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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 415)

Anxious Democratic Establishment Asks, ‘Is There Anybody Else?’

WASHINGTON — When a half-dozen Democratic donors gathered at the Whitby Hotel in Manhattan last week, the dinner began with a discussion of which presidential candidates the contributors liked. But as conversations among influential Democrats often go these days, the meeting quickly evolved into a discussion of who was not in the race — but could be lured in.

Would Hillary Clinton get in, the contributors wondered, and how about Michael R. Bloomberg, the former New York mayor? One person even mused whether Michelle Obama would consider a late entry, according to two people who attended the event, which was hosted by the progressive group American Bridge.

It’s that time of the election season for Democrats.

“Since the last debate, just anecdotally, I’ve had five or six people ask me: ‘Is there anybody else?’” said Leah Daughtry, a longtime Democrat who has run two of the party’s recent conventions.

With doubts rising about former Vice President Joseph R. Biden’s ability to finance a multistate primary campaign, persistent questions about Senator Elizabeth Warren’s viability in the general election and skepticism that Mayor Pete Buttigieg, of South Bend, Ind., can broaden his appeal beyond white voters, Democratic leaders are engaging in a familiar rite: fretting about who is in the race and longing for a white knight to enter the contest at the last minute.

It is a regular, if not quite quadrennial, tradition for a party that can be fatalistic about its prospects and recalls similar Maalox moments Democrats endured in 1992, 2004 and in the last primary, when it was Mr. Biden who nearly entered the race in October. But the mood of alarm is even more intense because of the party’s hunger to defeat President Trump and — with just over three months to go before voting starts in Iowa — their impatience with finding Mr. or Mrs. Right among the current crop of candidates.

“There’s more anxiety than ever,” said Connie Schultz, a journalist who is married to Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio, another Democrat who some in the party would like to see join the race. “We’re both getting the calls. I’ve been surprised by some who’ve called me.”

“I can see it, I can feel it, I can hear it,” Mitch Landrieu, the former New Orleans mayor, said of the unease within the party. He said he thinks Mr. Biden is best positioned to defeat Mr. Trump but called the former vice president’s fund-raising “a real concern.”

Westlake Legal Group democratic-polls-promo-1560481207024-articleLarge-v9 Anxious Democratic Establishment Asks, ‘Is There Anybody Else?’ Warren, Elizabeth United States Politics and Government Third-Party Politics (US) Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2004 Presidential Election of 1992 Patrick, Deval L Obama, Michelle Landrieu, Mitch Dean, Howard Clinton, Hillary Rodham Clark, Wesley K Brown, Sherrod Bloomberg, Michael R Biden, Joseph R Jr Axelrod, David American Bridge Co

Which Democrats Are Leading the 2020 Presidential Race?

There are 19 Democrats running for president. Here’s the latest data to track how the candidates are doing.

Mr. Biden’s lackluster debate performances and alarmingly low cash flow — he has less than $9 million on hand, not even half of some of his rivals — has fueled the Democratic disquiet. But if the causes of the concern are plain to see, what exactly can be done about it is less clear.

And even some of those being wooed acknowledge that it can be hard to discern between people just being nice and those who genuinely want them in the race.

Mrs. Clinton and Mr. Bloomberg have both told people privately in recent weeks that if they thought they could win, they would consider entering the primary — but that they were skeptical there would be an opening, according to Democrats who have spoken with them.

Former Secretary of State John F. Kerry, who associates say has wondered aloud about whether he should have run and has found it hard to watch Mr. Biden’s missteps, has also been urged to get in. But he still thinks the former vice president, who was once his longtime Senate colleague, is the party’s best nominee.

Another Obama administration official who weighed a campaign at the start of the year, former Attorney General Eric Holder, is considering a last-minute entry but has conceded it may be too late, according to a Democrat familiar with his thinking.

Mr. Brown, who nearly entered the race earlier this year, said the pressure on him to reconsider from labor leaders, Democratic officials and donors has “become more frequent.” And Deval Patrick, the former Massachusetts governor, who also weighed a campaign run before deciding not to, said he too has been nudged by friends to reconsider. “It’s nice to be rumored about,” he said, before notably refusing to rule out a last-minute entry. “Don’t ask me that question,” he said.

But Mr. Patrick suggested an 11th-hour bid was highly unlikely and had a message for increasingly angst-ridden Democrats: “Everybody needs to calm down, it’s early. It’s so early.”

The chances that another major contender decides to run are remote: While Mrs. Clinton and Mr. Bloomberg have both been encouraged to enter the race, Democrats close to them believe the only scenario under which they’d consider running is if Mr. Biden drops out or is badly weakened.

Neither is likely to take place before the end of this calendar year, at which point the filing deadline to be on the primary ballot in large Super Tuesday states like California and Texas will have passed. But that’s not stopping the speculation, which has only grown of late thanks in part to the 2016 Democratic nominee’s public comments.

Mrs. Clinton, after largely staying in the background of the Democratic primary, has been more vocal this month, promoting a book she wrote with her daughter and taunting Mr. Trump on Twitter. She also opened a feud with Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii by claiming the long-shot candidate was being supported by the Russians, as a potential third-party spoiler in the general election.

