russian-made missile defense system. Mr. Trump has avoided enforcing those sanctions, which members of Congress insist are mandatory under a 2017 law meant to penalize countries for doing business with Russia’s military.

“This invasion will ensure the resurgence of ISIS in Syria, embolden America’s enemies including Al Qaeda, Iran and Russia, and launch yet another endless conflict in what had been, until today, one of the most safe and stable areas of Syria and a region experimenting with the best model of local governance currently available in that war-torn country,” the senators said in their statement.

“Pray for our Kurdish allies who have been shamelessly abandoned by the Trump administration,” Mr. Graham wrote on Twitter earlier in the day.

Echoing Mr. Graham, Representative Liz Cheney of Wyoming tweeted that news of the Turkish action was “sickening.” She accused the president of “leaving America’s allies to be slaughtered and enabling the return of ISIS.”

But Mr. Trump was not without his defenders in Congress. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky, a Republican who often speaks with the president and has repeatedly pushed him to avoid foreign conflicts, wrote on Twitter that Mr. Trump “is stopping the endless wars and we will be stronger as a result. The Cheney/Graham Neocon War Caucus has cost us too much fighting endless wars.”

Prominent Democrats also denounced the Turkish move, and criticized Mr. Trump for failing to coordinate his decision to pull back American troops from the area — in effect clearing the way for Turkey to attack — with American generals and allies.

But at the Pentagon, where more than five years of fighting alongside Kurdish troops in Iraq and Syria has now given way to standing aside as those same allies are attacked, some officials said there was more anger than they had seen at any point in Mr. Trump’s presidency.

As recently as last week, Defense Department officials had been assured by Turkish military officials that they were not seeking to launch an invasion of Syria. Nor were officials expecting Mr. Trump, in his Sunday call with Mr. Erdogan, to open the door for a Turkish offensive by deciding to remove the 50 to 100 American troops in the northeastern portion of Syria, where Mr. Erdogan wants to create a “safe zone.”

A person briefed about the call said the discussion between Mr. Trump and Mr. Erdogan was wide-ranging, until Mr. Erdogan, in the second half of the call, complained that the United States was not fully complying with an agreement struck with Turkey in September to jointly create a safe zone in northeastern Syria. Mr. Erdogan said he intended to unilaterally establish one immediately.

Mr. Trump demurred, evidently believing that Mr. Erdogan would not be willing to risk the president’s ire. But Mr. Erdogan effectively “called the president’s bluff,” the person said. What followed was a scramble to move American personnel from harm’s way in northern Syria.

In the days since, Mr. Trump has made repeated references to his desire to withdraw from Syria and avoid the “stupid endless wars” against which he campaigned in 2016. But that has furthered the impression — both in the United States but, perhaps more important, in Turkey — that Mr. Trump had blessed Mr. Erdogan’s proposed incursion.

A Kurdish-led militia known as the Syrian Democratic Forces has fought alongside the United States in the campaign against the Islamic State over the past five years. Mr. Erdogan sees Syria’s Kurdish fighters as an enemy, and wants to flush them out of a safe zone along his country’s southern border with Syria, which has been devastated by a civil war of more than eight years. The conflict has produced an exodus of roughly one million Syrian refugees into Turkey whom Ankara wants to relocate into a secured zone across the border.

The long-term reverberations in Washington will depend on the extent of the Turkish operation, which remains unclear.

On Monday, Mr. Trump warned that if Turkey did anything that he considered “off limits, I will totally destroy and obliterate the Economy of Turkey.” Mr. Trump has not clearly defined those limits, although asked by reporters on Wednesday what he would do if Mr. Erdogan wiped out the Kurds in Syria, Mr. Trump replied: “I will wipe out his economy if he does that.”

That supports the view of analysts who say the real red line for Mr. Trump and many members of Congress is not a matter of territory but rather the killing of Kurdish fighters.

Soner Cagaptay, a senior fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, said he believed that Mr. Erdogan would calibrate any offensive to limit casualties that would prompt a major response from Congress and potentially humiliate Mr. Trump. He also said Turkey appeared to be moving on Arab-majority areas where its military would be more welcome than in heavily Kurdish areas nearby.

“I would say this is a war that is not a war,” Mr. Cagaptay said. “We’re not going to see fighting of epic proportions. It’s coordinated and pre-orchestrated.”

