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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 452)

Meghan Markle, Prince Harry share throwback photo from their wedding day

Westlake Legal Group harrymarkle Meghan Markle, Prince Harry share throwback photo from their wedding day The Sun fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fnc/entertainment fnc article 05007e84-5c8b-5ba6-9f69-68d3972af9b1

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry have delighted fans by sharing a heartfelt throwback photo from their spectacular wedding day.

The sweet image was shared with their 9.7 million followers on their SussexRoyal account yesterday.

The royal wedding photo shows Prince Harry beaming at his beautiful new bride at the altar in St George’s Chapel in Windsor.

It was shared as the Duke of Sussex, 35, attended a mental health workshop with the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, who officiated their wedding in May 2018.

MEGHAN MARKLE, PRINCE HARRY SHARE SWEET MOMENT WITH SON ARCHIE IN UPCOMING DOCUMENTARY

The caption said: “The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have a close personal relationship with The Archbishop of Canterbury, who officiated their wedding and also oversaw the baptism of their son.

“The Duke was pleased to attend this special conference to lend his support to The Archbishop and highlight the important work being done to tackle mental health challenges, specifically for the younger generation.”

The workshop yesterday aimed to focus on how the church and community organizations can help young people to open up about mental health.

Fans were quick to gush about the wedding shot, with one saying: “Absolutely beautiful couple. stay strong a lot of love.”

And another added: “So amazing and their wedding. So magical!!!”

MEGHAN MARKLE, PRINCE HARRY REMOVED FROM ROYAL FOUNDATION WEBSITE: REPORT

The post came as a clip emerged of Meghan holding back tears as she was interviewed for a new ITV documentary “Harry and Meghan: An African Journey” airing on Sunday at 9 pm.

The Duchess of Sussex, 38, was asked by host Tom Bradby about how royal life has been a “struggle.” particularly as a new mom.

Tom followed the couple, and five-month-old Archie, throughout their African tour which saw Prince Harry undertake solo engagements.

She fights back tears, saying: “Look, any woman especially when they are pregnant you’re really vulnerable and so that was made really challenging, and then when you have a newborn – you know…

“And especially as a woman, it’s a lot. So you add this on top of just trying to be a new mom or trying to be a newlywed it’s, well…

PRINCE HARRY SAYS MOM PRINCESS DIANA’S DEATH IS A ‘WOUND THAT FESTERS’

“And, also thank you for asking, because not many people have asked if I’m OK. But it’s a very real thing to be going through behind the scenes.”

Tom asks her directly if it is fair to say that it has been a struggle, and looking emotional, Meghan replies: “Yes.”

The hour-long documentary features interviews with the royal couple as well as an insight into their work, and how they’re balancing public and private life.

Meanwhile, a clip from the documentary released on Thursday showed Prince Harry revealing he feels the ‘festering wounds’ left by his mother’s death.

MEGHAN MARKLE REVEALS STRUGGLES OF BEING A MOM IN THE PUBLIC EYE: ‘NOT MANY PEOPLE HAVE ASKED IF I’M OK’

Prince Harry opened up about how important Africa was to him as he came to terms with the death of his mother, Princess Diana.

The couple has been vocal about mental health issues and Harry previously admitted he is so ‘overwhelmed’ by the world’s problems that he sometimes struggles to get out of bed.

This story originally appeared in The Sun

Westlake Legal Group harrymarkle Meghan Markle, Prince Harry share throwback photo from their wedding day The Sun fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fnc/entertainment fnc article 05007e84-5c8b-5ba6-9f69-68d3972af9b1   Westlake Legal Group harrymarkle Meghan Markle, Prince Harry share throwback photo from their wedding day The Sun fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fnc/entertainment fnc article 05007e84-5c8b-5ba6-9f69-68d3972af9b1

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Kate Upton shares rare photo of daughter cheering on dad Justin Verlander

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5724130738001_5724126624001-vs Kate Upton shares rare photo of daughter cheering on dad Justin Verlander Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/kate-upton fox news fnc/entertainment fnc b207b35f-f35a-57d8-92ba-e64c3c8b8bd5 article

Baby’s big night out!

Kate Upton shared a rare photo of her daughter, Genevieve, cheering on her dad, Astros pitcher Justin Verlander, as he and the Houston team took on the New York Yankees in the American League Championship Series game Thursday night.

The model, 27, uploaded the photo of the back of the toddler’s head as she stood watching the players on the baseball field.

KATE UPTON SHOWS OFF POST-BABY BODY IN SLEEK ONE-PIECE SWIMSUIT

She donned a mini jean jacket that featured Verlander’s name and jersey number.

“Go Daddy!” the Sports Illustrated star wrote. “We are ready for #Game4 !!! #goastros @justinverlander.”

Genevieve must have been good luck because the Astros beat the Yankees 8-3. If they win the ALCS, Verlander and the Astros will play the Washington Nationals in this year’s World Series.

6 THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT KATE UPTON

Upton and Verlander married in Italy in 2017 after beginning to date in 2014.

They welcomed their daughter in November 2018.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Upton gushed about Gen in an interview with Extra in January. “She actually is a really good baby. I feel like she’s a really cute mixture of us both,” she said.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5724130738001_5724126624001-vs Kate Upton shares rare photo of daughter cheering on dad Justin Verlander Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/kate-upton fox news fnc/entertainment fnc b207b35f-f35a-57d8-92ba-e64c3c8b8bd5 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5724130738001_5724126624001-vs Kate Upton shares rare photo of daughter cheering on dad Justin Verlander Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/kate-upton fox news fnc/entertainment fnc b207b35f-f35a-57d8-92ba-e64c3c8b8bd5 article

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Chile’s Capital Engulfed In Chaos As Metro Protests Intensify

Westlake Legal Group ap_19292130101476-c0a0b863c002a59888ba65fab887769ff697b9c3-s1100-c15 Chile's Capital Engulfed In Chaos As Metro Protests Intensify

Firefighters put out the flames on a burning bus during a protest against the rising cost of subway and bus fares in Santiago Friday. Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

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Esteban Felix/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Chile's Capital Engulfed In Chaos As Metro Protests Intensify

Firefighters put out the flames on a burning bus during a protest against the rising cost of subway and bus fares in Santiago Friday.

