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5 things we learned from the 2020 Democratic debate in Houston

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 5 things we learned from the 2020 Democratic debate in Houston

Health care was the dominant issue, and front runner Joe Biden was the main target for the other nine candidates on the stage. USA TODAY

The top 10 showed spirit, but the breakout moments were scarce.

The leading Democratic presidential candidates appeared on stage together for the first time at Thursday night’s debate — and the field was feisty.

The intra-party debate on how to revamp the health care system remained the dominant issue. Candidates offered some of the most emotional moments discussing their visions for tightening gun laws following two mass shootings in Texas last month.

And for the third straight debate, former Vice President Joe Biden faced the toughest and most persistent barbs from his fellow Democratic White House hopefuls. 

Here’s what else we gleaned from the stage in Houston:

1: Biden once again takes licks but keeps standing.

In a pointed exchange, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro attacked Biden for selling himself as Barack Obama’s wingman and partner when it’s convenient, but shying away from the former president’s more controversial decisions, including Obama’s record on deportations of undocumented immigrants.

That was after Sen. Bernie Sanders slammed Biden’s proposal to expand health care as shortsighted amidst the former vice president’s contention that Sanders Medicare for All would be too costly.

“Well, Joe said that Medicare for All would cost over $30 trillion,” said Sanders, who repeatedly referred to Biden by his first name. “That’s right, Joe. (But) status quo over 10 years will be $50 trillion. Every study done shows that Medicare for All is the most cost-effective approach to providing health care to every man, woman, and child in this country. I, who wrote the damn bill, if I may say so …”

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In perhaps the most sharp exchange of the night, Castro accused Biden of forgetting what he had said two minutes earlier as they contrasted health care plans — a not so subtle dig at Biden’s penchant for gaffes.

Sharp exchange: Castro appears to misrepresent Biden’s health care plan during debate

The rumble in Space City: Democratic debate featured frontrunners who battled each other, attacked Trump

But a few of Biden’s Democratic rivals came to his defense, suggesting Castro’s digs went too far.

“This is why presidential debates are becoming unwatchable,” South Bend, Indiana Mayor Peter Buttigieg intoned. “This reminds everybody of what they cannot stand about Washington, scoring points against each other, poking at each other, and telling each other that — my plan, your plan. Look, we all have different visions for what is better.”

At the first debate in Miami, Biden was called out by rivals for comments at a fundraiser about segregationist lawmakers and Sen. Kamala Harris landed the biggest blow over his opposition to busing to integrate schools during his time as a senator.

Biden took plenty of punches Thursday, but he walked away, once again, fairly unscathed.

2: The much anticipated Elizabeth Warren-Joe Biden showdown didn’t happen.

Soon after he entered the race in April, Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts noted Biden’s ties to the credit card industry during his time in the Senate. He voted for legislation that tightened rules on who could qualify for bankruptcy protection and benefited credit card companies.

On the trail, she’s not so subtly dinged Biden for suggesting if he wins the White House, he will bring bipartisan comity to Washington.

“If they dream at all, they dream small,” Warren said in June at the California State Democratic Party Convention, using a version of a line she’s repeated on the trail. “Some say if we’d all just calm down, the Republicans will come to their senses. But our country is in a time of crisis. The time for small ideas is over.”

But in Houston, with Biden and Warren standing on the debate stage together for the first time, the sub-primary between moderate Biden and progressive Warren was fairly tempered.

Early in the debate, Biden criticized Warren and Sanders’ embrace of Medicare for All as policy that would raise taxes on middle-income people and force millions of Americans to give up their employer-provided insurance that they might like.

But Warren was ready.

“So, let’s be clear,” Warren said in a line that received sustained applause from the audience, “I’ve actually never met anybody who likes their health insurance company.”

The moment alone marked the most substantive back-and-forth between the two candidates over the course of the three-hour debate

Wizard of Oz: Kamala Harris calls Trump a ‘little dude’ and other moments from the Democratic debate

3: Democrats are united in keeping the press on Trump on gun control.

With Texas enduring two mass shootings last month, Democrats’ push for stricter gun laws got plenty of attention.

Rivals were united on the need to bolster background checks and renew an assault weapons ban. They also heaped praise on former Rep. Beto O’Rourke for his reaction after a mass shooting in El Paso last month. O’Rourke stepped off the trail for several days last month as his hometown grieved for 22 people killed by a gunman who posted an anti-immigrant screed online shortly before carrying out the rampage at crowded Walmart.

In one of the more heightened moments of the debate, O’Rourke reiterated his promise if elected to require owners of military-style weapons, such as the AR-15 and AK-47, to turn over the firearms to the government.

