web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 416)

Elizabeth Warren campaign staffer fired for unspecified ‘inappropriate behavior’

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Elizabeth Warren campaign staffer fired for unspecified 'inappropriate behavior'

Democratic presidential candidates Elizabeth Warren, Cory Booker and Kamala Harris defend the impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump at a candidate forum in Las Vegas. (Oct. 2) AP, AP

Elizabeth Warren’s presidential campaign has fired its national organizing director over complaints of behavioral misconduct.

“Over the past two weeks, senior campaign leadership received multiple complaints regarding inappropriate behavior by Rich McDaniel,” campaign spokesperson Kristen Orthman said in a statement to USA TODAY 

The campaign launched an investigation into the allegations over the past two weeks, which resulted in McDaniel’s termination.

“Based on the results of the investigation, the campaign determined that his reported conduct was inconsistent with its values and that he could not be a part of the campaign moving forward,” Orthman said. 

The firing was first reported by Politico.

More: Who is running for president in 2020? An interactive guide

“I have separated from the campaign and am no longer serving as National Organizing Director. I have tremendous respect for my colleagues despite any disagreements we may have had and believe departing at this time is in the best interest of both parties,” McDaniel said in a statement to Politico.

He also added he “would never intentionally engage” in inappropriate behavior.

“If others feel that I have, I understand it is important to listen even when you disagree. I wish the campaign and my colleagues well,” McDaniel said.

Warren has been steadily climbing in presidential primary polls, and is neck-and-neck with former Vice President Joe Biden, according to aggregated poll data provided by RealClearPolitics.

USA TODAY Poll: More good news for Elizabeth Warren, within striking distance of Joe Biden in Nevada

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/elections/2019/10/04/elizabeth-warrens-campaign-fired-senior-staffer-behavior-complaints/3868356002/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Aspirin could cut air pollution harms in half, study claims

Aspirin may lessen the negative effects of air pollution, an intriguing new study concludes.

Researchers from Columbia, Harvard and Boston Universities analyzed a subset of data collected from 2,280 male veterans from the greater Boston area who were given tests to determine their lung function. Participants’ average age was 73.

The researchers examined the relationship between test results, self-reported non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use and ambient particulate matter and black carbon in the month preceding the test.

ANCIENT TINY STONE TOOLS UNEARTHED BY SCIENTISTS IN SRI LANKAN CAVE

Westlake Legal Group getty-images-aspirin Aspirin could cut air pollution harms in half, study claims fox-news/science/planet-earth/pollution fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 384fb832-ef15-5553-82d4-6f4f9ca4f836

Aspirin could help to reduce the negative effects of air pollution. (Getty Images)

ANCIENT DNA PUTS BLACK DEATH’S ORIGIN IN RUSSIAN REGION

The study — it was published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine — accounted for a variety of factors, including the health status of the person and whether he was a smoker.

They found that using any NSAID nearly halved the effect of particulate matter on lung function, with the association consistent across all four weekly air pollution measurements.

Particulate matter comes from a range of sources, including the burning of fossil fuels in vehicles and power plants.

“Our findings suggest that aspirin and other NSAIDs may protect the lungs from short-term spikes in air pollution,” first and corresponding author Xu Gao, a post-doctoral research scientist in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the Columbia Mailman School, said in press statement. “Of course, it is still important to minimize our exposure to air pollution, which is linked to a host of adverse health effects from cancer to cardiovascular disease.”

A previous study from Columbia University found that B vitamins may also play a role in lowering the negative impact of air pollution.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

Westlake Legal Group getty-images-aspirin Aspirin could cut air pollution harms in half, study claims fox-news/science/planet-earth/pollution fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 384fb832-ef15-5553-82d4-6f4f9ca4f836   Westlake Legal Group getty-images-aspirin Aspirin could cut air pollution harms in half, study claims fox-news/science/planet-earth/pollution fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 384fb832-ef15-5553-82d4-6f4f9ca4f836

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Prince Harry Snaps At Reporter In Tense Exchange After Media Lawsuit

Prince Harry scolded a reporter for her behavior in a resurfaced clip from the duke’s recent trip to Malawi, which was part of his 10-day trip abroad with Meghan Markle.

In the video, first shared by the Daily Mail, Sky News reporter Rhiannon Mills asked Harry questions after he visited with people at the Mauwa Health Centre in the African nation and was headed into a car. 

“That short conversation, what do you hope to achieve through it?” Mills said. 

“What? Ask them!” Harry fired back as he walked to the car. 

“Is that why it’s important for you to come here and talk to them?” Mills said in her follow up.

The prince wasn’t having any of it. 

