web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 439)

Detroit-area Yemeni expats avoid prison time for sending millions of dollars to native country

Several Yemeni expats in the Detroit area who pleaded guilty to transferring millions of dollars to their war-torn native country unlawfully will not be going to prison — after the judge cited a need for “compassion,” according to a report Sunday.

One by one, U.S. District Judge Avern Cohn declined to send them to prison, even though the men had failed to register their activities as a money transfer business. Failing to do so usually carries up to five years behind bars.

Regarding his recent rulings, Cohn noted that Yemen’s financial system has been in ruins and people inside the country needed help.

Westlake Legal Group AP19293536462754 Detroit-area Yemeni expats avoid prison time for sending millions of dollars to native country fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 035c5be4-e023-50ba-b312-90eeb1e5146f

U.S. District Judge Avern Cohn, seen in a photo last week, defended his decisions not to sentence Yemeni men to jail time for sending millions of dollars to their home country. (AP)

“Only people without compassion” would object to the light sentences, Cohn, 95, told The Associated Press. “As I’ve been here longer, I’ve come to the realization that the rules are flexible — at least to me.”

The Detroit area has the highest concentration of Yemenis, a demographic that has risen amid a war in Yemen that has killed tens of thousands of people and left millions more with inadequate food and health care.

The World Bank estimates that Yemenis received at least $3.3 billion in 2018 – a conservative figure by some estimates.

FEAR US WEAPONS ARE FALLING INTO THE ‘WRONG HANDS’ DURING CHAOTIC YEMENI WAR

Since 2018, federal prosecutors in Detroit have charged nine people in an investigation of cash transfers to Yemen. Bank accounts were opened in the names of shell businesses, then used to deposit and wire roughly $90 million over a seven-year period, according to plea agreements.

All nine men have pleaded guilty to failing to register money transfer businesses or making false statements to agents.

Cohn, who has been a judge since 1979, has described the conditions in Yemen as “horrendous,” noting that sending men to prison could cause hardship in conservative Muslim families where wives often don’t work outside the home.

NEARLY 100,000 HAVE BEEN KILLED IN ONGOING YEMEN WAR, REPORT FINDS

It’s unfair to “shed the traditions and practices of your homeland,” Cohn said to one of the men.

Prosecutors said they had no evidence the scheme was anything more than sending money to relatives and possibly avoiding taxes, but they believed sentences within the guidelines were appropriate.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Judges don’t have to follow sentencing guidelines, and Cohn rejected prison terms.

He placed six men on supervised release. Three others awaited sentencing.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19293536462754 Detroit-area Yemeni expats avoid prison time for sending millions of dollars to native country fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 035c5be4-e023-50ba-b312-90eeb1e5146f   Westlake Legal Group AP19293536462754 Detroit-area Yemeni expats avoid prison time for sending millions of dollars to native country fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 035c5be4-e023-50ba-b312-90eeb1e5146f

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

San Diego man who said he tried saving relatives from fire is arrested in their deaths

A San Diego man was arrested Friday for allegedly starting a suspicious house fire that killed his parents, sister and injured two siblings last weekend — despite initially claiming he tried to save his family.

Wilber Romero, 26, faced homicide and arson charges, Fox 5 reported.

The fire ignited just before 4:30 a.m. on Oct. 13, tearing through their small home in Logan Heights with at least five members of the Romero family still inside.

Westlake Legal Group San-Diego-Fire San Diego man who said he tried saving relatives from fire is arrested in their deaths fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 20f49c0e-c8fd-504a-a6c6-0cbb5f642fef

The charred remains of the Romeo family home in Logan Heights. Three members of the family were killed during a deadly fire last Sunday and the oldest son is now a suspect. (Fox 5)

CALIFORNIA WILDLIFE COMPENSATION DEADLINE LOOMS, 70,000 VICTIMS MAY MISS OUT ON PAYMENTS

Wilber’s father, Jose Antonio Romero, 44, turned up dead inside the home.

His mother, Nicolasa Mayo, 46, died in the hospital, as did his sister, Iris “Krystal” Romero, 21 — following a heroic attempt to use her body as a human shield — to protect her younger brother, 17-year-old Angel Romero, from being burnt, relative Tania Flores told KNSD.

Iris had become brain dead and was pronounced dead on Wednesday night, police told the outlet.

Angel and his sister, Wendy Romero, 24, are expected to recover from their injuries. Wendy had tried so hard to escape that she broke her fingers beating on the door, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported.

Wilber reportedly escaped unhurt.

He told KGTV he awoke to find his bed on fire and tried yelling at his family to get them out of the burning home.

“My dogs were jumping on me, trying to wake me up. I woke up. When I woke up, my bed was on fire. I jumped out of bed and started screaming the house is on fire,” Romero told the outlet.

