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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 413)

Golden State Warriors’ Stephen Curry wanted to get drafted by New York Knicks in 2009

Hindsight is 20/20.

Stephen Curry revealed during a podcast this week that he wanted to get picked up by the New York Knicks during the 2009 draft, a decision that could have left him and the Golden State Warriors with three fewer NBA championships.

Speaking with former NBA players Matt Barnes and Stephen Jackson on their podcast “All the Smoke,” Curry revealed that the Warriors weren’t even on his radar before he received a call from the team’s former General Manager Larry Riley during the draft that would define his career.

ANTONIO BROWN’S EX-GIRLFRIEND FILES FOR SOLE CUSTODY OF 3 CHILDREN CITING ‘INCAPACITY TO MAKE DECISIONS’ IN THEIR ‘BEST INTEREST’: REPORT 

“When I got drafted, it’s kinda funny thinking back, I wanted to go to New York and thought I was going to New York. I was in the draft, in the green room like, ‘Oh, I’ll get to the eight spot, New York will get me’, and then I got the call from Larry Riley like, ‘We’re going to pick you in the seven spot,'” Curry recalled.

Westlake Legal Group curry_2 Golden State Warriors' Stephen Curry wanted to get drafted by New York Knicks in 2009 Paulina Dedaj fox-news/sports/nba/new-york-knicks fox-news/sports/nba/golden-state-warriors fox-news/person/stephen-curry fox news fnc/sports fnc article 1db9d354-67ec-5a26-b10b-b738a150802c

Phoenix Suns’ Kelly Oubre Jr., left, guards Golden State Warriors’ Stephen Curry during the first half of an NBA basketball game Oct. 30, in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

Knowing the state of the Warriors at the time, Curry saw an opportunity. “I knew it was coming off a restructure … I knew we weren’t going to be that good, but I got to work my way into the starting lineup.”

After 11 seasons with the Warriors, Curry has three NBA championships and was named MVP twice. He is regarded as the best 3-point shooter in history, a claim Curry said he never set out to achieve.

“Not a chance,” Curry told Barnes and Jackson when asked if he ever thought that he would “change the face of basketball.”

“I dreamed of playing in the league, playing the way I know how to play the game.”

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He’s averaged 23.5 points, 6.6 assists and 43.5 percent from three-point range over his career.

Curry has been out since Oct. 30 after breaking his left hand in a game against the Phoenix Suns. Reports this week indicated a return in early March. Golden State is 10-36 this season and dead last in the Western Conference.

Fox News’ Ryan Gaydos contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group steph-curry2 Golden State Warriors' Stephen Curry wanted to get drafted by New York Knicks in 2009 Paulina Dedaj fox-news/sports/nba/new-york-knicks fox-news/sports/nba/golden-state-warriors fox-news/person/stephen-curry fox news fnc/sports fnc article 1db9d354-67ec-5a26-b10b-b738a150802c   Westlake Legal Group steph-curry2 Golden State Warriors' Stephen Curry wanted to get drafted by New York Knicks in 2009 Paulina Dedaj fox-news/sports/nba/new-york-knicks fox-news/sports/nba/golden-state-warriors fox-news/person/stephen-curry fox news fnc/sports fnc article 1db9d354-67ec-5a26-b10b-b738a150802c

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A Major Fear for Democrats: Will the Party Come Together by November?

FORT DODGE, Iowa — Democrats have always represented a cacophonous array of individuals and interests, but the so-called big tent is now stretching over a constituency so unwieldy that it’s easy to understand why voters remain torn this close to Iowa, where no clear front-runner has emerged.

The party’s voters are splintered across generational, racial and ideological lines, prompting some liberals to express reluctance about rallying behind a moderate presidential nominee, and those closer to the political middle to voice unease with a progressive standard-bearer.

The lack of a united front has many party leaders anxious — and for good reason. In over 50 interviews across three early-voting states — Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina — a number of Democratic primary voters expressed grave reservations about the current field of candidates, and in some cases a clear reluctance to vote for a nominee who was too liberal or too centrist for their tastes.

As she walked out of a campaign event for former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. in Fort Dodge this week, Barbara Birkett said she was leaning toward caucusing for Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, and dismissed the notion of even considering the two progressives in the race, Senators Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.

“No, I’m more of a Republican and that’s just a little bit too far to the left for me,” Ms. Birkett, a retiree. She said that she’d like to support a Democrat this November because of her disdain for Mr. Trump but that Mr. Sanders would “be a hard one.”

Elsewhere on the increasingly broad Democratic spectrum, Pete Doyle, who attended a Sanders rally in Manchester, N.H., last weekend, had a ready answer when asked about voting for Mr. Biden: “Never in a million years.” He said that if Mr. Biden won the nomination, he would either vote for a third-party nominee or sit out the general election.

Westlake Legal Group primary-election-guide-promostill-articleLarge A Major Fear for Democrats: Will the Party Come Together by November? Warren, Elizabeth Sanders, Bernard Presidential Election of 2020 Biden, Joseph R Jr

Ready, Set, Vote: Here’s Everything You Need to Know for the 2020 Primaries

The Iowa caucuses are around the corner. As you get ready for primary season, take a look at our cheat sheet on the race.

The uncertainty about party unity has been exacerbated in recent days by clashes among the Democratic candidates, as well as one involving a prominent party leader.

Mr. Sanders and Ms. Warren have accused one another of lying about a private conversation in 2018 over whether a woman could become president; Mr. Sanders and Mr. Biden have attacked each other over Social Security and corruption; and Hillary Clinton, the 2016 Democratic nominee, has come off the sidelines to stoke her rivalry with Mr. Sanders, declaring that “nobody likes him.”

The lack of consensus among Democratic voters, 10 days before the presidential nominating primary begins with Iowa caucuses, has led some party leaders to make unusually fervent and early pleas for unity. On Monday alone, a pair of influential Democratic congressmen issued strikingly similar warnings to very different audiences in very different states.

“We get down to November, there’s only going to be one nominee,” Representative James E. Clyburn of South Carolina, the third-ranking House Democrat, said at a ceremony for Martin Luther King’s Birthday at the State House in Columbia. “Nobody can afford to get so angry because your first choice did not win. If you stay home in November, you are going to get Trump back.”