Democrats who have recently spoken with Mrs. Clinton say she shares the same concerns other party elites have about the field — worried about Mr. Biden’s durability, Ms. Warren’s liberal politics and unsure of who else can emerge to take on Mr. Trump. But these people, who spoke anonymously to discuss private conversations, say she enjoys the freedom that comes with not being on the ballot.

Mr. Bloomberg is said to be more eager to find a way into the race — and chatter about his potential candidacy has only grown among Democrats who work on Wall Street and are concerned about Ms. Warren’s rise. He raised some eyebrows recently by putting off a fund-raising request from one third-party Democratic group until he knew about his own intentions, according to two Democrats familiar with the conversation.

But the former New York mayor has flirted with presidential runs before, only to pull back. Friends say he recognizes his long odds at this stage of the race and his advisers suggest he will play a significant financial role in the 2020 race without his name on the ballot.

Still, it’s unlikely that the what-if musing, particularly among the party’s class of donors, elected officials and strategists, will quiet down as long as Mr. Biden is struggling and Ms. Warren, the Massachusetts senator, is surging.

“With Trump looming, there is genuine concern that the horse many have bet on may be pulling up lame and the horse who has sprinted out front may not be able to win,” said David Axelrod, a former adviser to President Barack Obama.

While much of the daydreaming about a last-minute entry comes from pro-business Democrats, it is not confined to the wealthy.

Mr. Brown and Ms. Schultz noted that they were hearing from a broad range of people but declined to offer any names.

He said he was staying out of the race and had no regrets. The Ohio senator said he was confident Democrats would eventually rally behind their nominee, but he warned the party not to embrace a single-payer health care plan that eliminates private insurance.

“I think it’ll be a hard sell to the public if we go into the general election for ‘Medicare for all,’” said Mr. Brown, citing the risk of alienating union workers who would lose their negotiated plans.

One longtime Democrat who originally sought to entice Mr. Brown into the race, Randi Weingarten, the president of the American Federation of Teachers, could not help letting out a loud “oy!” when asked about the possibility of another candidate joining the sprawling field.

“For as long as I have been in politics, I’ve heard Democrats fretting about their presidential contenders,” said Ms. Weingarten.

Indeed, for some Democrats, the grass is always greener outside their field.

There were multiple stages of the 1992 primary when Bill Clinton’s candidacy was seen as doomed, either because of his own vulnerabilities or because of the third-party threat of H. Ross Perot, the wealthy Reform Party candidate. Would-be Democratic saviors that year included Gov. Mario Cuomo of New York, former Senators Lloyd Bentsen of Texas, Sam Nunn of Georgia and Al Gore of Tennessee, and Representative Richard Gephardt of Missouri.

In the 2004 race, Mr. Gore was again sought after as a potential candidate. That race evolved along similar lines to the current primary, with Democrats desperate to oust an incumbent Republican (George W. Bush) but nervous that their front-runner into the fall (Gov. Howard Dean of Vermont) would prove unelectable as the nominee. That time, a candidate did come in relatively late in the race, Wesley K. Clark, a retired general, but he gained little traction and Mr. Kerry ultimately won the nomination.

At this time three years ago, it was Mr. Biden who some Democrats were hoping would join the race to offer the party another option besides Mrs. Clinton and Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont. Mr. Biden, of course, decided not to run. But now it’s his own candidacy that’s prompting a familiar call for the cavalry, or at least one horse-bound white knight.

“If Biden were surging, I doubt you would be hearing this,” said Harold Ickes, a longtime Democratic consultant. “This shows a restlessness among a lot of people.”

Maggie Haberman contributed reporting.

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Beckham’s stadium complex for Inter Miami taking shape

Piles of steel sit at one end of the property, waited to be lifted into place. Workers were going in all directions, some pounding nails into wood, others ready to pour concrete, others driving heavy equipment over piles of dirt.

For now, it’s a construction site.

Before long, Inter Miami will call it home.

“Organized chaos,” Inter Miami sporting director Paul McDonough said as he took a look around the site of the now-demolished Lockhart Stadium where work on a new complex is happening 12 hours a day, seven days a week. “But we’ll be ready.”

These are hectic times for McDonough and Inter Miami, the team headlined by soccer icon David Beckham that will embark on its inaugural MLS season starting early in 2020. The team doesn’t have a coach yet. Or players. Or a schedule. Or even the first blade of grass for its new pitch.

Over the next few weeks, all those issues — and countless others — will be addressed. Construction is on schedule, with all signals pointing toward everything being ready for the team’s first home match that’s likely to come in March.

Still, that doesn’t do much to help McDonough’s sleep cycle.

“This takes up a ton of time and everything keeps me up at night,” McDonough said. “But it’s OK. We’re just on an accelerated timeline. There’s so much stuff going on. But this is expansion. It’s awesome. Everything we’re doing here, we’re trying to do it right.”

At any given time, there are about 225 workers on the job site — the whereabouts of all of them tracked with an app that gets data from a chip attached to the back of their hard hats. If there’s lightning in the area, work gets halted for 30 minutes until the cell passes. And that’s a big deal, because even with next season still months away every minute counts.

Nothing is ready, yet — but it will be.

“The way it was built out, we’re thinking of the athlete first from the minute they walk in,” said Jacklyne Ramos, the team’s vice president of communications as she stood inside what will be the building containing the locker room and other key spaces for the team. “The main stadium, that’s for the games. Where we are now, this is where they’ll live.”

