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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 433)

PBS moderator awkwardly corrected after confusing Andrew Yang for Tom Steyer: ‘I’m over here!’

The Democrats’ debate Thursday night had a rocky start after one of the PBS moderators awkwardly mixed up tech businessman Andrew Yang with billionaire donor Tom Steyer, prompting Yang to exclaim, “I’m over here!”

PBS NewsHour anchor Judy Woodruff kicked off the evening by pressing all of the seven of the candidates about the impeachment of President Trump and “what more” each could do to convince the American people that impeachment was the right move, asking them in order of their ranking in the polls. However, things took a bizarre turn with the last two candidates.

“Mr. Yang, what more could you say to the American people,” Woodruff began while looking directly at Steyer.

CNN PANEL SHOWERS PELOSI WITH PRAISE FOLLOWING IMPEACHMENT VOTES: ‘PITCH PERFECT’

“I’m over here!” Yang said from the other side of the stage. “I’m over here, Judy.”

Yang then clapped multiple times into his microphone as Woodruff tried to question Steyer, again using the wrong name.

Westlake Legal Group Yang-Woodruff_AP-Getty PBS moderator awkwardly corrected after confusing Andrew Yang for Tom Steyer: 'I'm over here!' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/person/andrew-yang fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc e30eecd3-8a4a-51a0-a24c-06da67d4909e article

Judy Woodruff had an awkward moment with Andrew Yang, left, soon after the debate got underway. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

“Judy, Judy,” Yang said to the moderator.

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“I’m sorry, Mr. Steyer,” Woodruff corrected herself. “I’m sorry.”

Steyer responded by claiming he was “the one” who began the impeachment movement over two years ago and how “the court of public opinion” should drive its results. Afterward, Woodruff called on Yang, who urged Democrats to stop being “obsessed” with impeachment.

Westlake Legal Group Yang-Woodruff_AP-Getty PBS moderator awkwardly corrected after confusing Andrew Yang for Tom Steyer: 'I'm over here!' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/person/andrew-yang fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc e30eecd3-8a4a-51a0-a24c-06da67d4909e article   Westlake Legal Group Yang-Woodruff_AP-Getty PBS moderator awkwardly corrected after confusing Andrew Yang for Tom Steyer: 'I'm over here!' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/person/andrew-yang fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc e30eecd3-8a4a-51a0-a24c-06da67d4909e article

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On the Day After, an Angry Trump Looks to Vindication in November

Westlake Legal Group 19dc-trump-facebookJumbo On the Day After, an Angry Trump Looks to Vindication in November United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Senate Republican Party Presidents and Presidency (US) Presidential Election of 2020 Pelosi, Nancy impeachment House of Representatives

WASHINGTON — President Trump sat forward on the edge of his chair and chatted at length with reporters in the Oval Office on Thursday, unbowed but for him a little subdued. The day after he was impeached for high crimes and misdemeanors, he dismissed the judgment of the House of Representatives and punched back by celebrating with a Democratic congressman who switched parties to stand with him.

“I don’t feel like I’m being impeached because it’s a hoax, it’s a setup,” Mr. Trump insisted as he showcased Representative Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey, the newly minted Republican, and looked beyond his seemingly certain acquittal in a Senate trial to next fall’s election.

“I’m beating everybody by a lot,” the president said, “and I think that’s where we’re going.”

For Mr. Trump, it was the first day of his new reality, the first day when he woke up with the scarlet letter of impeachment marked with indelible ink on his page in the history books. No matter what else happens, he now enters posterity as the third president to be impeached.

But barring the unforeseen, he will also be the first impeached president to face re-election, setting up a 320-day campaign to convince voters that he was right and his accusers were wrong. He has a chance that Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton never had — to mitigate, at least, the sting of impeachment — and his political operation wasted little time mounting a counterassault on what Mr. Trump characterizes as the corrupt, liberal Democrats who orchestrated a largely party-line scheme to nullify his election.

In a fund-raising pitch on Thursday, Brad Parscale, the president’s campaign manager, called the Democrats who voted to impeach him “traitors” and urged supporters to fight back. “Let’s make sure they know that we will NEVER FORGET,” Mr. Parscale wrote. The campaign announced a “Democrats for Trump” coalition of disaffected members of the other party.