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA OIL FACILITY FIRE CAUSES AUTHORITIES TO DECLARE HAZMAT EMERGENCY, ORDER RESIDENTS TO STAY INSIDE

Later, in an interview with KFMB, Wilber continued to deny he had anything to do with the fire.

“You can lock me up, but you’re not going to take me in for me to say this: ‘I did it,'” he said. “I’m not going to say it because I didn’t do it.”

Wilber was questioned by police after the fire, but they let him go before his eventual arrest, KNSD added. Neighbors say they saw Wilber running down the street screaming when they recalled the heartbreaking scene.

“I thought it was like a scary movie. I thought it was a nightmare, honestly. I’m just like, ‘This is not real. This is not really happening,'” Jamie Felix, a family friend living next door, said.

A nearby church had a vigil on Tuesday to support the family, while neighbors raised money for the funeral by holding a car wash and a couple of fundraisers.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Wilber spoke at the funeral, thanking everyone for their thoughts and prayers.

He was booked into county jail and expected to make his first court appearance on Oct. 22.

Westlake Legal Group San-Diego-Fire San Diego man who said he tried saving relatives from fire is arrested in their deaths fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 20f49c0e-c8fd-504a-a6c6-0cbb5f642fef   Westlake Legal Group San-Diego-Fire San Diego man who said he tried saving relatives from fire is arrested in their deaths fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 20f49c0e-c8fd-504a-a6c6-0cbb5f642fef

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Estate Taxes Are Easy to Flee, but They Still Help States

Arkansas reaped a windfall when a Walmart founder, James L. Walton, known as Bud, died in 1995 with a fortune estimated by Forbes at $1.65 billion in today’s money. The next year, state estate tax receipts jumped 425 percent, to about $183 million in current dollars.

In an age when bigger fortunes are being made, the states’ prize is getting richer. Research by Enrico Moretti of the University of California, Berkeley, and Daniel J. Wilson of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco estimates that if Jeff Bezos of Amazon died today at his home in the Seattle suburbs, the state tax bill on his estate, estimated by Forbes at more than $100 billion, would add up to almost $12 billion. Washington State’s entire budget for two years is $52 billion.

There’s a hitch to state estate taxes: The rich can move to avoid their reach. That makes counting on the revenues a bit of a crapshoot. If an aging Mr. Bezos moved before he died, establishing his residence in California, his fortune would produce no estate tax revenue.

And yet the payoff from estate taxes can be so big that it’s worthwhile for states to impose them anyway.

The study by Mr. Moretti and Mr. Wilson, to be published by the National Bureau of Economic Research on Monday, explores the main drawback of this kind of wealth tax: The rich will deploy all sorts of tactics to avoid them. The arsenal includes charitable bequests, trusts, the creative valuation of assets and, apparently, moving out of state to die.

The older the wealthy get, the less likely they are to continue to live in states that charge estate taxes. Mr. Moretti and Mr. Wilson estimate that from 2001 to 2017, a 40-year-old billionaire on the Forbes list had a 22 percent chance of living in a state with an estate tax. By age 70, the odds were only 14 percent. By age 90, they had fallen to only 9 percent.

But over the long run, Mr. Moretti and Mr. Wilson conclude, the state estate tax can be a useful tool. From 1982 to 2017, the death of the average Forbes billionaire generated $165 million in revenue in states with estate taxes. Lots of billionaires moved to avoid them. But estate taxes raised more money for states that had them than they lost in income-tax revenue when billionaires left.

“The behavioral response is very high, but despite the strong response it is still worth it for the states,” Mr. Moretti said.

Taxing the wealth of America’s ultrarich is a central issue in the campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination. Senator Bernie Sanders proposed an annual tax ranging from 1 percent on fortunes worth $32 million to $50 million to 8 percent on those above $10 billion. Senator Elizabeth Warren is calling for a comparatively modest annual tax of 2 percent on fortunes above $50 million, with an additional 1 percent on wealth over $1 billion.

Not all Democrats are on board. But even Democratic economists who have pushed back against these ideas say federal estate and gift taxes, the only taxes on wealth in the United States today, could be applied much more broadly and aggressively. reducing exemptions and increasing tax rates on large estates.

Westlake Legal Group arkansas-estate-tax-280 Estate Taxes Are Easy to Flee, but They Still Help States Wilson, Daniel J tax evasion States (US) Moretti, Enrico Inheritance and Estate Taxes High Net Worth Individuals Economics (Theory and Philosophy)

Arkansas estate tax revenue

Bud Walton dies in 1995, generating a windfall for the state the next year.

The state eliminates the tax in 2005, creating a haven for wealth inheritance.