The Associated Press got a tour on Monday of what will be Inter Miami’s inaugural home. The shell of the team’s headquarters — locker rooms, equipment room, dining area, coach’s office, what will become the sports performance lab, the academy workout facilities and more — is coming together. Every detail has been thought of; the walk from the players’ parking lot to the building will be short, the training room will be small (“I don’t want them comfortable in there,” McDonough said), and an area will be built just off the outside wall of the locker room to air out cleats after training sessions.

“They’ll never be in the building,” McDonough said. “Boots can stink.”

Beckham spent about five years trying to get MLS back in South Florida, and after many sites were considered — there’s still plans for the team to eventually play in another stadium that Beckham and his partner Jorge Mas want built in Miami — they settled on the former Lockhart site. Lockhart is where the MLS’ Miami Fusion played from 1998-2001, eventually folding because of poor attendance.

The centerpiece of everything is the 18,000-seat stadium, and parts of what will become the field are already largely marked off. Drainage was installed first, followed by four inches of rock for a base. From there, sprinklers go into place and four thin pieces of wood are set in place to mark where the goalposts will go. About a foot of soil will be added in the coming weeks, watered and compacted and graded. Sod is scheduled to go in Nov. 14; from there, it’ll be protected and fenced off and finally, what now seems like an oversized sand pit right now will look like a place to play soccer.

Behind that are more fields, including a turf one can be used for high school football and other events. The other half-dozen grass fields will be for training and the team’s affiliate clubs.

A coach will be hired soon. A roster is coming. There are plans for a soft opening a few weeks before the season and then, when the first match is played all the mess and chaos will be forgotten.

“I wasn’t ready for this. I’m still not,” McDonough said. “I’m learning as we go. Conduits, positioning of poles, there’s so many things that you don’t realize until you live it. But that’s what it takes and we’re getting it done.”

Westlake Legal Group SOC-Inter-Miami Beckham's stadium complex for Inter Miami taking shape fox-news/sports/soccer fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 771fc579-b1b8-5712-a742-950bfa829905   Westlake Legal Group SOC-Inter-Miami Beckham's stadium complex for Inter Miami taking shape fox-news/sports/soccer fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 771fc579-b1b8-5712-a742-950bfa829905

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Temple opens new era with former star McKie in place

Aaron McKie stayed up all night before he was set to address Temple for the first time as head coach. McKie thought hard for the right words as they raced through his mind, trying to craft the perfect pep talk to assert points of emphasis for the Owls as they headed into summer.

Once McKie gathered the Owls the next day after a workout, he had his approach down.

“I blew the whistle like I’m this badass,” McKie said. “C’mon, hurry up! Couple of guys were walking, jogging. I just wanted to set the tone.”

McKie stood at Temple’s huddle, surveyed his new team and, well, blanked. He forgot what he wanted to say.

“I just said, ‘How’s everybody feeling? Good morning,'” McKie said, laughing.

McKie even struggles to find the words of appreciation he has for landing a dream job as just the third head coach for Temple since Hall of Famer John Chaney was hired in 1982. He learned at the knee of Philly high school coaching great Bill Ellerbee. He played for Chaney and came within a win of the Final Four. He nearly won a championship with his childhood team, the 76ers, as a super sixth man under Larry Brown. And he studied as Fran Dunphy’s successor.

“It’s happening. It’s moving fast,” McKie said. “It’s like, this is your life. I was a Philly kid. I went to Temple. I talk to some of these guys just about the honor it is to be able to coach this university. But the path I had to go on to get here wasn’t an easy path, by no means.”

McKie joined Temple’s staff in 2014 and spent last season as head coach-in-waiting as the choice to replace Dunphy, who left the program after 13 seasons and eight NCAA Tournaments. He gets his shot to revitalize a program that has just two tournament berths since 2013 and was picked to finish seventh this season in the American Athletic Conference. Temple barely matters in a Philly winter sports landscape that is dominated by the Philadelphia Eagles and in a city basketball sphere that has seen rival Villanova blossom into the upper echelon of college programs.

He has to make the Owls matter again, as much as he needs to make them winners.

McKie is also among the crop of former NBA stars that turned to college coaching, among them Penny Hardaway and his top-ranked recruiting class at AAC favorite Memphis and Patrick Ewing at Georgetown. The 47-year-old McKie finished a solid NBA career in 2007, so long ago that he’s a YouTube search for recruits to know exactly who they’re dealing with when he walks through their door. A starter for all 92 career games, he averaged 17.9 points and led the Owls to 60 wins, three NCAA Tournaments and was a first-round pick by Portland in 1994. Then again, those teens could be playing NBA 2K20 and recognize him from the 2000-01 Sixers team when gamers want to use their controller for a crossover and play as Allen Iverson.

“I’m still relevant because of AI,” McKie said. “A lot of kids, they play the 2K game and they play as AI. All these kids grew up watching him and loving him. They end up seeing me on the screen.”

Iverson and McKie starred on the last Sixers team to play for the championship in ’01. Iverson, the league MVP and future Hall of Famer, and McKie, the NBA sixth man of the year, formed a familial bond in Philly that has lasted decades. When Iverson clashed with Brown (yes, over practice, and other grievances), McKie stepped in with brotherly, off-the-court mentoring that kept the tempestuous guard in line.

