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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 45)

How Makeup Turned Charlize Theron Into Megyn Kelly In ‘Bombshell’

Charlize Theron didn’t play Megyn Kelly in “Bombshell.” She was her. The 2019 film recounting the multiple sexual assault allegations against former Fox News CEO Roger Ailes even had Kelly’s own family members doing a double-take.

As prosthetist and artist Kazu Hiro told HuffPost, that was exactly Theron’s plan.

“She didn’t want to see herself in the mirror,” he told HuffPost. “It was really important to her to have the likeness of Megyn, to help herself and help others really get into the story.”

Westlake Legal Group 5e20df8a24000033006c42cb How Makeup Turned Charlize Theron Into Megyn Kelly In ‘Bombshell’

Hilary B Gayle

Charlize Theron as Megyn Kelly in “Bombshell.”

Hiro, who also transformed John Lithgow into Alies and Nicole Kidman into Gretchen Carlson for the film, worked diligently― and quickly ― to bring these characters to life.

“The whole pre-production time was about six weeks,” he said. “We did about four practice runs, and then I was finessing the look the entire time during filming.”

Hiro took a head cast and 3D scan of Theron, then studied images and film of both Kelly and Theron to learn their key features and differences, mapping out exactly which prosthetics he and his team would have to use and how they would have to use them.

“The difficult part is that everyone knows what they both look like,” he said. “So if the makeup was just halfway to Megyn, people would think, ‘OK, Charlize has something on her face, and that’s not good.’ We had to go all the way. I also wanted the makeup to be as [minimal] as possible, because the more I put on her, the harder it is to act through. So I cut it down to the most essential and important parts.”

Westlake Legal Group 5e2146692200005500472ecb How Makeup Turned Charlize Theron Into Megyn Kelly In ‘Bombshell’

Courtesy

Kazu Hiro applying prosthetics to actor Charlize Theron.

The most “important parts” came down to a couple of key features: Giving Theron Kelly’s square, angular jaw, adding Kelly’s heavier eyelid to Theron’s big eyes and ― probably most visibly― getting the nose just right, slightly turned up and with much attention paid to nostrils.

“Megyn has much bigger nostrils, so I made nose plugs,” Hiro said. “Having something in your nose is of course uncomfortable, but I tried to make it as comfortable as possible. It was a challenge because I didn’t want to make it look like a comedy. It had to be subtle and realistic.”

Hiro took an impression of the inside of Theron’s nostrils and used a 3D scanner to design the plugs on the computer, printing them with a 3D printer.

“Using a 3D printer made it easier to modify in a short pre-production time,” he said. “I was able to make a new one in a few hours. I went through five modifications, and once the design was finalized, I printed about 40 sets of plugs for the length of filming.”

And the nose plugs weren’t the only things Hiro and the team continued to work on throughout the course of the shoot.

Westlake Legal Group 5e20dfec22000031003f7934 How Makeup Turned Charlize Theron Into Megyn Kelly In ‘Bombshell’

Hilary B Gayle

Charlize Theron in “Bombshell.”

“Once filming started, I was still finessing the eyelids because it was one of the hardest parts,” he said. “The eyes are so delicate and have to move with her. I changed it three more times ― it’s a tiny difference but it made it more comfortable and also made the eyelid look better.”

The team also had to be constantly monitoring the placement of the silicone, in case of any wrong movement. “It’s very soft and stretchy, and we have to stretch it in a certain direction and concentrate on the movements,” he said. “If we don’t do that, it starts to wrinkle on the edges.”

Hiro and his team used prosthetics made from medical-grade silicone and adhered them to Theron’s face using medical glue ― first the jaw, the chin, the nose, and finally, the eyelid. Once the prosthetics were on, the team painted them to match Theron’s skin tone, after which the rest of the makeup and hair, led by Vivian Baker and Anne Morgan respectively, were applied. Theron also wore contact lenses to make her eyes darker.

Westlake Legal Group 5e2146b722000033003f797c How Makeup Turned Charlize Theron Into Megyn Kelly In ‘Bombshell’

Courtesy of “Bombshell”

Theron spent three hours in the chair transforming into Kelly.

The entire process, from start to finish, took about three hours each time.

“It’s a very difficult application, but Charlize is a dancer ― she has great body coordination to be in a certain position every morning, looking in the same place when I’m applying the eyelids.”

Hiro called working on “Bombshell” a “great honor,” pointing out the talented team that worked on it, as well as the film’s timeliness.

“I am glad people recognize what we did,” he said.” I believe it’s a really important film for what’s going on in the world right now and I feel really fortunate to work on this project with many amazing talents. One of the greatest experiences in my whole career.”

“Bombshell” is in theaters now. To see more of Hiro’s work, check out his website and Instagram.

Westlake Legal Group 5e2147c92200003200472ecc How Makeup Turned Charlize Theron Into Megyn Kelly In ‘Bombshell’

Getty Images, Courtesy

The transformation. Is. Real.

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How Boeing’s Responsibility in a Deadly Crash ‘Got Buried’

Westlake Legal Group 00boeing-dutch-facebookJumbo How Boeing’s Responsibility in a Deadly Crash ‘Got Buried’ Turkish Airlines National Transportation Safety Board Federal Aviation Administration Boeing Company Boeing 737 Max Groundings and Safety Concerns (2019) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters Amsterdam (Netherlands)

After a Boeing 737 crashed near Amsterdam more than a decade ago, the Dutch investigators focused blame on the pilots for failing to react properly when an automated system malfunctioned and caused the plane to plummet into a field, killing nine people.

The fault was hardly the crew’s alone, however. Decisions by Boeing, including risky design choices and faulty safety assessments, also contributed to the accident on the Turkish Airlines flight. But the Dutch Safety Board either excluded or played down criticisms of the manufacturer in its final report after pushback from a team of Americans that included Boeing and federal safety officials, documents and interviews show.

The crash, in February 2009, involved a predecessor to Boeing’s 737 Max, the plane that was grounded last year after accidents in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people and hurled the company into the worst crisis in its history.

A review by The New York Times of evidence from the 2009 accident, some of it previously confidential, reveals striking parallels with the recent crashes — and resistance by the team of Americans to a full airing of findings that later proved relevant to the Max.

