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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 480)

Union Says G.M. Strike Will Go On Until Workers Vote on Deal

Westlake Legal Group 17motors4-facebookJumbo Union Says G.M. Strike Will Go On Until Workers Vote on Deal Wages and Salaries United Automobile Workers Temporary Employment Strikes Organized Labor General Motors Factories and Manufacturing Automobiles

DETROIT — Leaders of union locals voted Thursday to approve a tentative contract agreement with General Motors, but said a strike against the automaker would continue until workers voted to ratify the deal.

After a lengthy meeting in Detroit, the group said voting by the 49,000 members of the United Automobile Workers at G.M. plants would begin on Saturday and be completed within a week.

The walkout, now a month old, is the longest against General Motors in half a century.

According to a summary posted online by the union, the four-year deal includes wage increases and a formula for allowing temporary workers to become full-time employees. It would also keep production going at the Detroit-Hamtramck plant, which G.M. had said it would close.

The tentative agreement does not reverse plans for three plants that have been idled, including one in Lordstown, Ohio, though it provides retirement incentives for workers displaced there.

Brian Rothenberg, the union’s spokesman, said after Thursday’s meeting that the U.A.W.’s negotiating team “did everything they could” to save jobs.

“This was a strike not just by U.A.W. workers,” he said. “It became a strike for American workers and the middle class.” Workers walked off the job, he added, to secure fair wages and “a fair share of the profits.”

In the last three years, G.M. has reported earnings of $35 billion in North America. Analysts estimate the strike cost G.M. $2 billion in operating profit.

In announcing the accord on Wednesday, the U.A.W. said it had “achieved major wins.” But ratification is not a foregone conclusion. In the union’s last negotiations with G.M., in 2015, approval of a tentative agreement was delayed for a month and the terms had to be reworked.

A rejection of the proposed contract would be a rebuke for the U.A.W. president, Gary Jones, and his negotiating team.

“If the rank-and-file vote down an agreement their leaders send them, they also are voting down the leaders,” said Erik Gordon, a business professor at the University of Michigan who follows the auto industry. “Workers may ask whether it was worth being out of work a month to get a deal that could be close to what they would have gotten with no strike and no loss of pay.”

G.M. issued a statement urging the union “to move as quickly as possible through the ratification process, so we can resume operations.”

If the contract is ratified, each full-fledged U.A.W. worker will receive a signing bonus of $11,000, a 3 percent wage increase in the second and fourth years of the contract, and a 4 percent lump sum in the first and third years. Temporary workers get a signing bonus of $4,500, the same wage increases as full-time workers, and the possibility of becoming permanent employees within three years.

Under the proposed terms, all U.A.W. workers at G.M. have a path to reach the top wage of $32 an hour within four years.

The deal also eliminates a $12,000 cap on annual profit-sharing payouts, which could have a significant upside if G.M. continues to be as profitable as it has been in recent years.

Health care benefits are unchanged, with workers paying about 3 percent of the cost.

There were signs of dissent Thursday from union members outside the Renaissance Center office complex, where G.M. has its headquarters and where the union meeting took place. As the roughly 200 union officials arrived, they were greeted by about 30 workers from the Lordstown plant in red T-shirts shouting, “Vote no!”

“It’s no deal for us,” said one of the protesters, Todd Piroch, a Lordstown worker who has been transferred to a plant in Bowling Green, Ky. He said he was going to vote against the contract, but said he wasn’t sure workers elsewhere would do so. “We’re just angry,” he said.

G.M. has promised to invest $7.7 billion in its manufacturing operations in the United States over the next four years, and a further $1.3 billion in ventures with partners, saying those moves would create or preserve 9,000 jobs. But the deal includes no specific promises to expand domestic production or to move manufacturing to the United States from Mexico, both of which were goals of the union going into the negotiations.

Mr. Rothenberg, the union spokesman, said the U.A.W. would make the details of G.M.’s investment plans public soon. In previous years, the union has presented a breakdown of plant-by-plant investments.