But national security officials are especially worried about how a Turkish offensive could affect the continuing fight against the Islamic State, which — thanks in large measure to the Kurdish-led forces now under attack — has lost its territorial holdings in Syria but which officials say has been gaining new momentum in both Syria and Iraq.

Senator Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire, Democrat of New Hampshire and a member of the Senate Armed Services and Foreign Relations Committees, noted that Mr. Erdogan had not publicly committed to Mr. Trump’s demands that his country take responsibility for any freed Islamic State captives in the area, or a local resurgence of the terrorist group.

“We know that terrorism in Syria does not stay in Syria,” Ms. Shaheen said in a statement. “President Erdogan, despite his claims, does not have the support of the international community for this operation and he refuses to assure the U.S. that he will guard ISIS detention facilities in the area and prevent ISIS from once again gaining a foothold in the region. I’m afraid we are dangerously close to the point of no return.”

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U.S. Takes Custody of British ISIS Detainees Who Abused Hostages

Westlake Legal Group 09dc-beatles-facebookJumbo U.S. Takes Custody of British ISIS Detainees Who Abused Hostages United States Politics and Government United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Torture Terrorism Syrian Democratic Forces Syria Kotey, Alexanda Kidnapping and Hostages Justice Department Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) Iraq Foley, James (1973-2014) Emwazi, Mohammed Elsheikh, El Shafee Defense and Military Forces

WASHINGTON — The American military has taken custody of two British detainees notorious for their roles in an Islamic State cell that tortured and killed Western hostages, removing them from a wartime prison in northern Syria run by a Kurdish-led militia, according to United States officials.

The abrupt move came as the Turkish military moved into northern Syria after getting a green light from President Trump. Turkey is targeting the American-backed Kurds — known as the Syrian Democratic Forces — who were the primary allies of the United States in the fight against the Islamic State in Syria. The Turkish invasion called into question the militia’s ability to continue securely holding some 11,000 captured ISIS fighters.

The two British men, El Shafee Elsheikh and Alexanda Kotey, were part of a four-member British cell that ISIS put in charge of Western hostages, who nicknamed them the “Beatles” because of their accents. Among their victims was James Foley, the American journalist who was beheaded in August 2014 for an ISIS propaganda video.

Another member of the cell, Mohammed Emwazi, or “Jihadi John,” is believed to have killed Mr. Foley. Mr. Emwazi was later killed in a drone strike.

The Justice Department has intended to eventually bring Mr. Elsheikh and Mr. Kotay to the United States for trial in Virginia, but a court fight in Britain has delayed that transfer. The lawsuit is over whether the British government may share evidence with the United States without an assurance that American prosecutors will not seek the death penalty.

The American military was taking the men to Iraq, where the United States has a base where it has held Islamic State detainees with American citizenship before transferring them to domestic soil — or, in one case, releasing him in Bahrain.

Because of their role in abusing Americans, the two British men were at the top of a list of ISIS detainees of concern for the American government, officials said. But that list has more than five dozen names on it, including a dozen or so other ISIS prisoners in Kurdish hands who are considered particularly dangerous.

It remains unclear whether the Trump administration will seek to take any additional detainees out of the Syrian Democratic Forces’ hands as the situation in northern Syria continues to rapidly deteriorate after Mr. Trump’s decision to clear the way for Turkey to launch its operation into northern Syria.

The Washington Post first reported on the transfer of the detainees’ custody.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Eric Schmitt contributed reporting.

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Cardinals score 10 runs in first inning of NLDS Game 5 vs. Braves

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Cardinals score 10 runs in first inning of NLDS Game 5 vs. Braves
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ATLANTA — By the time the nightmare first inning ended for the Atlanta Braves on Wednesday, there were mock cheers from the capacity crowd at SunTrust Park

Just one frame into a decisive Game 5 of the National League Division Series, sarcasm was all Braves fans had left as the St. Louis Cardinals put 10 runs – yes, 10 – on the board.

Though it might be theoretically possible for a team to have a worse start to a series-deciding game, the Braves did their best to put themselves into history books for all the wrong reasons – and the Cardinals took full advantage. 