In the 2009 and Max accidents, for example, the failure of a single sensor caused systems to misfire, with catastrophic results, and Boeing had not provided pilots with information that could have helped them react to the malfunction. The earlier accident “represents such a sentinel event that was never taken seriously,” said Sidney Dekker, an aviation safety expert who was commissioned by the Dutch Safety Board to analyze the crash.

Dr. Dekker’s study accused Boeing of trying to deflect attention from its own “design shortcomings” and other mistakes with “hardly credible” statements that admonished pilots to be more vigilant, according to a copy reviewed by The Times.

The study was never made public. The Dutch board backed away from plans to publish it, according to Dr. Dekker and another person with knowledge of its handling. A spokeswoman for the Dutch board said it was not common to publish expert studies and the decision on Dr. Dekker’s was made solely by the board.

At the same time, the Dutch board deleted or amended findings in its own accident report about issues with the plane when the same American team weighed in. The board also inserted statements, some nearly verbatim and without attribution, written by the Americans, who said that certain pilot errors had not been “properly emphasized.”

The muted criticism of Boeing after the 2009 accident fits within a broader pattern, brought to light since the Max tragedies, of the company benefiting from a light-touch approach by safety officials.

References to Dr. Dekker’s findings in the final report were brief, not clearly written and not sufficiently highlighted, according to multiple aviation safety experts with experience in crash investigations who read both documents.

One of them, David Woods, a professor at the Ohio State University who has served as a technical adviser to the Federal Aviation Administration, said the Turkish Airlines crash “should have woken everybody up.”

Some of the parallels between that accident and the more recent ones are particularly noteworthy. Boeing’s design decisions on both the Max and the plane involved in the 2009 crash — the 737 NG, or Next Generation — allowed a powerful computer command to be triggered by a single faulty sensor, even though each plane was equipped with two sensors, as Bloomberg reported last year. In the two Max accidents, a sensor measuring the plane’s angle to the wind prompted a flight control computer to push its nose down after takeoff; on the Turkish Airlines flight, an altitude sensor caused a different computer to cut the plane’s speed just before landing.

Boeing had determined before 2009 that if the sensor malfunctioned, the crew would quickly recognize the problem and prevent the plane from stalling — much the same assumption about pilot behavior made with the Max.

And as with the more recent crashes, Boeing had not included information in the NG operations manual that could have helped the pilots respond when the sensor failed.

Even a fix now proposed for the Max has similarities with the past: After the crash near Amsterdam, the F.A.A. required airlines to install a software update for the NG that compared data from the plane’s two sensors, rather than relying on just one. The software change Boeing has developed for the Max also compares data from two sensors.

Critically, in the case of the NG, Boeing had already developed the software fix well before the Turkish Airlines crash, including it on new planes starting in 2006 and offering it as an optional update on hundreds of other aircraft. But for some older jets, including the one that crashed near Amsterdam, the update wouldn’t work, and Boeing did not develop a compatible version until after the accident.

The Dutch investigators deemed it “remarkable” that Boeing left airlines without an option to obtain the safeguard for some older planes. But in reviewing the draft accident report, the Americans objected to the statement, according to the final version’s appendix, writing that a software modification had been unnecessary because “no unacceptable risk had been identified.” GE Aviation, which had bought the company that made the computers for the older jets, also suggested deleting or changing the sentence.

The Dutch board removed the statement, but did criticize Boeing for not doing more to alert pilots about the sensor problem.

Dr. Woods, who was Dr. Dekker’s Ph.D. adviser, said the decision to exclude or underplay the study’s principal findings enabled Boeing and its American regulators to carry out “the narrowest possible changes.”

The problem with the single sensor, he said, should have dissuaded Boeing from using a similar design in the Max. Instead, “the issue got buried.”

Boeing declined to address detailed questions from The Times. In a statement, the company pointed to differences between the 2009 accident and the Max crashes. “These accidents involved fundamentally different system inputs and phases of flight,” the company said.

Asked about its involvement with the Dutch accident report, Boeing said it was “typical and critical to successful investigations for Boeing and other manufacturers to work collaboratively with the investigating authorities.”

Joe Sedor, the N.T.S.B. official who led the American team working on the Turkish Airlines investigation, said it was not unusual for investigating bodies to make changes to a report after receiving feedback, or for American safety officials to jointly submit their comments with Boeing.

Mr. Sedor is now overseeing the N.T.S.B.’s work on the Max crashes. He acknowledged that reliance on a single sensor was a contributing factor in both cases but cautioned against focusing on it.

“Each of these accidents were complex and dynamic events with many contributing factors,” he said. “Boiling them down simply to the number of inputs ignores the many, many more issues that differentiate them.”

The F.A.A., in a statement, also emphasized the “unique set of circumstances” surrounding each accident. “Drawing broad connections between accidents involving different types of emergencies oversimplifies what is, by definition, a complex science,” it said.

The agency, also part of the American team in the Dutch investigation, declined to say whether the lessons from the Turkish Airlines crash factored into its decision to certify the Max — which was approved to fly in 2017 and became the fastest-selling plane in Boeing’s history.

But a senior F.A.A. official, who was not authorized to speak publicly, praised Dr. Dekker’s study and said it identified important issues that had not received enough public attention. The official pointed to the similarities — such as the reliance on a single sensor — between the Turkish Airlines crash and the Max accidents.

A spokeswoman for the Dutch board, Sara Vernooij, said it was common practice to amend draft reports in response to outside comments, but she declined to address the specific changes. Other companies and government bodies involved in the investigation, such as the French firm that made the sensors and that country’s aviation safety board, also submitted comments, but the American submission was the most extensive.

Ms. Vernooij said the Dutch agency regarded the Dekker study as confidential. “The parts considered relevant by the board were used while writing the final report,” she said.

On the morning of Feb. 25, 2009, Turkish Airlines Flight 1951 approached Amsterdam, carrying 128 passengers from Istanbul. The first officer guided the plane toward Runway 18R, calling out changes to its speed and direction. He was new to the Boeing jet, so the crew included a third pilot in addition to the captain, who was a former Turkish Air Force officer with about 13 years of experience flying the aircraft.