One of the union’s main objectives was getting G.M. to reopen the car factory in Lordstown, a goal that President Trump endorsed. But there is no indication that the matter was ever on the table in the contract talks. G.M. stopped production at that plant, and others in Baltimore and in Warren, Mich., as part of a cost-cutting effort that eliminated 2,800 factory jobs and thousands of white-collar positions.

In a statement on Thursday, General Motors said it was looking into building a battery factory near Lordstown that would employ about 1,000 workers. The plant would be built with a partner and would be unionized, but under a separate contract.

An electric-truck company that hopes to purchase the Lordstown plant from G.M. would employ about 400 production workers, the automaker said.

The company has not indicated that displaced workers from its Lordstown plant would be given preference in hiring at either operation.

G.M. reaffirmed a plan announced in May to invest $700 million in three existing plants in Ohio — in Parma, Toledo and the Dayton area — with an expected net gain of 450 jobs.

“G.M. is committed to future investment and job growth in Ohio,” the company said.

If the G.M. contract is ratified, the U.A.W. will turn its focus to Ford Motor or Fiat Chrysler. Contracts with those manufacturers expired on Sept. 14, but workers continued reporting to assembly lines while the union negotiated with G.M.

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Boeing C.E.O., Already Set for House Hearing, Is Likely to Face Senate, Too

Westlake Legal Group 17boeing1-facebookJumbo Boeing C.E.O., Already Set for House Hearing, Is Likely to Face Senate, Too Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation Muilenburg, Dennis A Boeing Company Boeing 737 Max Groundings and Safety Concerns (2019) Airlines and Airplanes

The Senate Commerce Committee is completing preparations for a hearing about Boeing this month, and members expect to use it to interview the company’s chief executive, Dennis A. Muilenburg, about the crashes and grounding of the 737 Max, according to four people familiar with the matter.

Mr. Muilenburg is already scheduled to appear before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee on Oct. 30. The Senate hearing is expected to take place on Oct. 29 or after the House hearing on Oct. 30, according to the people, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the hearing was not yet confirmed.

The occasion will be the first time that Boeing executives address Congress about the two crashes, as frustration with the company mounts on Capitol Hill and throughout the aviation industry. John Hamilton, the chief engineer of Boeing’s commercial airplanes division, is also expected to testify at the House hearing, and may also appear at the Senate hearing.

The hearings come on the heels of the removal of Mr. Muilenburg’s title as chairman of the Boeing board last week. They are expected to cover everything from the design, certification and marketing of the 737 Max to what happened on the flights that crashed.

The Max has been grounded since Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crashed in March, five months after the crash of Lion Air Flight 610 in Indonesia. In both crashes, a new automated system on the Max malfunctioned, sending the planes into unrecoverable nose dives.

Last week, a multiagency task force released a damning report that faulted both Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration for their work on the plane. It argued that Boeing had not been forthcoming enough about the new system, known as MCAS, and that the F.A.A. had been unequipped to effectively review the plane.

This month, it was revealed that a Boeing engineer who worked on the Max filed an internal ethics complaint alleging that the company, in order to minimize costs, rejected a proposed safety system that he felt could have reduced the risks that contributed to the crashes.

As a result of the prolonged grounding, airlines around the world have canceled thousands of flights and lost hundreds of millions of dollars. Boeing has announced that the grounding will cost the company at least $8 billion.

Airline executives have grown increasingly frustrated with Boeing.

“The relationship at the moment is rocky,” Michael O’Leary, chief executive of Ryanair, said in an interview last week. “Our view is that Boeing has not addressed this as seriously as was warranted.”

Lawmakers on Capitol Hill have also called for Boeing to be more forthcoming with information about what led to the crashes and what it is doing to fix the Max. In an interview last month, Representative Peter A. DeFazio, a Democrat from Oregon, expressed his frustration with the company.

“We’ve got massive amounts of documents from Boeing,” he said. “But they have otherwise been not particularly cooperative.”

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Boeing C.E.O., Already Set for House Hearing, Is Likely to Face Senate, Too

Westlake Legal Group 17boeing1-facebookJumbo Boeing C.E.O., Already Set for House Hearing, Is Likely to Face Senate, Too Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation Muilenburg, Dennis A Boeing Company Boeing 737 Max Groundings and Safety Concerns (2019) Airlines and Airplanes

The Senate Commerce Committee is completing preparations for a hearing about Boeing this month, and members expect to use it to interview the company’s chief executive, Dennis A. Muilenburg, about the crashes and grounding of the 737 Max, according to four people familiar with the matter.