“Rhiannon, don’t behave like this,” Harry said directly to Mills’ face before getting into the car. 

The British royals don’t typically speak directly to media at events and rarely give press interviews, which might explain Harry’s frustration with Mills’ questioning.

The interaction comes amid tension between the royals and the press, as the  Duchess of Sussex filed a claim against Associated Newspapers, the parent company of the Daily Mail and the Mail on Sunday, “over the intrusive and unlawful publication of a private letter.”

Earlier this year, the Mail on Sunday published a private letter the duchess wrote to her father, Thomas Markle, in 2018. Harry announced the suit in a fiery statement posted on the couple’s website Wednesday and denounced press treatment of his wife. 

“My wife has become one of the latest victims of a British tabloid press that wages campaigns against individuals with no thought to the consequences — a ruthless campaign that has escalated over the past year, throughout her pregnancy and while raising our newborn son,” Harry wrote. 

Westlake Legal Group 5d88c56c2100003200da5ed4 Prince Harry Snaps At Reporter In Tense Exchange After Media Lawsuit

Toby Melville / Reuters Prince Harry and his Meghan Markle smile during a stop on the first day of their African tour in Cape Town, South Africa, on Sept. 23.

“My deepest fear is history repeating itself. I’ve seen what happens when someone I love is commoditised to the point that they are no longer treated or seen as a real person,” the prince said, invoking the late Princess Diana, who faced dizzying levels of scrutiny from paparazzi.

“I lost my mother and now I watch my wife falling victim to the same powerful forces,” he said, before thanking those that support the couple. “We thank you, the public, for your continued support. It is hugely appreciated. Although it may not seem like it, we really need it.” 

On Friday, Buckingham Palace announced that the Duke of Sussex will be taking legal action against the Sun and the Daily Mirror for alleged phone hacking, some of which dates back to the early 2000s, according to BBC’s royal correspondent, Jonny Dymond.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Surging In The Polls, Elizabeth Warren Sets Her Sights On California’s Primary

SAN DIEGO ― A new poll confirms that a tight three-way race is developing in California’s key Democratic presidential primary, with one candidate showing impressive momentum: Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.

survey released Thursday by the Public Policy Institute of California showed Warren the choice of 23% of likely primary voters, with former Vice President Joe Biden at 22% and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) at 21%. When the Democratic race was first taking shape in the spring, a Quinnipiac Poll had shown Warren in single digits in the Golden State, far behind Biden, Sanders and California Sen. Kamala Harris.

Indeed, as Warren’s support has surged in California ― as it has nationally ― the prospects for Harris in her home state have taken a hit, again reflecting national trends. Perhaps the new poll’s most striking finding is that Harris trailed well behind the pack with just 8% support, another sign of trouble for her struggling campaign.

“Warren may well be a beneficiary of Harris’ collapse,” said veteran California Democratic strategist Garry South. “Since her very impressive debut (as a White House candidate) in Oakland in January, Harris has done little in California to solidify whatever support may have been potentially there for her.”

Voters like Cindy Henderson, an author who showed up to hear Warren speak Thursday as the candidate made her first campaign stop in San Diego, give a glimpse into the race’s current dynamics.

“I was actually a Kamala fan,” Henderson said. “Just something in the last two or three months, I’m just kind of dropping off [on her]. I think she’s not quite ready. I just don’t think there’s much depth yet. The more I hear and watch what Elizabeth does, it’s just like, OK, she’s a rock star. I’m loving her message.”

Westlake Legal Group 5d978c3e2100005100a95525 Surging In The Polls, Elizabeth Warren Sets Her Sights On California’s Primary

Mike Blake / Reuters Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren at her outdoor rally Thursday in San Diego.

Warren drew about 8,500 people for her rally in downtown San Diego. (A rally for Sanders was attended by an estimated 6,400 people at the same venue in May).

Like most of Warren’s audiences, her Thursday crowd was predominantly white ― which aligns with how her support breaks down in public opinion surveys, as well. A UC Berkeley Institute of Governmental Studies poll released in late September showed her leading the California race with 29%, with Biden at 21% and Sanders at 20%. But Warren trailed both of those two with Latino voters. 

Warren mostly stuck to her populist stump speech on Thursday, laying out her plans to take on Washington corruption, special interests and big corporations. She appeared to choke up at one point as she recalled the family struggles that marked her childhood in Oklahoma, including the time her mother lost her job. The story is a big hit with many voters, who cite it when discussing the candidate.

At one point, after discussing her plan to break up big tech companies, Warren called out Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who told employees in recently leaked audio the company would “go to the mat” to defeat her efforts.

“And yes, Mark Zuckerberg, I’m looking at you,” she said, to cheers and applause from the audience.