Esteban Felix/AP

Protests in Santiago, Chile’s capital, shut down metro service Friday afternoon and left a high-rise engulfed in flames, prompting President Sebastian Pinera to declare a state of emergency in the city.

The Santiago metro network will be closed through Sunday, according to its website, citing “serious damage.” The protesters, mostly high school students, according to the Associated Press, were spurred by the recent public transportation fare hikes. The students struck stations during the afternoon commute, dodging fares, damaging turnstiles and smashing glass as seen on videos posted online. Large objects, such as a metal sheet, can be seen thrown onto the metro tracks, blocking incoming trains and sending sparks flying as it came into contact with the electrified rail.

The rate hike went into effect Oct. 6, increasing the cost of a metro ride by 4%, according to the AP, partially due to Chile’s dependence on imported energy. Bus fares were also affected. The move comes amid growing discontent among Chileans as the cost of living – gas, groceries, rent – continues to rise without improvement in salaries. Pinera, in contrast, has a net worth of about $2.8 billion, according to Forbes.

“To be honest, I think there’s a big feeling of injustice that goes beyond the thing about the metro and buses,” Cristián Castro, Director of History Department at Universidad Diego Portales, said. “The cost of living in Chile has no logic when related to the paychecks you receive at the end of the month, unless you’re part of the upper class. The system has favored too few for too long. “

Students began turnstile-hopping protests as early as Monday, according to the AP, but their demonstrations turned violent yesterday.

The first protests on Friday left hundreds of thousands of commuters stranded, according to the AP. Police armed with riot gear, tear gas and batons responded, beating protesters, dragging them out of the stations and making arrests, but were met with violent resistance. The AP reported that police withdrew from some stations. Protesters expanded the riots beyond the metro stations, taking to the streets, prompting armored military vehicles with water cannons to push back the protesters.

Westlake Legal Group ap_19292145606226-b3f8cc77ef8d1cafc77f3adc1d27e37b196761be-s1100-c15 Chile's Capital Engulfed In Chaos As Metro Protests Intensify

Protesters push a bicycle in front of a gate of the Santa Lucia subway station during a protest against the rising cost of subway and bus fares in Santiago Friday. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix) Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

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Esteban Felix/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Chile's Capital Engulfed In Chaos As Metro Protests Intensify

Protesters push a bicycle in front of a gate of the Santa Lucia subway station during a protest against the rising cost of subway and bus fares in Santiago Friday. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)

Esteban Felix/AP

As the night continued, the protests intensified. Reuters reported that protesters set fires at metro stations and kiosks, looted stores and barricaded station entrances with bikes, metal bars and other objects. Footage posted online by RT showed a bus enveloped in flames, and the AP reported that police vehicles were attacked with stones. The riots expanded beyond the metro stations, as Santiago residents took to the streets to protest the rate hikes.

Around 10 p.m. local time, a high-rise building belonging to Enel Chile, an energy company, was firebombed, according to the company’s website. Chile’s “largest electricity group in terms of installed capacity,” the company’s corporate headquarters can be seen in videos burning from the first floor to the top. The company said that the emergency staircase had been targeted, but that all workers were evacuated without injuries.

[embedded content]

YouTube

At midnight, President Pinera announced a state of emergency in Santiago and surrounding regions during a press conference, handing responsibility of the city’s security to the military and giving it the authority to restrict constitutional rights to assembly and movement. Maj. Gen. Javier Iturriaga del Campo has been appointed Head of National Defense, according to Pinera.

“The objective of this state of emergency is very simple, but very deep,” Pinera said.

“Guarantee the rights of each and every one of our countrymen who have been seriously violated by the action of true criminals, who do not respect anything or anyone.”

Westlake Legal Group ap_19292147167955-1a41fe3a10734be3c45410136a97307cdd131f9c-s1100-c15 Chile's Capital Engulfed In Chaos As Metro Protests Intensify

Chilean police detain a man during a protest against the rising cost of subway and bus fares, near the Santa Lucia subway station in Santiago on Friday. Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Esteban Felix/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Chile's Capital Engulfed In Chaos As Metro Protests Intensify

Chilean police detain a man during a protest against the rising cost of subway and bus fares, near the Santa Lucia subway station in Santiago on Friday.

Esteban Felix/AP

Pinera added during the conference that his government will invoke the State Security Law to prosecute those involved with the attacks on the capital’s metro system. The AP reported that the law carries prison sentences of three to five years. Pinera said, however, that he sympathized with those affected by the rate hikes.

“For that reason, in the coming days, our government is going to summon a transversal dialogue, and we will use all efforts within our reach to be able to mitigate and alleviate the situation of our compatriots,” Pinera said.

In a televised statement on CNN Chile, transportation minister Gloria Hutt said that it was possible for metro service to be restored, gradually, next week.

Social media responded to the protests, with many drawing parallels between the armored vehicles patrolling the streets of Santiago and the repressive Pinochet regime, the military junta in Chile that suppressed opposition through arrests, torture and murder from 1973 to 1990.

Others have compared the protests to similar recent demonstrations in Hong Kong and Catalonia.

@tuerk_alexander is an intern at Here and Now.

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In a Strong Economy, Why Are So Many Workers on Strike?

Westlake Legal Group 20labor-print1-facebookJumbo-v2 In a Strong Economy, Why Are So Many Workers on Strike? Wages and Salaries United States Economy Teachers and School Employees Strikes Recession and Depression Organized Labor Labor and Jobs Income Inequality

At first glance, it may seem like a paradox: Even as the economy rides a 10-year winning streak, tens of thousands of workers across the country, from General Motors employees to teachers in Chicago, are striking to win better wages and benefits.

But, according to those on strike, the strong growth is precisely the point. Autoworkers, teachers and other workers accepted austerity when the economy was in a free fall, expecting to share in the gains once the recovery took hold.