“I’ll never disrespect him by taking away from what he did for me to be able to wear this ring,” Iverson said, flashing his Hall of Fame ring. “He had so much to do with that, as far as the mental part. All of the things that maybe coach couldn’t get through to me, he got through to me. In some way, I think coach was probably getting messages to me through him. He knew that I wouldn’t take anything that (McKie) said to me the wrong way. I would look at it as something positive.”

Iverson said “knowing how much he cared about me” made it easy to listen to McKie, and the Owls would be wise to do the same.

“Because of his voice,” Iverson said. “He’ll tell you, I still did all of the things that I did. But his thing was, with the talent that I have, you can do all of those things that you do, but this is how you do it. The physical ability is there. But he gave me so much as far as just thinking instead of just doing and reacting and going off, ‘OK, I’m Allen Iverson, I’ll just do it this way.’ No, you can still be Allen Iverson, but do it this way. Do it this way quietly instead of doing it loud. The results are still going to be the same.”

Results. The Owls want better ones after they went 23-10 last season and were knocked out by Belmont in the First Four. Temple 1,000-point scorer Quinton Rose (16.3 points) made the AAC preseason first team, and is one of the holdovers who believed McKie would make a smooth transition from top assistant to top man on the bench.

“Coach McKie’s younger, so naturally he’s more into it,” Rose said.

McKie has embraced his predecessors; he sought advice from the 87-year-old Chaney and recently invited Dunphy back to give a preseason talk to the team. Dunphy found the right words, reminding the Owls to be good teammates. He also hired Temple career leading scorer Mark Macon as an assistant coach.

“I’ve got a Temple community looking over my shoulder. I’ve got a Philadelphia community that’s looking over my shoulder,” McKie said. “If I can get any advice, especially from coach Dunph, I want them to come in and give it.”

There’s one more confidant McKie wanted to pop by North Philly — there’s an open invitation for Iverson to come and talk about practice.

“I would love to do it, not to repay nobody because you don’t repay your friend,” Iverson said. “But it’s like, he’s always there for me, I’ve got to always be there for him.”

Westlake Legal Group CBB-Aaron-McKie Temple opens new era with former star McKie in place fox-news/sports/ncaa-bk fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc f7f5fabb-ecc4-5394-b07e-3b97fc021ac8 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group CBB-Aaron-McKie Temple opens new era with former star McKie in place fox-news/sports/ncaa-bk fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc f7f5fabb-ecc4-5394-b07e-3b97fc021ac8 Associated Press article

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Halloween Comes Early For Mom Who Sees ‘Ghost Baby’ Sleeping Beside Son

Maritza Cibuls experienced a real taste of the spooky season Friday night.

The Illinois mom had just put her 18-month-old son to sleep when she spotted something terrifying on the baby monitor. Nestled beside her sleeping child was what looked like the ghost of a baby:

Westlake Legal Group 5dae961f210000e81e34aa26 Halloween Comes Early For Mom Who Sees ‘Ghost Baby’ Sleeping Beside Son

Maritza Cibuls Maritza Cibuls was terrified when she saw what looked like a ghost baby lying beside her sleeping son.

“So last night I was positive there was a ghost baby in the bed with my son,” she wrote on Facebook. “I was so freaked out, I barely slept. I even tried creeping in there with a flashlight while my son was sleeping.”

Cibuls repeatedly checked on her son and sent the above picture to her mom, husband and friends to seek an explanation. She even tried feeling around in the crib ― to no avail. 

When morning came, Cibuls finally got her answer:

Westlake Legal Group 5dae99f8200000881c5065ea Halloween Comes Early For Mom Who Sees ‘Ghost Baby’ Sleeping Beside Son

Maritza Cibuls Maritza Cibuls was in a panic when she thought she could see a “ghost baby” beside her son in his cot all night. She couldn’t help but laugh when she uncovered the explanation the next morning.

“Well, this morning I go to investigate a bit further. It turns out my husband just forgot to put the mattress protector on when he changed the sheets,” Maritza wrote, alongside laughing emojis. “I could kill him.”

On Monday, with her viral post clocking in at 500,000 likes and almost 300,000 shares, Cibuls told HuffPost she never imagined “our silly little ghost story would spread so far and fast.”

“We’re so glad we were able to spread some laughter!” she said.

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China Sharpens Hacking to Hound Its Minorities, Far and Wide

Westlake Legal Group 19chinahack1-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 China Sharpens Hacking to Hound Its Minorities, Far and Wide Xinjiang (China) Xi Jinping Uighurs (Chinese Ethnic Group) Tibet Surveillance of Citizens by Government Smartphones People's Liberation Army (China) Mobile Applications Ministry of State Security of the People's Republic of China Hong Kong Protests (2019) Hong Kong Google Inc FireEye Inc facial recognition software Cyberwarfare and Defense Computers and the Internet Computer Security Citizen Lab China Apple Inc Android (Operating System)

SAN FRANCISCO — China’s state-sponsored hackers have drastically changed how they operate over the last three years, substituting selectivity for what had been a scattershot approach to their targets and showing a new determination by Beijing to push its surveillance state beyond its borders.

The government has poured considerable resources into the change, which is part of a reorganization of the national People’s Liberation Army that President Xi Jinping initiated in 2016, security researchers and intelligence officials said.