The true contours of the Democratic battle will emerge in February when the narrative-driving nominating contests in Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina take place. But right around the corner comes primaries in 14 states on March 3, Super Tuesday. And California is the day’s dominant contest, with 416 convention delegates allotted.

That’s why so many of the main Democratic contenders are paying frequent visits to the state to meet with voters ― as well as well-heeled donors. Also, early mail-in voting begins a month before the actual primary date. And conquering California presents unique challenges for a politician: its population is decidedly more diverse than that in the earlier-voting states, campaign ads are far more expensive than in those other locales and gaining media attention is difficult.

In terms of having the money to compete, Warren and Sanders are well-primed as the race enters the final stretch before primary season. Warren raised $24.6 million in the third quarter, her campaign told supporters in an email Friday, and has $25.7 million cash on hand. Sanders, hospitalized earlier this week in Nevada because of a blocked artery, raised $25.3 million from July to September (his campaign didn’t release a cash-on-hand figure).

Their figures are especially impressive because both candidates have opted against holding fundraisers focused on big-dollar donors during the primary campaign.

Biden’s campaign, meanwhile, reported a lackluster $15.2 million raised over the past three months, far less than his second-quarter haul of $21.5 million. He could be in trouble if his fundraising continues to taper off.

President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign and the Republican National Committee announced raising a combined $125 million in the third quarter, a record-setting haul. His war chest will only grow as Democrats spend several months ― and maybe more, in the case of a lengthy primary battle ― determining their nominee.

Warren dismissed Trump’s haul on Thursday, telling reporters she didn’t think “scooping up a bunch of money from rich people and buying a bunch of TV ads” is “how democracy works anymore.” She added: “I think it’s going to be about going out and building a grassroots movement.”

Given Warren’s steady rise in the primary race, the Oct. 15 Democratic debate in Westerville, Ohio, looms particularly large for her. As the frontrunner in several of the race’s most recent national polls, she’ll likely have a bigger target on her back.

Westlake Legal Group 5d978c7e200000fc004c812b Surging In The Polls, Elizabeth Warren Sets Her Sights On California’s Primary

Steve Marcus / Reuters The struggling status of Sen. Kamala Harris’ presidential bid is reflected in the latest poll gauging support in the March 3 Democratic primary in her home state of California.

Even as Warren received enthusiastic backing at her San Diego rally, interviews with some of the undecided voters at it underscored some of the doubts she still most overcome.

Corinne Lytle-Bonine, an environmental consultant who voted for Sanders in the 2016 Democratic primary, acknowledged she was giving Warren a strong look this time around.

“Having the nomination be another old white man is a hard pill to swallow when it feels like women have been the ones really carrying the Democrats through 2018,” Lytle-Bonine said.

She added that “I think Warren has some establishment credentials that Bernie doesn’t, and may make her more electable in the general election.”

Still, Lytle-Bonine questioned why Warren has been hesitant to acknowledge whether the middle class would see a tax hike if, as president, she would push into law “Medicare-for-All” government health care plan Sanders has introduced and that she supports. Several of Warren’s rivals have criticized her for repeatedly dodging the question; she’s brushed off the attacks as unfair Republican framing.

“I wish that she would” directly deal with that issue, Lytle-Bonine said. “I guess I don’t know what is holding her back. I don’t think it’s a hard answer to say ‘Yes, we’ll raise taxes, however, all of your out-of-pocket expenses (for health care) go away.’”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Amb. Callista Gingrich: US, Vatican partner with faith-based groups to promote freedom and human dignity

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6088902278001_6088899790001-vs Amb. Callista Gingrich: US, Vatican partner with faith-based groups to promote freedom and human dignity fox-news/world/religion/vatican fox-news/person/pope-francis fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Callista Gingrich c98de77c-268d-5617-b052-6af65b19589d article

Thirty-five years after establishing formal diplomatic relations, the United States and the Holy See partnered in an unprecedented way.

On Oct. 2 in Vatican City, the U.S. Embassy to the Holy See and the secretariat of state of the Holy See co-hosted a symposium, “Pathways to Achieving Human Dignity: Partnering with Faith-Based Organizations.”

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo joined the Holy See’s foreign minister, Archbishop Paul Gallagher, in launching this symposium, which featured participation by the Holy See’s prime minister, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, and U.S. Ambassadors-at-Large Sam Brownback and John Cotton Richmond.