Mr. Muilenburg is already scheduled to appear before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee on Oct. 30. The Senate hearing is expected to take place on Oct. 29 or after the House hearing on Oct. 30, according to the people, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the hearing was not yet confirmed.

The occasion will be the first time that Boeing executives address Congress about the two crashes, as frustration with the company mounts on Capitol Hill and throughout the aviation industry. John Hamilton, the chief engineer of Boeing’s commercial airplanes division, is also expected to testify at the House hearing, and may also appear at the Senate hearing.

The hearings come on the heels of the removal of Mr. Muilenburg’s title as chairman of the Boeing board last week. They are expected to cover everything from the design, certification and marketing of the 737 Max to what happened on the flights that crashed.

The Max has been grounded since Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crashed in March, five months after the crash of Lion Air Flight 610 in Indonesia. In both crashes, a new automated system on the Max malfunctioned, sending the planes into unrecoverable nose dives.

Last week, a multiagency task force released a damning report that faulted both Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration for their work on the plane. It argued that Boeing had not been forthcoming enough about the new system, known as MCAS, and that the F.A.A. had been unequipped to effectively review the plane.

This month, it was revealed that a Boeing engineer who worked on the Max filed an internal ethics complaint alleging that the company, in order to minimize costs, rejected a proposed safety system that he felt could have reduced the risks that contributed to the crashes.

As a result of the prolonged grounding, airlines around the world have canceled thousands of flights and lost hundreds of millions of dollars. Boeing has announced that the grounding will cost the company at least $8 billion.

Airline executives have grown increasingly frustrated with Boeing.

“The relationship at the moment is rocky,” Michael O’Leary, chief executive of Ryanair, said in an interview last week. “Our view is that Boeing has not addressed this as seriously as was warranted.”

Lawmakers on Capitol Hill have also called for Boeing to be more forthcoming with information about what led to the crashes and what it is doing to fix the Max. In an interview last month, Representative Peter A. DeFazio, a Democrat from Oregon, expressed his frustration with the company.

“We’ve got massive amounts of documents from Boeing,” he said. “But they have otherwise been not particularly cooperative.”

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Mick Mulvaney walks back his admission of quid pro quo in Trump’s Ukraine call.

Hours after saying Thursday that President Donald Trump withheld foreign aid in order to get Ukraine’s help in the U.S. election, acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney walked back his remarks.

He released a lengthy statement wrongly blaming the press for putting a spin on his comments.

“Once again, the media has decided to misconstrue my comments to advance a biased and political witch hunt against President Trump,” he said. “Let me be clear, there was absolutely no quid pro quo between Ukrainian military aid and any investigation into the 2016 election.”

But the remarks Mulvaney made at a news conference earlier in the day were not vague. 

“We do that all the time with foreign policy,” Mulvaney said when ABC News reporter Jon Karl noted that it would constitute a quid pro quo if the U.S. was withholding funding from Ukraine unless it agreed to do an investigation into the Democrats’ server.

Westlake Legal Group 5da8e5eb210000a615ad3228 Mick Mulvaney walks back his admission of quid pro quo in Trump’s Ukraine call.

Leah Millis / Reuters Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney answers questions from reporters at the White House on Thursday.

“Get over it,” Mulvaney added later. “There’s going to be political influence in foreign policy. … That is going to happen. Elections have consequences.”

Mulvaney’s statement, which followed reports that the White House was shocked by his comments at the news conference, contradicts that.

“The president never told me to withhold any money until the Ukrainians did anything related to the server,” he said. “The only reasons we were holding the money was because of concern about lack of support from other nations and concerns over corruption.”

But in his earlier remarks, Mulvaney said Trump told him he was concerned about corruption related to the Democratic National Committee’s server, the key element of a debunked conspiracy theory that Trump and others close to him have pushed. The baseless claim is that the DNC server has gone missing in a cover-up and that Crowdstrike, a private cybersecurity company hired to investigate Russia’s hack of the DNC’s servers, is now framing Russia for election interference.