China’s hackers have since built up a new arsenal of techniques, such as elaborate hacks of iPhone and Android software, pushing them beyond email attacks and the other, more basic tactics that they had previously employed.

The primary targets for these more sophisticated attacks: China’s ethnic minorities and their diaspora in other countries, the researchers said. In several instances, hackers targeted the cellphones of a minority known as Uighurs, whose home region, Xinjiang, has been the site of a vast build-out of surveillance tech in recent years.

“The Chinese use their best tools against their own people first because that is who they’re most afraid of,” said James A. Lewis, a former United States government official who writes on cybersecurity and espionage for the Center for Strategic Studies in Washington. “Then they turn those tools on foreign targets.”

China’s willingness to extend the reach of its surveillance and censorship was on display after an executive for the National Basketball Association’s Houston Rockets tweeted support for protesters in Hong Kong this month. The response from China was swift, threatening a range of business relationships the N.B.A. had forged in the country.

In August, Facebook and Twitter said they had taken down a large network of Chinese bots that was spreading disinformation around the protests. And in recent weeks, a security firm traced a monthslong attack on Hong Kong media companies to Chinese hackers. Security experts say Chinese hackers are very likely targeting protesters’ phones, but they have yet to publish any evidence.

Some security researchers said the improved abilities of the Chinese hackers had put them on a par with elite Russian cyberunits. And the attacks on cellphones of Uighurs offered a rare glimpse of how some of China’s most advanced hacking tools are now being used to silence or punish critics.

Google researchers who tracked the attacks against iPhones said details about the software flaws that the hackers had preyed on would have been worth tens of millions of dollars on black market sites where information about software vulnerabilities is sold.

On the streets in Xinjiang, huge numbers of high-end surveillance cameras run facial recognition software to identify and track people. Specially designed apps have been used to screen Uighurs’ phones, monitor their communications and register their whereabouts.

Gaining access to the phones of Uighurs who have fled China — a diaspora that has grown as many have been locked away at home — would be a logical extension of those total surveillance efforts. Such communities in other countries have long been a concern to Beijing, and many in Xinjiang have been sent to camps because relatives traveled or live abroad.

The Chinese police have also made less sophisticated efforts to control Uighurs who have fled, using the chat app WeChat to entice them to return home or to threaten their families.

China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs did not respond to a request for comment. China has denied past claims that it conducts cyberespionage, adding that it, too, is often a target.

Security researchers recently discovered that the Chinese used National Security Agency hacking tools after apparently discovering an N.S.A. cyberattack on their own systems. And several weeks ago, a Chinese security firm, Qianxin, published an analysis tying the Central Intelligence Agency to a hack of China’s aviation industry.

Breaking into iPhones has long been considered the Holy Grail of cyberespionage. “If you can get inside an iPhone, you have yourself a spy phone,” said John Hultquist, director of intelligence analysis at FireEye, a cybersecurity firm.

The F.B.I. couldn’t do it without help during a showdown with Apple in 2016. The bureau paid more than $1 million to an anonymous third party to hack an iPhone used by a gunman involved in the killing of 14 people in San Bernardino, Calif.

Google researchers said they had discovered that iPhone vulnerabilities were being exploited to infect visitors to a set of websites. Although Google did not release the names of the targets, Apple said they had been found on about a dozen websites focused on Uighurs.

“You can hit a high school student from Japan who is visiting the site to write a research report, but you are also going to hit Uighurs who have family members back in China and are supporting the cause,” said Steven Adair, the president and founder of the security firm Volexity in Virginia.

The technology news site TechCrunch first reported the Uighur connection. A software update from Apple fixed the flaw.

In recent weeks, security researchers at Volexity uncovered Chinese hacking campaigns that exploited vulnerabilities in Google’s Android software as well. Volexity found that several websites that focused on Uighur issues had been infected with Android malware. It traced the attacks to two Chinese hacking groups.

Because the hacks targeted Android and iPhone users — even though Uighurs in Xinjiang don’t commonly use iPhones — Mr. Adair said he believed that they had been aimed in part at Uighurs living abroad.

“China is expanding their digital surveillance outside their borders,” he said. “It seems like it really is going after the diaspora.”

Another group of researchers, at the Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto, recently uncovered an overlapping effort, using some of the same code discovered by Google and Volexity. It attacked the iPhones and Android phones of Tibetans until as recently as May.

Using WhatsApp messages, Chinese hackers posing as New York Times reporters and representatives of Amnesty International and other organizations targeted the private office of the Dalai Lama, members of the Tibetan Parliament and Tibetan nongovernmental organizations, among others.

Lobsang Gyatso, the secretary of TibCERT, an organization that works with Tibetan organizations on cybersecurity threats, said in an interview that the recent attacks were a notable escalation from previous Chinese surveillance attempts.

For a decade, Chinese hackers blasted Tibetans with emails containing malicious attachments, Mr. Lobsang said. If they hacked one person’s computer, they hit everyone in the victim’s address books, casting as wide a net as possible. But in the last three years, Mr. Lobsang said, there has been a big shift.

“The recent targeting was something we haven’t seen in the community before,” he said. “It was a huge shift in resources. They were targeting mobile phones, and there was a lot more reconnaissance involved. They had private phone numbers of individuals, even those that were not online. They knew who they were, where their offices were located, what they did.”