Still, some Republicans were less confident that impeachment would be a boon at the ballot box. Corry Bliss, a Republican strategist who oversaw the party’s independent but ultimately unsuccessful effort to defend its House majority in 2018, said there was a long road to Nov. 3.

“The world is going to end 500 times between impeachment and the election,” he said. “We don’t live in a society where anything can last for 10 or 11 months.”

In a blistering editorial on Thursday evening, a prominent evangelical magazine, Christianity Today, called for Mr. Trump to be removed from office. The move was a pointed departure from the vast majority of Mr. Trump’s white evangelical base, which has supported the president through myriad controversies.

“The president of the United States attempted to use his political power to coerce a foreign leader to harass and discredit one of the president’s political opponents,” wrote Mark Galli, the editor in chief. “That is not only a violation of the Constitution; more importantly, it is profoundly immoral.”

But the editorial is unlikely to signal a significant change in Mr. Trump’s steadfast support from white evangelicals, as the magazine has long represented more centrist evangelical thought and popular evangelical leaders continue to support him.

For Mr. Trump, the day after found him still a little shellshocked, according to people close to him. Despite the clear momentum behind impeachment among Democrats in recent weeks, some of Mr. Trump’s advisers tried to convince him — and themselves — that Speaker Nancy Pelosi did not have the votes and might not even bring the articles of impeachment to the floor, despite warnings from the White House director of legislative affairs, Eric Ueland, that the votes were there.

Mr. Trump’s aides packed his schedule with events to keep him out of Washington as the debate took place on Wednesday. He vented his fury at a rally in Michigan that started even as the votes were being recorded. But having gotten his emotions off his chest, he was unusually talkative flying home on Air Force One. Impeachment “doesn’t feel like anything,” he told aides, according to one person briefed on the conversation.

However much the humiliation and the ensuing news coverage stung, Mr. Trump was intent on not showing it — even in private.

By Thursday morning, he was eager for information. He watched television coverage, listening for clues about what Ms. Pelosi might be up to. Almost as soon as she said she might delay sending the articles of impeachment to the Senate, Mr. Trump started surveying advisers about what it could mean. “Why do you think she’s doing that?” he asked one person after another.

The answers varied and advisers assured him they were looking at options, including trying to push through a trial regardless or arguing that he technically was never actually impeached in the first place, according to a person familiar with the discussions.

Ivanka Trump, the president’s eldest daughter, made a point of going on CBS News to make clear that Mr. Trump was undaunted by impeachment. “He’s energized,” she said.

To make sure of that, and to press any advantage against Democrats, Mr. Trump’s aides rushed to put together an event for Thursday with Mr. Van Drew, one of two Democrats to vote against both articles.

Mr. Van Drew, who declared himself a Republican after the votes, was invited to the Oval Office on a day’s notice.

“You have my undying support,” he told the president. “Always.”

Mr. Trump thanked him. “And by the way, same way,” he said. “I’m endorsing him, O.K.?”

No other president has gone on to an election after being impeached. Johnson, who had not been elected in the first place and acceded to the office after Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, was shunted aside after being acquitted in a Senate impeachment trial.

A Democrat who had joined the Republican Lincoln’s ticket as his vice-presidential running mate in 1864, Johnson found himself without a party in 1868. Within weeks of the Senate verdict, both parties nominated other candidates without considering him, and Gen. Ulysses S. Grant went on to win as a Republican.

Johnson later mounted a comeback of sorts when the Tennessee legislature made him a senator back in the days before direct elections, but he died several months after joining the body that had put him on trial.

As for Mr. Clinton, he was in his second term when he was acquitted by the Senate in 1999 and therefore ineligible to run again. His vice president, Al Gore, ended up losing the 2000 election.

For that matter, President Richard M. Nixon was also in his second term when he resigned after the approval of articles of impeachment by the House Judiciary Committee in 1974. His vice president and successor, Gerald R. Ford, ended up losing in 1976.

Mr. Trump resolved to reverse that record, and advisers said they had already detected a surge of support from the president’s base. The Republican National Committee and the Trump campaign said they had raised at least $5 million on Thursday alone and $20.6 million in the past month. About 600,000 new volunteers have signed up since September, the party said.