“No matter who our nominee is, we can’t make the mistake that we made in ’16,” Representative Dave Loebsack of Iowa said that night in Cedar Rapids as he introduced his preferred 2020 candidate, former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., at a town hall meeting. “We all got to get behind that person so we can get Donald Trump out of office,” Mr. Loebsack added.

In interviews, Democratic leaders say they believe the party’s fights over such politically fraught issues as treasured entitlement programs, personal integrity, and gender and electability could hand Mr. Trump and foreign actors ammunition with which to depress turnout for their standard-bearer.

“I am concerned about facing another disinformation campaign from the other side,” said Representative Brendan Boyle of Pennsylvania, a Biden supporter who was uneasy enough that he recently sought out high-profile congressional backers of some of the other contenders to discuss an eventual détente. “For those of us who are elected officials, we need to exercise real leadership to make sure all of the camps are immediately united after all this is over.”

Most Democrats believe that the deep revulsion their party’s voters and activists share for Mr. Trump will ultimately help heal primary season wounds and rally support behind whoever emerges as the nominee. “If it means getting rid of Donald Trump, they would swallow Attila the Hun,” State Representative Todd Rutherford, the Democratic leader of the South Carolina House, said of his party’s rank-and-file.

And some leading Democrats were less worried about recovering from the cut-and-thrust of the primary fights than figuring out how to address the deep fissures within their coalition that this race has exposed.

“The Democrats cover everybody from Bernie to Bloomberg and that does present a real problem in terms of making a decision,” said former Gov. Jerry Brown of California, himself a former presidential hopeful, referring to former Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg of New York. “It’s not blendable at this point. And if the division continues you’re not going to get a first-ballot candidate.”

The political and cultural distance between the two leading Democratic candidates, Mr. Biden and Mr. Sanders, is easy enough to grasp from their events.

A rally for Mr. Sanders in Exeter, N.H., last weekend featured the actor John Cusack, who introduced his candidate by invoking left-wing writers like Noam Chomsky and Howard Zinn and denouncing neoliberalism and imperialism.

The event had few of the trappings of Mr. Biden’s events, like the Pledge of Allegiance and a call for blessings upon the American military and the restoration of consensus and comity in Washington. The former vice president does not ask his audiences to raise their hands if they know anyone arrested for marijuana possession, as Mr. Sanders usually does.

Vivid as the surface differences are between Mr. Sanders and Mr. Biden, what’s even more revealing are the views that emerge in polling and conversations with their supporters.

A new CNN survey showed that about as many Democrats under 50 would be upset or dissatisfied with Mr. Biden as the nominee as they would be enthusiastic. And among those older than 65, views were even starker about Mr. Sanders: just 23 percent said they’d be enthusiastic about him while 33 percent said they’d be upset or dissatisfied.

Mr. Sanders has tried to bolster his standing with older voters, and lessen their ardor for Mr. Biden, by trumpeting his support for Social Security and highlighting the former vice president’s past willingness to consider cuts to the program — a contrast Sanders supporters believe is vital given Mr. Trump’s suggestion this week that he’d pursue entitlement trims.

Interviews with Sanders supporters at his events in New Hampshire and at the King Day gathering in South Carolina revealed a group of progressive activists who were as dedicated to him as they were in 2016 — and who were uneasy about his rivals, especially Mr. Biden. That was borne out in a new poll of New Hampshire primary voters this week from Suffolk University, which indicated that nearly a quarter of the Vermont senator’s supporters would not commit to backing the party’s nominee if it was not Mr. Sanders.

That number could drop by November if Mr. Sanders does not win the nomination: research shows that most of Mr. Sanders’s supporters eventually rallied to Mrs. Clinton against Mr. Trump. Yet it would not necessarily happen easily, especially if Mr. Sanders’s supporters believe he’s been treated unfairly by the party.

Many Sanders supporters who said they would grudgingly support one of his rivals against Mr. Trump quickly added that that’s all they’d do, ruling out doing the volunteer work that is the lifeblood of all campaigns.

“I just couldn’t morally,” Laura Satkowski said, explaining why she would not canvass or make phone calls on behalf of Mr. Biden. “I don’t like his policies.”

Some pro-Sanders households are mixed.

Michelle McKay and her partner, Bill Davis, came to the South Carolina State House from their home in Raleigh, N.C., she wearing a vest festooned with Sanders buttons, to show their support for their candidate.

“Hell no,” Ms. McKay said about the prospect of backing Mr. Biden. Reminded that North Carolina could be a pivotal state in the general election, she said: “I don’t care. My vote is not going to an establishment Democrat.”

Mr. Davis, though, said that while he didn’t want to vote for anybody besides Mr. Sanders, he’d cast a ballot for any Democrat against Mr. Trump. “I think the party will come together,” he said, as Ms. McKay looked on unconvinced.

For many Democratic leaders, the hope for party unity rests on shared loathing of Mr. Trump. His divisive record and conduct in office helped propel Democrats to a new House majority in 2018 and a number of governorships in the last three years.

Yet while his astonishing election and often demagogic politics have accelerated the rise of the left, energizing a new generation of progressives and socialists, Mr. Trump’s presidency has also enlarged the moderate wing of the party, creating a slice of de facto Democrats among the Republicans and right-leaning independents who cannot abide him.

Phil Richardson, a farmer who came to the Biden event in Fort Dodge with his wife, Christy, said he’d be happy to vote for Mr. Sanders.

But Mr. Richardson said his worry is that others in his community would find it harder to support somebody so liberal.

“I’ve had some of my farmer friends tell me they could probably live with Biden but he couldn’t go for Bernie,” he said.

Over in Dubuque, Iowa, Ron Davis said flatly that he’d support Mr. Trump if Mr. Sanders was the nominee.

An Ames, Iowa, native who now lives in suburban Detroit, Mr. Davis and his wife, Barbara Rom, are retirees traversing Iowa as political tourists this week — “candidate groupies,” he called them — and trying to decide who to support in Michigan’s primary in March.

On Wednesday they came to the University of Dubuque to see Mr. Buttigieg, who impressed Mr. Davis. Mr. Sanders, however, would be “too radical a change,” he said. Ms. Rom said she’d back Mr. Sanders if it meant defeating Mr. Trump.

