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In Trump, Turkey’s Erdogan Keeps Finding a Sympathetic Ear

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_162369690_a81ed3e0-463c-4034-a0ca-bc8b6ed05a53-articleLarge In Trump, Turkey’s Erdogan Keeps Finding a Sympathetic Ear United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Erdogan, Recep Tayyip

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey was invited to visit the White House in mid-November.CreditAndrej Cukic/EPA, via Shutterstock

WASHINGTON — Three times over the past year, President Trump has spoken with Turkey’s leader, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, and told Mr. Erdogan what he wanted to hear.

Last December, Mr. Trump stunned his own national security team by abruptly deciding to pull American troops out of Syria, clearing the way for Mr. Erdogan’s long-sought incursion into the country.

On Sunday, Mr. Trump spoke again to his Turkish counterpart, and then issued a similar declaration. And in between the calls, in June, Mr. Trump came away from a meeting with Mr. Erdogan echoing Turkish talking points blaming President Barack Obama for the country’s purchase of a Russian missile system.

The relationship between the two prideful and blustery men has had its rocky patches — and its threats. Mr. Trump, facing backlash from Republicans on Monday, warned on Twitter that he would “totally destroy and obliterate the Economy of Turkey” if Mr. Erdogan were to cross unspecified “limits” in Syria.

But American and Turkish officials alike describe an unusual partnership in which Mr. Erdogan has repeatedly guided Mr. Trump toward positions that pit him against his own national security advisers and Republicans allies. Analysts call it an oddity of their relationship that two naturally combative leaders, both prone to explosive public insults, seem to understand each other and believe they can sort things out by phone.

Mr. Erdogan will soon have the president’s ear again: Mr. Trump announced in a tweet on Tuesday that the Turkish leader would visit the White House on Nov. 13. He also continued on Tuesday to defend his decision, tweeting that “in no way have we abandoned the Kurds, who are special people and wonderful fighters.” Mr. Erdogan is one of several foreign strongmen who draw condemnation from human rights groups but with whom Mr. Trump appears to keen to do business. Both are man-of-the-people nationalists who have battled resistance from their respective security establishments.

While Mr. Trump rails against a bureaucratic “Deep State” seeking to overthrow him through investigations and impeachment, in 2016, Mr. Erdogan survived an actual military coup that turned bloody. The term “Deep State,” in fact, was first coined to describe the generals who long ruled Turkey from behind the scenes.

“They share a similar worldview, they dislike elites,” said Ozgur Unluhisarcikli, the director of the German Marshall Fund of the United States’ office in the Turkish capital, Ankara. “Trump would probably like to govern the way Erdogan does.”

On Sunday, Mr. Erdogan even seemed to play a version of the Deep State card with his counterpart. According to the readout of Sunday’s telephone call released by Turkey’s presidential palace, Mr. Erdogan “shared with President Trump his frustration over the U.S. military and security bureaucracy’s failure to implement” an agreement between the two countries governing security in northern Syria.

Mr. Trump responded by telling Mr. Erdogan, much as he had in December, that he would be removing American troops from the area where the Turkish leader hoped to do battle with the Kurdish-led militia that has been critical American allies against the Islamic State. Turkey considers the militia a threat to its own borders and security.

Mr. Trump knows Turkey from his earlier life in real estate — he sold his brand name to the Trump Towers Istanbul in 2010 — but like presidents before him, he has struggled to devise a consistent policy toward the country.

Instead, he has focused on his personal relationship with Mr. Erdogan in conversations that people familiar with them describe as typically “fawning.” Mr. Trump usually begins by praising Mr. Erdogan, who is himself notorious for haranguing American presidents with grievances, according to those people.

“We have a great friendship as countries,” Mr. Trump said in an appearance with Mr. Erdogan that September. “I think we’re, right now, as close as we have ever been. And a lot of that has to do with the personal relationship.” The following July, he was spotted fist-bumping the Turkish leader at a NATO summit in Brussels.

That chumminess has unsettled both appointed and elected officials suspicious of Mr. Erdogan’s repressive policies, Islamist sympathies and deepening relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Nearly everyone agrees, however, that simply shunning the head of a NATO-member nation at the pivot point between East and West is not practical.

The Trump-Erdogan friendship has already survived at least one major test, when relations flared over Mr. Erdogan’s continued detention of an American pastor, Andrew Brunson, who was jailed for nearly two years in a widespread crackdown after a failed coup in Turkey. When Mr. Brunson was not freed as he expected, Mr. Trump announced in a hostile tweet that he was doubling tariffs on Turkish steel and aluminum and watching the Turkish lira slide.

After Mr. Brunson was freed last October, Mr. Trump expressed public gratitude to Mr. Erdogan for “making this possible.”