Westlake Legal Group arkansas-estate-tax-335 Estate Taxes Are Easy to Flee, but They Still Help States Wilson, Daniel J tax evasion States (US) Moretti, Enrico Inheritance and Estate Taxes High Net Worth Individuals Economics (Theory and Philosophy)

Arkansas estate tax revenue

Bud Walton dies in 1995, generating a windfall for the state the next year.

The state eliminates the tax in 2005, creating a haven for wealth inheritance.

Westlake Legal Group arkansas-estate-tax-600 Estate Taxes Are Easy to Flee, but They Still Help States Wilson, Daniel J tax evasion States (US) Moretti, Enrico Inheritance and Estate Taxes High Net Worth Individuals Economics (Theory and Philosophy)

Estate tax revenue

in Arkansas

Bud Walton dies in

1995, generating a

windfall for the

state the next year.

The state eliminates

the tax in 2005,

creating a haven for

wealth inheritance.

Source: Enrico Moretti (University of California, Berkeley)

By The New York Times

Currently, federal estate and gift taxes apply beyond a threshold of $11.4 million per person. They are levied at a top rate of 40 percent and raised $23 billion in 2018.

Unlike the issues with state taxes, the rich can’t move out of the country to avoid federal estate taxes because United States citizens are liable for the tax no matter where they live.

For many years, there was no reason for rich people to flee state estate taxes because they paid the same no matter where they lived. Before 2001, the government offered a federal tax credit to cover the state tax liability. Many states passed estate taxes that exactly matched the available federal credit.

But President George W. Bush’s tax-cut package of 2001 phased out the credit over the next three years. And as the federal system changed, a wealthy person’s state of residence started to matter. By 2010, more than one in five billionaires from states that kept estate taxes had moved to a state without one, while only 1.2 percent had moved in the opposite direction. And by 2017, only 13 states had an estate tax.

Gabriel Zucman, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley, who with his colleague Emmanuel Saez has advised the Warren campaign on taxation issues, argues that “people who dislike taxes like to create circumstances for tax competition.”

If the rich can avoid taxes by moving to the lower-tax state or country next door, states and countries will race to cut taxes to poach one another’s wealthy. Such competition is the main reason European countries have all but abandoned wealth taxes, Mr. Zucman said.

Still, Mr. Moretti and Mr. Wilson pointed out that for most states the race to the bottom is probably pointless: The typical estate tax of 16 percent yields more revenue than the income tax that the states would have collected in the interim from the billionaires who fled.

In states without an income tax, like Florida and Texas, the argument for the estate tax is straightforward: There is no income tax revenue to lose if billionaires leave. But even in Arkansas, which stopped collecting an estate tax in 2005 and was home to five billionaires in 2017, the income tax revenue lost would be only about half of what the state would reap with a 16 percent estate tax, Mr. Moretti and Mr. Wilson estimate.

While the estate tax could generate additional losses if departing billionaires took their companies, investments and charitable contributions with them, Mr. Moretti argues that it is not likely that an aging Mr. Bezos moving to, say, Texas, will take Amazon with him. And estate taxes decades down the road seem unlikely to influence where young entrepreneurs decide to live.

The Moretti-Wilson argument doesn’t apply only to billionaires. In all but eight states, a 16 percent tax applied to estates larger than $5.5 million (the federal threshold before the 2017 tax law) would generate more money than would be lost in forgone income taxes. And if the merely rich were only half as likely as Forbes billionaires to cross state lines fleeing the estate tax, every state would gain from imposing one.

If all states imposed an estate tax, of course, the rich would have no choice but to pay it. Mr. Zucman suggests that an easy way to maximize states’ estate tax revenues would be to reintroduce the federal credit, eliminating interstate tax competition.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Vietnam Marine veteran in New Mexico hospice care reunites with beloved dog one last time

A New Mexico veteran who served with the Marines in Vietnam said a final goodbye last week to the beloved dog he had to put up for adoption when he entered hospice care.

John Vincent was reunited with Patch, a 5-year-old Yorkie, for one last time Thursday at the Hospice Center at the Raymond G. Murphy VA Medical Center in Albuquerque, according to reports.

“Yeah, that’s me, that’s daddy,” Vincent said as Patch licked his face, the Albuquerque Journal reported. “Are you so happy to see me? I’m so happy to see you.”

Westlake Legal Group john-vincent-2 Vietnam Marine veteran in New Mexico hospice care reunites with beloved dog one last time Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/new-mexico fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/military-families fox-news/us/military/marines fox news fnc/us fnc article 2c084dae-b251-5d04-a93f-5b3c37236f44

Marine veteran John Vincent was reunited with his dog, Patch. (Albuquerque Animal Welfare Department)

Vincent, 69, was admitted to the hospice center last week and was forced to take Patch to an Albuquerque Animal Welfare shelter because he had no family in New Mexico. Shelter officials said Vincent may not have much time left.

