web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 450)

How TV Covered the Moment of Impeachment

Westlake Legal Group 18impeachtv-facebookJumbo How TV Covered the Moment of Impeachment Trump, Donald J Television Survivor (TV Program) News and News Media National Broadcasting Co impeachment House of Representatives Hannity, Sean Fox News Channel CBS Corporation Carlson, Tucker ABC Inc

The impeachment debate on the floor of the House of Representatives might have been historically significant, but it took longer than expected, which meant it got in the way of two network shows that had been promoted heavily in recent weeks.

At 8 p.m. on Wednesday, CBS cut away from the proceedings for the season finale of the long-running reality competition show “Survivor.” At the same time, ABC dropped its Washington feed to start airing back-to-back live recreations of the 1970s-vintage Norman Lear sitcoms “Good Times” and “All in the Family.”

NBC stuck with the news, rather than its scheduled programming, which was a rerun of “Ellen’s Greatest Night of Giveaways,” starring Ellen DeGeneres. As the anchor Lester Holt led political analysts and correspondents through a discussion, House members were seen milling about in the background. With the tally inching toward the key number, which the network put at 214, NBC included occasional cutaways, with no audio at first, to President Trump speaking at a rally in Battle Creek, Mich.

As the vote went through on the first article of impeachment, ABC broke into “Good Times” with a special report led by the anchor George Stephanopoulos. A banner at the top of the screen declared, “President Trump Impeached.”

When the moment approached on Fox News, Tucker Carlson, almost midway through hosting his 8 p.m. program, said the president had devoted 45 seconds of his rally speech to the topic of the day. The show then cut to a clip from Battle Creek, with the president saying, “It doesn’t really feel like we’re being impeached,” to cheers.

When it was all but official, Mr. Carlson’s reaction was muted. “They have the votes,” he said. “There it is, there it is, right there.”

His guests included Jenna Ellis, a lawyer who called the impeachment “fully unconstitutional,” and Representative Devin Nunes of California, who compared it to “a coup attempt.”

On MSNBC at the close of the vote on the second article, the anchor Brian Williams discussed with Claire McCaskill, the former Democratic senator of Missouri, the dim likelihood that the Senate would follow the House with a conviction. As the yeas mounted, Mr. Williams said: “This moment, make no mistake, is historic. We’ve crossed the threshold, making for two articles of impeachment.”

On CNN, Rick Santorum, a former senator and onetime Republican presidential candidate who is a regular commentator on the channel, was talking about former President Bill Clinton, saying that the House Republicans of 1998 had been “pretty woke” to impeach him, when considering his actions in light of the #MeToo movement.

The CBS anchor Norah O’Donnell interrupted “Survivor” with a special report, noting that not one Republican had voted in favor of impeachment and citing the lack of across-the-aisle agreement as evidence of the “split screen” state of America.

Mr. Carlson, on Fox News, looked grim toward the end of his hour as a guest, Tom Fitton, the head of the conservative activist group Judicial Watch, was saying, “The president has been terribly abused.”

At 9 p.m., CBS returned to “Survivor.” On ABC, the actor Woody Harrelson, with an accent that sounded as if it had originated a thousand miles from Queens, N.Y., was playing Archie Bunker in the “All in the Family” reboot. And on Fox News, Sean Hannity kicked off his highly rated show by calling the impeachment a “repulsive, dangerous political stunt” and a “revolting charade.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

MSNBC’s Chris Matthews: ‘Not one Republican’ defended Trump’s character during impeachment battle

Westlake Legal Group chris-matthews-MSNBC MSNBC's Chris Matthews: 'Not one Republican' defended Trump's character during impeachment battle Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/us/congress fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 9b98f433-7bf1-5130-b45c-fa33bbd3b655

MSNBC host Chris Matthews made what he thought was a “fascinating” observation as the House of Representatives voted on the two articles of impeachment against President Trump.

“I’ve been listening and I’ve been watching and I’ve heard something that wasn’t said all day,” Matthews began. “Now here’s a president, a human being, being accused of horrible things, of selling out his office, of trading his public trust for personal gain, a terrible assault on who he was. And yet, all day long, with all the Republican speakers, they were able to say anything they want all day long… not one Republican member of the House stood in that well and defended this president’s character.”

He continued, “No one person said he was an honest man, not one person said he’s a good man, not one person said he could’ve had done something like this, and that is powerful stuff — that a party felt that they can play all the games today. They could talk tactics and style. They talk about everybody else’s situation, but they never defended the man, the person in the White House, his character. This is extraordinary.”

MSNBC’S CHUCK TODD ON TRUMP IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY: PROBABLY MARKS ‘THE WORST DECADE IN AMERICAN POLITICS’

Earlier in the day, Matthews’ colleague Chuck Todd declared that Trump’s impeachment marked “the worst decade in American politics.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“This feels like we’re coming on the air dealing with a government-shutdown threat, not impeachment,” Todd said. “The reason I say it that way is because that is how numb, I think, our politics is to what we’re facing. I mean, this should be a moment where the whole country is basically having their own gut check, where we are — we are having a national conversation trying to figure this out.”

He added, “The fact that we’re not having it, that this feels like just another battle in what has been… Basically, this has probably been the worst decade in American politics, certainly in our lifetimes.”

Westlake Legal Group chris-matthews-MSNBC MSNBC's Chris Matthews: 'Not one Republican' defended Trump's character during impeachment battle Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/us/congress fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 9b98f433-7bf1-5130-b45c-fa33bbd3b655   Westlake Legal Group chris-matthews-MSNBC MSNBC's Chris Matthews: 'Not one Republican' defended Trump's character during impeachment battle Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/us/congress fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 9b98f433-7bf1-5130-b45c-fa33bbd3b655

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump, Unbowed, Uses Rally to Strike Back Against Impeachment Vote

Westlake Legal Group 18dc-trump-2-facebookJumbo-v4 Trump, Unbowed, Uses Rally to Strike Back Against Impeachment Vote Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Republican Party Pence, Mike Michigan House of Representatives

Describing the impeachment vote as an attempt to “nullify the ballots of tens of millions of patriotic Americans,” President Trump struck a defiant tone on Wednesday night, lashing out at Democrats and saying he had done nothing wrong at all.

Moments after the House finished passing two articles of impeachment against him, Mr. Trump used a campaign rally in Battle Creek, Mich., to tout the strong economy, mock the Democratic presidential field, relive his 2016 victory and claim that Democrats made up the charges against him.

“They said there’s no crime,” he said. “There’s no crime. I’m the first person to ever get impeached and there’s no crime. I feel guilty. It’s impeachment lite.”

He paused before adding, “I don’t know about you, but I’m having a good time.”

His rejoinder created the remarkable image of a combative president — even as he was becoming the third to be impeached — standing unbowed before his core base of supporters heading into a year in which he will be seeking re-election.

Characteristically, there was no reflection about the gravity of the moment in his address, much less contrition about the pressure campaign he waged against Ukraine, seeking a commitment from the country’s new president to investigate former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and look into various allegations about the 2016 election, including an unfounded theory that Ukrainians rather than Russians had stolen emails from the Democrat National Committee.

Mr. Trump seemed intent at times on diverting attention from the impeachment proceedings unfolding back in Washington. His discursive remarks touched on everything from light bulbs to sinks, showers and toilets to Beto O’Rourke, the former Democratic presidential candidate who quit the race over a month ago.

“It doesn’t really feel like we’re being impeached,” Mr. Trump said. “The country is doing better than ever before. We did nothing wrong. We have tremendous support in the Republican Party like we’ve never had before.”

At the moment when the House approved the first article of impeachment against Mr. Trump, for abuse of power, about 17 minutes after he took the stage, he was bragging about how F-35 pilots were better looking than the actor Tom Cruise.

Mr. Trump’s decision to hold a rally and immerse himself in the warmth of an adoring crowd at the critical juncture in his presidency was an echo of how he handled his worst public humiliation — the revelation of the “Access Hollywood” tape on Oct. 7, 2016, during the final days of his 2016 presidential campaign.