To some former United States officials who have worked closely with Mr. Erdogan’s government, the relationship between Mr. Trump and Mr. Erdogan is an unsolved puzzle.

“It’s not really clear to me what Trump, or the United States, gets out of this,” said Phil Gordon, who served at the State Department and on the National Security Council under Mr. Obama.

“It’s consistent with other seemingly inexplicable Trump actions that are more in line with Russian interests than with ours,” added Mr. Gordon, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Even before their collective anger over Mr. Trump’s Sunday announcement about Syria, Senate Republicans had been frustrated with the president’s resistance to placing sanctions on Turkey for its purchase of the advanced Russian S-400 missile system. Congressional leaders call it a clear violation of a 2017 law requiring economic penalties on countries that purchase Russian arms.

With pressure mounting in Washington on Mr. Trump to enact sanctions, he sat down in June with Mr. Erdogan at the Group of 20 summit in Osaka, Japan, where the Turkish leader argued that he had been forced to buy Russian arms because Mr. Obama had unreasonably blocked Turkish efforts to purchase the American-made Patriot missile.

Former Obama administration officials say the story is far more complicated, and that Mr. Erdogan had other options. But they said the Turkish leader had skilfully handed Mr. Trump, who revels in criticism of his predecessor, an ideal talking point as he deferred questions about whether he would impose sanctions.

“It’s a very tough situation that they’re in. And it’s a very tough situation that we’ve been placed in — the United States,” Mr. Trump said in mid-July, adding that “it’s not really fair.”

Mr. Trump did cancel the planned sale of more than 100 F-35 fighter jets to Turkey, whose operation in proximity to the Russian system NATO opposes on security grounds. But Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has said that the law “requires” sanctions.

“Trump is trying really hard to avoid slapping sanctions on Turkey, and that’s partly because he’s trying to not rupture his relationship with Erdogan,” said Soner Cagaptay, the director of the Turkish Research Program at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.

A Pentagon spokesman on Tuesday challenged published reports that Mr. Trump’s decision to order American troops to move out of the area where Turkey plans an offensive surprised senior officials and said Mr. Trump had consulted Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper and Gen. Mark A. Milley, the new chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in the days before talking to Mr. Erdogan.

But Pentagon officials said they had discussed Mr. Erdogan’s threats to invade northern Syria, and there was no prior hint about Mr. Trump ordering American troops to step aside and leave their Syrian Kurdish allies vulnerable to attack. In fact, the officials said, both Mr. Esper and General Milley warned their Turkish counterparts last week that any such cross-border operation would seriously damage United States-Turkey relations.

One senior Trump administration official on Monday said that it was troubling to some officials that Mr. Erdogan was not concerned about angering Mr. Trump, and that he appeared to feel he had autonomy to move into Syria.

In all the furor over Mr. Trump’s announcement, there has been a studied silence from Mr. Erdogan.

Likewise, Mr. Trump’s recent tweets — even those threatening Turkey’s economy with destruction — have avoided calling out Mr. Erdogan by name.

Michael Crowley reported from Washington, and Carlotta Gall from Istanbul. Maggie Haberman contributed reporting from New York, and Eric Schmitt from Washington.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

In Trump, Turkey’s Erdogan Keeps Finding a Sympathetic Ear

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_162369690_a81ed3e0-463c-4034-a0ca-bc8b6ed05a53-articleLarge In Trump, Turkey’s Erdogan Keeps Finding a Sympathetic Ear United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Erdogan, Recep Tayyip

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey was invited to visit the White House in mid-November.CreditAndrej Cukic/EPA, via Shutterstock

WASHINGTON — Three times over the past year, President Trump has spoken with Turkey’s leader, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, and told Mr. Erdogan what he wanted to hear.

Last December, Mr. Trump stunned his own national security team by abruptly deciding to pull American troops out of Syria, clearing the way for Mr. Erdogan’s long-sought incursion into the country.

On Sunday, Mr. Trump spoke again to his Turkish counterpart, and then issued a similar declaration. And in between the calls, in June, Mr. Trump came away from a meeting with Mr. Erdogan echoing Turkish talking points blaming President Barack Obama for the country’s purchase of a Russian missile system.

The relationship between the two prideful and blustery men has had its rocky patches — and its threats. Mr. Trump, facing backlash from Republicans on Monday, warned on Twitter that he would “totally destroy and obliterate the Economy of Turkey” if Mr. Erdogan were to cross unspecified “limits” in Syria.

But American and Turkish officials alike describe an unusual partnership in which Mr. Erdogan has repeatedly guided Mr. Trump toward positions that pit him against his own national security advisers and Republicans allies. Analysts call it an oddity of their relationship that two naturally combative leaders, both prone to explosive public insults, seem to understand each other and believe they can sort things out by phone.