Increasingly, however, many of those workers believe that they fell for a sucker’s bet, having watched their employers grow flush while their own incomes barely budged. Corporate profits are near a record high, up nearly 30 percent since the pre-recession peak in 2006. During the same time, the income of the typical household has increased by less than 4 percent. Some workers are responding with measures like strikes partly as a result.

“That was the understanding — that if we gave up the concessions back in 2007 and 2009, that once G.M. got back on their feet, we would slowly get those things back,” said Tammy Daggy, who worked at the now-idled G.M. plant in Lordstown, Ohio, for nearly 25 years. But on many issues, “we never did.”

To an extent, the pattern of strikes reflects a recurring feature of the labor market: Workers typically become bolder the longer an expansion continues, using the leverage they have when jobs are harder to fill to demand greater compensation. This was particularly true during the three decades after World War II, according to a survey of research by Jake Rosenfeld, a sociologist at Washington University in St. Louis.

Overall strike activity has fallen sharply since the 1970s, as the ranks of unions have been depleted, dropping to about 10 percent of the work force from over 25 percent. Employers have also responded more aggressively — for example, by permanently replacing striking employees.

Now, though, workers appear increasingly willing to walk off the job. Last year, the number of workers who participated in significant strikes soared to nearly 500,000, its highest point since the mid-1980s, while the total duration of such strikes reached a 15-year high.

The backdrop for this trend is a rising gap between the money employers are making and the portion they’re sharing with workers. The share of the national income that workers receive fell in the early 2000s to its lowest level since World War II according to some measures, then collapsed further in 2009. It has yet to recover.

That may be partly because the labor market is weaker than the picture painted by the official unemployment rate of 3.5 percent. That rate measures only the number of out-of-work Americans who say they are looking for jobs. It excludes Americans in their prime working years who are not actively looking for work but, given the opportunity, might choose to re-enter the work force.

According to Neel Kashkari, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, the group who could quickly re-enter the work force is potentially large, and may help employers avoid bidding up wages to lure those who are currently employed. “We still don’t know how much shadow labor is out there,” Mr. Kashkari said in an interview on Thursday.

But regardless of the strength of the labor market, in recent decades employers have amassed more power to hold wages down.

“In the late 1990s, it seemed like maybe a hot economy was sufficient” to substantially raise workers’ incomes and narrow inequality, said Jason Furman, who led the White House Council of Economic Advisers during President Barack Obama’s second term. But a series of reports that Mr. Furman’s council released in 2016 documented changes that have allowed employers to pocket more of the gains from growth. Those changes include noncompete clauses in employment contracts and even outright collusion, in which companies explicitly agree not to hire workers away from one another or to offer identical wages.

Employers argue that they need additional flexibility with their work force as they contend with global competition and technological changes.

Scholars say there was an element of economic opportunism behind the strikes of the 1950s and ’60s, as unions exploited their bargaining power in tight labor markets.

But workers say today’s strikes are fueled by a deeper sense of unfairness and economic anxiety. This past week, for example, unions representing about 2,000 workers at copper mines and smelters in Arizona and Texas went on strike, saying their members had not received raises for a decade.

“It’s about: ‘O.K., the government is not going to take care of us. Business is not going to take care of us. We’ve got to take care of ourselves,’” said D. Taylor, president of the hospitality workers union, UNITE HERE, which has had thousands of members strike in the past two years, including at Marriott International. “It’s been bubbling up for some time. Now it’s come up to the surface.”

In the airline industry, workers who made numerous concessions amid a wave of post-9/11 corporate restructurings complain that they continue to struggle under austerity even as the airlines post outsize profits.

“They got all these employees to agree to terms within the shadow of bankruptcy court, then they created these megamergers and are making billions,” said Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants.

While airline workers, unlike most private-sector workers, must receive permission from the government before they can strike, they have repeatedly demonstrated their anger. Thousands of airline catering workers, many of whom make under $12 per hour, voted to strike this year, pending the assent of a federal mediation board. Airline mechanics, including at Southwest Airlines, have won raises after effectively gumming up the operations of their employers: The mechanics significantly increased the number of low-grade maintenance problems they identified, leading to widespread flight delays and cancellations. (The mechanics denied that this was their intention.)

Teachers have expressed frustration that their districts were slow to reverse the spending cuts that followed the economic crisis a decade ago, even as state and local budgets have recovered.

“When the recession hit, teachers kind of buckled down. We said: ‘We get it. Everybody has got to pull their weight,’” said Noah Karvelis, who helped organize last year’s teacher walkouts in Arizona that forced lawmakers to raise teacher salaries and partially restore education funding. “But 10 years later, the state’s economy is back, we’re doing really well, and still the cuts are there. It was a huge, huge thing for us.”

In Chicago, teachers who went on strike on Thursday are demanding that local officials devote more of a recent billion-dollar cash infusion from the state to raises. They point out that teaching assistants’ pay starts at around $30,000 a year but they are required by law to live in the high-cost city. And veteran teachers often leave the district because their salaries plateau for several years. The teachers also want the district to hire more school nurses and librarians, who are in short supply across Chicago.

“In Chicago, the citizenry during the austerity talks believed it,” said Michelle Gunderson, a first-grade teacher on the union’s bargaining committee, referring to the lean contract negotiated in 2016. “At that time, we had a Republican governor who wasn’t funding our schools. But now an infusion of money has come in that has not made it to the classroom.”

The school district has said that $700 million of that money went directly to teacher pensions, and that the rest kept the district solvent. The district has proposed raising salaries 16 percent over five years and substantially increasing the number of nurses.

For its part, while G.M. has made $35 billion in profits in North America over the past three years, sales appear to be slowing in the United States and China. Domestic automakers also say they are under pressure from foreign rivals, which have lower labor costs in nonunion factories in the South, and to invest in developing electric vehicles.

That is one reason G.M. sought to preserve a so-called two-tiered wage scale introduced amid the company’s struggles over a decade ago, in which workers hired after 2007 make up to 45 percent less than the $31 an hour that veteran workers currently earn. The company also relies on a cadre of temporary workers who earn even less.