BOY, 11, WITH TERMINAL BRAIN CANCER ASKS FOR ‘PATCHES AND PRAYERS’ FROM MILITARY, LAW ENFORCEMENT, FIRE COMMUNITIES

He told Amy Neal, a social worker at the hospice center, that he had only one request—to see Patch one last time.

“When the request came in, it was an immediate ‘absolutely,’ and let’s do whatever we can to get it done,” Animal Welfare director Danny Nevarez said, according to the paper. “It was as simple as getting Patch over here.”

Vincent enlisted in the Marines for three years and served in Vietnam, the paper reported.

DYING WOMAN GRANTED WISH TO SEE BELOVED PET HORSE

Westlake Legal Group john-vincent-3 Vietnam Marine veteran in New Mexico hospice care reunites with beloved dog one last time Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/new-mexico fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/military-families fox-news/us/military/marines fox news fnc/us fnc article 2c084dae-b251-5d04-a93f-5b3c37236f44

He told the hospice center his only request was to see his dog one last time. (Albuquerque Animal Welfare Department)

He rode a Harley and would take Patch with him on rides. The dog had its own pair of tiny goggles, according to the paper.

Animal Welfare posted photos of the reunion on its Facebook page Friday with a post that reported Vincent and Patch were so happy to see each and to say their goodbyes.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP 

“It was an honor to make this veteran’s final wish come true,” the post continued.

The shelter reported that Patch has found a new owner and will be leaving for a new home soon.

Westlake Legal Group john-vincent Vietnam Marine veteran in New Mexico hospice care reunites with beloved dog one last time Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/new-mexico fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/military-families fox-news/us/military/marines fox news fnc/us fnc article 2c084dae-b251-5d04-a93f-5b3c37236f44   Westlake Legal Group john-vincent Vietnam Marine veteran in New Mexico hospice care reunites with beloved dog one last time Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/new-mexico fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/military-families fox-news/us/military/marines fox news fnc/us fnc article 2c084dae-b251-5d04-a93f-5b3c37236f44

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Court dismisses charges stemming from 1939 Virginia sit-in

Westlake Legal Group 18021767_G Court dismisses charges stemming from 1939 Virginia sit-in

The city of Alexandria issued a news release about the decision late Saturday. It says that after recent research by Alexandria library staff determined that the disorderly conduct charges were technically still outstanding, although they were never prosecuted, the local commonwealth’s attorney asked a court to dismiss them.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Tennessee doctors plead guilty to overprescribing opioids, DOJ says

Two Tennessee doctors pleaded guilty Thursday to distributing high doses of opioids with no medical legitimacy, the Justice Department announced.

Dr. Samuel Mcgaha and Dr. Frank McNiel – both from East Tennessee – each pleaded guilty to one count of unlawful distribution of a controlled substance.

Between 2015 and early 2018, Mcgaha and McNiel prescribed a combined total of 271,938 opioid pills, a DOJ news release said.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-opiods Tennessee doctors plead guilty to overprescribing opioids, DOJ says fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 831e7dc1-c862-501d-8420-4741241eec4d

Two Tennessee doctors pleaded guilty last week to prescribing opioids to patients that exceeded CDC guidelines.  (iStock, File)

Mcgaha admitted to writing opioid prescriptions that exceeded the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines. He also prescribed opioids even when his patients tested positive for illegal drugs.

McNiel admitted to writing some opioid prescriptions without evaluating patients and without obtaining medical records that would have warranted the prescriptions.

‘ALL THESE PEOPLE HAD TO DIE BECAUSE MY PROFESSIONAL DIDN’T UNDERSTAND IT’: DR. DREW ON OPIOID CRISIS

Their case was investigated jointly by the FBI and Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

It was prosecuted by Trial Attorney Louis Manzo of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section and Assistant U.S. Attorney Anne Svolto of the Eastern District of Tennessee.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Sentencing is scheduled for March 26, 2020, according to the DOJ news release.

Their charges would carry a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison, but they’re expected to face less time because of their guilty pleas.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-opiods Tennessee doctors plead guilty to overprescribing opioids, DOJ says fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 831e7dc1-c862-501d-8420-4741241eec4d   Westlake Legal Group iStock-opiods Tennessee doctors plead guilty to overprescribing opioids, DOJ says fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 831e7dc1-c862-501d-8420-4741241eec4d

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Biggest Late-Night Guests Now Bring a News Angle, Not a Movie Clip

Westlake Legal Group merlin_162438378_156bc3a4-07ba-472b-a919-419824d0fda4-facebookJumbo Biggest Late-Night Guests Now Bring a News Angle, Not a Movie Clip Television Tapper, Jake Ratings (Audience Measurement) Maddow, Rachel Kimmel, Jimmy Fallon, Jimmy Colbert, Stephen CBS Corporation

The formula for success on the big late-night network television shows used to be simple. Keep it light, keep it moving and book a major star, preferably one in the news.