Mr. Erdogan will soon have the president’s ear again: Mr. Trump announced in a tweet on Tuesday that the Turkish leader would visit the White House on Nov. 13. He also continued on Tuesday to defend his decision, tweeting that “in no way have we abandoned the Kurds, who are special people and wonderful fighters.” Mr. Erdogan is one of several foreign strongmen who draw condemnation from human rights groups but with whom Mr. Trump appears to keen to do business. Both are man-of-the-people nationalists who have battled resistance from their respective security establishments.

While Mr. Trump rails against a bureaucratic “Deep State” seeking to overthrow him through investigations and impeachment, in 2016, Mr. Erdogan survived an actual military coup that turned bloody. The term “Deep State,” in fact, was first coined to describe the generals who long ruled Turkey from behind the scenes.

“They share a similar worldview, they dislike elites,” said Ozgur Unluhisarcikli, the director of the German Marshall Fund of the United States’ office in the Turkish capital, Ankara. “Trump would probably like to govern the way Erdogan does.”

On Sunday, Mr. Erdogan even seemed to play a version of the Deep State card with his counterpart. According to the readout of Sunday’s telephone call released by Turkey’s presidential palace, Mr. Erdogan “shared with President Trump his frustration over the U.S. military and security bureaucracy’s failure to implement” an agreement between the two countries governing security in northern Syria.

Mr. Trump responded by telling Mr. Erdogan, much as he had in December, that he would be removing American troops from the area where the Turkish leader hoped to do battle with the Kurdish-led militia that has been critical American allies against the Islamic State. Turkey considers the militia a threat to its own borders and security.

Mr. Trump knows Turkey from his earlier life in real estate — he sold his brand name to the Trump Towers Istanbul in 2010 — but like presidents before him, he has struggled to devise a consistent policy toward the country.

Instead, he has focused on his personal relationship with Mr. Erdogan in conversations that people familiar with them describe as typically “fawning.” Mr. Trump usually begins by praising Mr. Erdogan, who is himself notorious for haranguing American presidents with grievances, according to those people.

“We have a great friendship as countries,” Mr. Trump said in an appearance with Mr. Erdogan that September. “I think we’re, right now, as close as we have ever been. And a lot of that has to do with the personal relationship.” The following July, he was spotted fist-bumping the Turkish leader at a NATO summit in Brussels.

That chumminess has unsettled both appointed and elected officials suspicious of Mr. Erdogan’s repressive policies, Islamist sympathies and deepening relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Nearly everyone agrees, however, that simply shunning the head of a NATO-member nation at the pivot point between East and West is not practical.

The Trump-Erdogan friendship has already survived at least one major test, when relations flared over Mr. Erdogan’s continued detention of an American pastor, Andrew Brunson, who was jailed for nearly two years in a widespread crackdown after a failed coup in Turkey. When Mr. Brunson was not freed as he expected, Mr. Trump announced in a hostile tweet that he was doubling tariffs on Turkish steel and aluminum and watching the Turkish lira slide.

After Mr. Brunson was freed last October, Mr. Trump expressed public gratitude to Mr. Erdogan for “making this possible.”

To some former United States officials who have worked closely with Mr. Erdogan’s government, the relationship between Mr. Trump and Mr. Erdogan is an unsolved puzzle.

“It’s not really clear to me what Trump, or the United States, gets out of this,” said Phil Gordon, who served at the State Department and on the National Security Council under Mr. Obama.

“It’s consistent with other seemingly inexplicable Trump actions that are more in line with Russian interests than with ours,” added Mr. Gordon, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Even before their collective anger over Mr. Trump’s Sunday announcement about Syria, Senate Republicans had been frustrated with the president’s resistance to placing sanctions on Turkey for its purchase of the advanced Russian S-400 missile system. Congressional leaders call it a clear violation of a 2017 law requiring economic penalties on countries that purchase Russian arms.

With pressure mounting in Washington on Mr. Trump to enact sanctions, he sat down in June with Mr. Erdogan at the Group of 20 summit in Osaka, Japan, where the Turkish leader argued that he had been forced to buy Russian arms because Mr. Obama had unreasonably blocked Turkish efforts to purchase the American-made Patriot missile.

Former Obama administration officials say the story is far more complicated, and that Mr. Erdogan had other options. But they said the Turkish leader had skilfully handed Mr. Trump, who revels in criticism of his predecessor, an ideal talking point as he deferred questions about whether he would impose sanctions.

“It’s a very tough situation that they’re in. And it’s a very tough situation that we’ve been placed in — the United States,” Mr. Trump said in mid-July, adding that “it’s not really fair.”