Because of instructions from air traffic control, the crew had to execute a maneuver that could be challenging: slowing while descending more rapidly than normal. They engaged a computer that controlled engine thrust, known as an autothrottle, to help regulate the drop in speed.

As the plane dipped to 1,000 feet, the pilots had not yet completed their landing checklist. Strict adherence to airline procedure would have meant circling around for another try, but violations were commonplace at the busy runway, investigators later determined.

About a minute later, with the plane at about 450 feet, the pilots’ control sticks began shaking, warning of an impending stall. The jet had slowed too much. Immediately, one of the pilots pushed the thrust lever forward to gain speed, but when he let go, the computer commanded it to idle.

The captain intervened, disabling the autothrottle and setting the thrust levers to their maximum. Nine seconds had elapsed since the stall warning. By then, it was too late. The jet plunged into a field less than a mile from the airport.

The three pilots, another crew member and five passengers were killed.

Dutch investigators determined that the cause of the malfunction was a sensor on the plane’s exterior measuring altitude. The sensor had mistakenly indicated that the plane was just moments from touchdown, prompting the computer to idle the engines.

For 70 seconds, the autothrottle had done what the crew intended: steadily cut the plane’s speed. But the pilots failed to notice that the computer did not then maintain the target speed when it was reached; instead, it continued to slow the plane down. The pilots realized what had happened only when the control stick began vibrating.

Losing track of airspeed is considered a grave error. The pilots, who investigators believe were preoccupied with the landing checklist, also missed multiple warnings that the autothrottle was acting up. The Dutch board’s conclusions focused on the decision not to abort the landing, the failure to recognize the dangerous drop in speed and the incorrect response to the shaking control stick, possibly because of inadequate training.

At the request of the American team led by the N.T.S.B., the Dutch added comments that further emphasized the pilots’ culpability. The final report, for example, included a new statement that scolded the captain, saying he could have used the situation to teach the first officer a “lesson” on following protocol.

In their comments, reflected largely in an appendix, the Americans addressed criticism of Boeing in the draft report. A description of the company’s procedures for monitoring and correcting potential safety problems was “technically incorrect, incomplete and overly” simplistic, they wrote. In response, the board inserted a description of Boeing’s safety program written by the Americans and a statement that Boeing’s approach was more rigorous than F.A.A. requirements.

The draft had also referred to studies that found it was common for complex automation to confuse pilots and suggested design and training improvements. The studies, the draft said, included research by “Boeing itself.”

The Americans objected, saying the statements “misrepresent and oversimplify the research results.” In its final report, the board deleted the Boeing reference.

When the Dutch board announced its conclusions during a news conference, its chairman said, “The pilots could have prevented this.”

The Dutch Safety Board had also commissioned Dr. Dekker’s analysis of the accident, which applied an engineering discipline known as human factors. As planes have come to rely on complex computer systems, researchers and investigators have identified design and training practices that can make pilot error less likely.

Dr. Dekker, then a professor in Sweden who had investigated other serious crashes and had worked part time flying a 737, acknowledged fatal mistakes by the Turkish Airlines pilots in his 129-page study.

But he also found that Boeing bore significant responsibility.

While his study was never made public, copies circulated among some researchers and pilots. And his role in the investigation was cited in an appendix to the board’s report. He is now a professor in Australia and the Netherlands.

In the study, Dr. Dekker chastised Boeing for designing the autothrottle to rely on just one of two sensors measuring altitude. That decision, he wrote, left “a single-failure pathway in place,” raising the risk that a single error could lead to catastrophe.

Five years before the Turkish Airlines crash, Boeing was aware that a sensor malfunction could idle the engines improperly, but the company decided it wasn’t a safety concern, the Dutch investigators wrote. After receiving reports about autothrottle misfires that did not lead to accidents, a Boeing review board determined that if a malfunction occurred, pilots would recognize it and intervene.

In the meantime, Boeing developed a software update that allowed the autothrottle to compare the readings from the two altitude sensors. If they differed by more than 20 feet, the autothrottle wouldn’t be able to improperly idle the engines.

The safeguard was available in 2006, but the change wouldn’t work on some 737 NG models, like the Turkish Airlines plane, that used an autothrottle computer made by a different company. After the 2009 crash, Boeing developed a version of the update compatible with those computers, and the F.A.A. required airlines to install it.

The Dekker study found that another decision by Boeing — to leave important information out of the operations manual — had also hampered the Turkish Airlines pilots.

The 737 NG has two parallel sets of computers and sensors, one on the left side of the plane and one on the right. Most of the time, only one set is in control.

On the Turkish Airlines flight, the system on the right was in control. The pilots recognized the inaccurate altitude readings and noted that they were coming from the sensor on the left. This would have led them to conclude that the bad data coming from the left didn’t matter because the autothrottle was getting the correct data from the right, Dr. Dekker found.

What the pilots couldn’t have known was that the computer controlling the engine thrust always relied on the left sensor, even when the controls on the right were flying the plane. That critical information was nowhere to be found in the Boeing pilots’ manual, Dr. Dekker learned.

Erik van der Lely, a 737 NG pilot and instructor for a European airline who studied under Dr. Dekker, told The Times that he had not known about this design peculiarity until he read a copy of the study. “I’m pretty sure none or almost none of the 737 pilots knew that,” he said.

When the draft report criticized Boeing for not giving pilots information that might have helped prevent the accident, the Americans disagreed, citing general directions from the training manual and writing, “Boeing did provide appropriate guidance to flight crews.” The plane was “easily recoverable” if the pilots had followed the proper procedures, they said.

In its final report, the board retained its general conclusion but softened some language.

Boeing later made a similar assessment on the 737 Max. The company did not inform pilots of a new automated system that contributed to both deadly crashes, hindering their ability to counteract its erroneous commands, investigators have determined.

Over all, the final report by the Dutch Safety Board did mention some of Dr. Dekker’s conclusions, but the aviation safety experts who read his study said the systemic issues he raised received too little emphasis.

For example, while the report noted the design quirk not included in the manual, it did so only briefly amid other technical documentation, and the significance of it was unclear. Dr. Dekker estimated that the board included the equivalent of about one page of information from his study in its report, which was 90 pages in addition to appendices.