In reality, the DNC’s so-called “server” is actually a system of 140 individual servers, none of which are missing. 

This article has been updated with details on the news conference and the server conspiracy theory.

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Mick Mulvaney Walks Back Admission Of Quid Pro Quo In Trump’s Ukraine Call

Westlake Legal Group 5da8e5eb210000a615ad3228 Mick Mulvaney Walks Back Admission Of Quid Pro Quo In Trump’s Ukraine Call

Hours after saying Thursday that President Donald Trump withheld foreign aid in order to get Ukraine’s help in the U.S. election, acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney walked back his remarks.

He released a lengthy statement wrongly blaming the press for putting a spin on his comments.

“Once again, the media has decided to misconstrue my comments to advance a biased and political witch hunt against President Trump,” he said. “Let me be clear, there was absolutely no quid pro quo between Ukrainian military aid and any investigation into the 2016 election.”

But the remarks Mulvaney made at a news conference earlier in the day were not vague. 

“We do that all the time with foreign policy,” Mulvaney said when ABC News reporter Jon Karl noted that it would constitute a quid pro quo if the U.S. was withholding funding from Ukraine unless it agreed to do an investigation into the Democrats’ server.

“Get over it,” Mulvaney added later. “There’s going to be political influence in foreign policy. … That is going to happen. Elections have consequences.”

Mulvaney’s statement, which followed reports that the White House was shocked by his comments at the news conference, contradicts that.

“The president never told me to withhold any money until the Ukrainians did anything related to the server,” he said. “The only reasons we were holding the money was because of concern about lack of support from other nations and concerns over corruption.”

This article has been updated with details on the news conference and later remarks by Mulvaney.

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When A Celebrity Tabloid Fixture Joins Instagram

Oct. 15, 2019, will go down in the history books as the day elusive megastar Jennifer Aniston joined Instagram. Within mere moments of posting a photo with her “Friends” co-stars, Aniston’s new account crashed as millions of users tried to “follow” her. She eventually claimed the record for the account that reached 1 million Instagram followers most quickly, beating out Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s SussexRoyal channel.

After sharing that cast selfie, Aniston poked fun at her Instagram-breaking moment with a clip from her upcoming Apple TV Plus series, “The Morning Show,” in which she throws her cellphone. She captioned the post, “I swear I didn’t mean to break it… Thank you guys for the kind, glitchy welcome ❤️.” She also uploaded some content to Instagram Stories of her appearance on “The Howard Stern Show” and behind-the-scenes videos at “Jimmy Kimmel Live.”

At the time of this story’s publication, Aniston had over 12 million followers and three posts, including one for throwback Thursday

But why, pray tell, is this such a big deal for the internet? It’s that Aniston ― Hollywood’s tabloid fixture, America’s sweetheart and the self-professed “most reluctant” social media user ― decided to join the very public, highly addictive Instagram, opting to give ordinary admirers a more authentic glimpse into her life.

After evading social media for years — and being constant fodder for gossip magazines and news sites for decades — Aniston has a chance to take control of her publicly personal life. She can react to false stories about her changing body and private relationships. She can choose which bikini photo to share. She can maybe even break some “Friends” reunion news. 

Since her star-rising turn as Rachel Green on the hit ’90s sitcom, Aniston has been chewed up and spit out by the celebrity news machine. Her name has been splashed across tabloid covers and displayed front and center on every gossip website in made-up headlines like “Dumped After 21 Days,” “Shattered World” and “I’m Finally Pregnant!” Aniston has been emotionally and physically shamed and humiliated. She’s been through the stardom ringer, more so than perhaps any other public figure in the world. 

“I’m fed up with the sport-like scrutiny and body shaming that occurs daily under the guise of ‘journalism,’ the ‘First Amendment’ and ‘celebrity news,’” Aniston wrote in a passionate opinion piece for HuffPost in 2016. “I used to tell myself that tabloids were like comic books, not to be taken seriously, just a soap opera for people to follow when they need a distraction. But I really can’t tell myself that anymore because the reality is the stalking and objectification I’ve experienced first-hand, going on decades now, reflects the warped way we calculate a woman’s worth.” 