If it all seems messy, and the party hopelessly fragmented, that’s for good reason, said Kathleen Sebelius, the former Kansas governor and health and human services secretary who grew up in Democratic politics as the daughter of a former Ohio governor.

“This primary is a reflection of the politics of the country at large,” Ms. Sebelius said. “There are clearly differences among people who still feel incremental change is the best way of getting things done, and folks who say we need more to pursue more radical change.”

She said she’d be more worried if Democrats didn’t have Mr. Trump as “a rallying cry,” but conceded there was no candidate on the horizon who could fully unify the party’s factions.

“There is no savior who’s going to rescue us from the current state of affairs,” she said. “We’re all going to need to save each other.”

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Helicopter-sharing app Blade pairs with NYU Langone to speed transplant organs

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6125857054001_6125854853001-vs Helicopter-sharing app Blade pairs with NYU Langone to speed transplant organs Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/health/wellness fox-news/health/medical-research/transplants fox-news/health/medical-research/surgery fox news fnc/health fnc article 9d208590-4c34-5d51-a579-f1177887c56d

Talking about a life-saving initiative.

Time is of the essence when it comes to organ transplants. That’s why the helicopter-sharing app Blade — largely used to transport elite New Yorkers to surrounding airports and destinations like the Hamptons in the summertime — has paired with NYU Langone Health to more quickly transport donated organs to transplant patients in need.

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Fox News Medical Contributor and NYU Langone Professor of Medicine Dr. Marc Siegel recently checked out the roughly four-month-old pilot program for himself.

“Speed is increasing, traffic and costs are decreasing, the benefits are bountiful and outcomes are improving,” he told Fox News’ Ainsley Earhardt of the initiative.

Will Heyburn, the head of corporate development at Blade, said there’s no extra cost to transplant an organ via the helicopter service — in fact, one NYU Langone official estimated that Blade is a fourth of the cost of a typical medical evacuation helicopter. In addition to cutting costs, time is also reduced as well — ultimately bettering the outcome of the transplant.

There’s “no question” that shorter times outside of the body equate to better functionality of transplanted organ, Dr. Nader Moazami, NYU Langone chief of cardiac and lung transplantation, said.

One transplant recipient whose new lungs were transported via Blade said the experience was “great.” He’s recovered quickly; when speaking to Fox News this week, he was only 16 days post-op.

SECOND US BABY BORN AFTER UTERUS TRANSPLANT FROM DECEASED DONOR

“It’s amazing to take a deep breath,” he said. ‘I’m blessed.”

“Reducing transit time is what Blade does for a living,” Heyburn added.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6125857054001_6125854853001-vs Helicopter-sharing app Blade pairs with NYU Langone to speed transplant organs Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/health/wellness fox-news/health/medical-research/transplants fox-news/health/medical-research/surgery fox news fnc/health fnc article 9d208590-4c34-5d51-a579-f1177887c56d   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6125857054001_6125854853001-vs Helicopter-sharing app Blade pairs with NYU Langone to speed transplant organs Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/health/wellness fox-news/health/medical-research/transplants fox-news/health/medical-research/surgery fox news fnc/health fnc article 9d208590-4c34-5d51-a579-f1177887c56d

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She’s the Next President. Wait, Did You Read That Right?

Westlake Legal Group 24pronouns1-facebookJumbo She’s the Next President. Wait, Did You Read That Right? Women and Girls Warren, Elizabeth Voting and Voters United States Politics and Government Presidential Election of 2020 Language and Languages Klobuchar, Amy Harris, Kamala D Democratic Party Debates (Political) Clinton, Hillary Rodham

It was a blip of a moment during the Democratic debate last week, one perhaps overshadowed by a long discussion of the prospect of a female president. Responding to a question about climate change, Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts said, “I will do everything a president can do all by herself on the first day.”

All by herself. Did you clock the use of that word?

A study released this month shows that you did — and that, in fact, it may have cost you a third of a second in reading time just now.

Her. It’s a three-letter pronoun that, despite the seemingly endless debate over whether a woman can become president, feels relatively benign. But what if its use, or an unconscious aversion to its use, had some small power to influence voter perception? Could something as simple as a pronoun reflect, or even affect, the way voters understand power?

That’s the question raised by the research, conducted by cognitive scientists and linguists at M.I.T., the University of Potsdam and the University of California, San Diego, who surveyed people during the run-up to the 2016 election. Wanting to understand how world events might influence language, the researchers hypothesized that the possibility a woman would be elected president at that time might override the implicit bias people had toward referring to the president as “he.”

But what they found was that Americans — even young, self-identified Democratic women who believed Hillary Clinton would win — were reluctant to use “she” even in the context of a hypothetical president.

“There seemed to be a real bias against referring to the next president as ‘she,’” said Roger Levy, a professor of brain and cognitive sciences at M.I.T. and one of the authors of the study.

When the researchers watched subjects in a reading setting — they were asked to read a short passage about the next president, pressing a button on a screen to reveal each word of the sentence — their bias was even more pronounced: The word “she,” when referring to the future president, made people cognitively stumble, leading to a “considerable disruption” in reading time, said Titus von der Malsburg, another author of the study and a linguist at the University of Potsdam, in Germany.

“People had difficulties reading ‘she’ even if the text had previously used ‘she,’ showing how persistent and deeply ingrained this bias is,” he said.

So could struggling to say or read the word “she” in the context of a president affect our willingness to vote for a woman?

“That’s of course the million-dollar question,” said Dr. von der Malsburg.

He noted that if people gravitated toward male language when talking about presidents, that could indirectly contribute to a culture in which women were not seen as typical candidates.

“And that, in turn, would likely influence election outcomes because women would have to do extra work to convince voters that they can do the job,” he said.

When it comes to women in politics — and specifically, women in the presidency — often lurking behind language are unconscious assumptions about women in power.

“We are uneasy with the president as ‘she’ because encountering it forces us to have in mind a new conception of ‘president,’” the linguist Robin Lakoff said.

Dr. Lakoff, whose book “Language and Woman’s Place” helped create the field of gender linguistics in the 1970s, said that language tended to reflect the beliefs of a particular moment in time.

But it can also shape them.

Research has found that the use of the pronoun “he” can create a male bias in readers, that countries with gendered language have higher gender inequality and that even subtly sexist language may influence voters’ likelihood of supporting a particular candidate.