O’Rourke recalled meeting the mother of a 15-year-old who was gunned down in an Aug. 31 shooting in Odessa and Midland, Texas, that left eight dead

“That mother watched her bleed to death over the course of an hour because so many other people were shot by that AR-15 in Odessa and Midland, there weren’t enough ambulances to get to them in time,” O’Rourke said. “Hell, yes, we’re going to take your AR-15, your AK-47.”

Gun control: Beto O’Rourke: ‘Hell, yes, we’re going to take your AR-15, your AK-47’ to keep children safe

Trump was briefed on Thursday by senior advisers on various courses of action he could take on gun laws. He declined to detail where he stood in comments to reporters following the briefing.

“I think we made some good progress on background checks and guns,” Trump told reporters.

One thing is certain: 2020 Democrats will continue to hammer at Trump on gun control— an issue Democrats believe they’re aligned with vast majority of Americans on—unless he takes significant action.

Harris reiterated her belief — shared by some on the left — that Trump’s rhetoric disparaging undocumented immigrants played a role in the El Paso killings.

“Well, look, I mean, obviously, he didn’t pull the trigger, but he’s certainly been tweeting out the ammunition,” Harris said of Trump.

4: Candidates need to can some of the canned lines.

The canned line is a tried-and-true part of debates. 

In 1984, the septuagenarian Ronald Reagan memorably addressed concerns about his age with humor as he faced off against Democrat Walter Mondale. “I will not make age an issue of this campaign,” he said. “I am not going to exploit, for political purposes, my opponent’s youth and inexperience.”

But on Thursday, several seemingly rehearsed lines landed with a thud.

“For a socialist, you’ve got a lot more confidence in corporate America than I do,” Biden quipped at Sanders. The audience did not react.

Harris laughed enthusiastically — more than the audience — after she compared Trump to the man behind the curtain in “The Wizard of Oz.”

“Donald Trump in office on trade policy, you know, he reminds me of that guy in “The Wizard of Oz,” you know, when you pull back the curtain, it’s a really small dude?”

Harris guffawed. Moderator George Stephanopoulos, a slight man, replied, “OK. I’m not even going to take the bait,” and moved on to the next question as Harris assured him the joke was not about him.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota elicited groans across social media when she offered some NASA-themed barb at Trump in the Space City.

“Houston, we have a problem,” said Klobuchar, using a popular but erroneous quote from the radio communications between the Apollo 13 astronaut John Swigert and Mission Control. “We have a guy there that is literally running our country like a game show.” 

5: Andrew Yang had his moments, but will his shtick resonate? 

The entrepreneur from New York teased before Thursday’s debate that he would deliver “something big,” never done before by a presidential candidate.

He delivered by vowing in his opening statement to shell out $120,000 to ten American families over the next year — a $1,000 per month “freedom dividend” that’s the linchpin of his longshot candidacy. The proposal will almost certainly face scrutiny from the Federal Election Commission from rival campaigns or citizens questioning of whether the scheme amounts to vote buying.

Freedom dividend: Andrew Yang reveals his debate surprise – $1,000 a month for 10 more families

Yang is the anti-politician. On the stump, he jokes about how he’s the only candidate whose uttered the “fourth industrial revolution” as he makes the case for universal basic income to blunt the trauma automation and artificial intelligence innovation is and will bring on truck drivers, clerks and call-center workers.

Another regular Yang zinger: “The opposite of Donald Trump is an Asian man who likes math.”

But when Yang invoked his Asian heritage in a jokey way on the debate stage Thursday— “I am Asian, so I know a lot of doctors…”— the lighthearted attempt at the ethnic-tinged humor fell flat with the audience at Texas Southern University and faced scorn on social media for amplifying the model minority stereotype.

Ethnic humor: Andrew Yang on healthcare during the Democratic Debate: ‘I’m Asian, so I know a lot of doctors’

Yang’s ability to emerge from obscurity to a top 10 candidate appearing on a winnowed stage is certainly remarkable.

But he still has some ways to go before emerging from the fringe.

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/elections/2019/09/13/democratic-debate-what-we-learned-from-the-2020-debate-in-houston/2285564001/

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Emilia Clarke Sings Spine-Tingling Rendition Of ‘Last Christmas’ In New Trailer

Westlake Legal Group 5d7b53663b0000c49fd2350f Emilia Clarke Sings Spine-Tingling Rendition Of ‘Last Christmas’ In New Trailer

Emilia Clarke sings her heart out in the newest trailer for “Last Christmas,” which opens with a powerful a capella rendition of the 1984 Wham! holiday classic the film is named for. 