After holing up at Trump Tower the day after that video was released, Mr. Trump emerged after seeing on television that a crowd supporters had gathered on Fifth Avenue. He walked through the glass doors, pumped his fist in the air, and then walked back into his building, clapping his hands as if cheering himself on.

On Wednesday night, Mr. Trump appeared to rally his own spirits by reminiscing about his 2016 victory in front of an adoring crowd, and taunting the 2020 Democratic presidential field. “She’s gasping for air,” he said of Senator Elizabeth Warren, while poking fun at the pronunciation of Mayor Pete Buttigieg’s name.

The rambling performance was vintage Trump, hitting on his favorite targets, like Lisa Page, the former F.B.I. lawyer, and James Comey, the former F.B.I. director. “Did I do a great job when I fired his ass?” he said.

But his anger at the House Democrats rang through his speech. At one point, Mr. Trump said that Americans would show up next year to “vote Pelosi the hell out of office.”

The crowd later seemed perplexed when he attacked Representative Debbie Dingell of Michigan, who he noted voted for impeachment despite the fact that Mr. Trump lowered the flags for her late husband, longtime Representative John Dingell. “Maybe he’s looking up” instead of looking down, Mr. Trump said.

Mr. Trump, described by his aides as having been in a frustrated, snappish mood for days, traveled to the rally in an electorally vital state after watching the impeachment debate on television and tweeting or retweeting more than 50 times.

“They want to Impeach me (I’m not worried!),” he wrote in one post on Wednesday morning. “And yet they were all breaking the law in so many ways. How can they do that and yet impeach a very successful (Economy Plus) President of the United States, who has done nothing wrong? These people are Crazy!”

The first image of Mr. Trump on Wednesday came as he cut across the South Lawn, alone, dressed in a dark overcoat and prepared to depart for Michigan. Instead of making a beeline for the cameras and microphones gathered outside of the Oval Office, as he typically does, he silently trudged over to a small group of supporters before leaving without taking any questions from reporters.

Earlier, Kellyanne Conway, a counselor to the president, stood in the White House briefing room and said Mr. Trump was in good spirits. “The president is fine,” Ms. Conway said, “his mood is good.”

Trump campaign aides and White House officials like Ms. Conway have been projecting confidence that the impeachment inquiry has only served as fuel for the president’s campaign, bolstering its fund-raising efforts as well as its volunteer recruitment. But privately, people who know him said, Mr. Trump has been aware of the historic nature of a charge of “high crimes and misdemeanors” and has been aggrieved at what he views as a stain on his legacy, a desire by Democrats to harm him personally and what he sees as the failure of Republicans to state with more conviction that he did nothing wrong.

Some of that anger played out online on Wednesday as Mr. Trump watched cable news coverage of the impeachment debate. “SUCH ATROCIOUS LIES BY THE RADICAL LEFT, DO NOTHING DEMOCRATS. THIS IS AN ASSAULT ON AMERICA, AND AN ASSAULT ON THE REPUBLICAN PARTY!!!!” he wrote on Twitter.

His all-caps burst of online frustration came minutes after the White House press secretary, Stephanie Grisham, tried to convey a sense of business as usual in the West Wing, saying in a statement that the president would be “working all day” and catching some of the impeachment proceedings “between meetings.”

Other aides were also committed to a “just another Wednesday” narrative, noting that legislative affairs officials were busy on Capitol Hill working on the revised trade agreement with Mexico and Canada as well as two spending bills.

But Mr. Trump’s grievance-infused state of mind was laid out clearly in a six-page letter the White House sent on Tuesday to Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

“You have cheapened the importance of the very ugly word, impeachment!” he wrote. “By proceeding with your invalid impeachment, you are violating your oaths of office, you are breaking your allegiance to the Constitution, and you are declaring open war on American Democracy.”

Mr. Trump drafted the letter with the help of three aides: Stephen Miller, his top policy adviser; Eric Ueland, his legislative affairs director; and Mike Williams, a counselor to the acting chief of staff.

The president purposefully did not consult with the White House counsel, Pat Cipollone, according to people involved with drafting the letter because he did not want to be told what he could and could not say — he simply wanted to vent.

In the audience in Battle Creek, Mr. Trump’s supporters were finally expressing the sentiments he had been wanting to hear more forcefully from Republican lawmakers.

“How they even have a right to say he did something wrong is baffling,” said Jonathan Anderson, a resident of nearby Portage.

Michigan promises to be crucial to Mr. Trump’s re-election fortunes, and will probably be tightly contested. Mr. Trump unexpectedly won Michigan by a fraction of a percentage point in 2016, or just over 10,000 votes more than Hillary Clinton. His final 2016 campaign stop, late at night, was in Grand Rapids. Battle Creek, a city of just over 50,000, is the hub of a county that voted for Mr. Trump but is surrounded by more liberal cities, including Kalamazoo and East Lansing. Residents still consider it an industrial town, even as empty storefronts dot the downtown. Kellogg’s, the major cereal producer, still employs thousands of people and churns out Raisin Bran and Rice Krispies at a plant that sends cereal scents into the city’s air.

Local officials said the arena would hold around 6,500 people. On Wednesday morning, a large screen in a plaza outside the building cycled through clips featuring Mr. Trump’s family, including his daughter-in-law Lara Trump, who interviewed Diamond and Silk, two pro-Trump internet personalities. Parka and scarf-wearing rally attendees lined up early in the morning, huddling in a parking garage to keep warm.

Annie Karni reported from Washington, Maggie Haberman from New York, and Michael Crowley and Noah Weiland from Battle Creek, Mich.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Brit Hume: Striking ‘how little interest people are showing in’ impeachment debate

Westlake Legal Group Carlson-Hume Brit Hume: Striking 'how little interest people are showing in' impeachment debate Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/tucker-carlson-tonight fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 2e084505-4e4d-5199-a202-01dfb78658a1

Fox News senior political analyst Brit Hume said Wednesday that the American people are showing “little interest” in the House vote to impeach President Trump, saying the accusations made against him “didn’t really go anywhere.”

“The striking thing to me, Tucker, is how little interest people are showing in this. The polls reflect that,” Hume said on “Tucker Carlson Tonight.” “I was up in the woods in Pennsylvania this week for Christmas. And I had lunch today with some guys who live up here. They’re smart guys, successful guys. They’re interested in politics. And there was almost no discussion of this. This on the very day that the vote was gonna be held.

WATCH LIVE: AS HOUSE VOTES ON IMPEACHMENT, TRUMP HOLDS DEFIANT RALLY IN BATTLE CREEK, MICH.

“And I think it’s because it hasn’t moved people and captured people’s imagination,” Hume added.

The House voted to impeach President Trump on an “abuse of power” charge related to his dealings with Ukraine after six hours of heated debate Wednesday, making Trump the third American president ever to be impeached. Minutes later, the House also voted to impeach Trump on a count of obstruction of Congress as well.

Hume said the crimes Trump was accused of have not held up.

“I mean, we’re talking about the temporary withholding of aid that was ultimately provided in exchange for an investigation that wasn’t conducted,” Hume said. “And while it was, I think, improper for the president to raise Joe Biden’s name in that now-famous conversation, it really didn’t go anywhere.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The analyst also dismissed the accusation that Trump’s call with the Ukraine president hurt national security.

“This administration’s policy toward Ukraine was stronger than the previous administrations,” Hume said. “Which leaves you to wonder how exactly was our national security compromised?”

Fox News’ Gregg Re contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Carlson-Hume Brit Hume: Striking 'how little interest people are showing in' impeachment debate Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/tucker-carlson-tonight fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 2e084505-4e4d-5199-a202-01dfb78658a1   Westlake Legal Group Carlson-Hume Brit Hume: Striking 'how little interest people are showing in' impeachment debate Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/tucker-carlson-tonight fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 2e084505-4e4d-5199-a202-01dfb78658a1

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Impeached for Abuse of Power and Obstruction of Congress

WASHINGTON — The House of Representatives on Wednesday impeached President Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, making him the third president in history to be charged with committing high crimes and misdemeanors and face removal by the Senate.