As part of the tentative deal the company reached with the United Automobile Workers, G.M. appears to have agreed to a path for temps to become permanent workers, and to alter its tiered wage scale. Workers will vote on the agreement over the next several days, and a result is expected on Friday.

Some workers are skeptical that the union made sufficient progress on these questions, and on the extent to which G.M. can continue to shift production to Mexico, which has imperiled jobs in the United States.

Selina Estrada, 32, who assembles doors at the G.M. plant in Spring Hill, Tenn., said she feared the company would prevent temporary workers from attaining permanent status by laying off those workers before they had achieved the required three years of “continuous service.”

“They’ll keep turning them around and laying them off right before their three years,” she said. “It’s never going to happen.”

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Facebook is allowing politicians to lie openly. It’s time to regulate

Westlake Legal Group GEWx_E6QTmHIaPaQz29vpO3TwBmoFDpPexaKXR_lXdo Facebook is allowing politicians to lie openly. It's time to regulate r/politics

Ahh here is the solution. Good job.

As far as the title it struck me funny: “Facebook is allowing politicians to lie openly”

Politicians have always lied openly. It’s just that now the corruption is at an all time high, that Mulvaney says the secret words out loud because to him this is STOP. “Yeah we do it all the time”. He has no reference point between what clean politics are and corrupt politics. All he has seen is corruption.

If people really cared, they’d leave FB in droves…so much so that it would make Zuck shit his pants. But no, we want government to regulate.

And I’m not saying that there shouldn’t be some regulations, and back stops in place, but all that is going to do is make Zuck more crafty in his approach.

Just stop using FB. I guarantee you when advertisers have no one left to advertise to, it will be a distant memory like MySpace.

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What Happened in the Impeachment Inquiry This Week?

Well, that escalated quickly. Congress is back. There were meltdowns. There was testimony. Representative Elijah Cummings, a powerful Baltimore Democrat who was a key figure in the impeachment investigation of President Trump, died at 68. Let’s dive right in.

[To keep up with daily impeachment developments, sign up for our briefing here.]

Video

Westlake Legal Group 17dc-mulvaney-sub-videoSixteenByNine3000-v2 What Happened in the Impeachment Inquiry This Week? United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Sondland, Gordon D (1957- ) Mattis, James N impeachment Giuliani, Rudolph W Foreign Aid

The acting White House chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, told reporters that military aid was held back in part to prod Ukraine to investigate Democrats, undercutting President Trump’s denial of a quid pro quo.CreditCreditLeigh Vogel for The New York Times

Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, threw the Trump administration’s defense against impeachment into disarray on Thursday when he said that the White House withheld nearly $400 million in military aid to Ukraine to further President Trump’s political interests. Mr. Mulvaney told journalists in a televised briefing that the aid was withheld in part until Ukraine investigated an unsubstantiated theory that Ukraine, not Russia, was responsible for hacking Democratic Party emails in 2016 — a theory that would show that Mr. Trump was elected without Russian help. The declaration by Mr. Mulvaney, which he took back later in the day, undercut Mr. Trump’s repeated denials of a quid pro quo that linked American military aid for Ukraine to an investigation that could help him politically. [Also read: What is a quid pro quo?]

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_154332234_e81312c7-8294-45cb-a128-c01569578970-articleLarge What Happened in the Impeachment Inquiry This Week? United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Sondland, Gordon D (1957- ) Mattis, James N impeachment Giuliani, Rudolph W Foreign Aid

CreditJustin T. Gellerson for The New York Times

A son of sharecroppers, Mr. Cummings fought tirelessly for his hometown, Baltimore, and became a key figure in the impeachment investigation. At the time of his death, he was chairman of the House Oversight Committee. On the panel, which is charged with maintaining integrity in government, Mr. Cummings may have left his most lasting legacy. The position gave him sweeping power to investigate Mr. Trump and his administration, and he used it. Mr. Cummings’s death left a gaping void on the committee.

____

It was supposed to be a briefing for lawmakers on the administration’s Syria policy. But a roughly 20-minute meeting on Wednesday, the first with Speaker Nancy Pelosi and President Trump since the impeachment inquiry began, devolved into name-calling and finger-pointing. Ms. Pelosi said Mr. Trump called her a “third-grade” politician, but the White House and Senator Chuck Schumer said the insult was actually “third-rate.” Ms. Pelosi told Mr. Trump that Russia had always wanted a foothold in the Middle East and that it now had one because of his decision to withdraw U.S. troops from Syria. “All roads with you lead to Putin,” she said, referring to Russia’s leader, Vladimir V. Putin. At another point, Mr. Trump said, “I hate ISIS more than you do.” Somewhere in there, Mr. Trump also insulted Jim Mattis, his former defense secretary, calling him, “the world’s most overrated general.” (Later in the week, Mr. Mattis said: “I have earned my spurs on the battlefield,” adding, “Donald Trump earned his spurs in a letter from a doctor.”)

After vowing not to cooperate with a “kangaroo court,” the president has largely failed to prevent current and former administration members from spending hours with Democrats seeking to impeach him. A parade of career diplomats and senior officials has offered a cascade of revelations. Among those testifying this week were Michael McKinley, above center, who resigned as a senior adviser to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. He testified that he quit because career diplomats had been sidelined on Ukraine. “I was disturbed by the implication that foreign governments were being approached to procure negative information on political opponents,” he said in his opening statement.

Also, George P. Kent, a deputy assistant secretary of state, told impeachment investigators that he raised concerns with a senior Obama White House official in 2015 about Hunter Biden holding a position on the board of a Ukrainian gas company. But the warning was ignored, according to two people familiar with Mr. Kent’s testimony. The White House official told Mr. Kent that Joseph R. Biden Jr. did not have the “bandwidth” to address the concerns while his son Beau was undergoing cancer treatment, according to the people, who were not authorized to discuss the private deposition. Mr. Kent’s remarks about the Bidens were first reported by The Washington Post.