Mr. Trump did cancel the planned sale of more than 100 F-35 fighter jets to Turkey, whose operation in proximity to the Russian system NATO opposes on security grounds. But Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has said that the law “requires” sanctions.

“Trump is trying really hard to avoid slapping sanctions on Turkey, and that’s partly because he’s trying to not rupture his relationship with Erdogan,” said Soner Cagaptay, the director of the Turkish Research Program at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.

A Pentagon spokesman on Tuesday challenged published reports that Mr. Trump’s decision to order American troops to move out of the area where Turkey plans an offensive surprised senior officials and said Mr. Trump had consulted Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper and Gen. Mark A. Milley, the new chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in the days before talking to Mr. Erdogan.

But Pentagon officials said they had discussed Mr. Erdogan’s threats to invade northern Syria, and there was no prior hint about Mr. Trump ordering American troops to step aside and leave their Syrian Kurdish allies vulnerable to attack. In fact, the officials said, both Mr. Esper and General Milley warned their Turkish counterparts last week that any such cross-border operation would seriously damage United States-Turkey relations.

One senior Trump administration official on Monday said that it was troubling to some officials that Mr. Erdogan was not concerned about angering Mr. Trump, and that he appeared to feel he had autonomy to move into Syria.

In all the furor over Mr. Trump’s announcement, there has been a studied silence from Mr. Erdogan.

Likewise, Mr. Trump’s recent tweets — even those threatening Turkey’s economy with destruction — have avoided calling out Mr. Erdogan by name.

Michael Crowley reported from Washington, and Carlotta Gall from Istanbul. Maggie Haberman contributed reporting from New York, and Eric Schmitt from Washington.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Lindsey Graham warns Trump on Syria troop withdrawal: ‘It’d be the biggest mistake of his presidency’

Westlake Legal Group trump Lindsey Graham warns Trump on Syria troop withdrawal: 'It'd be the biggest mistake of his presidency' Nick Givas fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/lindsey-graham fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 427db948-1831-5a7d-98f5-3ba5b3d9b0e0

If President Trump follows through on his proposed troop withdrawal from Syria, it would be one of the biggest follies of his presidency and cause ISIS to reemerge in the region, Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said Wednesday on “Fox & Friends.”

Trump tweeted about the issue on Wednesday and said the United States should never have been in the Middle East in the first place. He also put the onus on Turkey to stabilize the region and take up arms against any remaining ISIS elements.

SEN. GRAHAM WARNS SYRIA WITHDRAWAL WOULD BE ‘BIG WIN FOR ISIS,’ COMPARES TRUMP’S STRATEGY TO OBAMA

“That’s a pre-9/11 mentality that the Middle East is no concern to us,” Graham told Fox News. “I hope President Trump’s right. I hope we can turn the fight against ISIS over to Turkey. I hope that Turkey, when they go into Syria, they won’t slaughter the Kurds… If [Trump] follows through with this, it’d be the biggest mistake of his presidency.”

He claimed that if Trump doesn’t continue with safe zone border patrols, ISIS will fill the void and the fault will lie squarely with the Trump administration.

“I would argue for him to go back to the status quo,” Graham said. “The safe zones were working. Patrolling with Turkey and international forces to protect the Kurds and Turkey is the way to go. If we pull out, the Kurds are in a world of hurt and ISIS comes back, and President Trump will own it.”

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Turkish troops have reportedly crossed the border into Syria after Trump said he would destabilize the Turkish economy if they went too far.

“As I have stated strongly before, and just to reiterate, if Turkey does anything that I, in my great and unmatched wisdom, consider to be off limits, I will totally destroy and obliterate the Economy of Turkey (I’ve done before!)” Trump tweeted.

“They must, with Europe and others, watch over the captured ISIS fighters and families. The U.S. has done far more than anyone could have ever expected, including the capture of 100% of the ISIS Caliphate. It is time now for others in the region, some of great wealth, to protect their own territory. THE USA IS GREAT!”

SYRIAN KURDISH FORCES CALL FOR ALL HANDS ON DECK AS TURKISH TROOPS REPORTEDLY CROSS BORDER

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Graham said former President Barack Obama made the same mistake with Iraq and encouraged Trump to stick with his current strategy because it was producing results.

“Obama did the same thing in Iraq,” he said. “The Trump way of doing business worked. We destroyed ISIS with the help of the Kurds… We can’t abandon the Kurds now. We can’t turn it over to Turkey. To think that will work is really delusional and dangerous.”