On a day of constitutional consequence and raging partisan tension, the votes on the two articles of impeachment fell largely along party lines, after a bitter debate that stretched all day and into the evening, reflecting the deep polarization gripping American politics in the Trump era.

All but two Democrats supported the article on abuse of power, which accused Mr. Trump of corruptly using the levers of government to solicit election assistance from Ukraine in the form of investigations to discredit his Democratic political rivals. Republicans were united in opposition. It passed 230 to 197, with Speaker Nancy Pelosi gaveling the vote to a close from the House rostrum.

On the second charge, obstruction of Congress, a third Democrat joined Republicans in opposition. The vote was 229 to 198.

Westlake Legal Group trump-impeachment-vote-promo-1576708669492-articleLarge-v2 Trump Impeached for Abuse of Power and Obstruction of Congress United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Presidential Election of 2020 Politics and Government Pelosi, Nancy impeachment House of Representatives

How Democrats and Republicans Voted on Trump’s Impeachment

See how each House member voted on the articles of impeachment against President Trump.

The impeachment votes set the stage for a historic trial beginning early next year in the Senate, which will have final say — 10 months before Mr. Trump faces re-election — on whether to acquit the 45th president or convict and remove him from office.

Acquittal in the Republican-controlled chamber is likely, but the proceeding is certain to aggravate the political and cultural fault lines in the country that Mr. Trump’s presidency brought into dramatic relief.

On Wednesday, Democrats characterized his impeachment as an urgent action to stop a corrupt president whose misdeeds had unfolded in plain view from damaging the country any further.

“Over the course of the last three months, we have found incontrovertible evidence that President Trump abused his power by pressuring the newly elected president of Ukraine to announce an investigation into President Trump’s political rival,” said Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California and the Intelligence Committee chairman, who led the impeachment inquiry.

“The president and his men plot on,” Mr. Schiff said. “The danger persists. The risk is real. Our democracy is at peril.”

Video

transcript

House Votes to Impeach Trump

The Democratic-led House of Representatives charged President Trump with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

“The yeas and nays are ordered. Members will record their votes by electronic device.” “On this vote, the yeas are 230, the nays are 197. Present is one. Article 1 is adopted. On this vote, the yeas are 229, the nays are 198. Present is one. Article 2 is adopted.”

Westlake Legal Group 18dc-pelosivid-sub-videoSixteenByNine3000 Trump Impeached for Abuse of Power and Obstruction of Congress United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Presidential Election of 2020 Politics and Government Pelosi, Nancy impeachment House of Representatives

The Democratic-led House of Representatives charged President Trump with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.CreditCredit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

Far from showing contrition or contemplating resignation, as his predecessors have done in the face of impeachment, Mr. Trump instead offered an indignant defense as the House weighed his fate, raging on Twitter from the White House.

“SUCH ATROCIOUS LIES BY THE RADICAL LEFT, DO NOTHING DEMOCRATS,” the president wrote as the historic debate took place on the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue. “THIS IS AN ASSAULT ON AMERICA, AND AN ASSAULT ON THE REPUBLICAN PARTY!!!!”

Later, as members cast their votes to impeach him in Washington, Mr. Trump took the stage to roars of adulation from his supporters at an arena-style campaign rally in Battle Creek, Mich., where he brushed aside the constitutional confrontation as a “hoax” based on unfounded charges, even as he conceded that it would be a permanent blot on his presidency.

“I’m not worried,” Mr. Trump said. “You don’t do anything wrong and you get impeached. That may be a record that will last forever.”

“But you know what they have done?” he said of Democrats. “They have cheapened the impeachment process.”

Senators, he added, “are going to do the right thing.”

Regardless of the outcome of a Senate trial, the impeachment vote in the House puts an indelible stain on Mr. Trump’s presidency that cannot be wiped from the public consciousness with a barrage of tweets or an angry tirade in front of thousands of his cheering supporters at a campaign rally.

It did not grow out of the two-year investigation into Russian election meddling by Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel, or the seemingly endless series of other accusations of corruption and misconduct that have plagued his White House: embracing Russian election interference, tax evasion, profiting from the presidency, payoffs to a pornographic film actress and fraudulent activities by his charitable foundation.

Instead, the existential threat to Mr. Trump’s presidency centered around a half-hour phone call in July in which he pressured Ukraine’s president to announce investigations into former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and other Democrats, at the same time he was withholding nearly $400 million in vital military assistance for the country and a White House meeting.

Congress learned about the call after an anonymous C.I.A. official lodged a whistle-blower complaint in August — pulling a string that helped unravel an effort by the president and his allies to pressure a foreign government for help in smearing a political rival. Over a period of weeks this fall, a parade of diplomats and other administration officials confirmed and expanded on those revelations.

When Congress found out about the scheme and sought to investigate, the president ordered his administration to defy its every request, leading to what the House said Tuesday was a violation of the separation of powers and a de facto assertion by Mr. Trump that he was above the law.

United in their opposition, Republicans accused the Democrats, who fought their way back from political oblivion in 2016 to win the House in 2018, of misusing the power voters had invested in them to harangue a president they never viewed as legitimate by manufacturing a case against him. Though they conceded few of them, they insisted the facts against Mr. Trump nonetheless fell woefully short of impeachment.

“When all is said and done, when the history of this impeachment is written, it will be said that my Washington Democrat friends couldn’t bring themselves to work with Donald Trump, so they consoled themselves instead by silencing the will of those who did, the American people,” said Representative Mark Meadows, Republican of North Carolina.

Through the course of the inquiry, even as Republicans raged against the process and sought to offer benign explanations for Mr. Trump’s conduct, none disputed the central facts that served as its basis: that he asked Ukraine’s president to “do us a favor” and investigate Mr. Biden, a prospective rival in the 2020 campaign, and other Democrats.

Mr. Trump’s impeachment had the potential to change the trajectory of his presidency and redefine an already volatile political landscape. Democrats, including the most vulnerable moderates, embraced the articles of impeachment with the full knowledge that doing so could damage them politically, potentially even costing them control of the House.

The only Democratic dissenters from the abuse of power charge on Wednesday were Representatives Collin C. Peterson of Minnesota and Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey, a freshman who has announced that he will switch parties and become a Republican. Representative Jared Golden of Maine, another centrist freshman, joined them in opposition to the obstruction of Congress charge.

And Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii, a Democratic presidential contender who has built her reputation as a maverick in her party, voted “present” on both articles.

Republicans tethered themselves closely to Mr. Trump as they have since he took office, yoking their political brands and fortunes to his.

The debate proceeded in historic terms in the well of the House, even as an odd sense of inevitability hung over Washington about Mr. Trump’s fate.

“Today, as speaker of the House, I solemnly and sadly open the debate on the impeachment of the president of the United States,” Ms. Pelosi, dressed in all black, said as debate opened on the articles around noon. “If we do not act now, we would be derelict in our duty. It is tragic that the president’s reckless actions make impeachment necessary. He gave us no choice.”

In the Senate, Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, has already made clear he views the House’s case as “weak” and would prefer a speedy trial in January that does not call any additional fact witnesses. Doing so increases the likelihood that Congress will simply never hear from several senior government officials with knowledge of the Ukraine matter who avoided House testimony.

Impeachment traces its origins to monarchical England, but the framers of the Constitution confined its use on presidents to rare occasions, when his actions corrupted the public interest for personal ones. Only twice has the House previously impeached a president, Andrew Johnson in 1868 and Bill Clinton 1998. President Richard M. Nixon resigned in 1974 rather than face such a consequence.

Johnson remained in office by a single vote in 1868. Mr. Clinton more soundly beat the charges, with no more than half of the Senate voting for conviction after more than a month of deliberations. The trial of Mr. Trump is likely to reach a similar outcome, but it could do so much more quickly, with some Senate Republicans discussing the possibility that the case could be resolved in little more than a week.