JIM DALY: IT’S BRING YOUR BIBLES TO SCHOOL DAY – A CELEBRATION OF RELIGIOUS FREEDOM AND GOD’S LOVE

The United States and the Holy See appreciate and value the role of faith-based organizations in advancing peace and security. Faith-based organizations distribute aid to those in need, serve as lifelines for communities and individuals experiencing unfathomable hardships, and advocate for the oppressed. They often have extensive experience and unparalleled access to local populations, and are dedicated to advancing freedom and human dignity.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR OPINION NEWSLETTER

As President Trump said in his May 2018 Executive Order establishing the White House Faith and Opportunity Initiative, “These organizations lift people up, keep families strong, and solve problems at the local level. The federal government welcomes opportunities to partner with such organizations through innovative, measurable and outcome-driven initiatives.”

More from Opinion

The Oct. 2 symposium reinforced how faith-based organizations can support three key U.S.-Holy See priorities: advancing religious freedom, combating human trafficking, and delivering humanitarian assistance to the most vulnerable communities across the globe.

There has never been a more critical time to work with faith-based organizations to address these issues.

A shocking 83 percent of the world’s population live in nations where religious freedom is either threatened or denied entirely. The United States is committed to turning that tide.

The Oct. 2 symposium reinforced how faith-based organizations can support three key U.S.-Holy See priorities: advancing religious freedom, combating human trafficking, and delivering humanitarian assistance to the most vulnerable communities across the globe. 

President Trump issued the first global call to protect religious freedom at the United Nations on Sept. 23, and, in his Sept. 24 address to the 74th session of the U.N. General Assembly, vowed that “Americans will never tire in our effort to defend and promote freedom of worship and religion. We want and support religious liberty for all.”

On every continent and in nearly every community, through their unique ability to build trust and encourage dialogue, faith-based organizations can play a critical role in this effort. And as Secretary Pompeo stated in his remarks at the symposium, the United States will have their back: “In the Trump administration, you have the strongest advocates for religious freedom in the history of our country.”

Human traffickers also continue to plague communities around the world. President Trump and Pope Francis share a commitment to combat this global challenge, which necessitates a cooperation across governments, faith-based organizations, individuals, corporations, media and others.

And faith-based organizations can help governments offer assistance in places where they have neither the infrastructure, experience nor community contacts to make an impact. That’s why the Trump administration now delivers aid from U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to faith-based organizations to support persecuted minority groups in the Middle East and elsewhere.

Our diplomatic relationship with the Holy See plays a major role in this effort. The Catholic Church, through its extended network of non-governmental organizations, is one of the greatest humanitarian forces in the world. As Archbishop Gallagher noted in his opening remarks, “The aim of our collaboration is to build a society which is truly tolerant and inclusive and to safeguard the dignity and the inalienable rights of every human person.”

The Oct. 2 symposium featured representatives from a number of prominent faith-based organizations, including the Community of Sant’Egidio, Aid to the Church in Need, the AVSI Foundation, Caritas Internationalis, the Adyan Foundation, and Talitha Kum. To lead by example, I announced at the symposium that the U.S. Embassy to the Holy See will award financial grants to each organization to support their work in the coming year.

These organization leaders were joined by senior U.S. and Holy See officials from numerous departments and agencies, including the USAID, the U.S. State Department’s Office of International Religious Freedom, Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking-in-Persons, the Holy See’s Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, and the Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

As Cardinal Parolin said in his concluding remarks, “The challenges are many and great, but we should face them with faith and commitment. We know that God is with us when we engage to promote human dignity.”

Now, it’s time for all of us to take the lessons of our symposium forward – to encourage like-minded governments and leaders everywhere to partner with and to support faith-based organizations. Together we can achieve real and lasting freedom and human dignity for all.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY CALLISTA GINGRICH

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6088902278001_6088899790001-vs Amb. Callista Gingrich: US, Vatican partner with faith-based groups to promote freedom and human dignity fox-news/world/religion/vatican fox-news/person/pope-francis fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Callista Gingrich c98de77c-268d-5617-b052-6af65b19589d article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6088902278001_6088899790001-vs Amb. Callista Gingrich: US, Vatican partner with faith-based groups to promote freedom and human dignity fox-news/world/religion/vatican fox-news/person/pope-francis fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Callista Gingrich c98de77c-268d-5617-b052-6af65b19589d article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Surging In The Polls, Elizabeth Warren Sets Her Sights On California’s Primary

SAN DIEGO ― A new poll confirms that a tight three-way race is developing in California’s key Democratic presidential primary, with one candidate showing impressive momentum: Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.

survey released Thursday by the Public Policy Institute of California showed Warren the choice of 23% of likely primary voters, with former Vice President Joe Biden at 22% and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) at 21%. When the Democratic race was first taking shape in the spring, a Quinnipiac Poll had shown Warren in single digits in the Golden State, far behind Biden, Sanders and California Sen. Kamala Harris.