Rudy Giuliani, President Trump’s personal lawyer, continued to play a central role in the impeachment inquiry. A White House aide quoted John R. Bolton, the former national security adviser, as calling Mr. Giuliani “a hand grenade” in reference to his activities relating to Ukraine. Gordon D. Sondland, the American ambassador to the European Union, told House impeachment investigators that Mr. Trump delegated American foreign policy on Ukraine to Mr. Giuliani. Mr. Sondland, a hotelier from Portland, Ore., and Trump donor, testified under subpoena that he did not understand until later that Mr. Giuliani’s goal may have been an effort “to involve Ukrainians, directly or indirectly, in the president’s 2020 re-election campaign.” If you were wondering how Rudy Giuliani, the former mayor of New York, got to this point, carve out some time to watch this episode of “The Weekly.” You can find it here, if you have Hulu.

____

Energy Secretary Rick Perry, who has drawn scrutiny for his role in the controversy surrounding President Trump’s efforts to push Ukraine officials to investigate the son of a political rival, on Thursday told the president he would resign from the cabinet.

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Tom Brady visits massage parlor in Netflix comedy series, echoing Robert Kraft scandal

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady surprised the football world by appearing in a video that went viral on Friday night, which appeared to poke fun at Robert Kraft and his massage parlor scandal.

During a cameo for Paul Rudd’s new Netflix series “Living with Yourself,” Brady is seen exiting a strip mall massage parlor, where he asks Rudd’s character if it was the first time he’s visited the establishment.

NEW YORK JETS’ DEMARYIUS THOMAS LAMENTS ‘WASTING’ TIME WITH NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS

Rudd’s character then exclaims “uh-huh” before he asking Brady “you too?”

Brady then shakes his head side to side before replying “six” – a possible reference to his six Super Bowl victories.

Apparently, the cameo by Brady had been organized long before Kraft’s massage parlor scandal was uncovered. Timothy Greenberg, the show’s creator believed they would have to scrap the video once the news broke involving Kraft, according to Refinery 29.

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Robert-Kraft3 Tom Brady visits massage parlor in Netflix comedy series, echoing Robert Kraft scandal fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/tom-brady fox-news/organization/netflix fox news fnc/sports fnc David Aaro b4df5a16-fd95-51f2-9b7d-bfd37d4041cc article

New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft walks the turf ahead of an NFL football game between the Washington Redskins and the New England Patriots, Sunday, Oct. 6, 2019, in Washington. (AP)

In February, Patriots owner Kraft was charged with two counts of soliciting prostitution at Orchids of Asia Day Spa & Massage in Jupiter, Florida. He’s been in a legal battle over video evidence and police records involving the case. Florida prosecutors recently appeared a lower court decision that threw out video evidence of his involvement in the case.

NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS SUSPEND MICHAEL BENNETT AFTER ‘PHILOSOPHICAL DISAGREEMENT’ WITH COACH

Westlake Legal Group orchids-of-asia-spa-Getty Tom Brady visits massage parlor in Netflix comedy series, echoing Robert Kraft scandal fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/tom-brady fox-news/organization/netflix fox news fnc/sports fnc David Aaro b4df5a16-fd95-51f2-9b7d-bfd37d4041cc article

People mill around in front of the Orchids of Asia Day Spa after New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft being charged with allegedly soliciting for sex on February 22, 2019 in Jupiter, Florida. Mr. Kraft was caught up in a law enforcement operation in South Florida that netted hundreds of johns over the past two weeks.  (Getty)

“That [Orchids of Asia Day Spa] looked almost exactly like what we were shooting. Like, I would have used it as a reference photo,” Greenberg told the outlet. “So we’re like, ‘Alright, this is clearly not going to happen now.”

To their surprise, Brady decided to go ahead with the project anyway.

<img src="https://a57.foxnews.com/static.foxnews.com/foxnews.com/content/uploads/2019/09/640/320/NFL-Tom-Brady10.jpg?ve=1&tl=1" alt="New England Patriots quarterback, Tom Brady, surprised the football world by appearing in a video that went viral on Friday night, which appeared to poke fun at Robert Kraft and his massage parlor scandal.
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New England Patriots quarterback, Tom Brady, surprised the football world by appearing in a video that went viral on Friday night, which appeared to poke fun at Robert Kraft and his massage parlor scandal.<br data-cke-eol=”1″>

Greenberg described his feelings on actually having the six-time Super Bowl winner on his show, especially with it being so eerily similar to Kraft’s scandal.

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“Like, really, something is wrong here. This can’t be real,” he told Refinery 29.

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Tom-Brady10 Tom Brady visits massage parlor in Netflix comedy series, echoing Robert Kraft scandal fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/tom-brady fox-news/organization/netflix fox news fnc/sports fnc David Aaro b4df5a16-fd95-51f2-9b7d-bfd37d4041cc article   Westlake Legal Group NFL-Tom-Brady10 Tom Brady visits massage parlor in Netflix comedy series, echoing Robert Kraft scandal fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/tom-brady fox-news/organization/netflix fox news fnc/sports fnc David Aaro b4df5a16-fd95-51f2-9b7d-bfd37d4041cc article

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What Happened in Today’s Brexit Vote

Oct. 19, 2019Updated 12:00 p.m. ET

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_162959829_c02e1da5-9e1b-4c2a-96c1-4effc6f49654-articleLarge What Happened in Today’s Brexit Vote Politics and Government Legislatures and Parliaments Johnson, Boris Great Britain Withdrawal from EU (Brexit) European Union Democratic Unionist Party (Northern Ireland) Conservative Party (Great Britain)

Huge anti-Brexit crowds marched near Parliament in London on Saturday.CreditAndrew Testa for The New York Times

British lawmakers on Saturday scuttled Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s carefully choreographed plan to push his Brexit deal through a special Saturday session of Parliament.

They voted 322-306 in favor of an amendment that puts off the moment of decision until they have had more time to scrutinize his plan.

It was the latest twist in a debate that has convulsed the country for three anguished years, ever since the British public voted in 2016 for a divorce from the European Union.

The move to postpone the crucial Brexit vote on Saturday muddled Mr. Johnson’s path to a Brexit deal, though it also could end up increasing the chance that some moderate lawmakers will vote for his deal down the road.

The whiplash developments mean he is legally obliged to seek yet another extension for Britain’s departure from the European Union, which he had vowed never to do.