As he did in the face of past accusations, Mr. Trump, 73, railed against impeachment as a “witch hunt” and a “hoax,” attacking his adversaries with a viciousness rarely heard from previous presidents.

“More due process was afforded to those accused in the Salem Witch Trials,” the president seethed in an angry impeachment eve letter to Ms. Pelosi.

In Mr. Trump’s reality, reinforced by the conservative cable news programs that swirl around him throughout the day, his three years in the White House have been more successful than any other. Wednesday’s impeachment intrudes on that, forcing the president and those around him to confront a different narrative, one in which he has — in the words of the articles of impeachment — “betrayed the nation” and acted “in a manner grossly incompatible with self governance and the rule of law.”

“Whether Donald Trump leaves in one month, one year or five years, this impeachment is permanent,” said Representative Ted Lieu, Democrat of California. “It will follow him around for the rest of his life, and history books will record it.”

The absolutist defense by many members of the Republican Party and the partisan nature of Wednesday’s vote underscored the remarkable hold that Mr. Trump, who has never commanded the support of a majority of the nation, has come to have over the party, remaking it in his image.

One Republican, Representative Barry Loudermilk of Georgia, compared Mr. Trump on Wednesday with Jesus Christ, saying that the son of God had been “afforded more rights” by Pontius Pilate than Democrats had given the president.

Democrats’ most fervent supporters have fantasized since Inauguration Day 2017 about impeaching Mr. Trump, an extreme remedy for the ultimate insurgent they believed was shredding American institutions in his self interest. The debate reached a new pitch this year when Democrats reclaimed control of the House after nearly a decade and awaited the results of a two-year Justice Department investigation into whether Mr. Trump’s campaign had conspired with Russia to interfere in the 2016 election.

But as the left pushed harder for Mr. Trump’s ouster, Democratic leaders resisted. “He’s just not worth it,” Ms. Pelosi said in March. The Russia investigation fizzled when the special counsel declined to recommend charges, even though his report detailed at least 10 instances of possible obstruction of justice by Mr. Trump when he tried to thwart the inquiry. By the time lawmakers returned to Washington this fall after a summer break, impeachment appeared all but dead.

Ms. Pelosi’s calculations — and public opinion — shifted abruptly in September, when the C.IA. whistle-blower arrived on the House’s doorstep.

The inquiry it prompted moved with alacrity, even as Democrats did not have an independent counsel or special prosecutor on whose work they could build. Instead, the House Intelligence Committee called senior American diplomats and White House officials for questioning and requested reams of documents.

In private and then in publicly televised hearings — and all in defiance of White House orders — they outlined a wide-ranging attempt by Mr. Trump and his allies to bend United States policy on Ukraine toward carrying out what one former White House official called “a domestic political errand” on the president’s own behalf.

Fueling the obstruction of Congress charge, a dozen more witnesses, some with direct knowledge of Mr. Trump’s actions, were blocked from speaking to investigators and the Trump administration refused to produce a single document under subpoena.

As the facts tumbled out into the open, there were moments when Republicans in the House and Senate flirted with casting their lot against the president. After the acting White House chief of staff said from the White House in October that Mr. Trump had withheld military aid in part to extract at least one politically beneficial investigation from Ukraine, Representative Francis Rooney said he was open to impeachment. But on Wednesday, he joined every Republican in voting no.

Testimony weeks later in November by Gordon D. Sondland, Mr. Trump’s ambassador to the European Union, said that there had been a quid pro quo around a White House meeting and maybe around the foreign aid money prompted momentary fears of a mass defection. It did not materialize.

If anything, the process underscored the extent to which the nation is pulling apart into two, with each side claiming its own news sources and fact sets that make meaningful debate between Democrats and Republicans over the significance of president’s conduct almost impossible. Public opinion polls show the nation is closely divided over Mr. Trump’s impeachment and removal as it was on Election Day 2016.

On Wednesday, neither lawmakers nor aides to Mr. Trump foresaw a resolution.

“We know how this partisan process will end this evening,” said Representative Will Hurd of Texas, one of a handful of Republicans willing to criticize Mr. Trump’s conduct, who is retiring from Congress. “But what happens tomorrow?”

Sheryl Gay Stolberg, Emily Cochrane and Catie Edmondson contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Rose McGowan wants nothing to do with Rain Dove after actress’ ex admits to selling Asia Argento texts

Rose McGowan wants to forget her relationship with Rain Dove.

“Does anyone out there know how to fix a Wikipedia entry?” she tweeted on Tuesday. “I broke up with my ex [Dove] 6 months ago and they are still listed as my partner. I would like my name to be cleared of association.”

Soon after tweeting, Wikipedia removed Dove as McGowan’s partner.

ROSE MCGOWAN SUES HARVEY WEINSTEIN, LISA BLOOM, CLAIMS THEY WORKED WITH SPIES TO DISCREDIT HER RAPE ALLEGATIONS

McGowan’s tweet comes after the LGBTQ activist admitted to selling incriminating private text messages from Asia Argento where she allegedly admitted to having sex with a minor to TMZ for $10,000 in an hour-long YouTube video. Argento and McGowan are both outspoken Harvey Weinstein accusers.

“When it came to the text messages with the Asia Argento thing, I sold them to TMZ,” said Dove, who uses they/them pronouns. “I asked for advice from my closest friends, some of which are very powerful and wonderful people and very connected in the industry, and they said just do it but that I might not have enough protection from libel and lawsuits and I might need to get a lawyer.”

They continued, “I got so much backlash for sharing these messages about someone having sex with a minor. I mean, I honestly thought I was in the right.”

Dove said they felt like they made the “right decision” but that they “could have been honest from the beginning.” They also shared that 20% of the $10,000 was given to a publicist who helped protect Dove’s anonymity, 10% went to a close friend to hold onto, and the rest went into Dove’s bank account until “everything was done.” Dove then donated the remains to the anti-sexual assault organization RAINN as well as using it to pay their rent.

ASIA ARGENTO ACCUSED OF SEXUAL ASSAULT: ROSE MCGOWAN HEARTBROKEN

Dove also opened up about their relationship with McGowan, saying, “I really loved Rose, and there were times in which I was insecure about whether or not she loved me back … I accepted that our relationship was probably just for her benefit. It happened during a time in which she was being called out for being transphobic.

McGowan took to Instagram to respond to Dove’s accusation in a screenshot of a series of texts to “explain some s–t about a piece of s–t.”

“There’s some bulls—t on the horizon. My horrible, monstrous, con artist ex-partner is a pathological liar and NBC just did an expose of her life but she’s trying to say that I was part of her shenanigans. I absolutely am not,” McGowan wrote on Tuesday. “She conned me during a period where my brain was breaking. Rain, my disgusting ex, sold a story about Asia Argento to TMZ.

“I found out definitively that Rain was a liar and a fraud and sold the stories 6 months ago when her [now] ex-best friend spilled the beans. She is a monster and I believed Rain over Asia and Rain told me that Asia said she’d started molesting a young actor at age 12. Asia slept with him when he was 17 and Rain said should I go to the police? And I said if it’s 12 years old you absolutely have to.

Westlake Legal Group Dove20-20McGowan20Getty Rose McGowan wants nothing to do with Rain Dove after actress’ ex admits to selling Asia Argento texts New York Post Leah Bitsky fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc article 4c8c3009-d379-5631-8f94-f34e8ea5e8f7

Rain Dove and Rose McGowan (Getty Images)

“The NYT did an expose of the Asia thing so was coming out no matter what, but Rain sold text messages between she and Asia.

“Rain was pretending to help Asia, But really she was getting material to sell. Rain targeted me as a job for her con artist skills. Con artists come to you when you’re down and boy. My first opposite sex experience turned out to be a monstrous dirty fiasco.