Indeed, as Warren’s support has surged in California ― as it has nationally ― the prospects for Harris in her home state have taken a hit, again reflecting national trends. Perhaps the new poll’s most striking finding is that Harris trailed well behind the pack with just 8% support, another sign of trouble for her struggling campaign.

“Warren may well be a beneficiary of Harris’ collapse,” said veteran California Democratic strategist Garry South. “Since her very impressive debut (as a White House candidate) in Oakland in January, Harris has done little in California to solidify whatever support may have been potentially there for her.”

Voters like Cindy Henderson, an author who showed up to hear Warren speak Thursday as the candidate made her first campaign stop in San Diego, give a glimpse into the race’s current dynamics.

“I was actually a Kamala fan,” Henderson said. “Just something in the last two or three months, I’m just kind of dropping off [on her]. I think she’s not quite ready. I just don’t think there’s much depth yet. The more I hear and watch what Elizabeth does, it’s just like, OK, she’s a rock star. I’m loving her message.”

Westlake Legal Group 5d978c3e2100005100a95525 Surging In The Polls, Elizabeth Warren Sets Her Sights On California’s Primary

Mike Blake / Reuters Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren at her outdoor rally Thursday in San Diego.

Warren drew about 8,500 people for her rally in downtown San Diego. (A rally for Sanders was attended by an estimated 6,400 people at the same venue in May).

Like most of Warren’s audiences, her Thursday crowd was predominantly white ― which aligns with how her support breaks down in public opinion surveys, as well. A UC Berkeley Institute of Governmental Studies poll released in late September showed her leading the California race with 29%, with Biden at 21% and Sanders at 20%. But Warren trailed both of those two with Latino voters. 

Warren mostly stuck to her populist stump speech on Thursday, laying out her plans to take on Washington corruption, special interests and big corporations. She appeared to choke up at one point as she recalled the family struggles that marked her childhood in Oklahoma, including the time her mother lost her job. The story is a big hit with many voters, who cite it when discussing the candidate.

At one point, after discussing her plan to break up big tech companies, Warren called out Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who told employees in recently leaked audio the company would “go to the mat” to defeat her efforts.

“And yes, Mark Zuckerberg, I’m looking at you,” she said, to cheers and applause from the audience.

The true contours of the Democratic battle will emerge in February when the narrative-driving nominating contests in Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina take place. But right around the corner comes primaries in 14 states on March 3, Super Tuesday. And California is the day’s dominant contest, with 416 convention delegates allotted.

That’s why so many of the main Democratic contenders are paying frequent visits to the state to meet with voters ― as well as well-heeled donors. Also, early mail-in voting begins a month before the actual primary date. And conquering California presents unique challenges for a politician: its population is decidedly more diverse than that in the earlier-voting states, campaign ads are far more expensive than in those other locales and gaining media attention is difficult.

In terms of having the money to compete, Warren and Sanders are well-primed as the race enters the final stretch before primary season. Warren raised $24.6 million in the third quarter, her campaign told supporters in an email Friday, and has $25.7 million cash on hand. Sanders, hospitalized earlier this week in Nevada because of a blocked artery, raised $25.3 million from July to September (his campaign didn’t release a cash-on-hand figure).

Their figures are especially impressive because both candidates have opted against holding fundraisers focused on big-dollar donors during the primary campaign.

Biden’s campaign, meanwhile, reported a lackluster $15.2 million raised over the past three months, far less than his second-quarter haul of $21.5 million. He could be in trouble if his fundraising continues to taper off.

President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign and the Republican National Committee announced raising a combined $125 million in the third quarter, a record-setting haul. His war chest will only grow as Democrats spend several months ― and maybe more, in the case of a lengthy primary battle ― determining their nominee.

Warren dismissed Trump’s haul on Thursday, telling reporters she didn’t think “scooping up a bunch of money from rich people and buying a bunch of TV ads” is “how democracy works anymore.” She added: “I think it’s going to be about going out and building a grassroots movement.”

Given Warren’s steady rise in the primary race, the Oct. 15 Democratic debate in Westerville, Ohio, looms particularly large for her. As the frontrunner in several of the race’s most recent national polls, she’ll likely have a bigger target on her back.

Westlake Legal Group 5d978c7e200000fc004c812b Surging In The Polls, Elizabeth Warren Sets Her Sights On California’s Primary

Steve Marcus / Reuters The struggling status of Sen. Kamala Harris’ presidential bid is reflected in the latest poll gauging support in the March 3 Democratic primary in her home state of California.

Even as Warren received enthusiastic backing at her San Diego rally, interviews with some of the undecided voters at it underscored some of the doubts she still most overcome.