Now, with impeachment in the air and the 2020 presidential campaign underway, the shows that do best are the ones that don’t shy away from politics — and the guests who deliver big ratings are political figures and news commentators.

“The Late Show With Stephen Colbert” on CBS, the most-viewed late-night host since 2017, had one of its biggest episodes of the year recently, when the first guest was the MSNBC host Rachel Maddow.

In a less fraught time, a journalist discussing the news of the day would not be much of a ratings winner, but 4.6 million people watched the “Late Show” episode in which Ms. Maddow and Mr. Colbert talked about President Trump, Ukraine and the impeachment inquiry, according to Nielsen.

That was more than the combined audience for that night’s episodes of ABC’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” (with Joaquin Phoenix as the lead guest) and NBC’s “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” (with Lin-Manuel Miranda). Mr. Colbert, who became the highest-rated late-night host only after he committed to packing his opening monologues with commentary on the Trump presidency, spoke with Ms. Maddow for three segments.

Before Mr. Trump became president, an entertainment star in the guest chair was much more likely to get a bigger audience than a commentator or candidate, according to Rob Burnett, an executive producer for “The Late Show” when David Letterman was its host.

“We usually booked politicians and pundits every few months, when there was something newsworthy,” Mr. Burnett said. “Now there is something newsworthy 11 times a day.”

News anchors made appearances on Mr. Letterman’s show, he added, but often because “they were in the building, or they were in New York, and we were stuck and we had a cancellation. Bookings of newscasters were desperation moves.”

Mr. Fallon has had an on-again, off-again approach to making “The Tonight Show” politically engaged. In June, he took his program live after the Democratic presidential debate that was broadcast by NBC. For the most part, though, he has made his show a refuge from stormy news cycles, playing “shouting charades” with Amy Poehler, “Mad Lib theater” with Natalie Portman and “name that song” with Taylor Swift.

Mr. Fallon once had a commanding lead among adult viewers under age 50, the demographic prized by advertisers. Now he is tied with Mr. Colbert in that segment. For one week last month, he fell into third place among total viewers.

In a late-night environment that favors news, the CNN anchor Jake Tapper has become a sought-after booking. “It’s definitely unusual,” Mr. Tapper said. “Previously, it would require some sort of hook. You know, I wrote a book about Afghanistan, or I was moderating a debate. Now they call randomly and want me to simply talk the news of the day.”

Chris Licht, a former CBS News producer who became the executive producer of Mr. Colbert’s show in 2016, said late-night viewers these days wanted shows that helped them make sense of a world in turmoil. “They don’t want escapism,” he said.

Mr. Colbert struggled in the ratings during his first year and a half as the host of a network show, which he inherited in 2015. It took off when he started emphasizing the news, with many of his jokes targeting Mr. Trump. Last week, CBS signed Mr. Colbert to a new deal to keep him as the host of “The Late Show” through 2023.

Mr. Colbert also trounced the competition the night before the Maddow interview, attracting 4.5 million viewers with Hillary and Chelsea Clinton. The audience for that episode, too, was greater than the combined total for the shows hosted by Mr. Fallon and Mr. Kimmel.

In the 11 o’clock time slot, the politics-heavy “The Daily Show” on Comedy Central, hosted by Trevor Noah, regularly beats its TBS competitor, the mostly Trump-free “Conan.” But even Conan O’Brien has adjusted to the new landscape, selecting shoot locations for his occasional travel show, “Conan Without Borders,” based on news events.

Mr. O’Brien took the program to Haiti after Mr. Trump disparaged that country, speaking with schoolchildren there about how the presidential insult made them feel. More recently, he traveled with his camera crew to Greenland after Mr. Trump floated the idea of buying it.

In addition to providing a ratings boon, an emphasis on politics wins accolades. HBO’s “Last Week Tonight With John Oliver,” a show that is as much journalism as it is comedy, has won the Emmy for outstanding variety talk series four years in a row. And with the 2020 campaign heating up, the presidential candidates Joseph R. Biden Jr., Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders, Beto O’Rourke, Pete Buttigieg, Kamala Harris and Cory Booker have all made the late-night rounds.

“If you’re a candidate now and you’re not on one of these shows or discussed by one of these hosts, you are not alive,” said Hank Sheinkopf, a veteran Democratic political consultant.