“It’s absolutely been more unifying than anything I’ve seen in years,” said Dan Eberhart, a Republican donor. “Impeachment is really Chapter 1 for the 2020 race. It’s setting up the battle lines and people are realigning their strategies based on how certain members voted.”

Catalina Lauf, a former Trump administration official who is challenging Representative Lauren Underwood, Democrat of Illinois, said impeachment had fired up even some Democrats in her district. “You might disagree with the man,” she said, “but you also feel the treatment he’s been given since the day he was elected is pure madness.”

That sense of grievance and persecution neatly fits into the message Mr. Trump has conveyed from the start — that the elites are out to get him, that they hate him and that they hate his supporters, the “deplorables,” to use the word once uttered by Hillary Clinton that has become a rallying cry for the president’s team.

John Fredericks, a radio host in Virginia, said the volume of calls into his morning show on Thursday was so inundating that he finally had to stop answering them.

“People are outraged because they know what is really going on is that Pelosi and the Democrats think that they know best,” Mr. Fredericks said. “Their message to us is, ‘You are really stupid people who go to Walmart and smell and can’t be trusted.’ It’s an insult.”

Still, Democrats are energized, too, and may be more so if a Senate trial results in acquittal along party lines. Moreover, Mr. Trump’s backlash strategy did not work as well as he had hoped during last year’s midterm elections when he tried to convert conservatives’ anger over what they considered unfair sexual misconduct allegations against Brett M. Kavanaugh, the president’s Supreme Court nominee, into turnout at the polls.

Arguably, the passion generated by the Kavanaugh hearings helped Republicans in select Senate races, but Democrats went on to capture the House.

John Whitbeck, the Republican Party chairman in Virginia, where Democrats captured the state legislature last month, said that impeachment helped Republicans see the stakes of the 2020 election more clearly. But the longer term political trends, he warned, suggested the party could still fall short.

“If you are a Trump supporter and you didn’t vote in these off-year elections, I just don’t see how you don’t show up,” he said. “But I don’t know if that’s going to be enough to overcome the fervor on the other side.”

In states like Virginia that have trended away from Republicans, Mr. Whitbeck said antipathy toward Mr. Trump has been so overwhelming that his political operation has been unable to account for it accurately in its data.

“We spent a ton of money trying to get Trump voters engaged. We’re doing everything we can to account for the high turnout. And still we’ve underestimated it every year,” he said. “It’s just historic on the other side.”

Peter Baker, Maggie Haberman and Jeremy W. Peters reported from Washington, and Elaina Plott from New York. Nick Corasaniti contributed reporting from New York, and Elizabeth Dias from Washington.

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Christianity Today Calls for Trump’s Removal

Westlake Legal Group merlin_162600882_406e6d54-9551-4f8b-8ccb-6f3d3f145f59-facebookJumbo Christianity Today Calls for Trump’s Removal Trump, Donald J Graham, Billy Evangelical Movement Christians and Christianity

Christianity Today, a prominent evangelical magazine, called for President Trump to be removed from office in an editorial on Thursday, a day after Mr. Trump was impeached by the House of Representatives.

The editorial was a surprising move for a publication that typically avoids taking sides in bitter partisan battles and a pointed departure from the vast majority of the president’s white evangelical base, which has supported Mr. Trump through multiple controversies.

“The president of the United States attempted to use his political power to coerce a foreign leader to harass and discredit one of the president’s political opponents,” Mark Galli, the editor-in-chief, wrote. “That is not only a violation of the Constitution; more importantly, it is profoundly immoral.”

Still, the editorial is unlikely to signal a significant change in Mr. Trump’s steadfast support from white evangelicals, as the magazine has long represented more centrist thought and popular evangelical leaders continue to support the president.

“My father would be embarrassed,” Franklin Graham said in an interview, referring to his father, Billy Graham, who founded the magazine.

“It is not going to change anybody’s mind about Trump,” Mr. Graham said. “There’s a liberal element within the evangelical movement. Christianity Today represents that.”

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Rep. Debbie Dingell on Trump mockery of her late husband: ‘Families are off-limits, period’

Westlake Legal Group CavutoDingell720 Rep. Debbie Dingell on Trump mockery of her late husband: 'Families are off-limits, period' Vandana Rambaran fox-news/shows/your-world-cavuto fox-news/politics fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc e8ee3908-2a57-5968-b7e8-ead5af6d8f7b article

Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich. told Fox News’ “Your World” Thursday that “families are off-limits, period” adding “the tone of rhetoric in this country should be bothering people,” a day after President Trump mocked her late husband during a reelection rally in the congresswoman’s home state.