Clarke, last seen as Daenerys in HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” plays Kate, a woman who works as an elf in a British Christmas store and has been struggling since experiencing some kind of medical emergency a year earlier. She falls for the enigmatic Tom, played by Henry Golding of “Crazy Rich Asians.”  

When the first trailer dropped last month, fans went wild with speculation about Golding’s mysterious character because he was never seen interacting with anyone else. Some guessed he was a ghost, perhaps even the spirit of the heart donor who gave Kate a new organ, thus giving the film a direct connection to the lyrics of the song and explaining the medical crisis. 

But filmmaker Paul Feig told Radio Times that the fan theories were wrong.

“It makes me laugh because it’s this romantic comedy and then everyone is treating it like it’s ‘The Matrix,’” he told the website. “It’s just a lovely Christmas movie!” 

“Last Christmas” opens Nov. 8. 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Every car should be a little like the 2020 Toyota Corolla hybrid

A day driving the 2020 Toyota Corolla hybrid raises two questions: Why on earth did it take Toyota more than 20 years to get around to making a hybrid version of its signature car? And why, in 2019, does any automaker bother building a car that’s not a hybrid?

The Corolla hybrid checks just about every box: fuel economy, value  and – with a couple of disappointing but unsurprising omissions – safety features.

It’s not remotely sporty, despite the generous torque that comes with electric power, but come on, it’s a Corolla. Don’t ask for miracles, although some would say the 57.2 mpg I got in mixed driving on highways and surface streets qualifies as one.

The Corolla hybrid is in dealerships now.

Westlake Legal Group  Every car should be a little like the 2020 Toyota Corolla hybrid

How much?

Prices for the Corolla LE hybrid start at $23,100. That’s in the middle of the range for compact hybrids and $3,500 up from the base gasoline-powered Corolla.

The front-wheel-drive hybrid has a 1.8L gasoline engine and electric motor. A continuously variable transmission is standard. The system’s total power is 121 horsepower, the same as in Toyota’s slightly larger Prius hybrid.

Westlake Legal Group  Every car should be a little like the 2020 Toyota Corolla hybrid

The Corolla hybrid has lots of standard features, including adaptive cruise control, pedestrian detection, forward collision alert and automatic braking, automatic high beams, lane departure alert and assist, 8.0-inch touch screen, Apple CarPlay, push button start, backup camera, LED lights, automatic climate control. Unfortunately, blind spot and cross-traffic alerts, my favorite advanced safety systems, were extra-cost options missing from my car, which stickered at $23,537. All prices exclude destination charges.

The Corolla hybrid competes with small hybrids like the Honda Insight, Hyundai Ioniq, Kia Niro and Toyota Prius.

The Prius costs a bit more and has more passenger and luggage space, despite being shorter than the Corolla. Chalk one up for hatchback over sedans. But while the Prius’ styling screams “Hybrid!” the Corolla looks like just another small car. Along with its slightly lower price, that should help it appeal to different customers. Anonymity suits some people to a T.

A simple interior, complicated infotainment

The Corolla is a roomy and practical small car. My test vehicle had cloth seats with manual adjustments that were comfortable over the course of a day behind the wheel. Big windows provide good sight lines, except, of course, when the little sedan is surrounded by SUVs.

Westlake Legal Group  Every car should be a little like the 2020 Toyota Corolla hybrid

An 8.0-inch touch screen rises above the center stack in the middle of the dashboard. The display is clear, though Toyota’s touchscreen and voice recognition system are unintuitive and slower than the best competitors. Adding a “back” button wouldn’t hurt, either.

The USB port to connect smartphones is very difficult to find, a black opening in a stretch of black plastic near the front passenger’s left knee. It’s harder to reach than the more central USBs most competitors design and lacks a nearby spot to hold your phone.

Westlake Legal Group  Every car should be a little like the 2020 Toyota Corolla hybrid

Apple CarPlay is standard. Toyota hasn’t made Android Auto available yet.

That’s not a typo, it’s my fuel economy

The Corolla’s hybrid system seamlessly combines gasoline and electric power killing and restarting the engine smoothly at stoplights and when cruising at a steady speed. The gasoline engine is a bit noisy under strong acceleration, despite its modest output. Torque from the electric motor steps in to provide acceleration around town and comfortable cruising at highway speeds.

The Corolla hybrid’s nickel-metal hydride battery is hardly cutting-edge technology, but it does the job, despite being heavy and less energy-dense than the pricier lithium-ion batteries most modern hybrids use.

The steering is light and numb. I found the lane departure assist a bit fussy and turned it off. Nothing else about the Corolla’s road manners draws attention.