It all started when Braves catcher Brian McCann dropped strike three on leadoff hitter Dexter Fowler, eventually leading to a walk. That was a bad omen for Atlanta starter Mike Foltynewicz, who didn’t walk a single batter in seven innings during his winning start in Game 2. 

St. Louis bunted Fowler to second and advanced him to third on a hard-hit ball by Paul Goldschmidt that shortstop Dansby Swanson snagged but couldn’t make a play on. The Cardinals put their first run on the board when Marcell Ozuna, who came into the game batting .471 for the series, singled. 

The Braves could have limited the damage there, but they didn’t. First baseman Freddie Freeman booted a potential double-play ground ball from Yadier Molina that loaded the bases.

Then Foltynewicz walked Matt Carpenter for the Cardinals’ second run. He was pulled one batter later when Tommy Edman smoked a double down the right-field line to make it 4-0 in favor of Max Fried, who immediately came into the game and walked Cardinals pitcher Jack Flaherty. 

The avalanche happened quickly from there as Fowler and Kolten Wong hit back-to-back doubles, taking the lead from 5-0 to 9-0.

Then, in the ultimate indignity, the Cardinals scored their 10th run when Ozuna swung at a third strike that got away from McCann, scoring Wong on the wild pitch. Ozuna ended up at first as McCann’s throw missed the bag by several feet. 

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Trump’s Decision To Abandon Syria’s Kurds Met With Immediate Broad Condemnation

Westlake Legal Group 5d9e5533200000d4064ff1fc Trump’s Decision To Abandon Syria’s Kurds Met With Immediate Broad Condemnation

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. must escape the “Endless Wars” in the Middle East, President Donald Trump repeatedly declares. Mission accomplished, at least in the shortest of short terms. When on Wednesday Turkey attacked the Kurds, America’s longtime battlefield allies, U.S. troops had evacuated from harm’s way.

But hardly anyone was cheering the latest result of Trump’s unpredictable foreign policy.

From Iran to North Korea, China, Iraq, Afghanistan and Venezuela, nearly all of Trump’s foreign policy priorities remain works in progress nearly three years into his presidency. All have been punctuated by abrupt shifts that have frustrated and alienated friends and allies, confused foes and rivals and left the impression that “America First” really does, as critics say, mean America alone.

But none has produced such speedy or potentially damaging consequences.

High-profile summits with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un followed threats of “fire and fury.” Offers to open a dialogue with Iran followed the imposition of harsh sanctions. Both efforts have yet to produce definitive outcomes.

Negotiations with the Taliban aimed at withdrawing U.S. forces from Afghanistan have been hit with fits and starts. The trade war with China continues apace. Venezuela remains a morass with Nicolas Maduro still in power despite attempts to dislodge him.

No such delay with Turkey, Syria and the Kurds.

Trump’s determination to pull American troops out of the Middle East opened the door to the Turkish incursion just 72 hours after the White House announced the U.S. would pull back from the Turkey-Syria border and not stand in the way.

“This clearly has an immediate, sequential consequence that very few of the other decisions he has made have had,” said Aaron David Miller, former U.S. diplomat and senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. “It has had a direct and negative impact, although how catastrophic remains to be seen.”

On Wednesday, Trump himself called Turkey’s military assault a “bad idea” that the U.S. did not “endorse.” U.S. officials held out hope that the attacks could be limited. But the start of combat along the border marked what may be the failure of a high-risk, complex strategy supposedly designed to prevent just such an outcome.

Officials familiar with the administration’s strategy say it was drawn up to try to reconcile the harsh realities of Trump’s insistence on withdrawal and Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s insistence on attacking. One official described the choice the administration faced as either getting into a shooting war with Turkey, a NATO ally, or standing down and pressing Turkey hard to limit its operation with threats to punish it economically if Erdogan should go too far.

Trump’s abrupt decision a few days ago to remove the American shield — just a few dozen soldiers but, crucially wearing U.S. uniforms — that was keeping the Turks away has been met with widespread condemnation from supporters as well as the usual critics. Condemnation from normally reliable Republican Trump allies on Capitol Hill has been notably fierce.

The Kurds have accused Trump of a gross betrayal. U.S. officials acknowledge that but also say it was unavoidable in the face of Erdogan’s determination to go after the Kurds, whom Turkey accuses of being terrorists and a severe threat.