Aniston has faced enormous amounts of press attention beginning with her relationship and subsequent marriage to Brad Pitt in 2000. It only heightened following their divorce, which was surrounded by rumors involving Pitt’s “Mr. and Mrs. Smith” co-star and eventual wife, Angelina Jolie.

From there, Aniston’s every romance was documented, her every heartbreak dissected. In the last few years, she’s dealt with countless false reports about her now ex-husband Justin Theroux, her “hopes” of becoming a mother and her changing body. It all came to a head in 2018 when, after Aniston and Theroux announced their separation, she was once again linked to “Brangelina”, who also split following a decadelong relationship and six kids together. Many started rooting for an Aniston-Pitt reunion and freaked out when he was spotted at her 50th birthday party in February. The rumor mill has started churning once again; the machine is relentless. 

Now, Aniston perhaps plans to put a wrench in it.

Westlake Legal Group 5da75a862000009b0d505e42 When A Celebrity Tabloid Fixture Joins Instagram

AFP via Getty Images Jennifer Aniston greets fans as she arrives for the UK premiere of the film ‘Break Up’ in Leicester Square in London on June 14, 2006. 

When Jimmy Kimmel asked Aniston what made her finally decide to join Instagram, she suspiciously told the late-night host, “I don’t know.” HuffPost also reached out to Aniston’s rep for comment, but didn’t get a response.

Particulars aside, Hollywood’s golden girl was welcomed to the platform by fellow celebrities who are also using social media to give fans a closer look into their daily lives.

Jennifer Garner, another tabloid mainstay whose marriage to ex Ben Affleck was given an enormous amount of media attention, has used social media to propel her off-screen personality further than imagined. The very private Garner joined Instagram in September 2017 and has been surprising her followers with snippets of joy ever since. A day-to-day that was once filled with out-of-line paparazzi and exhausting battles with gossip magazines has turned into a more controlled experience as she shares videos, photos and comments of her own accord. The protective mother of three has single-handedly steered the conversation surrounding her private life in a new direction ― one focused on her own personal brand of humor rather than her famous marriage. 

Instead of being hooked by the latest salacious tabloid headline at their local grocery store, people can now relate to Garner in a new way ― and feel like they are truly a part of her tribe as she shares inspirational quotes, photos from her kitchen or videos of her dog. She even posts clips of herself praising Broadway phenomenon “Hamilton” while high on laughing gas and Novocain after a dentist visit. You can’t get that kind of unfiltered access anywhere else!

The same could be said for Will Smith, a movie star who traded a personal life away from the cameras for one more in tune with his audience. 

“In the shift into this new world, it’s almost like a friendship with the fans,” he told HuffPost in 2017. “The relationship is less like the time of Madonna, Michael Jackson, when you could make the Tom Cruise these gigantic figures, because you can’t create that anymore. The shift is to ‘we’re best friends’ … I love trying to make that shift and make that transition into the new demands of the fans in this business.”

Smith’s wife, Jada Pinkett Smith, has connected more closely with her followers as well, launching the intimate Facebook Watch show “Red Table Talk” in 2018. Pinkett Smith co-hosts the show with her mother, Adrienne Banfield-Jones, and her daughter, Willow, and created it as a way to journey “towards my healing and my need for more authenticity from within myself.” In one poignant episode, she and Will address the gossip-fueled reports of their open marriage and explain, for themselves, what it means to be in a “life partnership.”

There’s no doubt social media has stunted the circulation of tabloid magazines and websites. Tabloid culture, which was once a way to catch up on the latest celebrity gossip ― most of which is made up with help from unnamed “sources” and “insiders” ― is rapidly disintegrating. For instance, the monthly average circulation for In Touch Weekly reportedly dropped from 431,038 magazines in June 2014 to 266,441 by June 2018, according to Morning Consult. And paparazzi are certainly struggling to keep their jobs. A poll by Morning Consult and The Hollywood Reporter found that 44% of adults consider these kinds of photographers to be intrusive. 