In recent years, some governments and organizations have started paying more attention to the power of words, taking steps to update or replace gendered terms.

In 2013, Washington State joined Florida and Minnesota in combing through its state codes and statutes to adjust terms like “ombudsman” (now “ombuds”) to be gender neutral. As Liz Watson, then senior counsel at the National Women’s Law Center, said at the time: “Words matter. Words help shape our perceptions about what opportunities are available to women and men.”

Administrators at Yale announced in 2017 that they would replace the words “freshman” and “upperclassman” with “first-year” and “upper-level” students, joining several other universities that have informally made the change. And the singular “they” — increasingly popular as both as substitute for “he or she” and as a gender-neutral pronoun for those who identify as nonbinary — was recently declared the “Word of the Decade” by the American Dialect Society.

That would seem like progress, said the historian Barbara J. Berg. Yet when it comes to the halls of power, she said, the masculine “remains the default in our language.”

It is popular these days to tell the story of Abigail Adams, wife of the founding father John, who urged her husband in a letter in 1776 to “remember the ladies.” Lesser known is that his reply, in a letter back, called her request “saucy.” (The word “she,” of course, does not appear anywhere in the Declaration of Independence, nor does the word “woman.”)

And while, over the years, words like “mailman,” “policeman” and “stewardess” have been replaced with terms like “mail carrier,” “police officer” and “flight attendant,” there are still plenty of phrases for which “he” connotes power. Think “manning the command post,” “maestro” or even “guy” as a way to describe expertise. “As in, ‘He’s a stats guy’ or ‘He’s a policy guy,’” said Philip N. Cohen, a sociologist at the University of Maryland.

The 2018 midterm elections broke all sorts of records — and a historic number of women ran for office and won — and yet they also provided ample opportunity to hear (and see) the phrase “freshman congresswoman.” Doesn’t it sound sort of funny?

Deborah Tannen, a linguist at Georgetown University, described how she had recently spoken with a group of female judges, some of whom recalled being referred to as “sir” when on the bench. Presumably, Dr. Tannen said, the speakers were nervous — and “sir” was an attempt to show respect.

“‘Sir’ is associated with respect to an extent that ‘ma’am’ is not,” Dr. Tannen said, noting that she, too, had occasionally stumbled over such words.

Once, she recalled, at an event in which Michelle Obama was speaking, a friend remarked that “Dr. Biden” would also be in attendance.

“I thought to myself, ‘Oh, I didn’t know Joe Biden had a Ph.D.,’” she said. “And of course it was his wife, who I had met, and who I knew had a Ph.D. So even I do it, Dr. Tannen.”

And then there’s “Madam.” During the 1970s, feminists fought for the adoption of a female equivalent of “Mr.” — one that did not denote marital status — and were largely successful with the honorific “Ms.” But male presidents in the United States are often addressed as “Mr. President,” while a woman — if the way we refer to cabinet secretaries is any indication — would quite likely be “Madam President.”

“‘Madam’ could be a term of respect, but it’s also the head of a brothel,” said Dr. Berg, the historian. “So it’s like this constant subtle reminder of a woman’s status.”

But a new breed of candidates may be flipping that script.

During the recent Democratic debate, in addition to Ms. Warren’s use of “herself” in reference to the next president on more than one occasion, Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota said in her closing statement, “We need a candidate who is actually going to bring people with her.”

Senator Kamala Harris of California, who dropped out of the race late last year, often did the same when she was running. As California’s first female attorney general, she sifted through the language that was written into the law — statutes referring to the attorney general as “he” or “his” — and changed them.

“I’ve always been very aware that when it comes to women holding leadership roles, we are sometimes asking people to see what they have not seen before,” Ms. Harris said in an email. “As our government becomes more reflective of the people it represents and the voices at the table become more diverse, it is important for us to really check how we are creating and supporting an inclusive environment — and a big part of that is about how we use language.”

Of course, one might argue there’s something of a feedback loop: The language reflects the culture. The culture won’t change until there is a winning candidate who upends the old biases. But those running for that spot may be impeded by the incessant talking about gender.

The researchers say the United Kingdom may provide an encouraging case study.

In 2017, they replicated the study there, in the lead-up to an election to determine the next prime minister.

Theresa May was prime minister at the time and was expected to win — but she was not the first woman to hold that post. (That was Margaret Thatcher.)

When referring to the next prime minister, the British study participants were more likely to use the pronoun “she” than “he.”

Sharon Attia contributed research.

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When the Prince of Wales Is Your Landlord

NEWQUAY, England — People who move to Nansledan, a new residential community in the southwestern corner of England, must abide by certain rules.

Homes and doors can be painted only certain colors, including pastel pink and eggshell blue. Local businesses are welcome to set up shop, but no fast-food chains, please. And don’t think of tampering with the dime-size holes in some of the bricks outside the houses: They are there to make homes for bees.

Also, don’t be surprised if you see Charles, the Prince of Wales, strolling down the street, admiring what he’s wrought.

Nansledan, which will eventually have about 4,000 homes, could be the most ambitious project undertaken in the 700 years of the Duchy of Cornwall, the patchwork of properties spread across England, covering more than 200 square miles, that provides an income to the Prince of Wales.

A dukedom within a kingdom, the duchy was created in 1337 by Edward III for his eldest son, Prince Edward (known after his death as the Black Prince, perhaps because of the color of his armor). Prince Edward became the first Duke of Cornwall and the Prince of Wales, but he was never king — he died, probably of an illness, at age 45 while his father was still on the throne.

Most of the time since then, the duchy has passed to the eldest surviving son of the monarch, who is also heir to the throne and holds the title of the Duke of Cornwall.

Since 1952, that has been Prince Charles. At age 71, he has been in charge of the duchy longer than anyone before him (thanks to his mother, still reigning at age 93).

The duchy, which receives rent from tenants that include farmers, homeowners and shopping centers, earned 21 million pounds, or about $28 million, for the year ending March 2019, and Charles shared some of that income with his two sons and their families.