Corinne Lytle-Bonine, an environmental consultant who voted for Sanders in the 2016 Democratic primary, acknowledged she was giving Warren a strong look this time around.

“Having the nomination be another old white man is a hard pill to swallow when it feels like women have been the ones really carrying the Democrats through 2018,” Lytle-Bonine said.

She added that “I think Warren has some establishment credentials that Bernie doesn’t, and may make her more electable in the general election.”

Still, Lytle-Bonine questioned why Warren has been hesitant to acknowledge whether the middle class would see a tax hike if, as president, she would push into law “Medicare-for-All” government health care plan Sanders has introduced and that she supports. Several of Warren’s rivals have criticized her for repeatedly dodging the question; she’s brushed off the attacks as unfair Republican framing.

“I wish that she would” directly deal with that issue, Lytle-Bonine said. “I guess I don’t know what is holding her back. I don’t think it’s a hard answer to say ‘Yes, we’ll raise taxes, however, all of your out-of-pocket expenses (for health care) go away.’”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Iowa teacher on leave after threatening Facebook post about climate activist Greta Thunberg

An Iowa science teacher has been placed on leave after posting what appeared to be a threatening comment on social media aimed at young climate change activist Greta Thunberg before her planned visit to the state.

In an emailed statement to Fox News, the Waterloo Community School District said Friday that the Facebook post “rose to the level of putting this employee on administrative leave pending an investigation.”

Local media have identified the teacher as Matt Baish, who is listed as a science teacher on Waterloo West High’s website.

The post came ahead of the Swedish teen’s planned visit to Iowa City for a student-led climate protest on Friday.

The post asked, “Who’s all going?” to the event.

A user named Matt Baish responded, “Dont have my sniper rifle.”

Iowa City police said security would be heightened for the event. Once the district was notified of the comment, a message was sent to school staff and families, district spokeswoman Tara Thomas told Fox News.

The district’s social media policies warn staffers to “think twice before posting” and to not post “threats of physical or bodily harm.”

Thunberg, 16, has made headlines for her calls to world leaders to take aggressive measures to combat the damaging effects of climate change.

Westlake Legal Group AP19270801747789 Iowa teacher on leave after threatening Facebook post about climate activist Greta Thunberg Louis Casiano fox-news/us/environment/climate-change fox-news/health/education fox news fnc/us fnc article 88da07eb-f637-5a9c-8557-65dc1cb210d0

Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg speaks to reporters after receiving the key to the city of Montreal during a ceremony in Montreal last month. (Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press via AP)

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

Last month, she testified before Congress and denounced world leaders at a United Nations summit for an insufficient action plan on climate change.

“You are still not mature enough to tell it like it is. You are failing us,” Thunberg said. “But the young people are starting to understand your betrayal.”

Her blunt nature has also come under criticism. Russian President Vladimir Putin recently said “no one has explained to Greta that the modern world is complex and different and … people in Africa or in many Asian countries want to live at the same wealth level as in Sweden.”

During her appearance at the University of Iowa on Friday, she told a cheering crowd “as we all know, the U.N. Climate Action Summit was a failure,” according to Reuters. “No matter what, we need to continue.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19270801747789 Iowa teacher on leave after threatening Facebook post about climate activist Greta Thunberg Louis Casiano fox-news/us/environment/climate-change fox-news/health/education fox news fnc/us fnc article 88da07eb-f637-5a9c-8557-65dc1cb210d0   Westlake Legal Group AP19270801747789 Iowa teacher on leave after threatening Facebook post about climate activist Greta Thunberg Louis Casiano fox-news/us/environment/climate-change fox-news/health/education fox news fnc/us fnc article 88da07eb-f637-5a9c-8557-65dc1cb210d0

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Treasury Watchdog Opens Investigation Into Handling Of Trump Tax Return Request

Westlake Legal Group 5d97a9a12100005000a95f4e Treasury Watchdog Opens Investigation Into Handling Of Trump Tax Return Request

An internal agency watchdog will review whether the Trump administration failed to follow regular procedures when it denied a congressional request for President Donald Trump’s tax returns. 

The acting inspector general for the Treasury Department, which oversees the Internal Revenue Service, will conduct the inquiry in response to a request from House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal (D-Mass.).

Neal asked Monday for the inspector make sure Treasury and the IRS are “enforcing the law in a fair an impartial manner and no one is endeavoring to intimidate or impede government officials and employees carrying out their duties.”

Acting inspector general Rich Delmar confirmed he would undertake the inquiry in an email on Friday, according to the New York Times.

The IRS automatically audits the president and vice president every year, and over the summer a whistleblower complained to Congress that someone had tried to interfere with that audit

The tax whistleblower has received renewed attention as another whistleblower’s complaint ― that the president corrupted U.S. foreign policy for his own electoral benefit ― has prompted Democrats to launch a formal impeachment inquiry in the House of Representatives. 