Today, faced with a public outcry over the Max crashes and demands for reforms, Boeing and the F.A.A. have agreed that more attention should be paid to the engineering discipline Dr. Dekker applied in his study.

Both the N.T.S.B. and a panel of international experts found that Boeing and the F.A.A. had not sufficiently incorporated lessons from this human-factors research when developing and certifying the Max.

But even though the research has been around for decades — an F.A.A. study recommended in 1996 that the industry and regulators embrace the approach more readily — accident investigations have tended to focus on pilot errors while minimizing or ignoring systemic factors, such as design and training problems, experts said.

“It’s really easy to blame it on the dead pilots and say it has nothing to do with our improperly designed system,” said Shawn Pruchnicki, who teaches at Ohio State and has worked on accident investigations for the Air Line Pilots Association.

Dr. Pruchnicki, who studied under Dr. Dekker, said he had participated in numerous investigations in which human-factors experts were largely ignored. “It just gets frustrating because we keep having the same types of accidents,” he said.

Dr. Woods, the Ohio State professor who has advised the F.A.A., wrote an email to colleagues shortly after the first 737 Max crash, in October 2018, of Lion Air Flight 610, which killed 189 people just minutes after taking off from Jakarta, Indonesia. The initial details, he wrote, indicated it was an automation-triggered disaster of the sort that he and others had studied for almost 30 years. He cited research from the 1990s and pointed to the Turkish Airlines crash.

“That this situation has continued on for so long without major action is not how engineering is supposed to work,” he wrote.

After the second Max crash — in March 2019, of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, killing all 157 people on board shortly after takeoff from Addis Ababa — Dr. Woods said in an interview, “I was appalled.”

“This is such of a failure of responsibility,” he said. “We’re not supposed to let this happen.”

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Bernie Sanders Has Been Getting It Right for 40 Years. Now, Says His Movement: ‘We Are Going to Win’ “We’ve never ever in our lifetimes had a true champion of social, economic, and climate justice this close to the White House.”

Westlake Legal Group BXJRa2XJAHkc033pKVoyc0Q_b_FpplpmXT2E587U-0w Bernie Sanders Has Been Getting It Right for 40 Years. Now, Says His Movement: 'We Are Going to Win' "We've never ever in our lifetimes had a true champion of social, economic, and climate justice this close to the White House." r/politics

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30 Funny Parenting Tweets From Rainn Wilson

30 Funny Parenting Tweets From Rainn Wilson | HuffPost Life

Like many parents, Rainn Wilson is a fan of tweeting the hilarious parts of life with his kid.

The actor and his wife, Holiday Reinhorn, have a teenage son named Walter. Over the years, Wilson, star of “The Office,” has shared funny quotes, anecdotes and jokes about parenting Walter.

In honor of his Jan. 20 birthday, we’ve rounded up 30 funny parenting tweets from Wilson.

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Westlake Legal Group p?c1=2&c2=6723616&c3=&c4=&c5=&c6=&c15=&cj=1 30 Funny Parenting Tweets From Rainn Wilson

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Alan Dershowitz’s Old Comments About Impeachment Come Back To Haunt Him

Westlake Legal Group 5e256dd224000031066c4634 Alan Dershowitz’s Old Comments About Impeachment Come Back To Haunt Him

Some old comments about impeachment made by attorney Alan Dershowitz are starting to look awkward in light of his current position in defense of President Donald Trump

Dershowitz was added to Trump’s legal team last week and claimed he would present a constitutional case against impeachment. Specifically, he said he planned to argue that “abuse of power” was not an impeachable offense. 

The vote was to impeach on abuse of power, which is not within the constitutional criteria for impeachment,” Dershowitz said on ABC’s “This Week” on Sunday.  

He made a similar claim on Friday on MSNBC.

“Abuse of power, even if proved, is not an impeachable offense. That’s exactly what the framers rejected,” he said, adding:

“They didn’t want to give Congress the authority to remove a president because he abused his power. They have to prove treason, they have to prove bribery or they have to prove other crimes and misdemeanors. ‘Other’ refers to crimes of the kind such as treason and bribery.”

But CNN uncovered comments Dershowitz made in 1998 ― when President Bill Clinton was facing impeachment ― that would seem to fly in the face of his current argument. 

“It certainly doesn’t have to be a crime if you have somebody who completely corrupts the office of president and who abuses trust and who poses great danger to our liberty,” Dershowitz said on CNN at the time. “You don’t need a technical crime.” 

Dershowitz also said impeachment was “like a nonviolent revolution” and had to be limited to great offenses of state. 

“We look at their acts of state, we look at how they conduct the foreign policy, we look at how they try to subvert the Constitution the way Iran-Contra did by going behind the back of Congress, by lying repeatedly and by misstating to the American public matters of great state issues,” he said.

Dershowitz added that Iran-Contra, a scandal under President Ronald Reagan, was not an impeachable offense. However, his concession that abusing the trust was an impeachable offense seemed to be at odds with his current belief that abuse of power was not.  

See more of that 1998 interview below: 

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Liz Peek: Americans will never allow Bernie and Liz to stomp on our freedoms

Westlake Legal Group Warren-Sanders-post-debate Liz Peek: Americans will never allow Bernie and Liz to stomp on our freedoms Liz Peek fox-news/us/personal-freedoms fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 053276ae-9c8e-559d-a02c-5228e96cbd69

Forget their embarrassing “he said- she said” bickering, a made-for-TV moment if ever there was one.

This is the reality: neither Bernie Sanders nor Elizabeth Warren is going to be elected president – not this year or any time soon. Why? Because they want to squelch our personal freedoms, and that is something Americans will always reject. 

Beto O’Rourke found that out the hard way, but he won’t be the last. The former Texas congressman’s campaign collapsed when he vowed to take away Americans’ guns and restrict our religious freedom.

JUSTIN HASKINS: AOC’S SOCIALIST TAKEOVER OF DEMOCRATS IS WORKING — HERE’S WHY MODERATES SHOULD WORRY

Those policies were anathema to millions, but are minor league compared to how Sanders and Warren want to take control of our lives. They want to decide what kind of house we should live in, what kind of car we drive, how we earn our living and so much more. 

This is not an exaggeration and helps to explain a recent poll, which shows the United States taking a surprising and unexpected lurch to the right.  