Dingell said the president’s comments about former Congressman John Dingell, D-Mich., who died in February after a long battle with prostate cancer, were particularly hurtful because he uttered them during the holiday season.

“Thanksgiving was very hard and this Christmas is very hard, and so those remarks made it harder because I miss John very much,” Dingell told host Neil Cavuto.

‘THE VIEW’ HOSTS BROWBEAT MELANIE AND IVANKA OVER TRUMP’S JOHN DINGELL ATTACK

While Dingell, along with the majority of her Democratic colleagues, voted to impeach Trump Wednesday evening, the president held a fiery “Merry Christmas” rally in Battle Creek.

“Debbie Dingell, that’s a real beauty,” the president said to a rapt crowd that booed the mention of Dingell’s name. Trump said he gave John Dingell the “A+ treatment” after his death last February and Debbie had called him to say “it’s the nicest thing that’s ever happened, thank you so much. John would be so thrilled. He’s looking down.”

“I said, ‘That’s OK. Don’t worry about it.’ Maybe he’s looking up. I don’t know,” he quipped to mixed reactions from the audience.

“Maybe, but let’s assume he’s looking down.”

The congresswoman said she hopes that the president’s comments will remind Americans to “take a deep breath, try to be nicer to each other and understand that random acts of kindness can make a person’s day and actually impact the quality of somebody’s life.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Dingell also defended House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s, D-Calif., decision to hold off on sending articles of impeachment to the Senate before the New Year.

“I think the speaker is trying to make sure … that there’s going to be a fair trial in the Senate,” Dingell said.

Westlake Legal Group CavutoDingell720 Rep. Debbie Dingell on Trump mockery of her late husband: 'Families are off-limits, period' Vandana Rambaran fox-news/shows/your-world-cavuto fox-news/politics fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc e8ee3908-2a57-5968-b7e8-ead5af6d8f7b article   Westlake Legal Group CavutoDingell720 Rep. Debbie Dingell on Trump mockery of her late husband: 'Families are off-limits, period' Vandana Rambaran fox-news/shows/your-world-cavuto fox-news/politics fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc e8ee3908-2a57-5968-b7e8-ead5af6d8f7b article

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Kansas man pleads guilty to murdering girlfriend on Bahamas cruise

A Kansas man pleaded guilty Thursday to strangling his girlfriend then pushing her to her death off the balcony of a cruise ship that was off the coast of Florida last year, according to federal prosecutors.

Topeka resident Eric Duane Newman, 55, pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in the January 2018 killing of his longtime girlfriend, Tamara Tucker, 50, “with malice aforethought,” the Department of Justice said in a news release.

Westlake Legal Group Topeka Kansas man pleads guilty to murdering girlfriend on Bahamas cruise fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 170635c6-dcb1-59e6-8908-6022623b4bdc

Eric Duane Newman has pleaded guilty to murdering his longtime girlfriend on a cruise ship last year.  (Shawnee County Jail)

The couple was on a Carnival cruise from Jacksonville, Fla., to the Bahamas and staying in a cabin on the 13th deck.

Newman admitted during his plea hearing in federal court in Kansas that the couple had been arguing before the murder. He said he strangled Tucker then pushed her over the cabin room balcony railing to the 11th deck. Tucker died from blunt force trauma caused by the fall.

At the time, the cruise ship was about 30 nautical miles from New Smyrna Beach, Fla.

TEXAS EX-COP PLEADS GUILTY TO MURDERING PREGNANT GIRLFRIEND

Tucker was a full-time faculty member in the social work department at Park University in Parkville, Mo., from 2012 to 2017. Before that, she’d been an adjunct instructor since 2007.