Adam Meyers, the vice president of intelligence at CrowdStrike, said these operations were notably more sophisticated than five years ago, when security firms discovered that Chinese hackers were targeting the phones of Hong Kong protesters in the so-called Umbrella Revolution.

At the time, Chinese hackers could break only into phones that had been “jailbroken,” or altered in some way to allow the installation of apps not vetted by Apple’s official store. The recent attacks against the Uighurs broke into up-to-date iPhones without tipping off the owner.

“In terms of how the Chinese rank threats, the highest threats are domestic,” Mr. Lewis said. “The No. 1 threat, as the Chinese see it, is the loss of information control on their own population. But the United States is firmly No. 2.”

Chinese hackers have also used their improved skills to attack the computer networks of foreign governments and companies. They have targeted internet and telecommunications companies and have broken into the computer networks of foreign tech, chemical, manufacturing and mining companies. Airbus recently said China had hacked it through a supplier.

In 2016, Mr. Xi consolidated several army hacking divisions under a new Strategic Support Force, similar to the United States’ Cyber Command, and moved much of the country’s foreign hacking operation from the army to the more advanced Ministry of State Security, China’s main spy agency.

The restructuring coincided with a lull in Chinese cyberattacks after a 2015 agreement between Mr. Xi and President Barack Obama to cease cyberespionage operations for commercial gain.

“The deal gave the Chinese the time and space to focus on professionalizing their cyberespionage capabilities,” Mr. Lewis said. “We didn’t expect that.”

Chinese officials also cracked down on moonlighting in moneymaking schemes by its state-sponsored hackers — a “corruption” issue that Mr. Xi concluded had sometimes compromised the hackers’ identities and tools, according to security researchers.

While China was revamping its operations, security experts said, it was also clamping down on security research in order to keep advanced hacking methods in house. The Chinese police recently said they planned to enforce national laws against unauthorized vulnerability disclosure, and Chinese researchers were recently banned from competing in Western hacking conferences.

“They are circling the wagons,” Mr. Hultquist of FireEye said. “They’ve recognized that they could use these resources to aid their offensive and defensive cyberoperations.”

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Today on Fox News, Oct. 22, 2019

STAY TUNED:

On Fox News:

Fox & Friends, 6 a.m. ET: Special guests include: Daniel Krauthammer, son of the late Charles Krauthammer; U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo.; Kevin Sorbo on his new film, “The Reliant.” Plus, the Republican National Committee reveals the “victims of socialism.”
 
On Fox Business:
 
Mornings with Maria, 6 a.m. ET:
Former U.S. Senator Al D’Amato, R-N.Y.

Varney & Co., 9 a.m. ET: Linda McMahon, former administrator of the Small Business Administration under President Trump.
 
On Fox News Radio:
 
The Fox News Rundown podcast:
“2016 Rematch? Clinton’s Gabbard Swipe Fueling 2020 Speculation” – Hillary Clinton has inserted herself into the 2020 presidential campaign. Without mentioning Rep. Tulsi Gabbard by name, the 2016 Democrat nominee accused the Hawaii congresswoman of being a “Russian asset” out to sabotage the party.

Besides creating a split among Democrats, Clinton’s comments are also fueling speculation she may be considering yet another presidential run. Mark Penn, chief strategist on Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign, joins the Rundown to give his reaction to the Clinton/Gabbard feud and speculation the former First Lady may want to run again.

Also on the Rundown: Presidential candidate, billionaire and political outsider Tom Steyer thinks he has what it takes to take on President Trump in the 2020 election. Steyer discusses why he’s been pushing for President Trump’s impeachment and talks about his campaign and his recent debut on the debate stage in Ohio. Plus, commentary by Jason Chaffetz, Fox News contributor and former Utah congressman.

Want the Fox News Rundown sent straight to your mobile device? Subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher.
 
The Brian Kilmeade Show, 9 a.m. ET: Special guests include – Neil Cavuto, host of “Your World with Neil Cavuto”; Bret Baier, host of “Special Report”; Daniel Krauthammer. Allen West, former Florida congressman; Chris Stirewalt, Fox News political editor; Michael Goodwin, New York Post columnist.

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‘I Am Back’: How Bernie Sanders’ Revolution Is Proving Resilient

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1176888003-1-_wide-93066b988bc2ada995baf43d3a369d04b0af362f-s1100-c15 'I Am Back': How Bernie Sanders' Revolution Is Proving Resilient

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders at a campaign rally in Queensbridge Park in New York on Saturday. Kena Betancur/Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  'I Am Back': How Bernie Sanders' Revolution Is Proving Resilient

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders at a campaign rally in Queensbridge Park in New York on Saturday.

Kena Betancur/Getty Images

About three weeks ago, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders had a heart attack that threw his campaign into question. But now, it’s more apparent than perhaps at any point in this presidential campaign that the 78-year-old white-haired politician and his revolution will remain a powerful force in the Democratic primary.

Sanders’ campaign has a renewed vitality following a record-setting rally in New York over the weekend, a strong debate performance last week in Ohio, an infusion of campaign cash that translates to having more money on hand than any other Democratic presidential candidate, and endorsements from two of the most progressive women of color in Congress: Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar and New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

His campaign is optimistic and emboldened with a clear mission: prove the senator’s skeptics wrong and quash any lingering questions about his health and ability to serve after his heart attack.