In fact, after the vote on the amendment, Mr. Johnson declared, “I will not negotiate a delay with the E.U.,” he said, “and neither does the law compel me to do so.”

“I wish the House to know I’m not daunted or dismayed by this particular result,” the prime minister added. “I will tell our friends and colleagues in the E.U. exactly what I’ve told everyone in the last 88 days: that further delay would be bad for this country, bad for the European Union and bad for democracy.”

How Parliament Voted on a Measure that Disrupted Boris Johnson’s Brexit Deal

Westlake Legal Group brexit-vote-600 What Happened in Today’s Brexit Vote Politics and Government Legislatures and Parliaments Johnson, Boris Great Britain Withdrawal from EU (Brexit) European Union Democratic Unionist Party (Northern Ireland) Conservative Party (Great Britain)

Approve AMENDMENT

Reject AMENDMENT

Reject AMENDMENT

Labour

231

Conservative

283

Scottish Nat. Party

35

Liberal Democrats

19

Independent

17

Independent

17

Westlake Legal Group brexit-vote-335 What Happened in Today’s Brexit Vote Politics and Government Legislatures and Parliaments Johnson, Boris Great Britain Withdrawal from EU (Brexit) European Union Democratic Unionist Party (Northern Ireland) Conservative Party (Great Britain)

Approve AMENDMENT

Reject AMENDMENT

Labour

231

Conservative

283

Scottish Nat. Party

35

Lib Dems

19

Independent

17

Independent

17

By Allison McCann

Note: Totals do not include the Speaker of the House of Commons, his three deputies, Sinn Fein members of parliament and those who did not vote.

Crowds of anti-Brexit marchers in Parliament Square erupted in cheers and applause at the news that the amendment had passed.

The amendment essentially turned Mr. Johnson’s up-or-down vote on his deal into a weaker one, saying only that “this House has considered the matter but withholds approval unless and until implementing legislation is passed.”

Lawmakers were worried that, were they to approve Mr. Johnson’s deal on Saturday, hard-line Brexiteer lawmakers would delay passing accompanying legislation next week, pushing Britain out of the European Union without a deal on Oct. 31.

The passage of the amendment means that Mr. Johnson is forced by law to send a letter to the European Union on Saturday night saying that, because he could not pass his deal in time in Britain’s Parliament, he needed an extension.

quagmire.

Even lawmakers who support Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal didn’t trust him or his hard-line Brexit backers, fearing that they might pull a procedural trick to force Britain to crash out of the European Union without a deal.

They also worried that Parliament could approve Mr. Johnson’s deal on Saturday, absolving the prime minister of any obligation to delay the Brexit deadline.

So a former Conservative lawmaker, Oliver Letwin, whom Mr. Johnson had kicked out of the party, put forward an amendment as sort of insurance policy to make approval of the deal conditional on also passing necessary legislation.

In essence, the so-called Letwin Amendment, which the speaker of the House of Commons, John Bercow, selected for a vote, aimed to turn Parliament’s up-or-down vote on Mr. Johnson’s deal into a much weaker motion.

It means that Saturday was not the day that lawmakers would fully endorse or reject the Brexit deal.

Read the Draft Withdrawal Agreement

The European Commission released a copy of the draft withdrawal agreement shortly after the deal was announced.

Westlake Legal Group thumbnail What Happened in Today’s Brexit Vote Politics and Government Legislatures and Parliaments Johnson, Boris Great Britain Withdrawal from EU (Brexit) European Union Democratic Unionist Party (Northern Ireland) Conservative Party (Great Britain)   64 pages, 0.92 MB

Now that the amendment has passed, lawmakers get to not only cast a definitive vote on Mr. Johnson’s deal, but also to debate, amend and vote on legislation putting that deal into law.

The Democratic Unionist Party of Northern Ireland, which stridently objects to Mr. Johnson’s deal, earlier signaled that it would vote for the Letwin amendment. Sammy Wilson, a Democratic Unionist lawmaker, said that “we would be failing in our duty” if the party did not try to force changes to the Brexit deal.

On a high-wire day in British politics, a crucial question now is how the government will respond to the upending of Mr. Johnson’s plan.

British news outlets reported that the government could put forward the legislation accompanying Mr. Johnson’s deal as soon as Monday or Tuesday and push for a quick vote then.

And Saturday afternoon, Jacob Rees-Mogg, a hard-line Conservative Brexiteer, announced in the Commons that the government would bring back another “meaningful” vote on Monday.

The defeat means that Prime Minister Boris Johnson is legally obliged by 11 p.m. Saturday local time to request another delay to Brexit until Jan 31, 2020, from Brussels.

Mr. Johnson was careful to choose his words carefully, saying that he would not “negotiate” a delay but not that his office would refuse to send the required letter.

That seemed to open a path to Mr. Johnson or someone else in the government signing the required letter, but with the prime minister’s refusing to put his weight behind the request and telling European leaders that he did not want it.

After his comments, Downing Street refused to clarify what the prime minister meant.

The developments place the leaders of he European Union in a tricky position, since they do not want a potentially damaging no-deal departure, but will want Britain to justify any further extension. All member countries of the bloc will have to agree on the delay.

By the time they consider a request, however, Parliament will most likely have had more votes on Brexit because Mr. Johnson said he would press on with legislation needed to effect his plan next week.

When the legislation comes to Parliament, that will also provide an opportunity for its opponents to try to amendment the plan. So next week may, or may not, provide more clarity.

In what commentators called the biggest speech of his political career, Prime Minister Boris Johnson argued strenuously in the House of Commons on Saturday that his deal was the best available Brexit deal and that Britain could not waste another day in extracting itself from the European Union.

“Now is the time for this great House of Commons to come together,” he said before the vote on the amendment. Amid shouts from the opposition benches, he added that any further delay to Brexit would be “pointless, expensive and deeply corrosive of public trust.”

Mr. Johnson cast his deal as a fulfillment of decades of conflict in Britain over its place in the European Union. He said it would allow the entire country to benefit from future trade deals and avoid a dreaded hard border on the island of Ireland.