That has become a sticking point lately. It’s unclear if duchy money will continue to help pay the bills for the prince’s younger son, Harry, and his wife, Meghan, also known as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, who recently caused a royal earthquake when they said they would separate themselves from their traditional duties and move to North America for part of the year.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_167465688_8f51c90a-b646-4201-b192-79d1799d0621-articleLarge When the Prince of Wales Is Your Landlord Royal Families Nansledan Markle, Meghan Harry, Duke of Sussex Great Britain Duchy of Cornwall Cornwall (England) Charles, Prince of Wales

A view of Newquay Harbor. Nansledan is on the outskirts of the town, whose sandy beaches are a popular destination for tourists.Credit…Suzie Howell for The New York Times

On a recent visit, few locals in Newquay, the seaside town adjacent to Nansledan, said that they paid much attention to the fact that tracts of land around them were providing money for Harry and Meghan.

“That connection doesn’t matter,” said Steph Maclaren, an artist. “They don’t have a bearing on anyone.”

Ask residents about the duchy’s big housing development, and they often respond with blank looks. “It just appeared,” is a common response.

The Duchy of Cornwall is often portrayed as a collection of picturesque organic farms with rushing streams. But it is also a vast real-estate holding company, with properties including Dartmoor Prison and a home improvement superstore in Milton Keynes, a town north of London.

Fruit trees have been planted across Nansledan. “All are welcome to the produce,” community rules state.Credit…Suzie Howell for The New York Times Houses in the community are made of local slate and brick.Credit…Suzie Howell for The New York Times

Nansledan, the duchy says, has been inspired by Prince Charles’s philosophy on architecture and the environment. The prince is outspoken in his support for traditional housing styles and sustainable development.

In a treatise entitled “Housing Britain: A Call to Action,” the prince has written that, “We must demand better places that break the stranglehold of the conventional mold of monocultural housing estates and zoned developments that, up to now, have put the car at the center of the design process and not the pedestrian and thereby created an increasingly unsustainable environment.”

The streets of Nansledan are angled to discourage drivers from speeding and the layout is intended to allow residents to reach shops and schools without having to drive. Marketplaces, plazas and nature reserves have been built in for residents. Houses have bird boxes constructed into their walls to encourage nesting and the gardens have communal orchards.

Alex Eley said she jumped at the opportunity to set up shop there in October 2018 because she thought the Duchy of Cornwall would be supportive toward her catering business, which limits plastic and uses local products. Prince Charles made the duchy’s own farm entirely organic more than 30 years ago, and he has separately set up the Duchy Originals brand, which sells organic food. He spoke about the topic of sustainability at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, this week.

“We’re shouting and preaching from the same hymn book,” Ms. Eley said.

When the duchy first tested the prince’s architectural principles in Poundbury, a village on the southern coast of England, it was ridiculed by some as a “feudal Disneyland.” But it flourished enough to lead to another test, on Tregunnel Hill in Newquay; and then to Nansledan, a 540-acre site that will eventually have almost twice as many homes as Poundbury. (Residents own their houses, but the land underneath still belongs to the duchy.)

As environmental concerns have become mainstream, the prince and his ethos of sustainability and long-term stewardship of the land have attracted less criticism, something he notes in his housing essay.

Although Poundbury was “derided by many at the time,” the prince wrote, “I am heartened that both the duchy’s and my foundation’s work is now gaining approval and shifting the tide of opinion.”

Residents and businesses who have moved to Nansledan (the name means broad valley in Cornish) are enthusiastic about their choice. They have already agreed to the rules of life on a duchy estate, including the requirement that residents wanting to change the color of their house or door must apply for permission from the duchy and conform to tints reminiscent of fishing cottages on the coast.

Buying a house in the development is like joining a club, said Tracey Nicholas, the project administrator for the Duchy of Cornwall in Nansledan. “These are the rules,” she says, flipping through the color charts.

And the rules that come with living on duchy-owned land are part of the attraction for some residents.

“You have to buy into that,” said Aaron Smith, a florist who moved from Staffordshire, about 275 miles away, to set up home and shop in Nansledan with his partner, Matt Drohan, six weeks ago.

“It can seem quite controlling,” Mr. Smith said, but he loved the “cookie-cutter feel” of the place, joking that he aspired to be like Bree Van De Kamp, the uptight perfectionist in the television series “Desperate Housewives.”

Residents’ commitment to the community has helped with maintenance too. The site has had problems with dog poop being left out and construction materials blowing away from the building sites by high coastal winds. So Mr. Smith organized a group to go litter picking that has been nicknamed Team Sparkle.

“It’s perfect,” Mr. Smith said with evident pride. “It’s so safe because everybody is watching.”

Mr. Smith is also a staunch royalist — it was the Duchy of Cornwall name that drew him to take a look at the development while on holiday.

To them, the royal family can do no wrong. Harry will be a “people’s prince, like Diana,” even if he moves away, said Mr. Smith.

Mr. Drohan is equally sympathetic. “You can’t blame them, the way they treat them,” Mr. Drohan said of the tabloids. “To be fair to Meghan, they are dreadful.”

Life in the community, where a four-bedroom home goes for about £400,000, is not without small frustrations. There is, for example, an issue with a pizza van.

The van would arrive on Fridays, park in the neighborhood, and sell pizzas baked in its wood-fired oven. It attracted quite a few customers, apparently, but a homeowner eventually complained. The duchy discussed matters with the van’s owner. The result: No more visits from the pizza van.

Residents who liked the van are “up in arms,” Mr. Smith said, and don’t want Friday-night pizzas to end. It is being discussed on the residents’ Facebook page. One resident approached the florists to discuss alternative parking spots for the van. A teenager getting his hair cut at the Nansledan barbershop said he hoped he would be able to take advantage of the van one last time.

Danny Murphy, who opened the barbershop almost two years ago, has had his own run-in with the rules. He wants to put up a single barber pole, but the Duchy has stipulated that he must have two poles and that they must be just red and white.

“They’re quite funny about what they want here,” Mr. Murphy said.

His fellow barber, Max Hoar, shrugged: “What they say goes.”

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‘Megxit’ still has Prince William, Kate Middleton ‘reeling,’ royal expert says

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s decision to step back from their senior royal duties is reportedly having a major impact on his brother, Prince William, and his wife, Kate Middleton.