The numbers on the fuel economy readout do, though. I averaged 59 miles a gallon running errands for 90 minutes in heavily built-up suburbs.

Westlake Legal Group  Every car should be a little like the 2020 Toyota Corolla hybrid

On a crowded, fast-moving urban highway, the Corolla kept pace easily with 80-mph traffic. I dialed back to the speed limit for fuel economy’s sake when I got to open highway for a 150-mile run.

I scored 57.2 mpg over the whole day, without really trying.

Westlake Legal Group  Every car should be a little like the 2020 Toyota Corolla hybrid

More, please

The Corolla hybrid’s not a compelling car to drive, but that was true of the millions of gasoline-powered Corollas Toyota sold, too. The hybrid’s fuel efficiency and value demand attention, whether you’re concerned about melting ice caps or your monthly budget.

Anyway, Porsche has proved you can build hybrids that are fun to drive. There will be plenty more.

Contact Mark Phelan at 313-222-6731 or mmphelan@freepress.com. Follow him on Twitter @mark_phelan. Read more on autos and sign up for our autos newsletter.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

New Zealand Plans Further Restrictions To Gun Ownership

Westlake Legal Group 5d7b5f2c2400002e2a7943ec New Zealand Plans Further Restrictions To Gun Ownership

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Six months after a gunman killed 51 people at two Christchurch mosques, New Zealand’s government is planning further restrictions to gun ownership.

A bill introduced to Parliament on Friday would create a register to track all the guns in the country and require gun owners to renew their gun licenses every five years instead of every 10. It would also place new responsibilities on doctors to notify police if they believe a gun owner shouldn’t have a license due to concerns over the owner’s mental health.

The government hopes lawmakers will approve the legislation by the end of the year.

The proposed measures come after New Zealand in April rushed through legislation to ban assault weapons such as AR-15 style rifles.

The government has launched a buyback scheme to compensate gun owners for the outlawed semi-automatics, and has so far collected about 19,000 weapons and 70,000 parts. The gun buyback and a parallel gun amnesty run until December.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern told reporters in Christchurch the focus remained on preventing another attack like the one on March 15. She said the attack exposed weaknesses in gun laws, which the government was fixing.

“We absolutely recognize there is a legitimate need in our communities to be able to access guns, particularly our rural community,” Ardern said. “But what these changes do is recognize that actually there’s a real responsibility that comes with gun ownership.”

Ardern has previously made the point that New Zealand has a different view on guns than the U.S., where gun ownership is seen as a constitutional right and is interpreted by many to be a defense against potential government overreach.

“Owning a firearm is a privilege not a right,” Ardern said on Friday.

Brenton Tarrant, a 28-year-old Australian white supremacist, has pleaded not guilty to terrorism, murder and attempted murder charges following the March attacks. He remains in jail ahead of his trial.

The judge in the case this week agreed to a request by prosecutors to delay the start of the trial by a month until next June to avoid a clash with the Islamic holy month of Ramadan.

Judge Cameron Mander noted that many of the witnesses are Muslim and that defense lawyers hadn’t raised any objections to the delay.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Every car should be a little like the 2020 Toyota Corolla hybrid

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Every car should be a little like the 2020 Toyota Corolla hybrid

Value, safety and 50 mpg+ fuel economy make the first hybrid Corolla a keeper. Mark Phelan, Detroit Free Press Auto Critic

A day driving the 2020 Toyota Corolla hybrid raises two questions: Why on earth did it take Toyota more than 20 years to get around to making a hybrid version of its signature car? And why, in 2019, does any automaker bother building a car that’s not a hybrid?

The Corolla hybrid checks just about every box: fuel economy, value  and – with a couple of disappointing but unsurprising omissions – safety features.

It’s not remotely sporty, despite the generous torque that comes with electric power, but come on, it’s a Corolla. Don’t ask for miracles, although some would say the 57.2 mpg I got in mixed driving on highways and surface streets qualifies as one.

The Corolla hybrid is in dealerships now.

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

How much?

Prices for the Corolla LE hybrid start at $23,100. That’s in the middle of the range for compact hybrids and $3,500 up from the base gasoline-powered Corolla.

The front-wheel-drive hybrid has a 1.8L gasoline engine and electric motor. A continuously variable transmission is standard. The system’s total power is 121 horsepower, the same as in Toyota’s slightly larger Prius hybrid.

The Corolla hybrid has lots of standard features, including adaptive cruise control, pedestrian detection, forward collision alert and automatic braking, automatic high beams, lane departure alert and assist, 8.0-inch touch screen, Apple CarPlay, push button start, backup camera, LED lights, automatic climate control. Unfortunately, blind spot and cross-traffic alerts, my favorite advanced safety systems, were extra-cost options missing from my car, which stickered at $23,537. All prices exclude destination charges.