“So there’s the saga. I f—ked up, but I [was] not in my right mind and it was an accident. Everyone lied to me.”

When asked for further comment, McGowan’s rep told Page Six to “please refer to her instagram post.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Dove said they decided to come clean for the new year.

“I haven’t always been the best person but it’s about to be 2020, the year of clarity, and I need to start in a space where people know who they’re dealing with when they’re dealing with me,” Dove said through sobs. “I’m not a person who acts the way that I used to. I’m a person who made poor choices. I have also made mistakes and I’ve hurt people.”

This article originally appeared in Page Six

Westlake Legal Group Dove20-20McGowan20Getty Rose McGowan wants nothing to do with Rain Dove after actress’ ex admits to selling Asia Argento texts New York Post Leah Bitsky fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc article 4c8c3009-d379-5631-8f94-f34e8ea5e8f7   Westlake Legal Group Dove20-20McGowan20Getty Rose McGowan wants nothing to do with Rain Dove after actress’ ex admits to selling Asia Argento texts New York Post Leah Bitsky fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc article 4c8c3009-d379-5631-8f94-f34e8ea5e8f7

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Impeached for Abuse of Power and Obstruction of Congress

WASHINGTON — The House of Representatives on Wednesday impeached President Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, making him the third president in history to be charged with committing high crimes and misdemeanors and face removal by the Senate.

On a day of constitutional consequence and raging partisan tension, the votes on the two articles of impeachment fell largely along party lines, after a bitter debate that stretched all day and into the evening, reflecting the deep polarization gripping American politics in the Trump era.

All but two Democrats supported the article on abuse of power, which accused Mr. Trump of corruptly using the levers of government to solicit election assistance from Ukraine in the form of investigations to discredit his Democratic political rivals. Republicans were united in opposition. It passed 230 to 197, with Speaker Nancy Pelosi gaveling the vote to a close from the House rostrum.

On the second charge, obstruction of Congress, a third Democrat joined Republicans in opposition. The vote was 229 to 198.

Westlake Legal Group trump-impeachment-vote-promo-1576708669492-articleLarge-v2 Trump Impeached for Abuse of Power and Obstruction of Congress United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Presidential Election of 2020 Politics and Government Pelosi, Nancy impeachment House of Representatives

How Democrats and Republicans Voted on Trump’s Impeachment

See how each House member voted on the articles of impeachment against President Trump.

The impeachment votes set the stage for a historic trial beginning early next year in the Senate, which will have final say — 10 months before Mr. Trump faces re-election — on whether to acquit the 45th president or convict and remove him from office.

Acquittal in the Republican-controlled chamber is likely, but the proceeding is certain to aggravate the political and cultural fault lines in the country that Mr. Trump’s presidency brought into dramatic relief.

On Wednesday, Democrats characterized his impeachment as an urgent action to stop a corrupt president whose misdeeds had unfolded in plain view from damaging the country any further.

“Over the course of the last three months, we have found incontrovertible evidence that President Trump abused his power by pressuring the newly elected president of Ukraine to announce an investigation into President Trump’s political rival,” said Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California and the Intelligence Committee chairman, who led the impeachment inquiry.

“The president and his men plot on,” Mr. Schiff said. “The danger persists. The risk is real. Our democracy is at peril.”

Video

transcript

House Votes to Impeach Trump

The Democratic-led House of Representatives charged President Trump with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

“The yeas and nays are ordered. Members will record their votes by electronic device.” “On this vote, the yeas are 230, the nays are 197. Present is one. Article 1 is adopted. On this vote, the yeas are 229, the nays are 198. Present is one. Article 2 is adopted.”

Westlake Legal Group 18dc-pelosivid-sub-videoSixteenByNine3000 Trump Impeached for Abuse of Power and Obstruction of Congress United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Presidential Election of 2020 Politics and Government Pelosi, Nancy impeachment House of Representatives

The Democratic-led House of Representatives charged President Trump with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.CreditCredit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

Far from showing contrition or contemplating resignation, as his predecessors have done in the face of impeachment, Mr. Trump instead offered an indignant defense as the House weighed his fate, raging on Twitter from the White House.

“SUCH ATROCIOUS LIES BY THE RADICAL LEFT, DO NOTHING DEMOCRATS,” the president wrote as the historic debate took place on the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue. “THIS IS AN ASSAULT ON AMERICA, AND AN ASSAULT ON THE REPUBLICAN PARTY!!!!”

Later, as members cast their votes to impeach him in Washington, Mr. Trump took the stage to roars of adulation from his supporters at an arena-style campaign rally in Battle Creek, Mich., where he brushed aside the constitutional confrontation as a “hoax” based on unfounded charges, even as he conceded that it would be a permanent blot on his presidency.

“I’m not worried,” Mr. Trump said. “You don’t do anything wrong and you get impeached. That may be a record that will last forever.”

“But you know what they have done?” he said of Democrats. “They have cheapened the impeachment process.”

Senators, he added, “are going to do the right thing.”

Regardless of the outcome of a Senate trial, the impeachment vote in the House puts an indelible stain on Mr. Trump’s presidency that cannot be wiped from the public consciousness with a barrage of tweets or an angry tirade in front of thousands of his cheering supporters at a campaign rally.

It did not grow out of the two-year investigation into Russian election meddling by Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel, or the seemingly endless series of other accusations of corruption and misconduct that have plagued his White House: embracing Russian election interference, tax evasion, profiting from the presidency, payoffs to a pornographic film actress and fraudulent activities by his charitable foundation.

Instead, the existential threat to Mr. Trump’s presidency centered around a half-hour phone call in July in which he pressured Ukraine’s president to announce investigations into former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and other Democrats, at the same time he was withholding nearly $400 million in vital military assistance for the country and a White House meeting.

Congress learned about the call after an anonymous C.I.A. official lodged a whistle-blower complaint in August — pulling a string that helped unravel an effort by the president and his allies to pressure a foreign government for help in smearing a political rival. Over a period of weeks this fall, a parade of diplomats and other administration officials confirmed and expanded on those revelations.

When Congress found out about the scheme and sought to investigate, the president ordered his administration to defy its every request, leading to what the House said Tuesday was a violation of the separation of powers and a de facto assertion by Mr. Trump that he was above the law.

United in their opposition, Republicans accused the Democrats, who fought their way back from political oblivion in 2016 to win the House in 2018, of misusing the power voters had invested in them to harangue a president they never viewed as legitimate by manufacturing a case against him. Though they conceded few of them, they insisted the facts against Mr. Trump nonetheless fell woefully short of impeachment.

“When all is said and done, when the history of this impeachment is written, it will be said that my Washington Democrat friends couldn’t bring themselves to work with Donald Trump, so they consoled themselves instead by silencing the will of those who did, the American people,” said Representative Mark Meadows, Republican of North Carolina.

Through the course of the inquiry, even as Republicans raged against the process and sought to offer benign explanations for Mr. Trump’s conduct, none disputed the central facts that served as its basis: that he asked Ukraine’s president to “do us a favor” and investigate Mr. Biden, a prospective rival in the 2020 campaign, and other Democrats.

Mr. Trump’s impeachment had the potential to change the trajectory of his presidency and redefine an already volatile political landscape. Democrats, including the most vulnerable moderates, embraced the articles of impeachment with the full knowledge that doing so could damage them politically, potentially even costing them control of the House.

The only Democratic dissenters from the abuse of power charge on Wednesday were Representatives Collin C. Peterson of Minnesota and Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey, a freshman who has announced that he will switch parties and become a Republican. Representative Jared Golden of Maine, another centrist freshman, joined them in opposition to the obstruction of Congress charge.

And Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii, a Democratic presidential contender who has built her reputation as a maverick in her party, voted “present” on both articles.

Republicans tethered themselves closely to Mr. Trump as they have since he took office, yoking their political brands and fortunes to his.

The debate proceeded in historic terms in the well of the House, even as an odd sense of inevitability hung over Washington about Mr. Trump’s fate.