Mr. Johnson’s odds were complicated by the fact that he does not have a working majority in Parliament and has not won a major vote there in the three months he has been in office.

Many of the lawmakers he needs to back his deal include the 21 members of Parliament he purged from the Conservative Party after they voted for a measure to prevent Britain from leaving the European Union without a deal.

His allies in Northern Ireland, 10 lawmakers from the Democratic Unionist Party, flatly rejected his Brexit deal, accusing Mr. Johnson of selling the territory short by accepting checks on some goods passing through Northern Ireland to get a deal.

In a striking moment on Saturday afternoon, as the debate dragged on before the vote, Theresa May, Boris Johnson’s predecessor as prime minister, stood up and give an impassioned speech in the House of Commons.

“Standing here, I have a distinct sense of déjà vu,” Mrs. May said to knowing laughter, given that her deal had been rejected in the same chamber three times.

For Mrs. May, it was a dramatic intervention, given that she was showing support for Mr. Johnson, who had often not supported her.

She said it was time for Parliament to vote for a deal on Brexit, having promised to abide by the democratic will of the people.

“If the Parliament did not mean it, then it is guilty of the most egregious con trick on the British people,” Mrs. May said. “You cannot have a second referendum simply because you don’t agree with the results of the first.”

“If you don’t want ‘no deal,’” she declared, “you have to vote for a deal.”

Cheers erupted at from the backbenchers the end of her speech.

It was the most visible appearance by Mrs. May in the nation’s Brexit debate since she stepped down from her job and relinquished leadership of the Conservative Party in the wake of her own stinging defeats.

But it also put her in an awkward position. During her negotiations with Brussels, Mrs. May said that no British prime minister could accept a deal that would keep Northern Ireland in the European Union’s customs territory.

Although Northern Ireland would remain in the United Kingdom’s customs territory under Mr. Johnson’s deal, the arrangement would impose the same customs checks between Britain and Northern Ireland that Mrs. May once ruled out.

Jeremy Corbyn, Britain’s left-wing opposition leader, who spoke after Prime Minister Boris Johnson but before Theresa May in the Commons on Saturday, earlier urged lawmakers to vote against the deal.

“This deal is not good for jobs, damaging to our industry and a threat to our environment and our natural world,” he said. “It should be voted down today by this House.”

He argued that the deal was worse than the agreement reached by Mr. Johnson’s predecessor, Theresa May.

“We simply cannot vote for a deal that is even worse than the House rejected three times,” he said.

Mr. Corbyn argued that the new deal would cost every citizen in the country, on average, more than $2,500 and would lead to “a race to the bottom in regulation and standards.”

.

Huge crowds of protesters streamed to Westminster on Saturday in a march to demand another referendum on Brexit — a show of defiance as British lawmakers voted on the deal outlining the nation’s exit from the European Union.

Organizers of the People’s Vote march said they had drawn about one million people, which would make it one of the largest demonstrations on record in Britain.

“We are now reaching a crucial moment in the Brexit crisis,” the organizers said in a statement. “The government has adopted the slogan ‘Get Brexit Done’ to try and browbeat an exhausted public into accepting whatever botched Brexit Boris Johnson presents to them, but we know this slogan is a lie.”

Outside Westminster on Saturday, Milou de Castellane, 52, who works as a nanny in London, said she had voted to remain in the European Union and would like to have a second referendum or to remain in Europe.

Before the parliamentary vote on Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s deal, she said: “I hope that the deal will not pass, but I have a sinking feeling that it might. But it cannot just be a rabbit-out-of-a hat scenario. We have to know what is in the deal.”

Three 16-year-olds who attend school together in Oxford descended on Parliament Square on Saturday before the vote.

“We came here today because we want to let our voices be heard; we have not been able to do it any other way,” said Anoushka Nairac, a student at Magdalen College School in Oxford. She added that “we have been living with the consequences” of the referendum.

“My father is an immigrant who set up his own company and provided jobs for citizens,” she said. “It makes me annoyed; people are not looking at the facts.”

She added: “The deal is appalling. They have taken Theresa May’s deal and wrapped it in new packaging. The deal is uncaring about E.U. citizens and the Northern Ireland border. ”

Michelle and Mike Megan, both 60, have been coming from Newbury to protest outside Westminster for a few days each week since January.

Ms. Megan said: “As a leave voter, we are here to counteract the people’s vote to remain in the E.U. Remainers are asking for a people’s vote, but the people already voted in 2016. We were told it was a once-in-a-generation referendum.”

Ms. Megan added: “So far, Boris Johnson has done a good job. I would never have called myself a Boris fan, but he is now our only hope of getting Brexit done. He has his faults, but so do great leaders in the past.”

When news of the vote on the amendment spread, marchers like Aleksandr Pessina, who says she has Italian and Russian heritage and works as a software engineer, called it “a great victory for democracy.”

She added that it would allow “more time for people to think it through, and it might eventually lead to the rejection of Brexit altogether.”

Reporting was contributed by Stephen Castle, Mark Landler, Ben Mueller, Marc Santora, Anna Schaverien, Claire Moses, Alan Yuhas and Megan Specia.

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Erdogan vows to ‘crush the heads’ of Kurds if they don’t withdraw; both sides trade blame for violating cease-fire

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095977502001_6095978711001-vs Erdogan vows to 'crush the heads' of Kurds if they don't withdraw; both sides trade blame for violating cease-fire Melissa Leon fox-news/world/world-regions/turkey fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/world fnc article 344e85a5-c5e2-524c-b0e8-be47f435b46f

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Saturday promised to “crush the heads” of the Kurds in Syria if they don’t fall back from the border’s safe zone, according to reports.

The threat comes as both Turkey and the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) claim the other is violating terms of a 120-hour cease-fire brokered by Turkey and the U.S. on Thursday.

Violence continued in northeast Syria despite the five-day peace agreement, a source told Fox News.

Dave Eubank with Free Burma Rangers, a private military company that provides emergency medical assistance, was on the ground near the Syrian border town of Ras al-Ayn trying to help trapped and wounded Kurds.