The Corolla hybrid competes with small hybrids like the Honda Insight, Hyundai Ioniq, Kia Niro and Toyota Prius.

The Prius costs a bit more and has more passenger and luggage space, despite being shorter than the Corolla. Chalk one up for hatchback over sedans. But while the Prius’ styling screams “Hybrid!” the Corolla looks like just another small car. Along with its slightly lower price, that should help it appeal to different customers. Anonymity suits some people to a T.

A simple interior, complicated infotainment

The Corolla is a roomy and practical small car. My test vehicle had cloth seats with manual adjustments that were comfortable over the course of a day behind the wheel. Big windows provide good sight lines, except, of course, when the little sedan is surrounded by SUVs.

An 8.0-inch touch screen rises above the center stack in the middle of the dashboard. The display is clear, though Toyota’s touchscreen and voice recognition system are unintuitive and slower than the best competitors. Adding a “back” button wouldn’t hurt, either.

The USB port to connect smartphones is very difficult to find, a black opening in a stretch of black plastic near the front passenger’s left knee. It’s harder to reach than the more central USBs most competitors design and lacks a nearby spot to hold your phone.

Apple CarPlay is standard. Toyota hasn’t made Android Auto available yet.

That’s not a typo, it’s my fuel economy

The Corolla’s hybrid system seamlessly combines gasoline and electric power killing and restarting the engine smoothly at stoplights and when cruising at a steady speed. The gasoline engine is a bit noisy under strong acceleration, despite its modest output. Torque from the electric motor steps in to provide acceleration around town and comfortable cruising at highway speeds.

The Corolla hybrid’s nickel-metal hydride battery is hardly cutting-edge technology, but it does the job, despite being heavy and less energy-dense than the pricier lithium-ion batteries most modern hybrids use.

The steering is light and numb. I found the lane departure assist a bit fussy and turned it off. Nothing else about the Corolla’s road manners draws attention.

The numbers on the fuel economy readout do, though. I averaged 59 miles a gallon running errands for 90 minutes in heavily built-up suburbs.

On a crowded, fast-moving urban highway, the Corolla kept pace easily with 80-mph traffic. I dialed back to the speed limit for fuel economy’s sake when I got to open highway for a 150-mile run.

I scored 57.2 mpg over the whole day, without really trying.

More, please

The Corolla hybrid’s not a compelling car to drive, but that was true of the millions of gasoline-powered Corollas Toyota sold, too. The hybrid’s fuel efficiency and value demand attention, whether you’re concerned about melting ice caps or your monthly budget.

Anyway, Porsche has proved you can build hybrids that are fun to drive. There will be plenty more.

Contact Mark Phelan at 313-222-6731 or mmphelan@freepress.com. Follow him on Twitter @mark_phelan. Read more on autos and sign up for our autos newsletter.

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2019/09/13/review-2020-corolla-hybrid/2298248001/

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Democratic Debate: Trump the winner as Biden again proves he’s not cut out to be nominee

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085837433001_6085833650001-vs Democratic Debate: Trump the winner as Biden again proves he’s not cut out to be nominee New York Post Michael Goodwin fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article 8c53c0f2-7a58-5175-89fb-5ee2e90dc34b

And the winner is . . . Donald Trump.

The Democrats’ third presidential debate was a long-winded, platitude-filled disaster where no single candidate could claim a clear victory. Instead, the seven men and three women took turns displaying why they are all probably unelectable.

Start with Joe Biden’s incoherence. The nominal frontrunner, the former vice president had a 40-year reputation for never shutting up. Now he can’t manage to finish a sentence without interrupting himself.

Nearly all his efforts to make a point were swamped by a sudden change of direction mid-sentence, and then another change a few words later as a random thought popped into his head and out his mouth. None of his rivals needed to interrupt him–he did it to himself.

Most of the time I had no idea what he was trying to say, let alone what he actually said. I veered between feeling sorry for him and expecting the AFLAC duck to come out on stage and shake its head in bewilderment.

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I have said all along that I don’t believe Biden will be the nominee, and last night left me more certain than ever. He’s not capable of going the distance in the primaries and then taking on Trump.