Neal quietly revealed the existence of the tax whistleblower’s complaint in an August court filing that said a federal employee had come forward with “evidence of possible misconduct.” 

The Ways and Means Committee has sued the administration over its refusal to hand over copies of the president’s taxes under a federal law that says the Treasury secretary “shall” do so. 

There will probably be plenty for the IG to investigate. The tax disclosure law has been on the books since 1924, and Democrats have contended in their court filings that the IRS has never before refused to hand over a tax return requested by a congressional tax committee. The IRS didn’t hesitate to hand over tax material on President Richard Nixon, for instance, when lawmakers asked for it in the 1970s. 

Trump is the first president since Nixon to keep his taxes a secret. 

An internal IRS memo that surfaced earlier this year said the law gives the bureau no wiggle room to refuse requests. 

“I think the IG will focus on process,” said Steve Rosenthal, a senior fellow with the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center. “I think the IRS refusal was unprecedented and illegal and I think it didn’t follow the ordinary course of any other request.”

Another line of investigation could focus on Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin’s decision to intervene in the tax return request, which is typically handled by the IRS without the Treasury secretary butting in

But if the IG finds that the Treasury Department failed to follow the law or its own procedures, the finding would likely have little practical effect, as the agency could simply ignore it. And the inspector would likely reach his conclusion after a long time, meaning not this year and possibly not next year, either.

“It will come much too late,” Rosenthal said. 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Democrats will ‘stop at nothing to impeach Trump’ but can’t define latest ‘crime,’ GOP lawmaker says

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6092376739001_6092380990001-vs Democrats will 'stop at nothing to impeach Trump' but can't define latest 'crime,' GOP lawmaker says fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/shows/your-world fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 24cb2e4c-7c1b-506f-b13d-5fa50470396e

House Judiciary Committee member Greg Steube, R-Fla., claimed it is apparent Democrats will do whatever it takes to impeach President Trump.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff continues to search for a case against the president that will stick, Steube said Friday on “Your World.”

“The Democrats will stop at nothing to impeach this president — I think that’s very clear at this point,” he said.

REP. STEUBE ON TRUMP INVESTIGATIONS: ‘WHEN IS ENOUGH ENOUGH?’

“It started with the Russia collusion hoax — for two years the mainstream media sold a farce to the American people… So Adam Schiff has moved from that to obstruction, from obstruction to corruption and now from corruption to this whistleblower complaint.”

More from Media

Steube, who said he has read the transcript from the phone call in question between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, claimed there’s nothing within it that warrants an impeachment inquiry.

“None of the Democrats have articulated to me or the American people what that high crime or misdemeanor would be,” he said.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

He also criticized 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton for adding to the chorus of rhetoric against Trump.

Steube said it was wrong for Clinton to suggest Trump is an “illegitimate” president, as she did in late September.

“Democrats have been trying to build this into impeachment the entire time,” he said, suggesting Trump has been under fire from political opponents since he took office.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6092376739001_6092380990001-vs Democrats will 'stop at nothing to impeach Trump' but can't define latest 'crime,' GOP lawmaker says fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/shows/your-world fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 24cb2e4c-7c1b-506f-b13d-5fa50470396e   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6092376739001_6092380990001-vs Democrats will 'stop at nothing to impeach Trump' but can't define latest 'crime,' GOP lawmaker says fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/shows/your-world fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 24cb2e4c-7c1b-506f-b13d-5fa50470396e

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Intelligence watchdog provided no new documents in Trump impeachment probe, lawmaker says

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Intelligence watchdog provided no new documents in Trump impeachment probe, lawmaker says

Whistleblowers have been at time essential and detrimental to a country’s democracy, but what makes them different than a leaker? We explain. Just the FAQs, USA TODAY

WASHINGTON – The inspector general who received the whistleblower’s complaint at the heart of the impeachment investigation of President Donald Trump and who found it credible testified privately Friday before the House Intelligence Committee.

Michael Atkinson, the inspector general for the intelligence community, received the whistleblower complaint Aug. 12 that focused on Trump’s call urging Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky to discredit a political rival, former Vice President Joe Biden.

Rep. Mike Quigley, D-Ill., told USA TODAY that Atkinson provided no new documents on Friday, but walked through the step-by-step process he took to deem the whistleblower credible. Quigley said he couldn’t describe those steps in detail.

“I don’t believe there was anything new revealed today,” Quigley said. “After yesterday, we need a break,” he added, referring to the nine-hour interview with former Ukraine envoy Kurt Volker.