Republicans as well as Democrats in Congress, and many national defense experts, say the move has placed U.S. credibility as well as the Kurds and regional stability at great risk. By all accounts, the Kurds were the most effective force in fighting the Islamic State in the region.

“I think it makes it less likely that others will want to work with the United States in the future,” said Bradley Bowman, senior director of the Center on Military and Political Power at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, a Washington think tank with hawkish views on the Mideast.

“The foreign policy is not clear,” said Rahim Rashidi, a Kurdish journalist based in Washington. “It is difficult to tell who is a friend, who is an enemy.”

The argument that the unpredictable and volatile Trump was following through on a plan put to him by experts is implausible to many, particularly his critics, who see the president as impulsive and concerned more about his own image than in U.S. national security. Democrats and Republicans alike denounced Trump’s first announcement as reckless and self-defeating, and the administration’s attempts to clean it up put Trump into the role of both good cop and bad cop with the Turks.

Mindful of Trump’s pledges to eventually withdraw all American forces from Syria and Erdogan’s increasingly vocal threats to fight the Kurds, the U.S. plan was to present Erdogan with a stark choice: either cooperate with its NATO ally at minimal cost to ensure Turkey’s security from legitimate threats it faces from the Kurds or go it alone with an invasion and bear all the consequences.

After initially opting for cooperation — which meant the U.S. persuading the Kurds to move away from the border and withdraw emplacements and heavy weapons, and bringing the Turks into joint air and ground patrols and intelligence sharing — Erdogan became insistent on going ahead with an incursion. According to the officials, Trump called his bluff in their Sunday phone call.

Faced with almost universal criticism, the administration scrambled on Monday to regain the upper hand. Trump threatened in a tweet to “obliterate” Turkey’s economy if it hit the Kurds hard and twice repeated the threat in person at White House appearances.

At the same time, U.S. officials were telling the Turks through military, diplomatic and intelligence channels that any major operation against the Kurds would cause major damage to U.S.-Turkey relations.

On Tuesday, Trump shifted tack. After consultations between the White House, the State Department and the Pentagon, he tweeted a friendly message to Erdogan, praising the two nations’ relationship and confirming that he had invited the Turkish leader to visit Washington in November.

What some saw as scattershot incoherence was, in fact, the next stage of the plan: an offer to reward Erdogan for holding back on the Kurdish operation.

Critics don’t buy it.

“Now, goody goody, we’re going to invite you to come visit the White House, and whatever domestic value that has for Erdogan in Turkey, this is really dangerous,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Tuesday.

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Elizabeth Warren says she won’t hold ‘big dollar fundraisers’ no matter how much Trump raises in 2020

Westlake Legal Group Elizabeth-Warren-Donald-Trump-AP Elizabeth Warren says she won't hold 'big dollar fundraisers' no matter how much Trump raises in 2020 Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/media fnc article 27ce9e16-a5ce-5429-bba6-f8d80fcfc118

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., has repeated her commitment to forgoing big-money fundraisers if she wins the Democratic nomination, no matter how much money President Trump pulls in from his supporters.

“I’m not going to go do the big-dollar fund-raisers. I’m just not going to do it,” Warren told CBS in an interview posted Tuesday. The 2020 hopeful said that her campaign was predicated on the notion “that we can build this together. And that’s exactly what we’re doing.”

CBS reporter Zak Hudak had asked Warren whether she could guarantee her supporters she wouldn’t utilize big-dollar fundraisers.

Warren claimed that without financial independence, candidates would continue serving wealthy interests after they were elected to office.

DEMS PUBLICLY TOUT SMALL DOLLAR DONATIONS WHILE QUIETLY COURTING BIG DOLLAR DONORS

“I will not be forced to make changes in how I raise money,” Warren said. “Look, for me, this is pretty straightforward. Either you think democracy works and electing a president is all about going behind closed doors with bazillionaires and corporate executives and lobbyists and scooping up as much money as possible.

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“Or you think it’s about a grass-roots, let’s build this from the ground up.”

That answer appeared to represent a reversal for Warren after she expressed openness to big-dollar donors in a general election. Not doing so, she indicated, was “unilateral disarmament.”