Click for more from The New York Post

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085837433001_6085833650001-vs Democratic Debate: Trump the winner as Biden again proves he’s not cut out to be nominee New York Post Michael Goodwin fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article 8c53c0f2-7a58-5175-89fb-5ee2e90dc34b   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085837433001_6085833650001-vs Democratic Debate: Trump the winner as Biden again proves he’s not cut out to be nominee New York Post Michael Goodwin fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article 8c53c0f2-7a58-5175-89fb-5ee2e90dc34b

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Food-delivery service’s TV ad banned for being ‘likely to mislead’

An advertisement for a food-delivery service which shows an astronaut receiving his order on the moon, and an escaped convict getting pizza delivered after tunneling free from prison, has been banned on the grounds that it’s “likely to mislead.”

The ad, from Deliveroo, first aired on television in March, featuring a voiceover that suggested customers would be able to order “what you want, where you want, when you want.”

The ad, however, included on-screen text reading, “some restrictions apply, obviously.”

28 PERCENT OF DELIVERY DRIVERS ADMIT TO THIS TROUBLING ACT

Despite this, the Advertising Standards Authority of the United Kingdom (ASA) received 22 complaints — but not from astronauts or escaped convicts. Rather, the complaints came from U.K. residents “who understood that Deliveroo did not deliver to their areas” and considered the ad misleading.

Roofoods, the parent company of Deliveroo, argued that its on-screen message (“some restrictions apply, obviously”) should have made it clear that not all locations in the U.K. were covered, but the ASA ruled that the “absolute nature” of the ad’s claim “suggested delivery was unrestricted throughout the U.K.”

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“We considered the very clearly fantastical nature of the settings – for example, in space and a car chase – was likely to lead viewers to interpret the qualification to mean that the restrictions applied to places where it would be ridiculous to expect to be able to access the service, rather than that there were certain areas of the country that were excluded,” the ASA wrote.

As per the ASA, Deliveroo can no longer show the ad “in the form complained of,” although the ad appears to still be live on its YouTube channel. (It’s unclear if it has been modified from its original form.)

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A spokesperson for Deliveroo was not immediately available to comment, but the company did respond to the ruling in a statement shared with the BBC.

“Deliveroo designed a playful advert to show that, through our service, people are able to order food to a wide range of places, whether home or work, for a range of occasions,” the statement read. “We know some will be disappointed that their local area isn’t currently served by Deliveroo, but we are expanding rapidly across the UK.”

Westlake Legal Group DeliverooDriverIstock Food-delivery service's TV ad banned for being 'likely to mislead' Michael Bartiromo fox-news/food-drink/food/food-trends fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article a48f9418-844f-5522-87fb-2894ad558c02   Westlake Legal Group DeliverooDriverIstock Food-delivery service's TV ad banned for being 'likely to mislead' Michael Bartiromo fox-news/food-drink/food/food-trends fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article a48f9418-844f-5522-87fb-2894ad558c02

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5 Questions Answered About The 3rd Democratic Debate

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1167620826_custom-e1fbf9c52792881f4c89a006c5a2d254f404a65b-s1100-c15 5 Questions Answered About The 3rd Democratic Debate

Democratic presidential hopefuls Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Former Vice President Joe Biden shake hands as they arrive onstage. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  5 Questions Answered About The 3rd Democratic Debate

Democratic presidential hopefuls Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Former Vice President Joe Biden shake hands as they arrive onstage.

Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Heading into Thursday’s Democratic presidential debate, the third this campaign season, we had five political questions.

Here’s how they got answered:

1. What will the Biden-Warren dynamic be like?

There weren’t tremendous fireworks between the two. Former Vice President Joe Biden signaled that he’d be ready to go after Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, and he took a couple of shots at her, especially on health care. “The senator says she’s with Bernie,” Biden said, referring to Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders’ Medicare for All plan, which would replace private health insurance. “I’m with Barack.”

The health care focus was more on Sanders, which allowed Warren to skate unscathed. And that was largely the case for most of the debate. It’s safe to say if Biden and Warren continue on the current course, they won’t be able to avoid each other so easily in the near future.

2. Can Biden take the heat — again?

Well, yes. This was Biden’s best debate of this campaign. At the outset he was the crispest he has been. Biden started to slip some in the last hour, but his campaign has to hope that fewer people were watching, and the highlights had already occurred. What helped him was that the debate didn’t turn into a pile-on of Biden again because Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota decided to hug the moderate lane, seeing an opening to do so.

Remember, on health care, the July NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll found Medicare for All as a replacement to the current health care system was unpopular. As an option, however, it was far more popular. And that led to perhaps a surprising split on stage with Biden, Klobuchar and South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg on one side (against Medicare for All as a replacement) versus Sanders and Warren, and it was mostly Sanders doing the defending. After all, he “wrote the damn bill,” which he reminded the audience again.