Westlake Legal Group trump Lindsey Graham warns Trump on Syria troop withdrawal: 'It'd be the biggest mistake of his presidency' Nick Givas fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/lindsey-graham fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 427db948-1831-5a7d-98f5-3ba5b3d9b0e0   Westlake Legal Group trump Lindsey Graham warns Trump on Syria troop withdrawal: 'It'd be the biggest mistake of his presidency' Nick Givas fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/lindsey-graham fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 427db948-1831-5a7d-98f5-3ba5b3d9b0e0

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Trump says he won’t pay $500K for MN rally. He still owes DC $9M.

Westlake Legal Group jJsYVKH-VQgMwV0NufpsS2cTFm0fXII4U1w9lgG5BNY Trump says he won't pay $500K for MN rally. He still owes DC $9M. r/politics

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MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred warned Oakland officials about Athletics move to Las Vegas, mayor says

Westlake Legal Group MLB-Rob-Manfred2 MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred warned Oakland officials about Athletics move to Las Vegas, mayor says Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/mlb/oakland-athletics fox-news/sports/mlb fox news fnc/sports fnc d6d01e6a-6e73-5127-8c77-e2fb56c5f4ec article

MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred warned Oakland officials that the Athletics could move to Las Vegas if a lawsuit preventing the franchise from building a new stadium doesn’t get dropped.

The San Francisco Chronicle first reported Manfred’s warning shot to city officials. Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf confirmed to KTVU-TV that Manfred mentioned Vegas as an option.

TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS’ OJ HOWARD MAKES SWEET FOUL-BALL CATCH AT ALDS GAME

The RingCentral Coliseum is jointly owned by the Athletics and Alameda County. The organization offered $85 million for the county’s share of the stadium and county officials have indicated they would be interested in the deal, according to the Chronicle.

The city filed the lawsuit claiming it cannot match the Athletics’ offer, according to the newspaper. A judge issued a temporary restraining order until Nov. 14 to halt the deal.

The Athletics are trying to buy the rights to the stadium to help subsidize the cost of a privately owned and financed ballpark project they plan to build at Howard Terminal. The Athletics are aiming to redevelop the land around the old Coliseum.

PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES OWNER ASKING PLAYERS ABOUT GABE KAPLER AS HE PONDERS MANAGER’S FUTURE: REPORT

“I’m very concerned about the developments of the last couple of days,” Manfred told the San Francisco Chronicle last week. “I think [A’s President] Dave Kaval and John Fisher and the rest of the A’s organization have made a huge investment to try to get a stadium done here, and to have a city entity turn around and litigate against progress is upsetting.”

According to the newspaper, Manfred met with Schaaf and Oakland City Council President Rebecca Kaplan about the Athletics’ new stadium construction.

“I made it clear that it’s time for the city of Oakland to show concrete progress on the stadium effort,” he said. “It’s gone on too long, and things need to fall into place to get a new stadium here. The fans here, as demonstrated by the 55,000 here tonight, are great fans and deserve a major-league-quality facility.”

The Athletics have played in the Coliseum since 1968 and it’s one of the oldest ballparks in the majors.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

By 2020, the Athletics will become the only professional team in the city. The Golden State Warriors are moving into a brand new facility in San Francisco and the Oakland Raiders will be moving to Las Vegas.

Westlake Legal Group MLB-Rob-Manfred2 MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred warned Oakland officials about Athletics move to Las Vegas, mayor says Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/mlb/oakland-athletics fox-news/sports/mlb fox news fnc/sports fnc d6d01e6a-6e73-5127-8c77-e2fb56c5f4ec article   Westlake Legal Group MLB-Rob-Manfred2 MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred warned Oakland officials about Athletics move to Las Vegas, mayor says Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/mlb/oakland-athletics fox-news/sports/mlb fox news fnc/sports fnc d6d01e6a-6e73-5127-8c77-e2fb56c5f4ec article

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Warren vows $1T for communities hit hard by industrial pollution

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093376613001_6093376446001-vs Warren vows $1T for communities hit hard by industrial pollution Tara Prindiville fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/politics fnc article 465c7c05-ae66-5e7c-b5fb-5dc1d07d317f

Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren announced a plan Wednesday to send at least $1 trillion – of her $3 trillion climate plan – to communities hit hard by industrial pollution, particularly low-income areas and communities of color.

The announcement came in a campaign video posted to Twitter, which shows the Massachusetts senator visiting a neighborhood in southwest Detroit, often referred to as the most polluted area in Michigan, alongside Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., who represents the district. In the clip, Warren speaks to community members about residents who have been diagnosed with cancer linked to exposure to toxins after years of living in the shadow of a massive oil refinery.

WARREN FACING SCRUTINY OVER CLAIM SHE WAS FIRED FOR BEING PREGNANT

In line with her overarching campaign to end corruption in Washington, Warren calls the pollution in these communities a result of “decades of discrimination and environmental racism,” saying it is “unacceptable and it must change.”