Hollywood stars are still staples of late night. “If I could have Tom Hanks every night, I would get him,” Mr. Licht said. Will Smith scored 3.9 million viewers for his recent appearance on Mr. Colbert’s show, and James Corden, the host of CBS’s “The Late Late Show,” has lately led the 12:30 a.m. time slot in total viewers with a program that often has the feel of a celebrity clubhouse.

But Mr. Corden’s rival Seth Meyers, the host of NBC’s “Late Night With Seth Meyers, ” drew more total viewers in the 2018-19 season thanks to a formula that had him devoting the first 20 minutes of his show to the latest on Mr. Trump. Mr. Meyers also led among adult viewers under 50 last season, and he remains the leader among that segment of the audience.

In this supercharged news environment, anchors like Bret Baier and Chris Wallace, both of Fox News, have been late-night guests, as have the CBS News stalwarts Gayle King and Norah O’Donnell. When Ms. King and Ms. O’Donnell were the lead guests on Mr. Colbert’s live show after the State of the Union address in February, they drew an audience of 4.6 million.

Jay Sures, a co-president of the United Talent Agency, which represents many news anchors, said he had noticed a spike in bookings for his clients. “They’ve unintentionally become celebrities based on how the news business has become part of our daily routine in a way it never has before,” he said. “The Trump era has elevated news.”

Mr. Burnett, the former producer for Mr. Letterman, agreed. “As a rule, we weren’t trying to book politicians or pundits,” he said. “You were trying to book things that your audience cared about. Back then, people did not care about politics to the extent that they do now.”

As Mr. Tapper put it: “It’s a reflection of people just being incredibly engaged and fascinated and focused and horrified on everything going on in Washington. It’s definitely a new world.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Gabbard, in defiant video, links Clinton ‘smears’ to her previous Sanders endorsement

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095351123001_6095346555001-vs Gabbard, in defiant video, links Clinton 'smears' to her previous Sanders endorsement Gregg Re fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tulsi-gabbard fox news fnc/politics fnc article a5985fbb-d4da-5890-b4f2-a5724d456213

Speaking directly to the camera in a video message posted on social media on Sunday, 2020 presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard suggested that Hillary Clinton recently “smeared” her as a “Russian asset” as payback for Gabbard’s defiance of the party establishment in 2016.

“If they can falsely portray me as a traitor, then they can do it to anyone — and in fact, that’s exactly the message they want to get across to you,” Gabbard, a Democrat, said in the video.

“If you stand up to Hillary and the party power brokers — if you stand up to the rich and powerful elite and the war machine, they will destroy you and discredit your message. But, here is the truth: They will not intimidate us. They will not silence us.”

WATCH: GABBARD TALKS TO ‘TUCKER’ ABOUT CLINTON’S REMARKS

The post ratcheted up an already escalating feud that has rocked the presidential primary. Several candidates, including Beto O’Rourke, Andrew Yang and Marianne Williamson, have criticized Clinton’s unfounded suggestion that Russians have been “grooming” Gabbard to be a third-party spoiler in the race.

Gabbard, D-Hawaii, started the video by referencing her time as the vice chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) from 2013 to 2016 — before she quit and threw her support behind Bernie Sanders. At the time, Gabbard accused party leaders of stifling her freedom of speech and unfairly tipping the scales in favor of eventual nominee Hillary Clinton.

“People warned me in 2016 that my endorsement of Bernie Sanders would be the end of my ‘political career’ — they said Clinton would never forget,” Gabbard said in the video, “that she and her rich and powerful friends — her allies in politics and the media — will make sure you’re destroyed.”

Gabbard asserted that “countless hit pieces full of smears” have been published in an effort to “destroy” her reputation, which included years of military and congressional service.

DAVID BOSSIE: HILLARY CLINTON, HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO DO NOW (HINT: TULSI GABBARD HAS A SOLUTION)

At last week’s New York Times-CNN primary debate, Gabbard specifically called out the Times and CNN for waging what she called a propaganda campaign against her, while also promoting endless “regime-change” wars.

“The New York Times and CNN have smeared veterans like myself for calling for an end to this regime-change war,” Gabbard said. “Just two days ago, The New York Times put out an article saying I’m a Russian asset and an Assad apologist, and all these different smears. This morning, a CNN commentator said on national television that I’m an asset of Russia. Completely despicable.”

CNN political commentator Van Jones echoed Gabbard’s argument on-air, and called out Clinton’s “disinformation” — saying “she just came out against a sitting U.S. congresswoman, a decorated war veteran, and someone who’s running for the nomination of our party, with just a complete smear and no facts.”