3. Will the candidates double down on positions unpopular with general-election voters?

Not so much. Many candidates were more careful than in prior debates not to go along with positions popular with the progressive base but unpopular with the general electorate. They were also much more gushing about the tenure of former President Barack Obama. They have up to this point largely ceded the pro-Obama turf to Biden, who has been leading in the polls, a reminder of how beloved the former president is within the party.

Here were the most unpopular candidate positions in the NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll from July and what happened with them in the debate Thursday night:

–A universal basic income of $1,000 a month to stave off the effects of automation — 27% good idea, 66% bad idea

This is an idea exclusive to entrepreneur Andrew Yang. When Yang offered to hold a competition to give money to 10 contestants, there was a dismissive laugh from California Sen. Kamala Harris and a side-eyed dismissal from Buttigieg.

–Providing reparations for slavery — 27%/62%

Former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke forcefully said he was in favor of reparations, but his was the only mention of it in the debate. Previously, other candidates have essentially side-stepped the issue, mostly saying they’re in favor of commissions to study the subject.

–Decriminalizing illegal border crossings — 27%/66%

This was a flashpoint between former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julián Castro and O’Rourke in a previous debate, but it did not come up Thursday night. Castro touted that he would get a comprehensive immigration overhaul bill done in his first 100 days, and Warren noted that she wanted a “path to citizenship that is fair and achievable.” That position is much more popular – 64% said it was a good idea to provide a path to citizenship for people in the U.S. illegally.

–Health insurance for immigrants in the U.S. illegally — 33%/62%

This was another flashpoint in an earlier debate, but not Thursday. Instead, mentioned more often were Dreamers, people who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children. Giving them citizenship is a far more popular policy issue than health insurance for those in the country illegally. Warren and O’Rourke did argue for Dreamers’ relatives to also get citizenship, but it’s not clear whether that’s popular with voters.

–Abolishing the death penalty — 36%/58%

This didn’t come up Thursday night. Criminal justice reform, yes, something President Trump has pursued. The death penalty – no.

–Medicare for All as a replacement to the current health care system — 41%/54%

This was the major subject of the night. Nothing creates a debate within the Democratic Party quite like health care. That’s because it routinely ranks as the top issue for Democrats, and their candidates have given it quite a bit of thought over the years. If the individual mandate was the health care debate point of the 2008 campaign between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, Medicare for All is this year’s.

And, as noted earlier, Sanders and Warren were left on their own to defend it, mostly from Biden, Klobuchar and Buttigieg. By the way, Medicare for All as an option, rather than replacement, is far more popular – 70% of Americans think it’s a good idea.

–What about guns?

Klobuchar noted that everyone on the stage is in favor of an assault-style weapons ban. That is a remarkable thing considering just how controversial it is in public debate, but the latest NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll found a ban fairly popular overall – 57% want Congress to pass it (but only a small minority of Republicans).

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1174333697_custom-726cafa555b559de075d2d3a7d08960169742412-s1100-c15 5 Questions Answered About The 3rd Democratic Debate

Democratic presidential candidates Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts raise their hands during the debate. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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4. Do Sanders and Warren maintain their nonaggression pact?

Yes. Sanders and Warren did not go after each other, but notably Sanders was under fire from Biden and others, who used his professed democratic socialism as a foil, to paint Sanders and his policies as extreme.

That allowed Warren to use Sanders as something of a heat shield. Sanders seemed irked by it all. One wonders if Warren’s numbers continue to rise and pass Sanders by whether the détente shall hold.

5. What kind of chances do candidates needing a breakout take?

If prior debates saw candidates cautious in the kinds of chances they would take, Thursday night saw lower-polling candidates take more risks and throw more Hail Marys. Yang tried his competition stunt. Klobuchar went for broke in the moderate lane.

O’Rourke, who was in full reboot mode of his candidacy, said he is in favor of reparations for African Americans as recompense for slavery, called Trump a “white supremacist” and added, “Hell yes,” when asked whether he is going to take away assault-style weapons as president.

Castro forcefully went after Biden and took a big risk, accusing him of “forgetting” what he said earlier (four different times) — something that, to many, looked and sounded like an assault on the 76-year-old Biden’s mental acuity. Castro argued after the debate that he was right on the merits, but the approach left a sour taste for many who saw it.

New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker said flatly that Trump is a “racist” and called for an office in the White House to deal with the problem of white supremacy and hate crimes.

So will any of that work? For what it’s worth, Klobuchar and Booker seemed to deliver good performances, and O’Rourke made a mark, standing out more than in the first two debates.

There doesn’t, however, seem to be much evidence from Thursday night’s debate to suggest that the shape of the race for the Democratic presidential nomination was altered in any fundamental fashion.