“Today, as speaker of the House, I solemnly and sadly open the debate on the impeachment of the president of the United States,” Ms. Pelosi, dressed in all black, said as debate opened on the articles around noon. “If we do not act now, we would be derelict in our duty. It is tragic that the president’s reckless actions make impeachment necessary. He gave us no choice.”

In the Senate, Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, has already made clear he views the House’s case as “weak” and would prefer a speedy trial in January that does not call any additional fact witnesses. Doing so increases the likelihood that Congress will simply never hear from several senior government officials with knowledge of the Ukraine matter who avoided House testimony.

Impeachment traces its origins to monarchical England, but the framers of the Constitution confined its use on presidents to rare occasions, when his actions corrupted the public interest for personal ones. Only twice has the House previously impeached a president, Andrew Johnson in 1868 and Bill Clinton 1998. President Richard M. Nixon resigned in 1974 rather than face such a consequence.

Johnson remained in office by a single vote in 1868. Mr. Clinton more soundly beat the charges, with no more than half of the Senate voting for conviction after more than a month of deliberations. The trial of Mr. Trump is likely to reach a similar outcome, but it could do so much more quickly, with some Senate Republicans discussing the possibility that the case could be resolved in little more than a week.

As he did in the face of past accusations, Mr. Trump, 73, railed against impeachment as a “witch hunt” and a “hoax,” attacking his adversaries with a viciousness rarely heard from previous presidents.

“More due process was afforded to those accused in the Salem Witch Trials,” the president seethed in an angry impeachment eve letter to Ms. Pelosi.

In Mr. Trump’s reality, reinforced by the conservative cable news programs that swirl around him throughout the day, his three years in the White House have been more successful than any other. Wednesday’s impeachment intrudes on that, forcing the president and those around him to confront a different narrative, one in which he has — in the words of the articles of impeachment — “betrayed the nation” and acted “in a manner grossly incompatible with self governance and the rule of law.”

“Whether Donald Trump leaves in one month, one year or five years, this impeachment is permanent,” said Representative Ted Lieu, Democrat of California. “It will follow him around for the rest of his life, and history books will record it.”

The absolutist defense by many members of the Republican Party and the partisan nature of Wednesday’s vote underscored the remarkable hold that Mr. Trump, who has never commanded the support of a majority of the nation, has come to have over the party, remaking it in his image.

One Republican, Representative Barry Loudermilk of Georgia, compared Mr. Trump on Wednesday with Jesus Christ, saying that the son of God had been “afforded more rights” by Pontius Pilate than Democrats had given the president.

Democrats’ most fervent supporters have fantasized since Inauguration Day 2017 about impeaching Mr. Trump, an extreme remedy for the ultimate insurgent they believed was shredding American institutions in his self interest. The debate reached a new pitch this year when Democrats reclaimed control of the House after nearly a decade and awaited the results of a two-year Justice Department investigation into whether Mr. Trump’s campaign had conspired with Russia to interfere in the 2016 election.

But as the left pushed harder for Mr. Trump’s ouster, Democratic leaders resisted. “He’s just not worth it,” Ms. Pelosi said in March. The Russia investigation fizzled when the special counsel declined to recommend charges, even though his report detailed at least 10 instances of possible obstruction of justice by Mr. Trump when he tried to thwart the inquiry. By the time lawmakers returned to Washington this fall after a summer break, impeachment appeared all but dead.

Ms. Pelosi’s calculations — and public opinion — shifted abruptly in September, when the C.IA. whistle-blower arrived on the House’s doorstep.

The inquiry it prompted moved with alacrity, even as Democrats did not have an independent counsel or special prosecutor on whose work they could build. Instead, the House Intelligence Committee called senior American diplomats and White House officials for questioning and requested reams of documents.

In private and then in publicly televised hearings — and all in defiance of White House orders — they outlined a wide-ranging attempt by Mr. Trump and his allies to bend United States policy on Ukraine toward carrying out what one former White House official called “a domestic political errand” on the president’s own behalf.

Fueling the obstruction of Congress charge, a dozen more witnesses, some with direct knowledge of Mr. Trump’s actions, were blocked from speaking to investigators and the Trump administration refused to produce a single document under subpoena.

As the facts tumbled out into the open, there were moments when Republicans in the House and Senate flirted with casting their lot against the president. After the acting White House chief of staff said from the White House in October that Mr. Trump had withheld military aid in part to extract at least one politically beneficial investigation from Ukraine, Representative Francis Rooney said he was open to impeachment. But on Wednesday, he joined every Republican in voting no.

Testimony weeks later in November by Gordon D. Sondland, Mr. Trump’s ambassador to the European Union, said that there had been a quid pro quo around a White House meeting and maybe around the foreign aid money prompted momentary fears of a mass defection. It did not materialize.

If anything, the process underscored the extent to which the nation is pulling apart into two, with each side claiming its own news sources and fact sets that make meaningful debate between Democrats and Republicans over the significance of president’s conduct almost impossible. Public opinion polls show the nation is closely divided over Mr. Trump’s impeachment and removal as it was on Election Day 2016.

On Wednesday, neither lawmakers nor aides to Mr. Trump foresaw a resolution.

“We know how this partisan process will end this evening,” said Representative Will Hurd of Texas, one of a handful of Republicans willing to criticize Mr. Trump’s conduct, who is retiring from Congress. “But what happens tomorrow?”

Sheryl Gay Stolberg, Emily Cochrane and Catie Edmondson contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Impeachment Day in Washington: History Emerges From the Routine Chaos

Westlake Legal Group 18dc-scene1-facebookJumbo-v2 Impeachment Day in Washington: History Emerges From the Routine Chaos United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Pelosi, Nancy impeachment House of Representatives

WASHINGTON — It’s not as if anyone was expecting a normal Wednesday to materialize on Capitol Hill. Presidents don’t get impeached every day, just like they generally don’t write six-page harangues charging Democrats with “declaring open war on American Democracy”(that was Tuesday) or tweet that Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s “teeth were falling out of her mouth” (that was Sunday).

This is what Washington is dealing with now: the daily acceptance that whatever notions of normal and not normal that used to exist have been scrambled beyond recognition. It has been like this for nearly three years.

Still, Wednesday — a clear and cold December morning — hit with a special punch. It was one of those “step back” days when history stands out from the pile of routine chaos. The 45th president of the United States would be impeached on Wednesday. Even in a nonstop news cycle, that’s a full-stop sentence. “Impeachment” can’t be brushed off like a subpoena.

It’s happened only twice before. President Trump seemed especially haunted by the “very ugly word, impeachment,” as he put it in his letter to the Democrats. He likened his coming impeachment to an “attempted coup,” an “election-nullification scheme” and a “lynching,” among other things. On Dec. 18, it would become part of his official ledger.

Remarkably, Congress nailed some of its orderly lawmaking duties this week, and not insignificant ones. While pro-impeachment rallies were held in several cities across the country on Tuesday, the House managed to pass a $1.4 trillion spending package, averting a government shutdown and tossing candy at both parties. (Here’s $1.37 billion for your border wall and $425 million in grants for election security.) The chamber was also expected to vote on Mr. Trump’s signature trade bill, the U.S.M.C.A., this week. There were whiffs of ordinary business.

But the stench of something momentous was hard to miss. For starters, it was unusually crowded at the Capitol. There were protesters of various persuasions, including a few hundred pro-impeachment people gathered on the Senate side of the Capitol, on a patch of grass known as “the Swamp,” named by television crews in the 1970s because the area was constantly wet. A hatless Santa Claus stood on the corner of Constitution Avenue holding a hard-to-read “Save Money, Impeach the Impeachers” sign. Another asserted “Virginia Is for Lovers, Not for Liars.”

House members started ambling toward their seats starting at 9 a.m., Democrats on the left, Republicans on the right. The center aisle might as well have been a moat.