In 2019, even as Democrat presidential hopefuls Sanders and Warren rallied millions to their cause, wagging their fingers over income inequality and railing about the downtrodden middle class, Americans walked away from their message by becoming – shockingly – more conservative. 

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Gallup reports that the country’s multi-decade leftward slide came to an abrupt halt last year, with those self-identifying as “liberal” dropping from 26 percent in 2018 to 24 percent. That’s up from 16 percent in 1996.

At the same time, in a surprising turnaround, the number of Americans who consider themselves “conservative” rose from 35 percent to 37 percent over the course of the year, and those who identify as “moderate” remained at 35 percent.

These small shifts may or may not endure, but they are telling. Considering the fevered anti-capitalist messaging of the Democratic primary contenders and the near-universal endorsement of their crusade by the left-leaning media, it is shocking that conservatives have not only held their ground but even expanded it.

How to account for this stubborn resistance to those hectoring Democrats? After decades of liberal ascendancy, why would the country dig in its heels?

Liberals have switched from championing our individual rights to limiting them. Ominously, they want Big Government to determine more and more aspects of our daily lives, controlling everything from health care to housing. 

One theory is that “liberalism” ascended over the past few decades on the back of issues like same-sex marriage and legalized marijuana, which at their heart tap Americans’ respect for individualism and personal freedom. For most, allowing others the right to choose whom to love or whether or not to smoke a joint, seems consistent with our country’s values.  

Same-sex marriage in 2004 was opposed 60 percent to 31 percent, according to Pew research; by last year that figure had flipped, with 61 percent now approving and 31 percent opposing.  

Views on legalizing marijuana have followed a similar path.  Only 12 percent of the country supported legalizing pot in 1969; that figure gradually climbed to 66 percent in 2018.

But, more recently, liberals have switched from championing our individual rights to limiting them. Ominously, they want Big Government to determine more and more aspects of our daily lives, controlling everything from health care to housing.

Democrats forget that individual freedom is America’s single most admired and important virtue. Over time, polling shows respondents rating the U.S. tops in offering the most freedoms compared to other countries. 

We pride ourselves on giving people the freedom to live their lives as they choose and, most importantly, the freedom to get ahead. That is the backbone of the American dream.

Sanders and Warren want to crimp those freedoms. They want to snatch away the opportunity for grad students to drive for Uber so as to fund their research or rein in the freelance writer who wants to pen articles when and for whom he chooses.

They want to decide how an entrepreneur manages her startup, what to pay workers and what hours they are allowed to work. They think that the government is better able to make those decisions than the business owner.

This appetite for diktat – for control – is un-American. It has people alarmed, and rightly so. Some of the biggest arguments of our day involve individual freedoms long fought for, like gun rights. But some target small issues, like whether we can still buy 100-watt light bulbs or dig a pond on our own property.

Over the past 10 years, Americans’ rating of how the U.S. stacks up compared to other modern industrialized nations on individual freedoms has declined from 77 percent rating the U.S. as “the best” or “above average” on that front to only 64 percent. That’s a reasonable reaction to the steady and alarming encroachment of Big Government in our daily lives.

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The fight for freedoms is not just an American issue. In Britain, the argument over exiting the European Union was spurred by many issues, including immigration, but it also revolved around sovereignty and freedom. English people did not like having most of their laws handed down from the EU, whom they considered an unelected faceless bureaucracy.

Those regulations included severe environmental restrictions and limits on the number of hours employees can work. But the ever-expanding bureaucracy also produced absurd regulations like determining that bananas must be “free of abnormal curvature” and that cucumbers must be “practically straight.” The EU also banned eating “pet horses.”

Americans realize that once unleashed, the drive for control is endless. I wrote an article predicting the “Brexit” vote when the EU banned electric teakettles, used by nearly every household in England. It was the (stupid) last straw.

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Like the EU, progressives in the U.S. are over-reaching. Americans are wary of ceding their personal freedoms to Washington bureaucrats, and rightly so. It is difficult to find any past Beltway “solution” that has not produced unintended, harmful consequences.

Sanders, Warren and other Democrats are keen to tell us what America’s “values” are, but they consistently miss the most basic one of all – our freedom.  

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Westlake Legal Group Warren-Sanders-post-debate Liz Peek: Americans will never allow Bernie and Liz to stomp on our freedoms Liz Peek fox-news/us/personal-freedoms fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 053276ae-9c8e-559d-a02c-5228e96cbd69   Westlake Legal Group Warren-Sanders-post-debate Liz Peek: Americans will never allow Bernie and Liz to stomp on our freedoms Liz Peek fox-news/us/personal-freedoms fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 053276ae-9c8e-559d-a02c-5228e96cbd69

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Security measures heightened as thousands head to Richmond for large gun rights rally

Westlake Legal Group Gun-rally-4 Security measures heightened as thousands head to Richmond for large gun rights rally fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics fox news fnc/us fnc f96ea63b-c5d2-5867-905f-2147fc15c187 Barnini Chakraborty article

RICHMOND, Va. — Stacks of chain-link fencing, white-covered tents and rows of metal detectors were in place Sunday night around Richmond’s Capitol ahead of Monday’s widely-publicized gun rights rally. 

Thousands of people from across the country are expected to attend the demonstration demanding state Democrats drop a push for comprehensive gun control in the commonwealth.

Richmond, once the capital of the Confederacy, has been on high alert for days following threats of violence, including claims of a militia storming the Capitol to protesters weaponizing drones.

The fear, though, wasn’t enough to keep Maryanne Martin or her husband William away.

“All of our freedoms as Americans are under attack. We have to stand up for our rights.”

— Maryanne Martin, protester 

“All of our freedoms as Americans are under attack,” Martin told Fox News. “We have to stand up for our rights.”

The Martins, who live in Baltimore, Md., drove 160 miles to Richmond Sunday morning and spent much of the afternoon walking around the barricades in place around the Capitol.

“We wanted to check it out today,” she said. “If you ask me, it’s a bit of overkill.”