Eubank told Fox News the fighting hasn’t stopped and movement in the area is severely limited, despite the cease-fire’s intention to “pause” fighting to allow Syrian Kurds time and space to retreat from the area. Thousands of Kurdish civilians live in the so-called buffer zone, a senior military source had told Fox News.

The Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA) was “still shooting all through the night,” Eubank said. “So far since [the] cease-fire, no airstrikes here, but artillery and ground attacks.”

Erdogan threatened the Kurds on Saturday during a televised speech, saying they will be slaughtered if they don’t pull back from the 20-mile-wide safe zone along the Turkey-Syria border by Tuesday night.

“We will start where we left off and continue to crush the terrorists’ heads,” Erdogan said.

US JETS DESTROY ANTI-ISIS COALITION BASE IN SYRIA AFTER WITHDRAWAL, OFFICIAL SAYS

Turkey claims it is living up to the terms of the cease-fire agreement and accused the Kurds of  violating it.

The Turkish Defense Ministry said Kurdish forces carried out 14 “provocative” attacks in Ras al-Ayn in 36 hours, according to the BBC.

In a statement, the SDF said there has been “no tangible progress” in solving the issues at the northeast border.

TURKEY-SYRIA CEASE-FIRE: SENIOR US MILITARY SOURCE ‘HIGHLY SKEPTICAL’ OF DEAL

As of Friday, 86 civilians had been killed since Turkey launched its military offensive into Syria on Oct. 9, according to a war monitor, the BBC reported.

Erdogan claimed the move was to “neutralize terror threats” and establish a “safe zone.” After carrying out airstrikes, Turkish ground troops later invaded northeastern Syria.

Nearly all U.S. troops there have been removed and will be redeployed in the region in the coming weeks.

TRUMPS WARNS ERDOGAN IN LETTER: ‘DON’T BE A TOUGH GUY. DON’T BE A FOOL!’

The U.S. had teamed up with the Kurds to fight ISIS in the region. Some analysts and politicians criticized President Trump for removing America forces, saying it was a “green light” for Ankara to invade Syria and fight the Kurds.

Trump said the Turks have been “warring for many years,” and that the U.S. does not need to protect war-torn Syria because it’s “7,000 miles away.”

The president on Friday claimed “thousands and thousands” of lives were being saved in Syria and Turkey due to the cease-fire.

Fox News’ Griff Jenkins and Jennifer Griffin contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095977502001_6095978711001-vs Erdogan vows to 'crush the heads' of Kurds if they don't withdraw; both sides trade blame for violating cease-fire Melissa Leon fox-news/world/world-regions/turkey fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/world fnc article 344e85a5-c5e2-524c-b0e8-be47f435b46f   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095977502001_6095978711001-vs Erdogan vows to 'crush the heads' of Kurds if they don't withdraw; both sides trade blame for violating cease-fire Melissa Leon fox-news/world/world-regions/turkey fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/world fnc article 344e85a5-c5e2-524c-b0e8-be47f435b46f

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Karl Rove: Adam Schiff can’t rise above ‘hyperpartisanship’

Westlake Legal Group karl-rove-adam-schiff-FOX-AP Karl Rove: Adam Schiff can't rise above 'hyperpartisanship' Julia Musto fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 98f8a502-4def-5a12-b978-b31eacdc4c6c

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., is the wrong person to lead House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry against President Trump, former White House Deputy Chief of Staff Karl Rove said Saturday.

Appearing on “Fox & Friends: Weekend” with hosts Ed Henry, Jedidiah Bila, and Griff Jenkins, Rove recalled that in both the Nixon impeachment hearings and the Clinton impeachment hearings “not only did the minority have equal rights with the majority when it came to calling witnesses and issuing subpoenas, but they also had immediate access to all the documents and materials.”

DEVIN NUNES: DEMOCRATS’ IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY IS A PARTISAN ‘ADVENTURE’

He added that the president’s lawyer sat in on staff meetings, closed hearings, and depositions and was able to ask questions, suggest witnesses, and state the president’s position.

“None of that is happening in this instance, and our democracy is ill-served by this hyperpartisan effort led by Adam Schiff,” he told the “Friends” hosts.

On Friday all nine Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee penned a scathing letter to Schiff, accusing him and other Democrats of not providing physical copies or uploading digital versions of documents related to the inquiry to the minority staff.

“We are concerned that the Majority is knowingly withholding Committee documents related to your so-called ‘impeachment inquiry’ from the Minority…We see no reason for your withholding of these documents except as a deliberate attempt to hinder the Minority’s participation,” they wrote.

Ranking member of the Intelligence Committee Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., and fellow Republican members cited several documents, including letters from Democrats on the committee, sent to White House counsel Pat Cipollone, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Vice President Mike Pence, Trump personal attorney Rudy Giuliani, Secretary of Defense Mark Esper, and others. The Republicans also cited letters requesting depositions for several key officials.

In addition, a motion to censure Schiff for his “parody” reading of President Trump’s July phone call with Ukrainian leader Volodymyr Zelensky during a hearing last month has garnered support from 173 co-sponsors.

“This is a serious matter and it ought to be treated seriously, and the way that Adam Schiff is doing it is highly partisan and not conducive to creating a credible record for the American people to look at,” Rove said, noting that while there is a  role for private depositions or private interviews, those conducted in this inquiry are “not fair and honest.”

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“The country is in a critical moment. This requires statesmanship. This requires somebody who is going to rise above hyperpartisanship. That person ain’t Adam Schiff,” the Fox News contributor concluded. “And, he is ill-serving our country and ultimately ill-serving his political party by being so partisan and being so fundamentally unfair.”

Fox News’ Brooke Singman contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group karl-rove-adam-schiff-FOX-AP Karl Rove: Adam Schiff can't rise above 'hyperpartisanship' Julia Musto fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 98f8a502-4def-5a12-b978-b31eacdc4c6c   Westlake Legal Group karl-rove-adam-schiff-FOX-AP Karl Rove: Adam Schiff can't rise above 'hyperpartisanship' Julia Musto fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 98f8a502-4def-5a12-b978-b31eacdc4c6c

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