“We’ll be up against a Republican machine that will be hell-bent on keeping the White House,” she told MSNBC in February. “They will have PACs and Super PACs and too many special interest groups to count, and we will do what is necessary to match them financially. That means investing — starting now — in each and every one of our state parties, and in our national party too.”

It’s unclear what was behind Warren’s apparent reversal but her comments came just days after her campaign announced it had raised $24.6 million from more than half a million individual donors in the third quarter of this year. That was substantially higher than the $15.2 million raised by former Vice President Joe Biden but slightly lower than the $25.3 million raised by Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.

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If Warren wins the Democratic nomination, she would likely face an incumbent candidate backed by a Republican Party that has recorded record-breaking fundraising numbers.

In the third quarter alone, the Republican National Committee and President Trump’s campaign raised $125 million. Within just 24 hours in September, those two entities raked in an eye-popping $5 million — an apparent backlash to the formal impeachment inquiry announced by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. So far in 2019, those two organizations have raised $308 million.

Fox News’ Paul Steinhauser contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Elizabeth-Warren-Donald-Trump-AP Elizabeth Warren says she won't hold 'big dollar fundraisers' no matter how much Trump raises in 2020 Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/media fnc article 27ce9e16-a5ce-5429-bba6-f8d80fcfc118   Westlake Legal Group Elizabeth-Warren-Donald-Trump-AP Elizabeth Warren says she won't hold 'big dollar fundraisers' no matter how much Trump raises in 2020 Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/media fnc article 27ce9e16-a5ce-5429-bba6-f8d80fcfc118

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Turkey: Trump Knew ‘Precisely’ the Scope of Our Attack Plans in Syria

Westlake Legal Group pWJ3-YdwdvLGmHirAHNdbWeE03-IwFOI94oPFDFaazo Turkey: Trump Knew ‘Precisely’ the Scope of Our Attack Plans in Syria r/politics

While Trump’s reasoning is fairly obvious, the reason for Turkey’s intervention is not obvious to all.

They have been arguing to create a safe zone and have been asking the US and the EU to help them with this for 2 years so the 6+ million Syrian refugees in Turkey and countless others in Europe can start to return home.

Even tho Erdo is a piece of garbage, the safe zone idea is very much bipartisan with conservatives and liberals alike in Turkey. We asked the US to either help with this project or get out of the way.

And before people get on the “Turks are committing genocide again” bandwagon, this is not the case. We have been dismayed for 5 years that the US has been supplying YPG bc a lot of the guns turned out inside our borders at the hands of PKK.

Before people call me a Erdo-shill, I realize this board is mainly about US politics and I do agree Trump did the biggest dick move to YPG, I welcome any questions or debates regarding the local politics of the issue

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Fox News Poll results October 6-8, 2019

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Fox News Poll results October 6-8, 2019 fox-news/columns/fox-news-poll fox news fnc/politics fnc article 47336edc-4b8c-5228-b081-aba193e23329

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Turkey: Trump Knew ‘Precisely’ the Scope of Our Attack Plans in Syria

Westlake Legal Group pWJ3-YdwdvLGmHirAHNdbWeE03-IwFOI94oPFDFaazo Turkey: Trump Knew ‘Precisely’ the Scope of Our Attack Plans in Syria r/politics

While Trump’s reasoning is fairly obvious, the reason for Turkey’s intervention is not obvious to all.

They have been arguing to create a safe zone and have been asking the US and the EU to help them with this for 2 years so the 6+ million Syrian refugees in Turkey and countless others in Europe can start to return home.

Even tho Erdo is a piece of garbage, the safe zone idea is very much bipartisan with conservatives and liberals alike in Turkey. We asked the US to either help with this project or get out of the way.

And before people get on the “Turks are committing genocide again” bandwagon, this is not the case. We have been dismayed for 5 years that the US has been supplying YPG bc a lot of the guns turned out inside our borders at the hands of PKK.

Before people call me a Erdo-shill, I realize this board is mainly about US politics and I do agree Trump did the biggest dick move to YPG, I welcome any questions or debates regarding the local politics of the issue

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Is it a Guilty Plea if the Plea Never Ends?

Westlake Legal Group Judge_defendant Is it a Guilty Plea if the Plea Never Ends?

Judge: “You’re pleading guilty to snipe hunting and before I can accept the plea I have to make sure that it is voluntarily made and that you understand what you’re doing so I’m going to ask you some questions.”