There had been concerns that white supremacists and anti-fascist activists would face off in Richmond but one of those activists, Molly Conger, tweeted Sunday that “there is no counter-demonstration planned for the january 20 convergence of armed militias on virginia’s capitol. please, please encourage anyone you know who is thinking about counter protesting this event to stay away from downtown richmond on monday.” (sic)

Also seen Sunday roaming the Capitol grounds was Alex Jones, the conspiracy theorist being InfoWars.

Members associated with the Light Foot Militia, some of whom were banned from Charlottesville, Va., following the deadly 2017 “Unite the Right” rally, are expected to attend Monday’s rally.  Richard Spencer, a prominent white nationalist, has also indicated he might make an appearance.

Security concerns have also led to road closures as well as a ban on firearms in the Capitol and on its grounds.

“A ban on guns at a gun rally… I’ve heard it all now,” Martin said.

An event memorializing victims of gun violence, and another honoring the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., were also canceled due to safety concerns. The Federal Aviation Administration has banned drones within a 2-mile radius of the Capitol and nearby students at VCU and the Medical College of Virginia have been encouraged to stay indoors.

Virginia Citizens Defense League President Philip Van Cleave told Fox News it’s not the pro-gun groups that are stoking fear.

“It’s the Democrats,” he said. “It’s almost like they want something to happen. It sounds crazy but they keep doing it and you have to start wondering if that’s intentional.”

Cleave said membership in his organization has tripled in the past six weeks and that 10,000 people have signed up for free email alerts. He attributes the spike in popularity to Gov. Ralph Northam and Democrats in the state legislature. Van Cleave believes they have “declared war on gun owners” and is counting on gun-rights advocates to show up Monday to have their collective voices heard.

“It’s woken up gun owners across the state,” he said.

Jaylynne Sensy, a mother of three from Chesterfield County, told Fox News she’s planning on coming to the rally and bringing her three children with her.

“They’re trying to take our guns and that’s not going to happen,” she said. “We won’t stand for it. This wouldn’t happen if Republicans were still running things.”

In November, Democrats flipped the state Senate and the House of Delegates, giving them control of both the governor’s office and the legislature for the first time in a generation.

Following his re-election, Northam vowed to push through new gun-control measures, saying it was a top priority for Virginia Democrats. In doing so, he angered gun-rights advocates who believe he is trying to take away their rights.

That suspicion was fueled further on Friday when President Trump warned in a tweet that Virginia Democrats were threatening Americans’ right to bear arms.

“Your 2nd Amendment is under very serious attack in the Great Commonwealth of Virginia. That’s what happens when you vote for Democrats, they will take your guns away. Republicans will win Virginia in 2020. Thank you Dems!” he tweeted.

Last week, three gun-control bills advanced in the General Assembly, setting the stage for a contentious showdown between gun-rights advocates and the Democratic lawmakers who campaigned on bringing changes to the state following last year’s mass shooting at a Virginia Beach municipal complex.

The bills that sailed through the Senate Judiciary Committee would require background checks on all firearms purchases, allow law enforcement to temporarily remove guns from people deemed to be a risk to themselves or others, limit handgun purchases to one a month and let localities decide on whether to ban weapons from certain events. To become law, the bills would have to pass the full Senate and the House of Delegates before going to the governor for his signature.

In a symbolic sign of defiance, more than 100 municipalities in Virginia have designated themselves as a save haven or sanctuary for the Second Amendment. Lawmakers and authorities in those areas have said they will refuse to enforce new gun control laws the Virginia legislature passes.

WHITE SUPREMACIST CONVICTED OF MURDER IN CHARLOTTESVILLE ATTACK GETS LIFE IN PRISON

Monday’s rally comes about 2 1/2 years after a deadly incident in Charlottesville, Va. In that case, hundreds of white nationalists and their supporters gathered in Charlottesville – about 70 miles from Richmond – to demonstrate over plans to remove a Confederate statute. They were met by counter-protestors and violence quickly erupted. At one point, a vehicle drove into a crowd of counter-protestors killing one and injuring more than a dozen others.

Fearing a similar scenario, Northam declared a state of emergency ahead of Richmond’s rally.

“We have received credible intelligence from our enforcement agencies that there are groups with malicious plans for the rally that is planned for Monday,” Northam said during a press conference on Wednesday.

House Republican Leader Todd Gilbert called the upcoming rally “a time for people to peacefully assemble and petition their government.”

“It is not a place for hate or violence… any group that comes to Richmond to spread white supremacist garbage, or any other form of hate, violence or civil unrest isn’t welcome here.”

— Todd Gilbert, House Republican leader 

“It is not a place for hate or violence,” he said in a statement. “Any group that comes to Richmond to spread white supremacist garbage, or any other form of hate, violence or civil unrest isn’t welcome here.”

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On Thursday, authorities announced the arrest of three men linked to the Base, a white extremist, anti-government group that has been tracked by the Federal Bureau of Investigations. The men, who obtained weapons and discussed going to the Richmond rally, were charged with a number of federal crimes in Maryland.  A day later, law enforcement announced the arrest of at least four other men tied to the group.

Northam later said the majority of those planning to attend Monday’s rally had no interest in fanning the flames of hate but acknowledged there were still a few hellbent on it.

Westlake Legal Group Gun-rally-4 Security measures heightened as thousands head to Richmond for large gun rights rally fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics fox news fnc/us fnc f96ea63b-c5d2-5867-905f-2147fc15c187 Barnini Chakraborty article   Westlake Legal Group Gun-rally-4 Security measures heightened as thousands head to Richmond for large gun rights rally fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics fox news fnc/us fnc f96ea63b-c5d2-5867-905f-2147fc15c187 Barnini Chakraborty article

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Pennsylvania woman injures 2 after allegedly driving into oncoming car as test of faith

Westlake Legal Group dd Pennsylvania woman injures 2 after allegedly driving into oncoming car as test of faith fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/auto fox news fnc/us fnc e263701d-cfa5-551a-b6e0-67a8521bbfd8 David Aaro article

A Pennsylvania woman allegedly drove her car into oncoming traffic as a way to test her faith, while showing no concern for those injured from her actions, state police said.

Nadejda Reilly, 31, was driving around for several hours on Jan. 7 — waiting for a calling from God — before directing her car straight into an oncoming vehicle on Route 93, according to an investigator who spoke to her.