After the Duke and Duchess of Sussex announced earlier this month that they plan to step back from their senior royal duties, a lot of attention and responsibility has reportedly fallen on the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. According to royal expert Katie Nicholl, William and Kate are only just coming to terms with the new makeup of the royal family.

“I think the severity of what’s happened has had a huge impact on his brother, on his sister-in-law,” Nicholl told Entertainment Tonight of Harry’s decision.

PRINCE HARRY TO BE PLAYED BY ORLANDO BLOOM IN ANIMATED SERIES BASED ON ROYAL FAMILY 

She added: “Both of them are still reeling from the news, coming to terms with the reality of this situation.”

The royal expert previously discussed the impact that losing Harry and Meghan in the public eye has had on the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge already. She notes that the duo received an extra warm reception at a royal engagement in Bradford earlier this month and has seemed noticeably more jovial in public in an effort to keep up appearances.

“The warm reception William and Kate received has given them a huge boost,” Nicholl told OK!, according to the Daily Mail. “They’ve stuck to the tried-and-tested approach, promoting a united royal family and it’s a success.”

MEGHAN MARKLE, PRINCE HARRY ‘WERE BULLIED OUT OF THE ROYAL FAMILY,’ AUTHOR CLAIMS

As for personal turmoil, she noted that Harry is likely missing his brother at this point.

“The past week must have been incredibly hard. With William busy performing royal duties, he’s not got his brother by his side right now and his father, Prince Charles, has returned to Scotland.”

In a speech given at a dinner for supporters of the Sentebale charity in London, Prince Harry addressed why he and Markle chose to relinquish their “royal highness” titles and move part-time to Canada.

Westlake Legal Group 987931d6-GettyImages-1194930791 'Megxit' still has Prince William, Kate Middleton 'reeling,' royal expert says Tyler McCarthy fox-news/world/personalities/will fox-news/world/personalities/kate fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 87207b96-56d8-5c25-aecc-e544e8809560

Prince William and Kate Middleton are reportedly still coming to terms with Meghan Markle, Prince Harry’s ‘Megxit’ news. (Yui Mok – WPA Pool/Getty Images)

“The decision that I have made for my wife and I to step back is not one I made lightly,” the prince said. “It was so many months of talks after so many years of challenges. And I know I haven’t always gotten it right, but as far as this goes, there really was no other option. What I want to make clear is, we’re not walking away, and we certainly aren’t walking away from you.”

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Harry has met with Queen Elizabeth and other senior royals to work out a deal that will see him and Markle relinquish their “royal highness” titles and pay back $3.1 million used to renovate their Frogmore Cottage residence. Harry capped things off by finally arriving in Canada where he and his wife will live part-time and raise 8-month-old Archie.

Westlake Legal Group Harry-meghan-william-kate 'Megxit' still has Prince William, Kate Middleton 'reeling,' royal expert says Tyler McCarthy fox-news/world/personalities/will fox-news/world/personalities/kate fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 87207b96-56d8-5c25-aecc-e544e8809560   Westlake Legal Group Harry-meghan-william-kate 'Megxit' still has Prince William, Kate Middleton 'reeling,' royal expert says Tyler McCarthy fox-news/world/personalities/will fox-news/world/personalities/kate fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 87207b96-56d8-5c25-aecc-e544e8809560

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Houston explosion at manufacturing plant rattles house miles away

Houston police reported a massive explosion overnight Friday at a manufacturing plant.

The blast rattled houses miles away, Fox 26 Houston reported. Firefighters responded around 4:25 a.m. local time.

One person went to the hospital and another was unaccounted for, the station reported.

SPAIN CHEMICAL PLANT EXPLOSION KILLS AT LEAST 1, INJURES 9 OTHERS

Fire officials said the injured person lived near the plant and the missing person worked there.

Westlake Legal Group houston-explosion-FOX26 Houston explosion at manufacturing plant rattles house miles away Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox news fnc/us fnc article 331a4e7b-14fd-5e51-a88c-0dbfdd3e8474

Image shows Watson Grinding Manufacturing in Houston after an explosion shortly after 4 a.m. local time Friday. (Fox 26 Houston)

The station reported that the building houses Watson Grinding Manufacturing and that the explosion was caused by a propylene gas tank.

“No evacuation order has been given at this time,” the Houston Fire Department tweeted around 7 a.m. local time.

School officials canceled classes at an elementary and middle schools in the area.

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Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo reported a half-mile debris field from the explosion, according to Fox 26.

Westlake Legal Group houston-explosion-FOX26 Houston explosion at manufacturing plant rattles house miles away Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox news fnc/us fnc article 331a4e7b-14fd-5e51-a88c-0dbfdd3e8474   Westlake Legal Group houston-explosion-FOX26 Houston explosion at manufacturing plant rattles house miles away Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox news fnc/us fnc article 331a4e7b-14fd-5e51-a88c-0dbfdd3e8474

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London Police Amp Up Surveillance With Real-Time Facial Recognition

Westlake Legal Group merlin_164586807_ce9d6b5f-ebc8-4e9a-85f4-1a9c9ac578f1-facebookJumbo London Police Amp Up Surveillance With Real-Time Facial Recognition Surveillance of Citizens by Government Scotland Yard (Metropolitan Police Service) Privacy London (England) facial recognition software Decisions and Verdicts Big Brother Watch

London’s police department said on Friday that it would begin using facial recognition technology in the city to identify people in real time, becoming one of the largest Western police forces to deploy software that has been criticized for its questionable effectiveness and violation of privacy.

The Metropolitan Police provided few details about when and where the technology would be used. In a statement, the department said the software would help “tackle serious crime, including serious violence, gun and knife crime, child sexual exploitation and help protect the vulnerable.”

The decision comes amid a worldwide debate about the use of facial recognition systems. Police departments contend that the software gives them a technological edge to catch criminals. Critics say the technology is an invasion of privacy and is being rolled out without adequate public debate.

In Britain, a judge ruled last year that police departments could use the technology without violating privacy or human rights, a case that is under appeal. The government’s top privacy regulator has raised concerns about the use of the technology, as did an independent report of a trial use by the Metropolitan Police.

The technology London plans to deploy goes beyond many of the facial recognition systems already in use, which match a photo against a database. The new systems attempt to identify people on a police watch list with security cameras in real time to enable officers to stop them in the specific location.