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Shootout mile from Democratic debate; suspect dead, officer seriously wounded

Westlake Legal Group crime-scene-iStock Shootout mile from Democratic debate; suspect dead, officer seriously wounded fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche article 2fd446d7-5dfa-5ced-bd36-fc7904d598c3

A Houston police officer was seriously wounded Thursday after being shot multiple times by one of four suspects who allegedly stole a car at gunpoint and later beat up a priest.

The shooting occurred about a mile south of the Democratic presidential debate at Texas Southern University in Houston. One of the debate’s key topics was gun control.

Chief Art Acevedo asked for prayers for the unidentified 29-year-old officer, who he said was in guarded condition. He said one of the suspects was shot and killed in the exchange of fire, two other men were in custody and police were searching for the fourth.

Acevedo said the chaotic evening of violence began about 9:56 p.m. Thursday with the carjacking, but the vehicle soon ran out of gas and the suspects fled.

Police believe the men then assaulted a priest and stole his cell phone. The firefight took place about 15 minutes later. At least one officer, potentially two, exchanged gunfire with the armed suspect. He was shot and killed, Fox 26 reported.

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The wounded police officer is a five-year veteran on the force. KHOU11 reported that he was shot three times and the bullets hit him just below the vest. He was awake and talking while he was rushed to Memorial Hermann Hospital.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group crime-scene-iStock Shootout mile from Democratic debate; suspect dead, officer seriously wounded fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche article 2fd446d7-5dfa-5ced-bd36-fc7904d598c3   Westlake Legal Group crime-scene-iStock Shootout mile from Democratic debate; suspect dead, officer seriously wounded fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche article 2fd446d7-5dfa-5ced-bd36-fc7904d598c3

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Cory Booker sides with Julián Castro on Biden attack: You do ‘wonder’ when Biden speaks…

Westlake Legal Group 73cca370-AP19160728038906 Cory Booker sides with Julián Castro on Biden attack: You do 'wonder' when Biden speaks... Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/julian-castro fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/cory-booker fox-news/media fox news fnc/politics fnc c1c6db1d-85c3-5e93-a614-bdc1ecce7926 article

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., expressed solidarity with former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro for his controversial attack against former Vice President and 2020 frontrunner Joe Biden.

“I think we are at a tough point right now, because there’s a lot of people concerned about Joe Biden’s ability to carry the ball all the way across the end line without fumbling,” Booker said when asked about Castro’s remarks following the debate. “And I think that Castro had really legitimate concerns about can he be someone in a long grueling campaign… and has every right to call out.”

“Do you think that Biden did a better job tonight?” CNN anchor Erin Burnett asked. “Do you think that he showed that he could take the ball over the line?”

“I think there were a lot of moments where a number of us were looking on the stage when he tends to go on sometimes,” Booker responded. “At one point, he was talking about communities like mine listening to record players. I don’t remember the last time I saw a record player… But there are definitely moments where you listen to Joe Biden and you just wonder…”

BIDEN MOCKED FOR ENCOURAGING KIDS TO LISTEN TO ‘THE RECORD PLAYER’ AT DEBATE

“Senator, are you saying that he’s just too old to be president?” CNN chief political correspondent Dana Bash reacted.

“No, I’m definitely not saying that because I’ve listened to Joe Biden over the years and often felt like there were times that he is going on or meandering in his speech,” Booker said. “I want someone that can excite and energize and call us to a campaign like we saw back in ’08, in ’12 where we saw record turnouts and somebody that can speak to the fullness of the Democratic Party. If I believed Joe Biden was that person, I wouldn’t be sitting here.”

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During a fiery exchange, Castro took a shot at Biden’s memory, accusing him of contradicting himself about whether Americans would have to buy into a public health care option under his plan or if they would be automatically enrolled.

“I can’t believe that you said two minutes ago that they had to buy in, and now you’re saying they don’t have to buy in,” Castro said. “You’re forgetting that!”

Westlake Legal Group 73cca370-AP19160728038906 Cory Booker sides with Julián Castro on Biden attack: You do 'wonder' when Biden speaks... Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/julian-castro fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/cory-booker fox-news/media fox news fnc/politics fnc c1c6db1d-85c3-5e93-a614-bdc1ecce7926 article   Westlake Legal Group 73cca370-AP19160728038906 Cory Booker sides with Julián Castro on Biden attack: You do 'wonder' when Biden speaks... Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/julian-castro fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/cory-booker fox-news/media fox news fnc/politics fnc c1c6db1d-85c3-5e93-a614-bdc1ecce7926 article

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