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Newman’s sentencing is scheduled for March 18, 2020, before Chief U.S. District Judge Julie A. Robinson.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Topeka Kansas man pleads guilty to murdering girlfriend on Bahamas cruise fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 170635c6-dcb1-59e6-8908-6022623b4bdc   Westlake Legal Group Topeka Kansas man pleads guilty to murdering girlfriend on Bahamas cruise fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 170635c6-dcb1-59e6-8908-6022623b4bdc

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Discussion Thread: Sixth Democratic Presidential Debate | 12/19/19 | 8pm-11pm EST

Westlake Legal Group i5CdhqD7_UKxHHrXvFYAW5qD-TljCtRv1tmvDsvwN9Q Discussion Thread: Sixth Democratic Presidential Debate | 12/19/19 | 8pm-11pm EST r/politics

The top seven Democratic presidential candidates will appear on stage in Los Angeles Thursday night in the sixth debate of the year.

Tonight marks the smallest debate lineup yet for the 2020 Democratic presidential primary as the Democratic National Committee continues to raise the polling and fundraising thresholds to qualify.

Which candidates will be there?

  • Joe Biden, former vice president

  • Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, Ind.

  • Amy Klobuchar, senator from Minnesota

  • Bernie Sanders, senator from Vermont

  • Tom Steyer, business executive and activist

  • Elizabeth Warren, senator from Massachusetts

  • Andrew Yang, entrepreneur and philanthropist

The debate will be moderated by Judy Woodruff, anchor of PBS NewsHour; Amna Nawaz, PBS senior national correspondent; and Yamiche Alcindor, PBS White House correspondent. They will also be joined by Politico’s chief political correspondent, Tim Alberta.

How to watch

The debate is set to begin at 8 p.m. ET and last around three hours. It is co-hosted by PBS NewsHour and Politico and will take place at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.

The debate will be televised on PBS and CNN, livestreamed online at PBS.org, PBS NewsHour, politico.com, and CNN.com, and available on many of the news organizations’ social, mobile and live-TV streaming apps. You can also listen to the debate on SiriusXM channels 116, 454, and 795. A youtube link to watch can be found here.

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WATCH LIVE: The Final 7 Debate

Westlake Legal Group 5dfc0547250000c70798eb95 WATCH LIVE: The Final 7 Debate

Democratic presidential hopefuls meet for the final time in 2019 at a debate in Los Angeles hosted by PBS and Politico.

Seven candidates qualified for the debate, including entrepreneur Andrew Yang; South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg; former Vice President Joe Biden; billionaire activist Tom Steyer; and Sens. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.), Amy Klobuchar (Minn.) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.).

PBS’s Judy Woodruff, Amna Nawaz and Yamiche Alcindor, as well as Tim Alberta of Politico, will moderate the event beginning at 8 p.m. Eastern.

Read updates on the debate below:

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Yang unloads on Dems’ ‘obsession’ with Trump, impeachment at presidential debate

Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang threw cold water on the media’s “obsession” with impeachment during Thursday night’s primary debate, telling attendees to applause that Americans become frustrated “the more we act like Donald Trump is the cause of all our problems.”

“If you turned on cable network news today, you would think [Trump’s] our president because of some combination of Russia, racism, Facebook, Hillary Clinton and emails all mixed together,” Yang said. “But Americans around the country know different.”

He added: “We have to stop being obsessed over impeachment … and focus on the problems that got Donald Trump elected.” He sounded the alarm over declining manufacturing jobs and other economic issues.

With less than seven weeks to go until Iowa’s caucuses kick off and just a day after House Democrats voted to impeach President Trump, a winnowed field of Democratic presidential contenders was on the debate stage for a sixth and final time in 2019.

Thursday night’s televised contest ahead of Christmas brought seven rivals to heavily Democratic California, the biggest prize in the primary season and home to 1 in 8 Americans.

The debate in Los Angeles could turn out to be the least-watched so far, as the holidays approach and impeachment drama dominates the news. Viewership has declined in each round though five debates, and even campaigns have grumbled that the candidates would rather be on the ground in early voting states than again taking the debate stage.

MCCONNELL HEADS BACK TO SENATE FLOOR LATE THURSDAY, SAYS DEMS BREAKING PRECEDENT, NOT SURE WHAT THEY’RE DOING

Republicans have slammed House Democrats’ plan to delay a Senate trial. Hours before the debate, Noah Feldman, the Harvard Law School professor who testified for Democrats at the impeachment inquiry earlier this month, wrote an explosive op-ed asserting that if Democrats do not forward the impeachment articles to the Senate as dictated by the Constitution, then Trump was never even impeached at all. The Constitution dictates that after impeachment by a majority in the House, a two-thirds vote is needed in the Senate to remove a president from office.