“In the professional pundit class, in the elite media circles, there’s been a strong effort to discount Bernie Sanders: ‘The movement is over, he can’t succeed. He doesn’t have opportunities for him to grow, it’s gonna end for him,'” said Faiz Shakir, Sanders’ campaign manager, paraphrasing what he sees as a problematic narrative.

But Shakir contends that the last week proves the pundits wrong.

“Sanders has shown that he has the support and the stamina to stick around,” he said.

On Saturday, the white septuagenarian was joined by perhaps the most well-known Latina in politics, the 30-year-old Ocasio-Cortez — an alliance that countered the “Bernie bro” caricature of his 2016 campaign. Ocasio-Cortez, a darling of the progressive left, officially offered her stamp of approval to the Vermont senator.

“For me, the mass movement, mobilization and the decades of work that have gone into that was a personal tipping point,” Ocasio-Cortez told NPR’s Michel Martin on Weekend All Things Considered, explaining why she specifically supported Sanders over a progressive woman in the field (such as Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren). “It’s far larger than a presidential campaign, this is about really creating a mass movement … to guarantee health care, housing and education.”

Westlake Legal Group ap_19292707743753-77cf02672c5c39e2e53e067e07f0ce256742505a-s1100-c15 'I Am Back': How Bernie Sanders' Revolution Is Proving Resilient

Sanders hugs Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez during last Saturday’s campaign rally in Queens. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AP hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  'I Am Back': How Bernie Sanders' Revolution Is Proving Resilient

Sanders hugs Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez during last Saturday’s campaign rally in Queens.

Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AP

Sanders and Ocasio-Cortez were met in Queens, N.Y., by a crowd that campaign officials estimated exceeded 25,000 people — a rally larger than any other Democratic candidate has seen this campaign.

‘A loyal, strong base’

Sanders is not the first presidential candidate in history to have had a heart attack. In fact, Dwight D. Eisenhower suffered from one in 1955, a year before he was re-elected for a second term.

But Sanders has long been scrutinized for his age, and the moderators on the debate stage in Ohio last week were eager to get a response from him on record.

“I’m healthy, I’m feeling great,” Sanders quipped at one point, “but I would like to respond to that question,” he added, as he jumped into a conversation about the opioid epidemic and drug companies.

Analysts and experts agreed Sanders looked and sounded healthy on stage.

His positive debate reviews came on the heels of new fundraising numbers that showed his campaign had $33.7 million on hand at the end of the third fundraising quarter — more cash than any of his Democratic opponents, and notably more than three times as much money as former Vice President Joe Biden.

“If history is any guide, don’t count Sen. Sanders out, he is someone who I think will be with us in this campaign for quite a while,” said Karen Finney, a Democratic strategist who worked for Hillary Clinton in 2016. “We know that he’s got a loyal, strong base of support.”

Mark Longabaugh, a Democratic consultant who worked on Sanders’ campaign in 2016, pointed out that part of the senator’s fundraising advantage was his 2016 campaign operation.

“Just in a technical sense he came into this race with by far the largest fundraising list of any of the candidates,” said Longabaugh. ” And that was underestimated by a lot of people.”

For Finney and Longabaugh, the main question is how and if Sanders can regain his standing in the polls.

Even before his heart attack, Sanders’ poll numbers had begun dropping. And the conventional wisdom was that the Democratic primary was winnowing down to a two-person contest between Biden and Warren.

Shakir is dismissive of the polls and insists they don’t capture Sanders full support, but he also acknowledges that the senator has a steep path to the nomination.

“The path for Bernie Sanders to win this nomination is arguably the hardest and most ambitious path of any candidate,” he said.

Why?

Because Sanders base of support comes from young and lower-income Americans – people who usually vote at far lower rates than older and wealthier voters.

“He is trying desperately hard to increase voter participation,” said Shakir.

An urgency to differentiate

Strategists say it’s not enough to have a strong debate performance or bring in lots of money from devoted supporters, Sanders, they say, also has to figure out how to blunt Warren’s momentum.

One possible option is to focus on progressive policy.

Sanders has been trying to prove that he’s the furthest left candidate in the field.

For some of his supporters, that strategy is particularly effective on health care. Sanders, as he likes to point out, wrote the “damn bill” outlining a Medicare for All system. Warren has endorsed his plan, but, thus far, she has not laid out how she would pay for it.

Westlake Legal Group ap_19292841653948_wide-b52a97e2524ebf22480268c791a9b82363597939-s1100-c15 'I Am Back': How Bernie Sanders' Revolution Is Proving Resilient

Sanders speaks at last Saturday’s “Bernie’s Back Rally” at Queensbridge Park in New York. Greg Allen/Greg Allen/Invision/AP hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  'I Am Back': How Bernie Sanders' Revolution Is Proving Resilient

Sanders speaks at last Saturday’s “Bernie’s Back Rally” at Queensbridge Park in New York.

Greg Allen/Greg Allen/Invision/AP

“The Medicare for All message has sort of been his bread and butter, and I think that is still a powerful issue at the grassroots,” said Longabuagh.

Longabaugh, who is not working for Sanders this cycle, says part of the Vermont senator’s resiliency goes back to his consistency, particularly on healthcare.

Shakir says his loyal support is also about trust.