“Every day, our police officers are briefed about suspects they should look out for,” Nick Ephgrave, assistant commissioner of the police department, said in a statement. Live facial recognition, he said, “improves the effectiveness of this tact.”

“As a modern police force, I believe that we have a duty to use new technologies to keep people safe in London,” he added.

Already widespread in China, London’s announcement shows how the technology is gaining traction in Western countries. According to researchers at Georgetown University, cities including New York, Chicago, Detroit and Washington are using or have piloted the use of the technology.

Privacy groups immediately criticized London’s decision and vowed to take legal action to try to stop its deployment.

“This decision represents an enormous expansion of the surveillance state and a serious threat to civil liberties in the U.K.,” said Silkie Carlo, director of Big Brother Watch, a London-based group that has been fighting the use of facial recognition. “This is a breathtaking assault on our rights and we will challenge it.”

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US airports displaying CDC warning posters amid coronavirus outbreak

Amid the ongoing coronavirus outbreak, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has displayed posters explaining the symptoms in both English and Chinese at 14 American airports to raise awareness of the ongoing virus.

SHANGHAI DISNEYLAND, PART OF GREAT WALL OF CHINA TEMPORARILY CLOSED DUE TO CORONAVIRUS CONCERNS

The “health alert,” directed at travelers from Wuhan, China, instructs the reader to consult with a doctor if they’re suffering from a fever, cough or difficulty breathing within two weeks of leaving the now-quarantined city.

Westlake Legal Group corona-virus-warning-2-CDC US airports displaying CDC warning posters amid coronavirus outbreak Janine Puhak fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/travel fnc b4ef681f-9b5e-5c9b-852f-0a94f5e34539 article

Amid the mysterious coronavirus outbreak, the CDC has displayed posters explaining the symptoms in both English and Chinese at 14 American airports to raise awareness of the ongoing virus. (CDC)

The CDC’s advisory posters went up at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) on Thursday, ABC 7 News reports. Airport spokesperson Doug Yakel confirmed the signs have specifically been displayed inside of customs.

At present, the CDC and U.S. Customs and Border Protection is conducting “enhanced health screenings” for airline passengers arriving from or traveling through the Wuhan area at SFO, as well as John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York and Los Angeles International Airport.

Westlake Legal Group corona-virus-warning-1-CDC US airports displaying CDC warning posters amid coronavirus outbreak Janine Puhak fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/travel fnc b4ef681f-9b5e-5c9b-852f-0a94f5e34539 article

The “health alert” directed at travelers from Wuhan, China instructs the reader to consult with a doctor if they’ve suffered from a fever, cough or difficult breathing in within two weeks of leaving the now-quarantined city. (CDC)

The CDC is also giving health entry screenings at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport and Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport.

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On Thursday, numerous people in SFO were seen wearing protective face masks, especially in the International Terminal, according to ABC.

“It’s better to keep yourself safe. It’s better to wear the mask since this is a public area,” said Angel Wu, who wore a face mask. Wu was waiting for her parents’ flight to arrive from Shanghai.

Westlake Legal Group AP20021218908858 US airports displaying CDC warning posters amid coronavirus outbreak Janine Puhak fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/travel fnc b4ef681f-9b5e-5c9b-852f-0a94f5e34539 article

An official uses an infrared thermometer on a traveler at a health screening checkpoint at Wuhan Tianhe International Airport in Wuhan on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Emily Wang)

Overseas, Wuhan Tianhe Airport has been shut down, along with the central train station, while ferry, subway and bus services have been halted during the open-ended lockdown, the Associated Press reports.

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As of Friday morning, at least 25 people have died from the pneumonia-like disease and 800 were reported as sickened.

A spokesperson for the CDC was not immediately available to confirm the names of the 13 other airports across the country where the coronavirus health alert signs have been posted.

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The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group corona-virus-warning-1-CDC US airports displaying CDC warning posters amid coronavirus outbreak Janine Puhak fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/travel fnc b4ef681f-9b5e-5c9b-852f-0a94f5e34539 article   Westlake Legal Group corona-virus-warning-1-CDC US airports displaying CDC warning posters amid coronavirus outbreak Janine Puhak fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/travel fnc b4ef681f-9b5e-5c9b-852f-0a94f5e34539 article

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How Will Thousands of Latinos in Iowa Be Greeted at ‘El Caucus’?

Westlake Legal Group 00translator1-facebookJumbo How Will Thousands of Latinos in Iowa Be Greeted at ‘El Caucus’? Voting and Voters United States Politics and Government Spanish Language Sanders, Bernard Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 League of United Latin American Citizens Iowa Hispanic-Americans DES MOINES, Iowa Democratic Party

DES MOINES — There is no Spanish translation for a caucus, that political process particular to just a few states. It is simply “el caucus.”

But for many Latinos in Iowa, el caucus is hardly simple. The state’s Latino population has surged in recent decades, with the number registered to vote estimated at more than 50,000, making it a potentially important bloc in the fast-approaching Democratic caucuses. And local leaders like Vanessa Marcano-Kelly believe there are not nearly enough Spanish-tailored caucus sites or interpreters to meet the need in the state.

“I feel like this year everyone has been talking about how Iowa is super-white, but it’s really not super-white to me,” said Ms. Marcano-Kelly, who petitioned the state Democratic Party to create caucus sites in Spanish. “I see Latinos everywhere.”

It is the first Iowa caucus for Ms. Marcano-Kelly, 34. In 2016, she watched from the sidelines, slightly bewildered at the spectacle and wondering how people could possibly understand if they did not speak English. As she wrote in her application months ago to the state Democratic Party, the Spanish sites would “ensure that the voices of all people can really be heard.”

So on Feb. 3, the doors will open at the South Suburban Y.M.C.A. in Des Moines for hundreds of Spanish-speaking caucusgoers. Ms. Marcano-Kelly has been refreshing her Spanish vocabulary as she searches for the right words — some easier (viable is “viable”), some more obscure (threshold is “límite”).

Though Latinos make up just 6 percent of Iowa’s population, they have more than doubled in the state in the last two decades. In nearly a dozen towns throughout the state, Latinos now make up more than a third of the population. And since 2016, the League of United Latin American Citizens has worked to get thousands more registered to vote, a number the group estimates has now grown to 53,000.