Asked why polls show that many Americans oppose impeaching and removing Trump, former Vice President Joe Biden called impeachment a “constitutional necessity,” regardless of what the numbers show.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, for her part, accused Trump of corruption, without addressing the popularity of impeachment.

Westlake Legal Group AP19350683071367 Yang unloads on Dems' 'obsession' with Trump, impeachment at presidential debate Gregg Re fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc article 544875ac-ccb0-525b-814e-fa41c896d3fa

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks during a town hall meeting, Monday, Dec. 16, 2019, in Keokuk, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar called Trump’s actions a “global Watergate,” saying if he is really innocent, he should be encouraging his top lieutenants to testify — an argument that has rankled Republicans, who assert the importance of the presumption of innocence.

The lack of a clear front-runner in the Democratic field comes as Democrats complain that there will be a notable lack of diversity onstage compared to earlier debates. For the first time this cycle, the debate won’t feature a black or Latino candidate.

The race in California has largely mirrored national trends, with former Biden, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and Warren clustered at the top of the field, followed by South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Klobuchar, Yang and billionaire philanthropist Tom Steyer.

Conspicuously missing from the lineup at Loyola Marymount University on Thursday will be former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, a billionaire who is unable to qualify for the contests because he is not accepting campaign donations. But even if he’s not on the podium, Bloomberg has been felt in the state: He’s running a deluge of TV advertising in California to introduce himself to voters who probably know little, if anything, about him.

Bloomberg’s late entry into the contest last month highlighted the overriding issue in the contest, electability, a sign of the unease within the Democratic Party about its crop of candidates and whether any is strong enough to unseat an incumbent president. The eventual nominee will be tasked with splicing together the party’s disparate factions — a job Hillary Clinton struggled with after defeating Sanders in a long and bitter primary fight in 2016.

DEBATE IS ON: DEAL REACHED IN UNION DISPUTE THAT THREATENED TO SIDETRACK SHOWDOWN

Biden adviser Symone Sanders said to expect another robust exchange on health care. “This is an issue that is not going away and for good reason, because it is an issue that in 2018 Democrats ran on and won,” she said.

Jess O’Connell with Buttigieg’s campaign said the candidate will “be fully prepared to have an open and honest conversation about where there are contrasts between us and the other candidates. This is a really important time to start to do that. Voters need time to understand the distinctions between these candidates.” The key issues: health care and higher education.

The unsettled race has seen surges at various points by Biden, Warren, Sanders and Buttigieg, though it’s become defined by that cluster of shifting leaders, with others struggling for momentum. California Sen. Kamala Harris, once seen as among the top tier of candidates, shelved her campaign this month, citing a lack of money. And Warren has become more aggressive, especially toward Buttigieg, as she tries to recover from shifting explanations of how she’d pay for “Medicare for All” without raising taxes.

In a replay of 2016, the shifting race for the Democratic nomination has showcased the rift between the party’s liberal wing, represented in Sanders and Warren, and candidates parked in or near the political center, including Biden, Buttigieg and Bloomberg.

Two candidates who didn’t make the stage will still make their presence felt for debate watchers with ads reminding viewers they’re still in the race.

APPELLATE COURT DEMANDS HOUSE DEMS EXPLAIN WHETHER IMPEACHMENT VOTE RENDERS THEIR LEGAL CASE ‘MOOT’

New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker and former Housing Secretary Julián Castro are airing television ads targeted to primary voters during the debate. Booker’s is his first television ad, and in it he says even though he’s not on the debate stage, “I’m going to win this election anyway.” It’s airing as part of a $500,000 campaign, running in Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina, as well as New York, Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles.

A pro-Booker super PAC is also going up with an ad in Iowa highlighting positive reviews of Booker’s past debate performances.

Meanwhile, Castro is running an ad, in Iowa, in which he argues the state should no longer go first in Democrats’ nominating process because it doesn’t reflect the diversity of the Democratic Party.

Both candidates failed to hit the polling threshold to qualify for the debates and have in recent weeks become outspoken critics of what they say is a debate qualification process that favors white candidates over minorities.