The plan, which has been posted to her website, builds upon policies covering everything from affordable housing to green manufacturing to clean energy. She stresses the need to build “strong, resilient communities” by doing more than just “cleaning up polluted neighborhoods and tweaking a few regulations at the EPA.”

According to the campaign, this would mean identifying the most at-risk communities and requiring all federal agencies to consider the climate impact of any proposed projects. Warren also calls for investing in the nation’s public water systems, ending the privatization of those systems and enforcing water quality standards.

The plan is vague on how exactly the $1 trillion would be spent, but also calls for grants to long-term residents of “redlined” communities that were once discriminated against financially “so that they can buy homes in the neighborhood of their choice and start to build wealth.”

Warren’s plan is one of many multitrillion-dollar commitments from the Democratic field that have raised questions over how they would be funded. Her climate policy claims that an added corporate profit tax, as well as reversing part of the Trump administration’s tax cuts, would finance the programs.

WARREN SLIPS AHEAD OF BIDEN IN LATEST POLL

Warren also vows to get tough on polluting companies. This includes reinstituting the Superfund Waste Tax, which ensures hazardous waste sites are properly cleaned up and expired in 1995. “Polluters must pay for the consequences of their actions — not leave them for the communities to clean up. I’ll work with Congress to reinstate and then triple the Superfund tax, generating needed revenue to clean up the mess,” she says.

Warren’s environmental justice policy comes ahead of a campaign swing through South Carolina, California, and Nevada later in the week.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093376613001_6093376446001-vs Warren vows $1T for communities hit hard by industrial pollution Tara Prindiville fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/politics fnc article 465c7c05-ae66-5e7c-b5fb-5dc1d07d317f   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093376613001_6093376446001-vs Warren vows $1T for communities hit hard by industrial pollution Tara Prindiville fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/politics fnc article 465c7c05-ae66-5e7c-b5fb-5dc1d07d317f

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More than 500,000 in California are already without power in effort to curb wildfire risk

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close More than 500,000 in California are already without power in effort to curb wildfire risk

Calif. officials, residents brace for power cuts AP, AP

REDDING, California – More than 513,000 Northern California homes and businesses went dark Wednesday in the first phase of a Public Safety Power Shutoff aimed at curbing wildfire risks amid high winds.

Another 234,000 Pacific Gas and Electric Co. customers will lose power at noon California time, and 42,000 customers in the southernmost areas of the company’s reach could also go dark, the company said.

The precautionary shutdown are expected to last through most of Thursday, and some municipalities could be without power longer as the utility ramps back up after the winds abate. 

“The safety of our customers and the communities we serve is our most important responsibility, which is why PG&E has decided to turn power off to customers during this widespread, severe wind event,” said Michael Lewis, a senior vice president for California’s largest power company. “We … appreciate the public’s patience as we do what is necessary to keep our communities safe and reduce the risk of wildfire.”

Schools were shuttered for thousands of students as municipalities braced for days without power.

“It’s unfortunate, but we just do as we are instructed, and are hoping we can get kids back into school on Friday,” Cascade Union Elementary School District Superintendent Jason Provence said. 

Parts of Southern California could also go dark — Southern California Edison said it was considering implementing the Public Safety Power Shutoff plan to cut power to 173,000 customers.

That would push the total to almost 1 million homes and businesses statewide. Because every customer account could represent service to multiple residents or employees in a business, the number of people affected by the outages could be in the millions.

Class-action lawsuit:California wildfire was caused by Pacific Gas & Electric

Lewis said PG&E anticipates the wind “weather event” will last through midday Thursday, with peak winds forecast to reach 60 to 70 mph at higher elevations. Nearly all nine counties in the San Francisco Bay Area could be subjected to the shutdowns, the only exception being the city and county of San Francisco.

PG&E has been under intense scrutiny since November, when the deadliest and most devastating wildfire in state history roared through Butte County. California fire officials determined the blaze, which killed 85 people and destroyed more than 10,000 homes, was ignited by the company’s transmission lines.

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The beleaguered utility filed for bankruptcy earlier this year, and a new CEO has tried to restructure the company and win back customer confidence. The blackout warning hasn’t played well, however — the company’s website crashed amid heavy traffic, preventing subscribers from finding information about the blackouts. 

The state is bracing for another severe wildfire “season,” although officials say that season has become just about year-round. PG&E ordered a much smaller power cutoff in June involving thousands of customers in the Northern California counties of Napa, Solano and Yolo.

Read this: In Paradise, wildfire victims rush to meet deadline for claims against PG&E

On Tuesday, Cal Fire issued a fire warning across much of the state.