Everyone was checking their phones. The president kept tweeting. His topics included something that pleased him on “Fox & Friends” (“Well said Brian!”), nice things he’d heard about himself (“Good marks and reviews on the letter I sent to Pelosi”), things he will not accept (“Can you believe that I will be impeached today….I did nothing wrong”). He retweeted Sean Hannity and Jeanine Pirro, two of his favorite Fox News personalities.

Ms. Pelosi, dressed all in black, emerged from her office just after 10 a.m. and walked through Statuary Hall toward the House floor. She was trailed by a rush of media but said nothing, at least nothing audible but for the word “sad.” Representative Debbie Dingell, Democrat of Michigan, walked alongside, clutching the speaker’s hand, her eyes moist.

Sad and somber and solemn were once again the day’s watchwords. The message came down from the Democratic leadership that no members, under any circumstances, should cheer when the final votes were announced. Solemn, keep it solemn.

Members took turns throughout the morning, giving two-minute statements, variations on things their colleagues on the Judiciary and Intelligence Committees had been saying for weeks. Republicans: Democrats have been determined to impeach this president from Day 1. Democrats: No president is above the law.

By noon, resignation had fallen over Washington as the day crawled toward a predictable ending, to come at a late hour. Mr. Trump would be impeached by the House. Nearly all members would vote with their parties. The haggling had already commenced in the Senate.

At the White House, the president and his press secretary, Stephanie Grisham, stayed away from reporters, perhaps saving their energy for a “Merry Christmas”-style Trump rally to be held later in the evening in Michigan. A senior official observing the House debate likened the mood inside to “Election Day: Hurry Up and Wait.”

In the early afternoon, Kellyanne Conway, the counselor to the president, appeared before reporters in the White House briefing room to dismiss the articles of impeachment against Mr. Trump as “spare” and offer a jab at Ms. Pelosi: “She pretends it’s a solemn, sad moment and absorbs the applause.”

Over at the Trump International Hotel on Pennsylvania Avenue, the House debate on impeachment was playing silently on Fox News as instrumental Christmas music swelled and guests with “Keep America Great” hats meandered through the lobby, taking pictures against trees made of champagne bottles.

Stefan Hull, 42, who works in software and lives in Bethesda, Md., was sitting at the bar drinking bourbon and eating jelly beans, barely paying attention to what was unfolding on television. He said he knew how it would end.

“If the guy didn’t tweet, his presidency would actually be looked at as fairly positive,” Mr. Hull said. He paused. “But he loves to piss people off.”

Just outside the hotel, Ms. Pelosi had a fan.

“She’s wielding real power in service to the Constitution,” said Danusha Goska, a 60-year-old teacher who drove to the capital from Paterson, N.J., and was planning to attend a demonstration on Capitol Hill. “It makes me want to cry.”

Back up on Capitol Hill, Republicans derided the process a sham and a farce.

“Pontius Pilate afforded more rights to Jesus than the Democrats have afforded this president,” said Representative Barry Loudermilk, Republican of Georgia. Representative Mike Kelly, Republican of Pennsylvania, reminded everyone that the attack on Pearl Harbor also occurred in December, and just like that dreadful event, which killed 2,400 people, so too would the date Dec. 18, 2019, be recalled as “a day that would live in infamy” by some latter-day Franklin Roosevelt.

Representative Jim McGovern, Democrat of Massachusetts, took issue with Mr. Trump’s claim in his letter that “more due process was afforded to those accused in the Salem Witch Trials.” “The Salem Witch Trial people were burned, and they were crushed,” Mr. McGovern pointed out. He diagnosed the president as “clearly unhinged.”

By around 1 p.m., history went on cruise control, as things settled into a subdued, dutiful rhythm, although the president had migrated to ALL CAPS and multiple exclamation points on Twitter. (“SUCH ATROCIOUS LIES BY THE RADICAL LEFT, DO NOTHING DEMOCRATS. THIS IS AN ASSAULT ON AMERICA, AND AN ASSAULT ON THE REPUBLICAN PARTY!!!!”)

It’s not as if votes were left to change. The voting could have commenced at any moment but of course did not. So everyone waited, with more tedium than suspense.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Jacksonville Jaguars fire Tom Coughlin after NFLPA criticism

Westlake Legal Group Tom-Coughlin-Reuters Jacksonville Jaguars fire Tom Coughlin after NFLPA criticism Nick Givas fox-news/us fox-news/sports/nfl/jacksonville-jaguars fox-news/newsedge/sports fox news fnc/sports fnc e83fb163-ed6a-53e2-b31a-58fc0f8fbdbd article

The Jacksonville Jaguars fired Tom Coughlin as executive vice president of football operations on Wednesday, after arbiters sided with the NFL Players Association player association (NFLPA) in a dispute over how he was running the team.

The player’s association took on Coughlin, 73, over exorbitant fines and disciplinary measures he enacted, dating back to 2018.

One incident involved him trying to fine former defensive end Dante Fowler more than $700,000 for missing a “mandatory” appointment with the team’s trainer.

After the fines were negated, the player’s union released a statement on Tuesday that was critical of the Jaguar organization.

“This is just one of the many grievances we had to file to protect our players from the Jaguars’ actions,” the union said. “The decision puts a stop to the blatant overreach by the Jaguars and emphasizes the voluntary nature of almost all football activities during the offseason.”

JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS LOSE GRIEVANCE OVER FINING FORMER PLAYERS $700g FOR MISSED TEAM DOCTOR VISIT

This incident, coupled with the team’s poor record of 5-9, led to Coughlin’s dismissal.

Team owner Shad Khan’s statement thanked Coughlin for his years of service to the organization but also hinted that his spat with the player’s association had something to do with the timing of his termination.

“I determined earlier this fall that making this move at the conclusion of the 2019 season would be in everyone’s best interests but, in recent days, I reconsidered and decided to make this change immediately,” the statement read.

“I thank Tom for his efforts, not only over the past three years but for all he did from our very first season, 25 years ago, to put the Jacksonville Jaguars on the map. General Manager Dave Caldwell and Head Coach Doug Marrone will each report directly to me on an interim basis. My expectations, and those of our fans, for our final two games and the 2020 season are high.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Coughlin served as the franchise’s first head coach when they were an expansion team in 1995. He held that position until 2002 and coached the organization for eight seasons. He later went on to win two Super Bowls with the New York Giants before returning to Jacksonville as an operations executive in 2017.

Fox News’ Ryan Gaydos contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group Tom-Coughlin-Reuters Jacksonville Jaguars fire Tom Coughlin after NFLPA criticism Nick Givas fox-news/us fox-news/sports/nfl/jacksonville-jaguars fox-news/newsedge/sports fox news fnc/sports fnc e83fb163-ed6a-53e2-b31a-58fc0f8fbdbd article   Westlake Legal Group Tom-Coughlin-Reuters Jacksonville Jaguars fire Tom Coughlin after NFLPA criticism Nick Givas fox-news/us fox-news/sports/nfl/jacksonville-jaguars fox-news/newsedge/sports fox news fnc/sports fnc e83fb163-ed6a-53e2-b31a-58fc0f8fbdbd article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

HISTORY IN THE HOUSE: Trump Impeached For Abuse Of Power, Obstruction

WASHINGTON ― For the third time in history, the House of Representatives impeached the president, placing a permanent asterisk next to the name of Donald J. Trump and setting the stage for a Senate trial on removal.

House lawmakers voted Wednesday evening 230-197 in favor of impeaching Trump for abuse of power, with two Democrats — Collin Peterson (Minn.) and Jeff Van Drew (N.J.) — voting against impeachment alongside every Republican, Democratic presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii voting “present,” and former Republican (now independent) Justin Amash of Michigan also voting to impeach the president.

The House then voted 229-198 to impeach Trump on a second article, obstruction of Congress, with every member voting the same way except for Rep. Jared Golden (D-Maine), who voted with Republicans on that charge.

“December 18: A great day for the Constitution of the United States. A sad one for America that the president’s reckless activities necessitated our having to introduce articles of impeachment,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said during a news briefing shortly after the votes were tallied. “I could not be prouder or more inspired by the moral courage of the House Democrats.”