Fox News’ Paul Steinhauser and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6117152877001_6117147004001-vs Yang unloads on Dems' 'obsession' with Trump, impeachment at presidential debate Gregg Re fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc article 544875ac-ccb0-525b-814e-fa41c896d3fa   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6117152877001_6117147004001-vs Yang unloads on Dems' 'obsession' with Trump, impeachment at presidential debate Gregg Re fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc article 544875ac-ccb0-525b-814e-fa41c896d3fa

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Read Live Updates On The Last Democratic Debate Of 2019

Westlake Legal Group 5dfc0547250000c70798eb95 Read Live Updates On The Last Democratic Debate Of 2019

Democratic presidential hopefuls meet for the final time in 2019 at a debate in Los Angeles hosted by PBS and Politico.

Seven candidates qualified for the debate, including entrepreneur Andrew Yang; South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg; former Vice President Joe Biden; billionaire activist Tom Steyer; and Sens. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.), Amy Klobuchar (Minn.) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.).

PBS’s Judy Woodruff, Amna Nawaz and Yamiche Alcindor, as well as Tim Alberta of Politico, will moderate the event beginning at 8 p.m. Eastern.

Read updates on the debate below:

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Debbie Dingell Gets Support From Another Widow Whose Husband Trump Has Mocked: Cindy McCain

Westlake Legal Group 19dc-dingell-facebookJumbo Debbie Dingell Gets Support From Another Widow Whose Husband Trump Has Mocked: Cindy McCain United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Michigan McCain, Cindy impeachment House of Representatives Dingell, John D Jr Dingell, Deborah

WASHINGTON — One widow instantly knew how the other one felt.

“I’m preparing for the first holiday season without the man I love,” one said.

“I’m terribly sorry,” the other replied. “Please know I am thinking about you.”

The Twitter exchange sounded like a salutation between two women facing the season alone, but the message of support from Cindy McCain, the widow of John McCain, the Arizona senator, to Representative Debbie Dingell, Democrat of Michigan, was about a different shared experience.

It was a message of solidarity sent after President Trump had mocked Ms. Dingell (“You know Dingell? You ever hear of her, Michigan? Debbie Dingell, that’s a real beauty.”) and implied that her husband — John D. Dingell Jr., the former Michigan congressman who died in February — was “looking up” from hell. Ms. McCain’s own husband has been the object of relentless presidential attacks since he died.

In an interview on Thursday, hours after Mr. Trump became the third president in history to be impeached — an outcome she voted for — Ms. Dingell said that her husband “was never afraid to fight for what was right” but that the president’s remarks about him had cut deep.

“He hurt me,” Ms. Dingell said. “I think there’s some things that should be off limits.”

Mr. Trump has freely and frequently brought the power of his office down on a variety of journalists, lawmakers, Foreign Service officers and members of the military he has seen as standing in his way.

But Ms. Dingell is now joining the ranks of a more select group that includes the McCains and a Gold Star military family, who have suffered profound loss only to see it mocked and used as political ammunition by the president.

Ms. Dingell said on Thursday that she was still grieving the loss of her husband, who was the longest-serving congressman in American history. He retired from Congress in 2014 after serving his district, just outside Detroit, for 59 years. His wife, who now holds his seat, called for civility as she faced her first Christmas in 38 years without her husband.

“If anything good comes out of this,” Ms. Dingell said, “maybe people will take a deep breath and think about it.”

But Mr. Trump is not prone to contemplation. At his rally on Wednesday night, Mr. Trump was speaking off the cuff to supporters as he called out Democrats like Ms. Dingell, who had voted in favor of the two articles of impeachment against him. But the president singled her out because she had done so after he approved an “A-plus treatment” for her husband’s burial.

“So she calls me up: ‘It’s the nicest thing that’s ever happened; thank you so much,’” Mr. Trump said at the rally, mocking the congresswoman’s voice while recounting their call. He suggested that Ms. Dingell had begged for him to lower American flags to half-staff and, apparently impersonating her, said: “Do this, do that, do that. Rotunda.”

Mr. Dingell did not lie in state in the Capitol Rotunda — Ms. Dingell said on Thursday that that had not been one of his requests. Still, Mr. Trump said Ms. Dingell had said her husband would be thrilled as he looked down and saw how the country was honoring him.