“There is a #RedFlagWarning for most of Northern California and #FireWeatherWatch for the southernmost region of California from Wednesday morning to Thursday evening due to gusty winds and low humidity,” Cal Fire warned on Twitter. “This is #CriticalFireWeather and caution should be taken when outdoors.”

Residents in areas where power was going out lined up at gas stations and streamed into stores in pursuit of generators, flashlights, batteries and non-perishable food.

Jennifer Siemens, whose home in Paradise burned in the Camp Fire last year, said she’s now renting in nearby Oroville and is preparing for her third power shutdown in a month. Siemens said the outages scare her children, who were traumatized during the massive Paradise blaze, and also affect the family’s cleaning business.

“What’s wrong with the power lines that they have to do this so much?” asked Siemens. “We don’t want any more fires, obviously, but I feel like they are going a little overboard.”

Bacon reported Contributing: Jorge L. Ortiz, Kristin Lam, USA TODAY; Gabrielle Paluch, Palm Springs Desert Sun; The Associated Press

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2 Killed In Shooting Near German Synagogue

At least two people are dead after gunshots were fired near a synagogue in the eastern German city of Halle on Wednesday, authorities said.  

One person was arrested after the suspected assailants fled in a vehicle, police said. Witnesses say at least one of the suspects was wearing a helmet and military camouflage, reported The Associated Press and BBC.

Pictures of the scene show a body covered by a tarp in the street.

Westlake Legal Group 5d9dce1d2100004207343040 2 Killed In Shooting Near German Synagogue

ASSOCIATED PRESS A person lies on a road in Halle, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2019. A gunman fired several shots and at least two people were killed, according to local media.

The shooting took place on Yom Kippur, one of the holiest days in Judaism. It’s not yet clear whether the synagogue was targeted in the shooting.

Police have asked everyone near the shooting scene to stay inside as the investigation continues.

“Our forces have detained one person,” Halle police said in a tweet. “We remain alert, however. We have deployed forces in and around Halle and are trying to stabilize the situation until we have all the relevant information.”

The main train station in Halle, a city of about 240,000 located about 100 miles southwest of Berlin, has been closed, Reuters reported.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

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Toddler’s E. coli death after vacation sparks investigation amid family heartbreak

A British family is mourning the death of their 2-year-old daughter who fell critically ill on vacation and died just weeks shy of her third birthday. Allie Birchall, who was vacationing with her family at a luxury hotel in Turkey, came down with a case of E. coli that her family is pinning on poor conditions at the resort.

“We all suffered gastric illness and there were a number of people complaining of being unwell during our stay at the hotel, but we didn’t anticipate how serious it could be,” Katie Dawson, Allie’s mother, told SWNS.

Westlake Legal Group tragic-death-a-421026 Toddler's E. coli death after vacation sparks investigation amid family heartbreak fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/health/infectious-disease/foodborne-illness fox news fnc/health fnc f980f82a-8cfe-546c-94ac-7e6ed74daf2c article Alexandria Hein

Allie had just returned from a vacation in Turkey with her family members when she fell ill.  (SWNS)

The family, who has since hired a lawyer, said the food was often left uncovered or served lukewarm, and the cleanliness of the pool and bathroom facilities were often questionable.

MOM CLAIMS DIET SODA SENT HER INTO A COMA AFTER SEVERE ALLERGIC REACTION 

“We saw feces in the swimming pool and I spoke to other holidaymakers who saw the feces in the pool on more than one occasion, and staff just scooped it out without closing the pool or giving it a thorough clean,” Dawson claims.

She also claimed the children’s bathrooms were covered in feces.

When the family returned home from their 10-day stay, Allie began suffering from stomach pains and diarrhea, she also wasn’t hungry and was acting lethargic, according to SWNS.

On July 30, she was admitted to Royal Bolton Hospital, where she was diagnosed with Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC), which led to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS).

CHICKEN SALAD PRODUCTS RECALLED OVER LISTERIA CONCERNS

Nearly everyone is at risk of a STEC infection, which occurs when tiny amounts of human or animal feces enter the mouth. This may happen through contaminated food or water, or contact with feces of other people, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Symptoms of STEC vary for each patient, but it often causes severe stomach cramps, vomiting and bloody diarrhea. While some patients may get better within a week, others may develop life-threatening complications, such as HUS, which occurs in about 5 to 10 percent of STEC cases, according to the CDC.