Trump learned of the news while onstage at a rally in Michigan on Wednesday night, and launched into a vitriol-filled tirade against Democrats, who he said were conducting a “lawless” effort that would be a “political suicide march.”

“Every single Republican voted for us,” Trump said. “We didn’t lose one Republican vote.” 

Westlake Legal Group 5dfae0b7250000c70398e99d HISTORY IN THE HOUSE: Trump Impeached For Abuse Of Power, Obstruction

ASSOCIATED PRESS Trump learned of the impeachment votes while on stage at a rally in Michigan on Wednesday evening. (AP Foto/ Evan Vucci)

Democrats accused the president of corruptly soliciting a foreign government to investigate one of his chief political rivals, former Vice President Joe Biden, and conditioning $391 million of security aid on the launch of that investigation. They also charge Trump with “unprecedented, categorical and indiscriminate defiance” as the House sought to investigate his behavior. The White House refused to turn over any documents related to the impeachment inquiry, and a number of Trump administration officials ignored subpoenas to testify.

The key evidence supporting Democrats’ charge is a July 25 phone call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. During that call, which took place as U.S. military aid to Ukraine was suspended, Trump asked Zelensky to “do us a favor” and look into supposed Ukrainian interference in the 2016 U.S. election — a debunked conspiracy theory — as well as investigating Joe Biden and his son Hunter. Republicans view a rough transcript of the call as exculpatory, while Democrats see it as obviously damning.

“In America, no one is above the law,” House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) said on the floor Wednesday. “Donald J. Trump sacrificed our national security in an effort to cheat in the next election. And for that and his continued efforts to seek foreign interference in our elections, he must be impeached.”

Democrats sought to maintain a somber tone. Pelosi, who wore all black, reported at the beginning of the day that she was “sad” and said on the floor that Trump “gave us no choice.”

“If we do not act now, we would be derelict in our duty,” Pelosi said. “It is tragic that the president’s reckless actions make impeachment necessary.”

Westlake Legal Group 5dfae12e2500004071d30a6e HISTORY IN THE HOUSE: Trump Impeached For Abuse Of Power, Obstruction

SAUL LOEB via Getty Images Pelosi presided over the House as votes were cast on two articles of impeachment. (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)

Pelosi noted the absence of one prominent lawmaker during Wednesday’s votes: Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.), who chaired the House Oversight Committee until his death in October.

“We did all we could, Elijah,” Pelosi said. “We passed the two articles of impeachment. The president is impeached.”

Time and again, Democrats offered that this was a solemn occasion. At least a half-dozen Democrats described the impeachment as a “sad day.” They avoided taking victory laps.

But the day was still marked by partisanship.

On the Republican side, GOP members offered unhinged defenses of the president. They railed against Democrats over the process — at one point, Rep. Barry Loudermilk (R-Ga.) claimed that Jesus Christ had received more due process than Trump — and they accused Democrats of having decided to impeach the president even before he took office.

This “weaponized impeachment” was brought upon the House by “the same socialists who threaten unborn life in the womb, who threaten First Amendment rights of conservatives, who threaten Second Amendment protections of every American patriot, and who have long ago determined that they would organize and conspire to overthrow President Trump,” Rep. Clay Higgins (R-La.) said.

As he walked away from the lectern on the House floor, fellow Republicans thanked Higgins. “Good speech,” said Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.). 

Westlake Legal Group 5dfae1952500004071d30a6f HISTORY IN THE HOUSE: Trump Impeached For Abuse Of Power, Obstruction

ASSOCIATED PRESS House Judiciary Committee ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., speaks as the House of Representatives debates the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019. (House Television via AP)

The Trump defense offered by Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Texas) included the claim that then-President Barack Obama had enticed Russia to invade Ukraine, which prompted House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) to say it was concerning to see a member “spout Russian propaganda on the floor of the House.”

Rep. Tim Walberg (R-Mich.) argued that history would not be kind to Democrats. “You are the ones interfering in America’s election,” he said. “You are the ones subverting America’s democracy. You are the ones obstructing justice. You are the ones bringing pain and suffering to our republic for your own selfish personal, political and partisan gain.”

And it wasn’t just the GOP’s fringe members who offered frenzied arguments. The fringe has taken over the Republican Party. It seemed on Wednesday that every GOP member who came to the floor was accusing Democrats of a “sham impeachment” or a “complete charade” or a “kangaroo court.”

Republicans presented the process as completely political while failing to acknowledge their own political motivations for defending Trump. Even as Rep. Guy Reschenthaler (R-Pa.) decried impeachment as a “political hit job,” he said he would happily impeach Adam Schiff for abuse of power and Democrats in general for obstruction.

Rep. Bill Johnson (R-Ohio) asked for a moment of silence for the 63 million voters who were being “disenfranchised” by impeachment. He did not note that Hillary Clinton received nearly 66 million votes in the 2016 election. And as Nadler pointed out at one point when another Republican said Democrats were trying to undo the election, Vice President Mike Pence would simply become president if Trump were impeached and removed from office. 

Bizarrely, Republicans in the chamber cheered at that line.

Republicans made sport of jeering at a number of lines near the end of the debate. When Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) said “Democrats did not choose this impeachment, we did not wish for it,” Republicans groaned.

When Hoyer noted there was only one member who spoke on the floor who was not a Republican or a Democrat — Amash of Michigan — Amash’s former GOP colleagues sneered at his name, too.

Westlake Legal Group 5dfae1e3250000e10598e99e HISTORY IN THE HOUSE: Trump Impeached For Abuse Of Power, Obstruction

ASSOCIATED PRESS Pelosi, flanked by the chairs of several House committees, shortly after Wednesday’s votes. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

In truth, Trump faces little threat of being removed from office. Senate Republicans seem determined to quickly acquit the president, perhaps without even hearing from witnesses. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has made no secret of his view that impeachment is political. “I’m not an impartial juror,” McConnell said this week, adding that he’s been taking cues on a Senate trial from the White House.

McConnell declared last week that there was “no chance” the president would be removed from office, and he said Tuesday that the chamber would not call any new witnesses, despite a request from Democrats to subpoena Trump aides who have so far refused to testify. McConnell said that Democrats hadn’t given “one solid reason” why more officials should be called before lawmakers.

During her press conference Wednesday, Pelosi said she wouldn’t name any impeachment managers — the House members who would argue the case for impeachment to the Senate — until McConnell agrees to a “fair trial.” 

“So far, we haven’t seen anything that looks fair to us,” Pelosi said.

But Democrats decided it was important to take such a historic vote even though it seems certain to have little impact on Trump’s behavior.

Only two other American presidents have been impeached: Andrew Johnson in 1868 and Bill Clinton in 1998. Johnson and Clinton were each acquitted in the Senate. President Richard Nixon was on the cusp of being impeached in 1974, but he resigned before a vote as a bipartisan tide of lawmakers turned against him over the Watergate scandal.

“The framers gave us the power of impeachment for exactly this reason,” Nadler said Wednesday after the vote. “Today we took action to hold President Trump accountable for the serious and undisputed risk he poses to our free and fair elections, and to the separation of powers that safeguards our liberty. A President should not be allowed to become a dictator.”

The historic nature of the vote on Wednesday was clear. When Democrats gave floor speeches, many addressed their words to their children and grandchildren. After Rep. Joe Kennedy (D-Mass.) said that justice had won ― that the House had done its job, kept its word and stood its ground ― he added, “I love you. Listen to mom.”

Lawmakers seemed to recognize that their words might define them for the rest of their lives. In that spirit, many Democrats adopted a loftier tone.

“We are being tested on something greater than our ability to toe a party line,” said House Rules Chairman Jim McGovern (D-Mass.). “Something more than our ability to score the next great television soundbite. This is a democracy-defining moment.”

This story has been updated with remarks from Nancy Pelosi and Jerry Nadler.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com