Two people in the other vehicle were hospitalized with injuries, according to Trooper Bruce Balliet. Reilly survived and allegedly didn’t care about their physical well being because God would have protected them.

DREXEL UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR’S STRIP CLUB PURCHASES WITH RESEARCH GRANT FUNDS TRIGGER THEFT ARREST

“Reilly related [that] God took care of her by not having her injured,” Balliet wrote in an arrest affidavit. “Reilly expressed no concerns or remorse for the victims. Reilly also stated she did not care if the other people were injured because God would have taken care of them.”

Her $50,000 bail was revoked last Wednesday, according to a court docket. She’s charged with aggravated assault and other offenses.

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Her lawyer, Andrew Bench filed a notice that Reilly plans to waive her formal arraignment in Carbon County court.

The Associated Press contributed to the report

Westlake Legal Group dd Pennsylvania woman injures 2 after allegedly driving into oncoming car as test of faith fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/auto fox news fnc/us fnc e263701d-cfa5-551a-b6e0-67a8521bbfd8 David Aaro article   Westlake Legal Group dd Pennsylvania woman injures 2 after allegedly driving into oncoming car as test of faith fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/auto fox news fnc/us fnc e263701d-cfa5-551a-b6e0-67a8521bbfd8 David Aaro article

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Looming Impeachment Trial Adds Urgency To Senators’ Campaign Push

Westlake Legal Group ap_20020040277941_wide-f62e6d6009fc939929e06a630037416cf1a63c76-s1100-c15 Looming Impeachment Trial Adds Urgency To Senators' Campaign Push

Democratic presidential candidate and Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar speaks during a campaign event Sunday in Des Moines, Iowa. President Trump’s impeachment trial will pull her and three other candidates off the trail at a critical juncture. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Looming Impeachment Trial Adds Urgency To Senators' Campaign Push

Democratic presidential candidate and Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar speaks during a campaign event Sunday in Des Moines, Iowa. President Trump’s impeachment trial will pull her and three other candidates off the trail at a critical juncture.

Patrick Semansky/AP

How confident are Iowa Democrats in their choices, now two weeks out from the caucuses?

The response Renee Kleinpeter gave NPR when asked which candidates she’s narrowed her choice down to could sum it up: four seconds of laughter.

“I’ll go with anybody who could beat [President] Trump,” she said after laughing. “I wish somebody could tell me.”

Lacking any reliable electoral crystal balls, Iowans are instead keeping their options open. The most recent Iowa Poll, out earlier this month, showed that more than half of likely Democratic caucus-goers were either undecided, or could still change their top choice before Feb. 3.

Now, in the midst of all that fluidity, the four U.S. senators still in the race will be disappearing from the campaign trail. Starting Tuesday, Sens. Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Amy Klobuchar and Michael Bennet will sit on the Senate floor six days a week as impeachment jurors.

The looming trial — and the uncertainty it adds to the final days before the first primary contests in Iowa and New Hampshire — added some urgency to this weekend’s campaigning. Snowstorms in both states did too.

“Thank you for understanding that I’m not going to be able to be here every day, and so you show up on this snowy day,” Klobuchar told a crowd in Coralville, Iowa.

Like the three other senator-candidates, Klobuchar insists she’s not particularly worried about missing campaign events, and is stressing her constitutional obligations as a juror.

And, she quipped to the crowd: “I’m a mom and I can balance things really well.”

Her campaign is also planning remote events over Skype, along with deploying family members and surrogates to meet with potential supporters. And seeing the trial looming, Klobuchar sped up her schedule for visiting every one of Iowa’s 99 counties.

“I’m just cramming everything I can do into every waking hour,” she said.

Still, some supporters aren’t quite as sanguine about how the trial could affect Klobuchar’s chances. (She’s currently polling in fifth in Iowa.) “To not be able to get out there and meet more people … I can’t see how that wouldn’t hurt somewhat,” said Tim Behlke, moments after signing a commit-to-caucus card.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1200563613_wide-73deb3631f9adec448eb00f086f991d2e516d313-s1100-c15 Looming Impeachment Trial Adds Urgency To Senators' Campaign Push

Democratic presidential candidate and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren speaks during a town hall on Sunday in Des Moines, Iowa. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Looming Impeachment Trial Adds Urgency To Senators' Campaign Push

Democratic presidential candidate and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren speaks during a town hall on Sunday in Des Moines, Iowa.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Of course, impeachment won’t completely end campaigning for the senators in the race. Sanders has already announced a rally this Wednesday night in Iowa. He’ll fly there after the trial has wrapped for the day, and be back in Washington, D.C., the next morning.

And the proceedings won’t have any effect on the other hallmarks of campaigns in the closing days of a race: volunteers and organizers knocking on doors, and calling and texting potential caucus-goers; and ads on television, radio and online.

Still, the weekend of campaigning carried a whiff of premature nostalgia for some of the candidates who have spent most of the past year in Iowa.

“I’ll miss all the questions I get from people, the unfiltered questions, folks who get to stand up and say, ‘This is what matters to me. Talk to me about it,’ ” Warren told reporters after a Sunday rally in Des Moines.

“I truly have loved this part of the campaign, and I hope I’ll be able to come more to Iowa,” she said, “because the good people of Iowa have really taught me core parts of democracy.”

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What is ‘house hacking,’ and how can you do it?

In 2016 Corey Meyer, a 31-year-old living in Montana, bought a house in the luxury ski resort community of Big Sky. His grandma was proud of his grown-up purchase.

However, she was confused when he then proceeded to move into a 1967 camper and rent out his new house.

Westlake Legal Group HouseHackingCoreyMeyerATbradfordpopmcarthur2 What is 'house hacking,' and how can you do it? Katie Jackson fox-news/travel/general/home-rentals fox news fnc/real-estate fnc article 3531a60a-a033-5e2d-852b-59b5b01569e0 /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE/Buying

“This isn’t easy, but if you can buckle down and work hard to get approved, the delayed gratification will most certainly be worth it,” said Corey Meyer, who “hacked” a house in Montana while he was living in a camper. (@bradfordpopemcarthur)

Older generations might not understand what Meyer did. But millennials do. It’s called “house hacking,” and the concept behind it — buying a home with the intention of renting out all or part of it to cover the mortgage — is nothing new. (Think of Victorian-era boarding houses, for example.) But as younger generations — many burdened with student loans — are buying fewer homes than their predecessors, they’re relying more and more on house hacking for their first home purchase. You don’t have to be a card-carrying millennial, of course, to take advantage of this real estate trend. You just have to know a few things before you get started.