Westlake Legal Group tragic-death-a-421022 Toddler's E. coli death after vacation sparks investigation amid family heartbreak fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/health/infectious-disease/foodborne-illness fox news fnc/health fnc f980f82a-8cfe-546c-94ac-7e6ed74daf2c article Alexandria Hein

Allie could not recover from the illness, and died on Aug. 3.  (SWNS)

HUS may cause decreased urination, feeling tired, and loss of color in cheeks. Patients with HUS require immediate hospitalization because of the risk of kidney failure or other serious health issues. The patients who recover within a few weeks will likely suffer long-term damage, while other cases may be fatal.

For Allie, the infection caused severe brain damage, and her family decided to end life support on Aug. 3. She died shortly after.

“In sharing Allie’s story, we want to make people more aware of the signs and symptoms of STEC HUS,” Dawson told SWNS. “I kept thinking that if I had known about the condition then I would have probably taken Allie to the hospital sooner and it wouldn’t have ended the way it did.”

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Public Health England is investigating the child’s death, according to SWNS.

“Nothing will bring her back, we need to know what caused her illness and if anything could have been done to prevent it,” Dawson told the news outlet.

Westlake Legal Group tragic-death-a-421026 Toddler's E. coli death after vacation sparks investigation amid family heartbreak fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/health/infectious-disease/foodborne-illness fox news fnc/health fnc f980f82a-8cfe-546c-94ac-7e6ed74daf2c article Alexandria Hein   Westlake Legal Group tragic-death-a-421026 Toddler's E. coli death after vacation sparks investigation amid family heartbreak fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/health/infectious-disease/foodborne-illness fox news fnc/health fnc f980f82a-8cfe-546c-94ac-7e6ed74daf2c article Alexandria Hein

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‘Today’ show anchors on new Matt Lauer rape allegations: ‘I honestly don’t even know what to say’

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 'Today' show anchors on new Matt Lauer rape allegations: 'I honestly don't even know what to say'

News anchor Matt Lauer was fired from his longtime position as the co-anchor of NBC’s Today Show after allegations of sexual misconduct. Wochit

In a somber segment Wednesday morning on the “Today” show, co-anchors Savannah Guthrie and Hoda Kotb addressed a new report that details rape allegations against former “Today” anchor Matt Lauer, expressing to viewers NBC staff members are “disturbed to our core” and working to process the latest revelations. 

Variety reported late Tuesday night that Ronan Farrow’s Oct. 15 book “Catch and Kill” reveals new information about what led to Lauer getting fired from “Today” in November 2017, including allegations from Brooke Nevils, the previously unnamed former NBC News employee who initially complained about him, that he raped her at the 2014 Sochi Olympics. 

“I feel like we owe it to our viewers to pause for a moment,” Guthrie said, noticeably emotional. “This is shocking and appalling. I honestly don’t even know what to say about it. I want to say I know it wasn’t easy for our colleague Brooke to come forward then, it’s not easy now and we support her and any women who have come forward with claims. And it’s just very painful for all of us at NBC and who are at the Today show. It’s very, very, very difficult.”

USA TODAY has reached out to representatives for Lauer and NBC News for further comment. 

Jennifer Aniston: studied Matt Lauer’s last ‘Today’ appearance for ‘Morning Show’ inspiration

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 'Today' show anchors on new Matt Lauer rape allegations: 'I honestly don't even know what to say'

Matt Lauer is speaking out about the sexual misconduct allegations that led to his termination from NBC’s “Today” show Time

Guthrie announced at the top of the “Today” show on Nov. 29, 2017 that Lauer, an NBC morning anchor since 1997, had been fired over sexual harassment allegations. On Wednesday, co-host Hoda Kotb, who has since permanently replaced Lauer, noticed striking similarities between their latest broadcast and the one they faced nearly two years ago.

“I’m looking at you and having a weird moment: we were sitting here just like this two years ago,” she told Guthrie. “Truth be told, Savannah and I did a little prayer upstairs before just to sort of sort out what we were going to do. I think you feel like you’ve known someone for 12 years. I don’t know if you guys have ever felt like that. You know someone, you feel like you know them inside and out and then all of a sudden, a door opens up and it’s a part of them you didn’t know.”

Kotb continued: “We don’t know all the facts on all of this, but there are not allegations of an affair, there are allegations of a crime. I think that’s shocking to all of us here who have sat with Matt for many, many years. So I think we’re going to just sort of continue to process this part of this horrific story and as you said, our thoughts are with Brooke. It’s not easy what she did, to come forward. It’s not easy at all.”

“Today” also shared a statement Wednesday from NBC News: “Matt Lauer’s conduct was appalling, horrific and reprehensible, as we said at the time. That’s why he was fired within 24 hours of us first learning of the complaint. Our hearts break again for our colleague.” 

NBC News chairman Andy Lack added: “Our highest priority is to ensure we have a workplace environment where everyone feels safe and protected. We are absolutely committed to making this a reality – there can be no exception.”

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