Several Republicans left the meeting accusing Democrats of working with the whistleblower before the complaint was released.

“The inspector general for the intelligence community could provide no information about the contact between the (committee) majority and the whistleblower prior to his involvement,” said Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas. “The only way we’ll be able to get that information is from the (committee) majority themselves.”

Ratcliffe appeared with GOP Reps. Chris Stewart of Utah and Brad Wenstrup of Ohio, but neither of them answered questions.

A representative for the whistleblower asked the committee for guidance about how to file a complaint, but a panel spokesman said staffers directed the whistleblower to hire a lawyer to file a complaint with the inspector general. Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., has said he doesn’t know who the whistleblower is. And Mark Zaid, one of the lawyers on the whistleblower’s legal team, said no one from the committee helped craft the complaint.

As House Democrats worked to corroborate the complaint, Trump told reporters outside the White House on Thursday that both Ukraine and China should investigate Biden.

“Well, I would think if they were honest about it, they’d start a major investigation into the Bidens. It’s a very simple answer,” Trump said of Zelensky. “And by the way, likewise, China should start an investigation into the Bidens because what happened in China is just about as bad as what happened with Ukraine.”

Biden, a leading candidate for the Democratic nomination for president in 2020, has forcefully denied wrongdoing with his son, Hunter Biden, who worked on the board of an energy company in Ukraine. Kate Bedingfield, the communications director for Biden’s campaign, called Trump’s statement “a grotesque choice of lies over truth and self over country.”

Ukraine texts: Read key text messages between diplomats on Trump, Ukraine president

Atkinson spent two weeks reviewing the whistleblower’s complaint that alleged Trump “used the power of his office” to solicit foreign help for the 2020 election and then restricted access to records of the call. Atkinson found that the complaint appeared credible Aug. 26, after a preliminary review.

But the acting director of national intelligence, Joseph Maguire, prevented him from passing along the complaint to Congress within seven days, as is typically required for national-security whistleblower complaints. Maguire consulted with the White House and Justice Department in opting for the delay, he told the intelligence panel Sept. 26, the day after a summary of the call was released and the complaint was provided to the committee.

Maguire said he thought the complaint might be protected by executive privilege, despite being a conversation with a foreign leader. The Justice Department ruled that the complaint didn’t qualify as an “urgent concern” about “a serious or flagrant problem” requiring notification of Congress because the target – Trump – isn’t a member of the intelligence community.

Atkinson respectfully disagreed with that decision, saying in a letter Sept. 17 that the allegations related to “one of the most significant and important” of Maguire’s responsibilities to the American people. Atkinson warned lawmakers that withholding the information could lead to “a significant problem and deficiency” relating to Maguire’s intelligence programs.

Trump released a memo summarizing the calland Maguire provided the complaint to the House and Senate intelligence committees on Sept. 25. Lawmakers on those panels now want to hear from the whistleblower.

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

Schiff has characterized the call as sounding like a mafia shakedown, seeking the favor of an investigation of Biden in exchange for the release of military aid. He called Maguire’s decision to consult with the White House “bewildering” during the Sept. 26 hearing. And Schiff said Wednesday that lawmakers will have questions for Atkinson because they didn’t have the complaint when they last met with him.

“We certainly intend to ask (Atkinson) about the efforts that were made to corroborate that complaint, which we now know the inspector general found both credible and urgent,” Schiff said.

But the top Republican on the panel, Rep. Devin Nunes of California, said the whistleblower had arguable political motivation for the complaint and said Democrats were using it as ammunition in political warfare.

Trump has called the whistleblower “very inaccurate” and Schiff “a lowlife.”

“He should resign from office in disgrace and frankly they should look at him for treason,” Trump said of Schiff on Wednesday while meeting with the president of Finland.

Six House committees have been pursuing wide-ranging investigations of Trump since Democrats regained control of the chamber in January. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announced a formal impeachment inquiry Sept. 24 based on reports about Trump’s Ukraine call.

The inspector general’s meeting comes amid a flurry of subpoenas for documents and depositions with State Department officials and associates of Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, who met with Ukraine officials to urge an investigation of Biden.

More about Congress investigating President Trump’s Ukraine call:

What’s going on with Trump and Ukraine? And how does it involve Biden and a whistleblower complaint?

How does Congress hear from anonymous witnesses? Trump whistleblower seeks protection from retaliation

‘Unique and unprecedented’: Intel chief Joseph Maguire cites executive privilege in delaying whistleblower report to Congress

Nancy Pelosi has put the Trump impeachment inquiry on a fast track. Here’s the plan, timeline and key players

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/10/04/trump-impeachment-intelligence-watchdog-testifies-whistleblower/3839670002/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com