Jones continued: “This is a very, very dangerous game — and there’s a backstory here. Let’s not forget: Tulsi Gabbard was picked out by the Democratic Party establishment and put at the top of the DNC, and they thought she was going to be their golden girl. And, she got in that position in the DNC, and she looked around, and she saw [then-DNC Chairwoman] Debbie Wasserman-Schultz and other people, Clinton allies, doing stuff they shouldn’t have been doing in the primary.

“And, Tulsi publicly quit, and then endorsed Bernie Sanders, and it’s been payback hell ever since,” Jones said.

The brouhaha began in a podcast with former Obama adviser David Plouffe, when Clinton said she wasn’t “making any predictions, but [she thinks Russians] have got their eye on somebody who is currently in the Democratic primary and are grooming her to be the third-party candidate.”

“She’s the favorite of the Russians” she added, saying they “have a bunch of sites and bots and other ways of supporting her so far.”

Clinton described 2016 Green Party candidate Jill Stein as a “Russian asset,” but didn’t explicitly name Gabbard. Then, when Clinton spokesman Nick Merrill was asked if Clinton was referring to Gabbard, he responded: “If the nesting doll fits …”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

That prompted Gabbard to respond forcefully to Clinton on Twitter Friday, calling her the “queen of warmongers, embodiment of corruption, and personification of the rot that has sickened the Democratic Party!”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095351123001_6095346555001-vs Gabbard, in defiant video, links Clinton 'smears' to her previous Sanders endorsement Gregg Re fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tulsi-gabbard fox news fnc/politics fnc article a5985fbb-d4da-5890-b4f2-a5724d456213   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095351123001_6095346555001-vs Gabbard, in defiant video, links Clinton 'smears' to her previous Sanders endorsement Gregg Re fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tulsi-gabbard fox news fnc/politics fnc article a5985fbb-d4da-5890-b4f2-a5724d456213

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

New Orleans implodes damaged cranes on partially collapsed Hard Rock hotel

After looming over the streets of New Orleans for over a week, two damaged cranes that leaned precariously over the remains of a partially collapsed hotel were brought down Sunday afternoon using a series of controlled explosions.

Loud blasts reverberated quickly as the cranes fell. The first crane toppled down, landing upright on Rampart Street, while the other could be seen hanging over the side of the building.

Louisiana officials originally had planned to topple the cranes on Friday, before pushing the demolition to Saturday and then Sunday over crane stabilization issues and safety concerns. The Hard Rock Hotel, near the city’s iconic French Quarter, was under construction when it partially collapsed on Oct. 12, killing three workers and sending debris into the neighborhood below.

The two cranes — one 270 feet high and the other about 300 feet in height — have been a concern for officials for over a week, out of fears they may fall on their own and cause further injury and damage to nearby buildings.

Westlake Legal Group NolaCrane3 New Orleans implodes damaged cranes on partially collapsed Hard Rock hotel Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/us/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/us/disasters fox news fnc/us fnc article 1197d02a-03ad-55ae-adbe-dc74da93c4be

Workers in a bucket hoisted by a crane preparing the two unstable cranes for implosion at the collapse site of the Hard Rock Hotel n New Orleans on Friday. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

“As they got up and got closer they found out some things about it that have changed the way they are going to take it down … and that’s going to take a little longer for them to accomplish,” Fire Chief Tim McConnell told reporters on Saturday. “The cranes are more damaged than they thought.”

DAMAGED CRANES HAMPERING RESCUE EFFORTS IN PARTIALLY COLLAPSED NEW ORLEANS HARD ROCK HOTEL

Two bodies remained in the hotel’s unstable wreckage and Mayor LaToya Cantrell said recovering the remains would be a priority once the cranes were down. The cause of the collapse remained unknown. Cantrell and McConnell said evidence-gathering started soon after the collapse, and lawsuits already have been filed against the project’s owners and contractors.

Westlake Legal Group NolaCrane2 New Orleans implodes damaged cranes on partially collapsed Hard Rock hotel Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/us/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/us/disasters fox news fnc/us fnc article 1197d02a-03ad-55ae-adbe-dc74da93c4be

Workers preparing the two unstable cranes for implosion at the collapse site of the Hard Rock Hotel, which underwent a partial, major collapse while under construction on Oct., 12, in New Orleans. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

On Sunday morning, officials closed off streets in the evacuation area and other places nearby that could be affected by the implosion. Area residents were warned to prepare for a lot of noise when the demolition took place, with city officials comparing it to the sound of fireworks.

The city also issued an evacuation order for the areas immediately surrounding the stricken building, with temporary evacuation zones stretching into historic areas popular with tourists.

Services such as electricity, gas, water, and sewer also were shut off in the evacuation zone.