“You just trust that this is somebody who has a lifetime of consistency and that when he gets into the oval office, and he says he’s gonna fight for Medicare for All, he’s gonna fight for Medicare for All,” Shakir said. The indirect assumption from Shakir’s statement is that Warren, the other leading progressive candidate in the field supporting Medicare for All, cannot be trusted as much as Sanders to keep their word on the issue.

Sanders has also attempted to outflank Warren on one of her signature campaign issues: a wealth tax.

He recently proposed a plan that goes even further than Warren’s and, as our colleagues at Planet Money pointed out, it “could have one large unintended consequence: It makes Warren’s wealth tax look moderate.”

Sanders has been hesitant to go after Warren directly. The two senators are friends and allies in the Senate, but strategists say there is an urgency for Sanders to differentiate himself soon. Time is running out before the all-important early states start voting.

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This Day in History: Oct. 22

On this day, Oct. 22 …

1979: The U.S. government allows the deposed Shah of Iran to travel to New York for medical treatment — a decision that precipitates the Iran hostage crisis.
 
Also on this day:

  • 1797: French balloonist Andre-Jacques Garnerin makes the first parachute descent, landing safely from a height of about 3,000 feet over Paris.
  • 1934: Bank robber Charles “Pretty Boy” Floyd is shot to death by federal agents and local police at a farm near East Liverpool, Ohio.
Westlake Legal Group JFKCuba102219 This Day in History: Oct. 22 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc article 57900844-c6e4-5409-845b-67df6e26c778
  • 1962: In a nationally broadcast address, President John F. Kennedy reveals the presence of Soviet-built missile bases under construction in Cuba and announces a quarantine of all offensive military equipment being shipped to the Communist island nation.
  • 1981: The Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization is decertified by the federal government for its strike the previous August.
  • 1986: President Reagan signs into law sweeping tax-overhaul legislation.
  • 1991: The European Community and the European Free Trade Association concludes a landmark accord to create a free trade zone of 19 nations by 1993.
  • 1995: The largest gathering of world leaders in history marks the 50th anniversary of the United Nations.
  • 1998: The government advises parents to remove the batteries from their kids’ “Power Wheels” cars and trucks, made by Fisher-Price, because of faulty wiring that could cause them to erupt into flame.
  • 2001: A second Washington, D.C., postal worker, Joseph P. Curseen, dies of inhalation anthrax.
  • 2002: A bus driver, Conrad Johnson, is shot to death in Aspen Hill, Md., in the final attack carried out by the “Beltway Snipers.”
  • 2018: President Trump declares that the U.S. would start cutting aid to three Central American countries he accuses of failing to stop thousands of migrants heading for the U.S. border. 

2018: A bomb is found in a mailbox at the suburban New York home of liberal billionaire philanthropist George Soros; federal agents safely detonate the device after being summoned by a security officer.

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Leia Speaks 1 Word In Final ‘Star Wars’ Trailer And It Reduced Fans To Tears

Westlake Legal Group 5daea50f210000ba1e34aa3a Leia Speaks 1 Word In Final ‘Star Wars’ Trailer And It Reduced Fans To Tears

Star Wars” fans found plenty of reasons to be emotional on Monday as the last trailer dropped for “The Rise Of Skywalker,” the ninth and final episode in the saga that began in 1977.

At one point, C-3PO ― the droid who has appeared in every installment of the main episodic series ― utters what some fans thought could be a farewell:

But it was a single word that really got fans in their feels.

Thanks to previously unused footage shot for “The Force Awakens,” Carrie Fisher, who died in 2016, will reprise her role as Gen. Leia Organa in the movie, which hits theaters Dec. 20. She’s shown in the trailer embracing Rey (Daisy Ridley), but doesn’t speak until the end when the voice of an unseen Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) uses the phrase made famous by the franchise. 

“The Force will be with you,” he says.

Leia’s voice adds: “Always.”   

Bringing even more emotion to the moment, the trailer was released on what would have been Fisher’s 63rd birthday. 

Fans struggled to keep it together:

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Iraq’s military says US troops leaving Syria don’t have permission to stay in country

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096600491001_6096597836001-vs Iraq's military says US troops leaving Syria don't have permission to stay in country fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fnc/world fnc Associated Press article a03314ee-4592-50aa-be55-eabbe2dde4aa

Iraq’s military says U.S. troops leaving Syria and heading to neighboring Iraq do not have permission to stay in the country.

Tuesday’s statement says that American troops currently withdrawing from Syria have acquired permission from the Iraqi Kurdish regional government to enter Iraq to later be transferred out of the country.

It added that these troops do not have any approval to stay in Iraq.

The statement appears to contradict U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper who has said that under the current plan, all U.S. troops leaving Syria will go to western Iraq and the military will continue to conduct operations against the Islamic State group to prevent its resurgence.

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Esper said he has spoken to his Iraqi counterpart about the plan to shift the more than 700 troops leaving Syria into western Iraq.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096600491001_6096597836001-vs Iraq's military says US troops leaving Syria don't have permission to stay in country fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fnc/world fnc Associated Press article a03314ee-4592-50aa-be55-eabbe2dde4aa   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096600491001_6096597836001-vs Iraq's military says US troops leaving Syria don't have permission to stay in country fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fnc/world fnc Associated Press article a03314ee-4592-50aa-be55-eabbe2dde4aa

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