Roughly 194,000 Latinos live in the state, and by most estimates, fewer than 3,000 participated in the 2016 caucuses. This year, Latino activists expect that number to grow to 20,000 or more. And for the first time, there are set to be six Spanish satellite caucus sites, a concession Democratic Party officials made to try to increase participation.

But despite the efforts, many activists believe there are not nearly enough interpreters lined up for the caucuses. Party officials are still scrambling to find bilingual speakers to run the Spanish caucuses, even as they look for more Spanish speakers to volunteer at other sites throughout the state.

And while some campaigns plan to send Spanish-speaking volunteers to towns where Latinos make up more than a third of the population, there is no clear system to ensure that Spanish-speaking caucusgoers will have interpretation services.

“Whatever the number is, I think it would be impossible to have enough to meet the need,” said Rob Barron, a Polk County school board member who runs a group dedicated to electing more Latinos to office. “Even if you’re a native English speaker, the process is intimidating. So for those who are willing to walk into that room without speaking the language, then hear words like viable, it’s only going to get more and more chaotic and confusing.”

In her day job, Ms. Marcano-Kelly travels all over the state as a Spanish interpreter, working in courts, medical offices and community centers. She learned years ago that more work was available than she could ever take on.

“We’re always short,” she said, adding that she knew of fewer than 10 fully certified interpreters in the state.

A native of Venezuela, Ms. Marcano-Kelly became a citizen just last year, after years of studying and working in the United States. After spending some of her teenage years in Boca Raton, Fla., she applied to South Dakota State University — choosing the college because it had the cheapest international student tuition she could find.

When the Democratic Party put a call out for applications for satellite caucuses that could be held away from traditional geographic precincts, Ms. Marcano-Kelly knew immediately that she would write one for Spanish. She thought of several of her friends who recently became citizens but do not speak English, as well as many Puerto Ricans she knows who moved to Iowa after Hurricane Maria struck the island in 2017.

As soon as the application was approved, Ms. Marcano-Kelly rushed to get a news release to Spanish radio stations and newspapers throughout the state, describing the caucuses as “asambleas comunitarias electorales” — community electoral assemblies. But el caucus is what sticks.

For all the linguistic efforts, Ms. Marcano-Kelly was certain of one thing: She did not want to be the one to run the caucus.

“That would be just way too big of a leap,” she said, laughing, over a gyro lunch not far from the State Capitol. As it is, she is more than a little anxious that her ambitions got ahead of her.

After submitting the satellite application, Ms. Marcano-Kelly decided she would become the precinct captain for Senator Bernie Sanders’s campaign, in charge of rounding up supporters who come to the Spanish caucus. But in recent days she has found herself grappling with whether her primary responsibility lies with the campaign or individual voters.

On a recent Saturday, Ms. Marcano-Kelly gathered with a few other community activists at the American Friends Service Committee for caucus training. The choices were more straightforward than policy platforms — participants were asked to choose among chocolate chip, oatmeal raisin and M&M cookies and stand in a corner with the plate of cookies they preferred.

Ms. Marcano-Kelly was team M&M, but when it came time for the undecideds to choose, she did not argue the merits of candy-coated chocolate and instead dispassionately translated the pleas from others. Moments later, she reflected with some alarm about whether she would do the same on caucus night.

“I do pride myself in my ethics, but you know, I have a job to do,” she said. “So what do I do, deputize someone? Ultimately, above my undying loyalty for Bernie, I want people to participate and to be fair.”

Ms. Marcano-Kelly came into interpretation after working as a community organizer in Iowa. Burned out by long hours and low pay, she decided to take advantage of her fluency in English, Spanish and French and became a certified interpreter in 2015.

“The thing that is beautiful about being an interpreter is that you’re not going to omit, you’re not going to add, you’re not going to give advice, you’re going to literally let that person express in their own voice,” she said. “That’s what I am hoping everyone does here.”

But even more than that, Ms. Marcano-Kelly is hoping that the bilingual caucus turns into a monolingual Spanish caucus, so that there will be no need for interpretation at all.

“I’m nervous it’s going to be kind of chaotic,” she said.

Evidence of a booming Latino population can be seen in pockets all over the state, including Des Moines, where Latinos make up 12 percent of the city’s population and 26 percent of public school students. In recent years, Mexicans, Guatemalans and Salvadorans have settled here, many moving from California, Texas and Illinois.

As the temperature dipped below zero on a recent Sunday, the Mercado Iowa Market, an indoor swap meet, was packed with people drinking steaming champurrado and eating pupusas made on electric griddles. Couples sold hand-embroidered blouses and glittering cowboy boots imported from Mexico.

A Sanders campaign staff member was also present, handing out pamphlets in Spanish and answering questions for perplexed could-be caucusgoers.

Showing up to places where Latinos congregate has been a key part of the strategy for some of the campaigns and the League of United Latin American Citizens, more commonly known as LULAC, which has led the effort to register more Latinos. The group has held voter registration drives at tiendas and sponsored several mock caucus trainings in the state, with a handful more to come. Senator Elizabeth Warren’s campaign has sent a Latinx outreach director to dozens of festivals in the state over the last several months.

The Sanders campaign, in particular, has zeroed in on Latinos as a key voting bloc that it believes will prove vital to a win in Iowa. Advisers believe that increasing the number of Latinos who show up to caucus could push the campaign over the edge to gain more delegates.

In a novel way of attracting potential supporters, the campaign sponsored a futsal tournament, which brought out hundreds of Spanish-speaking soccer players and fans one recent Saturday night. So far, Mr. Sanders’s campaign appears to be the only one with precinct captains designated for the Spanish caucuses.

Despite the increased efforts this year, many Latino activists say the Democratic Party as a whole has not done enough to cultivate Latino voters, a criticism that is echoed nationally and that many believe could hurt the party in the general election.

“You would think that Iowa would really be a test case for Democrats,” said Joe Henry, who helped spearhead registration efforts in the state. “It isn’t hard for them to reach out to us. They either don’t see us, or when they see us they don’t want to listen.”

“The caucus has always been kind of like an inside game,” he added. “So we are inviting ourselves.”

There is still one question that keeps nagging at Ms. Marcano-Kelly.

“What is the plan,” she asks, “to make sure this goes smoothly?”

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