What is ‘house hacking’?

House hacking is basically buying a property with the intention of having renters cover your mortgage. It’s popular among millennials who see it as the only means of being able to afford to own. Most house hackers live in their home and rent out rooms, or if it’s a duplex or multi-unit, rent out the other units.

TOPEKA, KANSAS, OFFERING FOLKS $15G TO MOVE THERE

Get ready for a bit of research.

According to Michael Kelczewski, a real estate agent with Brandywine Fine Properties Sotheby’s International Realty, the first thing you should do is look up and, more important, understand local regulations. You’ll also need to know if the FHA loan you want requires owner occupancy, and for how long. Research is also critical if you plan on using Airbnb to rent out your future home. For example, in cities like New York and Los Angeles, short-term rentals are strictly regulated. Kelczewski also says it’s important to look into insurance – especially if you’re not living on-site.

<img src="https://a57.foxnews.com/static.foxnews.com/foxnews.com/content/uploads/2020/01/640/320/HOUSEMichaelAKelczewski-CdBPhotographyLLC.jpeg?ve=1&tl=1" alt="Michael Kelczewski, a Realtor with Brandywine Fine Properties Sotheby’s International Realty, warns that "house hacking" takes a fair bit of planning, especially depending on where one plans on "hacking" that house.”>

<a data-cke-saved-href=”http://www.michaelkelczewski.com/” href=”http://www.michaelkelczewski.com/” target=”_blank”>Michael Kelczewski</a>, a Realtor with Brandywine Fine Properties Sotheby’s International Realty, warns that “house hacking” takes a fair bit of planning, especially depending on where one plans on “hacking” that house. (Michael A. Kelczewski/CdB Photography LLC)

In 2017, Kelczewski himself bought a duplex for $150,000 in Wilmington, Delaware. He uses rent from the larger unit to pay off his mortgage “while leveraging equity to pyramid alternate investments.” Would he do it again? Definitely. But he says he’d buy a larger property, like a triplex or a 4-unit multi-family home.

Be financially disciplined.

As with buying a house for yourself to live in, the hardest part about house hacking, according to Meyer, is obtaining the mortgage. He recommends starting by eliminating bad debts, improving your credit score and saving money — at least $10,000 — for a down payment.

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“This isn’t easy, but if you can buckle down and work hard to get approved, the delayed gratification will most certainly be worth it,” said Meyer, who adopted the habits of a broke college student while saving for his first home. The good news is that long-term mortgage interest rates are nearing historic lows.

Consider your long-term goals.

While it may seem like every house hacker’s dream is to buy a duplex or a house with an in-law apartment for rental income, some people are better off buying a single-family home and living with roommates for a while to help pay it off. If Kris Lippi, a real estate broker and founder of ISoldMyHouse.com, could buy his house all over again, he’d find a multifamily home in a great school district so he wouldn’t have to move once he has kids.

“House hacking can be a nightmare for an individual who views the real estate they live in as ‘theirs’ without understanding that a tenant is paying for the right to make it their own space, too,” added Mihal Gartenberg of Warburg Realty in New York City. She said that it’s critical that buyers ask themselves what their final goal is. Is it to buy a grand home that they’ll live in, alone, in the future? Or would they prefer to turn their first property into an investment property?

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Use Airbnb or VRBO (if you can).

Yes, it can be a pain having to turn over rooms or deal with a rotating door of guests, but short-term vacation rental sites often get you higher nightly rates. For example, you could rent out a room in your house for $900 per month, or you could rent it out for just 15 days a month at $60 per night and earn the same amount.

9 HOME IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS THAT ARE EASIER – AND OFTEN CHEAPER – IN THE WINTER

Meyer went with Airbnb because it gave him the highest profit margins. (Of course, Meyer’s case is a bit extreme, since he opted not to live in his house, and instead chose to camp for virtually nothing so he could “hack his way to financial freedom”). A private bedroom in Big Sky, where Meyer’s house is located, can go for as much as $150 per night on Airbnb. And a one-bedroom condo, which is what Meyer owns, can go for as much as $500 a night. In fact, Meyer does so well financially — and with the help of Headwaters Hosting, who cleans the place between guests — he was able to take the last three months off to travel in New Zealand, Australia, Southeast Asia and India.

Westlake Legal Group HouseHackingCoreyMeyerATbradfordpopmcarthur What is 'house hacking,' and how can you do it? Katie Jackson fox-news/travel/general/home-rentals fox news fnc/real-estate fnc article 3531a60a-a033-5e2d-852b-59b5b01569e0 /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE/Buying

Meyer claims he lived like a broke college student while saving up to “hack” his first house. (@bradfordpopemcarthur)

Don’t live in your house.

It sounds counterintuitive, but the most successful house hackers — those who pay off their first homes the quickest and are able to move in entirely or buy more properties — don’t live in their first home. Instead, they rent out their property in its entirety while crashing on friends’ couches, living with parents or, in the case of Meyer, staying in an old camper in state parks. He also took a job as an adventure travel guide where his employer provided accommodations for three months.

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Still, it’s a hardcore model that’s not for everyone. Meyer says the next house he’s looking to buy will be another house hack (he plans on renting several bedrooms out) but this time he’ll actually live in it.

“It might not generate the same cash flow as my first house, but having a warm home to go back to at night with running water and a toilet are amenities I no longer want to live without.”

Westlake Legal Group housekeysistock What is 'house hacking,' and how can you do it? Katie Jackson fox-news/travel/general/home-rentals fox news fnc/real-estate fnc article 3531a60a-a033-5e2d-852b-59b5b01569e0 /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE/Buying   Westlake Legal Group housekeysistock What is 'house hacking,' and how can you do it? Katie Jackson fox-news/travel/general/home-rentals fox news fnc/real-estate fnc article 3531a60a-a033-5e2d-852b-59b5b01569e0 /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE/Buying

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