Mabel: “Okay.”
Judge: “Before you pled guilty did your lawyer answer all your questions about what you were charged with, your options, and the consequences of a guilty plea?”
Mabel: “No.”
Judge: “Ma’am, didn’t you talk with your attorney about your case?”
Mabel: “Yes, but I didn’t ask any questions.”
Judge: “Ooookay. So you met with him. Did the two of you discuss the case?”
Mabel: “I guess you could say that.”
Judge: “No, ma’am, I can’t say anything. You’re the one who has to answer the questions. Did you meet with your attorney prior to this hearing?”
Mabel: “Yes.”
Judge: “Did your attorney explain to you your right to go to trial, have a jury, the possible results of trial and the consequences if you accept the plea agreement offered by the prosecution?”
Mabel: “I guess so.”
Judge: “You can’t just guess, ma’am. You have to give an answer.”
Mabel: “Okay. Yeah”
Judge: “Yeah you’ll answer the questions or yeah he explained things to you?”
Mabel: “Yeah, I’ll answer the questions.”
Lather. Rinse. Repeat. It takes the judge what seems like hours to get the defendant through what should have been five minutes of questioning because he has to pin her down to get actual answers. I’m sitting there watching all this with semi-fascination from the prosecutor’s table and the defense attorney has chosen an enthralling section of wall to give her full attention. Personally, I’m having an internal debate over whether Mabel is on the simple side and just trying to answer as best she can or if this lady is some sort of manipulative mad genius who has decided she’s going to keep us in the courtroom until we all die from old age. The judge solved that quandary for all of us.
Judge: “Now, you’ve pled guilty to snipe hunting. Hunting snipe is illegal. So if you snipe hunt you break the law. Tell me what you did to get convicted of snipe hunting.”
Mabel: “I did something wrong.”
Westlake Legal Group Judge_defendant Is it a Guilty Plea if the Plea Never Ends?

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Gutfeld on Liz Warren’s latest lie

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093549151001_6093549910001-vs Gutfeld on Liz Warren's latest lie Greg Gutfeld fox-news/shows/the-five/transcript/gregs-monologue fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 0e78ff11-7921-5054-9f96-b6081c65b276

You know Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. She’s the former “Native American princess” who gave up truth-telling to cash in on telling more lies.

In her latest fundraising email, she claimed she was visibly pregnant when “the principal told [her] the job … would go to someone else.”

It’s another story in which she portrays herself as the oppressed, faking victimhood to gain an edge over others, including real victims.

COLIN REED: THE DEMOCRATIC NOMINATION IS NOW WARREN’S TO LOSE (AT LEAST FOR THE MOMENT)

However, her pregnant-victim story fell apart when school board records obtained by the Free Beacon showed the school offered her a new contract. She quit anyway — backing up the tale she told in 2007, when she said she left by choice.

Of course, all politicians lie.

Those who say they don’t are lying too.

Warren’s lies, however, fit a pattern. It’s victim karaoke — an opportunistic deception to exploit the plight of others.

It’s no different than parking in a handicapped space and faking a limp.

It’s fraud.

Now Liz claims her Native American ruse was an honest mistake, but it still got her favorable press as the first minority woman in Harvard Law — a story so heavily promoted both by her and Harvard.

But, when she knew that scheme was imploding, she paraded that pathetic DNA test, proclaiming her Native American blood. A toaster had more. That wasn’t an honest mistake.

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So, as former Vice President Joe Biden gets hit by the “Ukraine boomerang,” Warren is the frontrunner.

Will this new lie cost her in 2020? Maybe.

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But, if she loses, she can just lie again, and say she won.

I mean, who did that before — Hillary?

Adapted from Greg Gutfeld’s monologue on “The Five” on Oct. 9, 2019.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093549151001_6093549910001-vs Gutfeld on Liz Warren's latest lie Greg Gutfeld fox-news/shows/the-five/transcript/gregs-monologue fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 0e78ff11-7921-5054-9f96-b6081c65b276   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093549151001_6093549910001-vs Gutfeld on Liz Warren's latest lie Greg Gutfeld fox-news/shows/the-five/transcript/gregs-monologue fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 0e78ff11-7921-5054-9f96-b6081c65b276

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