NEW ORLEANS HARD ROCK HOTEL UNDER CONSTRUCTION COLLAPSES; AT LEAST 2 DEAD, MULTIPLE INJURED

The planned implosion was set to take place sometime after 1 p.m. but was delayed well into the afternoon as officials conducted last-minute safety checks and made sure no one had sneaked into the hotel. Safety officials also were asking people not to be on rooftops during the implosion.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Tourists, employees and people living in the area have spent the past couple of days milled about taking photos, but officials stressed that they did not want people approaching the site to watch the demolition.

“We prefer people to not be out here when this thing happens,” McConnell said. “It’s a dangerous operation.”

Westlake Legal Group nolacrane1 New Orleans implodes damaged cranes on partially collapsed Hard Rock hotel Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/us/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/us/disasters fox news fnc/us fnc article 1197d02a-03ad-55ae-adbe-dc74da93c4be

Three workers were killed in the partial collapse of the Hard Rock Hotel in New Orleans earlier this month. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Some, however, arrived just for this weekend to witness it themselves.

“You’re not going to see something like this every day,” Mike Mason told Fox 8 on Saturday. “The horrific site of the building is just horrible.”

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Fox News’ Bradford Betz and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19292649469977 New Orleans implodes damaged cranes on partially collapsed Hard Rock hotel Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/us/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/us/disasters fox news fnc/us fnc article 1197d02a-03ad-55ae-adbe-dc74da93c4be   Westlake Legal Group AP19292649469977 New Orleans implodes damaged cranes on partially collapsed Hard Rock hotel Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/us/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/us/disasters fox news fnc/us fnc article 1197d02a-03ad-55ae-adbe-dc74da93c4be

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘You said what you said’: Fox News’ Chris Wallace rejects Mulvaney’s attempt to walk back Ukraine comments

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 'You said what you said': Fox News' Chris Wallace rejects Mulvaney's attempt to walk back Ukraine comments

Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney contradicts Trump’s earlier claims that there was no quid pro quo with Ukraine on investigating Bidens. White House

Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney on Sunday denied ever saying that there had been a “quid pro quo” in the release of military aid to Ukraine, days after sparking an uproar by appearing to acknowledge exactly that during a news briefing

Citing concerns about corruption, Mulvaney said Thursday that one reason the aid was held up was because of President Donald Trump’s wish for an investigation into an unsubstantiated theory that Ukraine, not Russia, was behind the theft of Democratic National Committee emails in 2016.

“Fox News Sunday” host Chris Wallace asked Mulvaney why he said “that aid to Ukraine depended on investigating the Democrats.” Mulvaney denied that was what he had said.

“That’s what people said I said,” he told Wallace. Mulvaney claimed “people got sidetracked” at the news conference and that he had said the aid was withheld for two reasons: corruption concerns and to pressure European nations into giving Ukraine more aid.

Ukraine: Trump’s conspiracy theories thrive as young democracy battles corruption and distrust

More: Mick Mulvaney acknowledges Trump held up aid to pressure Ukraine, then rows back

He said the president had mentioned the Democratic National Committee server “from time to time” but “it wasn’t connected to the aid.”

But Wallace was unpersuaded, telling Mulvaney, “I believe that anyone listening to what you said in that briefing could come to only one conclusion.” 

“No, you totally said that,” Wallace said. 

Trump is currently facing an impeachment inquiry over allegations that he used the military aid as leverage to pressure Ukraine into investigating former Vice President Joe Biden, a leading candidate in the 2020 race.

Although Mulvaney denied the demand for a Biden probe was ever connected to the aid, his apparent admission that it had been withheld in part because of Trump’s push for an investigation into the 2016 election sparked an uproar because it contradicted the administration’s earlier position that there had been no kind of “quid pro quo.” 

Mulvaney, who also retracted his news conference comments in a statement last week, repeated his assertion that the aid had been held up over corruption and to push other countries to help. He said the funds were released after conducting “research on other countries’ aid to Ukraine” and they were satisfied that corruption was being addressed.

“There was never any connection between the flow of money and the server,” Mulvaney said. 

“Mick, you know, I hate to go through this, but you said what you said,” Wallace told Mulvaney. He said that later in the news conference Mulvaney had explicitly listed an investigation into the DNC server as a third reason for withholding aid. 

Mulvaney said he “didn’t speak clearly” and “folks misinterpreted what I said.” 

Wallace asked if Mulvaney had ever considered submitting his resignation amid the blowback from the news conference. 

“No, absolutely not,” he said. “I’m very happy working there.  Did I have the perfect press conference?  No. But again, the facts were on our side.” 

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/10/20/fox-news-host-chris-wallace-grills-mick-mulvaney-trump-ukraine/4045473002/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com