“Maybe he’s looking up,” Mr. Trump said at one point. “I don’t know. I don’t know, maybe. Maybe. But let’s assume he’s looking down.”

Ms. Dingell said the president had ordered American flags lowered, but beyond that, Mr. Dingell’s military service in World War II made him eligible for the only request he had made, which was to be buried at Arlington National Ceremony. At the time, she said, she had welcomed the president’s call — emphasizing that he called her.

“He was very kind,” Ms. Dingell said. “He had told me that he heard he was a great man and I thought it was very thoughtful for him to call at a time when I was really grieving.”

But Mr. Trump’s public remarks about their exchange were condemned by both Republicans — including Representative Fred Upton, who faces re-election next year in Michigan — and Democrats, including former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., a leading 2020 candidate whose own political life has been punctuated by loss.

“This is equally as cruel as it is pathetic,” Mr. Biden, whose son Beau died in 2015, said on Twitter, “and it is beyond unconscionable that our President would behave this way.”

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who has also been called “crazy” and “nervous” by Mr. Trump as she steered her caucus toward impeachment, said there was nothing funny about what Mr. Trump said.

“What the president misunderstands is that cruelty is not wit,” she said. “It’s not funny at all. It’s very sad.”

Mr. Upton, a close friend of Mr. Dingell’s who delivered a eulogy for him, called on the president to apologize, and said on Twitter, “There was no need to ‘dis’ him in a crass political way.”

Representative Paul Mitchell, another Michigan Republican, also said the president’s comments warranted an apology. “To use his name in such a dishonorable manner at last night’s rally is unacceptable from anyone, let alone the president of the United States,” he said. “An apology is due, Mr. President.”

The Trump campaign had no comment about whether the president’s comments could affect his political fortunes in Michigan, a state he narrowly won in 2016. Ronna McDaniel, the chairwoman of the Republican National Committee, also sidestepped the question.

“I have great respect for the Dingells’ decades of service to the state of Michigan and I’m very sorry for Representative Debbie Dingell’s loss,” Ms. McDaniel said in a statement. “I was glad to see the late Representative John Dingell honored so highly by the president when he passed away.”

As the criticism mounted, the White House did not apologize and instead suggested that the public consider how Mr. Trump might feel about being impeached.

“He has been under attack, and under impeachment attack, for the last few months, and then just under attack politically for the last two and a half years,” Stephanie Grisham, the White House press secretary, said in an interview with ABC on Thursday. “I think that as we all know, the president is a counterpuncher.”

She declined to explain how Mr. Dingell, who died 10 months ago, had thrown the first punch.

The president’s rough comments on his adversaries have earned him condemnation from grieving families before. In 2016, Mr. Trump criticized the parents of Capt. Humayun Khan, a Muslim soldier killed in Iraq, who had denounced the president during the Democratic National Convention. Mr. Trump said Captain Khan’s father had delivered the entire speech because his mother was not “allowed” to speak.

Khizr Khan, the soldier’s father, said he felt a sense of recognition when he heard that Mr. Trump had mocked the Dingell family.

“All three of them have served this nation and they have passed,” Mr. Khan said of his son, Mr. Dingell and Mr. McCain. “They deserve to be respected.”

Mr. Trump has particularly fixated on Mr. McCain, who died in 2018 from complications from brain cancer and, as he was dying, made plans to keep the president away from his funeral.

After Mr. McCain died, Mr. Trump waited days to issue a proclamation marking the senator’s death, relenting only under enormous pressure. He has repeatedly brought up Mr. McCain’s vote against repealing the Affordable Care Act at his political rallies. And when Mr. Trump traveled to Japan in May, the White House asked the Navy to hide a destroyer named after Mr. McCain during the president’s visit to Yokosuka Naval Base.

The senator’s daughter, Meghan McCain, offered her own sharp criticism on Thursday.

“The comments from Trump about Rep Dingell is utterly sick and cruel,” Ms. McCain said on Twitter. “Take heed in knowing he only attacks people for whom he is threatened by their great legacies. History will forever judge him very harshly.”

The McCain family declined to comment further. But for her part, Ms. Dingell said she did not want the president to call her again, even if he had an apology.

“No,” Ms. Dingell said. “He’s taken his shot.”

Eileen Sullivan contributed reporting. Kitty Bennett contributed research.

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