This new age of technology has further forced a necessary shift in the celebrity news cycle. Whereas Jennifer Aniston used to be hounded by the press for comments on her baby plans or chased down during private beach vacations, she now has the agency to decide for herself what she’d like to share with the world ― if she wants to share anything at all. 

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‘He is now with the angels’: Pelosi in tears over death of Cummings at House tribute

Westlake Legal Group AP19290340865966 'He is now with the angels': Pelosi in tears over death of Cummings at House tribute Frank Miles fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox news fnc/politics fnc article 74439e2c-c9fe-5015-a1aa-18430a6ef722

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., was left in tears Thursday by the death of House Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md.

“He is now with the angels, out of pain,” Pelosi said before the House of Representatives observed a moment of silence. ” … I didn’t realize it [his death] was this close. I thought he was coming back.”

“No matter how rough and tumble things would be, he [Cummings] would calm the waters,” the Speaker added. “… Personally I’m devastated by his passing.”

ELIJAH CUMMINGS REMEMBERED BY POLITICIANS, ACTIVISTS, CELEBRITIES

Cummings’ office said in a brief statement that he died early Thursday “due to complications concerning longstanding health challenges.” Cummings had been in ill health the past few years, navigating the Capitol in a motorized cart and using a walker. He was 68.

Cummings had hoped to return to Congress within about a week after a medical procedure for which he didn’t offer details. He’d previously been treated for heart and knee issues.

“We have lost a wonderful human being … all of us in this House lost a respected colleague … it was a painful shock to all who served with him,” added House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md.

Cummings’ committee, authorized to investigate virtually any part of the federal government, is one of three conducting the House impeachment probe of Trump. Cummings was among the three chairmen to sign a letter seeking documents into whether Trump pressured Ukraine to investigate the family of Democratic presidential rival Joe Biden, the former vice president. The committees have issued subpoenas of witnesses after the Trump administration’s refusal to cooperate with the impeachment probe and have jointly been meeting behind closed doors to hear testimony.

Separately, Cummings led an effort to gain access to Trump’s financial records. His committee subpoenaed records from Mazars USA, an accounting firm that provided services to Trump. The panel demanded documents from 2011 to 2018 as it probed Trump’s reporting of his finances and potential conflicts of interest. Last week, a federal appeals court ruled the records must be turned over.

Cummings was born on Jan. 18, 1951. In grade school, a counselor told Cummings he was too slow to learn and spoke poorly, and he would never fulfill his dream of becoming a lawyer.

“I was devastated,” Cummings told The Associated Press in 1996, shortly before he won his seat in Congress. “My whole life changed. I became very determined.”

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Hoyer also called Cummings “a prophet of God” who “was true to his name.”

“A moment of silence is not enough to honor the life of Eljiah Cummings,” the Majority Leader said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19290340865966 'He is now with the angels': Pelosi in tears over death of Cummings at House tribute Frank Miles fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox news fnc/politics fnc article 74439e2c-c9fe-5015-a1aa-18430a6ef722   Westlake Legal Group AP19290340865966 'He is now with the angels': Pelosi in tears over death of Cummings at House tribute Frank Miles fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox news fnc/politics fnc article 74439e2c-c9fe-5015-a1aa-18430a6ef722

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Sam Adams’ newest beer is illegal in 15 states

This beer isn’t just scary levels of alcoholic, it’s actually illegal in several states.

Samuel Adams is bringing its Utopias beer back just in time for Halloween, but not everyone will be able to find the brew. Due to the drink’s high level of alcohol, it’s actually illegal in 15 states.

Westlake Legal Group Sam-Adams-Utopias Sam Adams' newest beer is illegal in 15 states Michael Hollan fox-news/food-drink/drinks/beer fox news fnc/food-drink fnc b46176f9-eb82-5453-a4dc-74c774d768d4 article

Sam Adams’ Utopias beer reportedly has an ABV of 28 percent, much higher than the average beer. (Samuel Adams)

Utopias is described as a “barrel-aged extreme beer” and has a multiyear-long brewing process, Forbes reports. The 2019 brew is a blend of Sam Adams’ earlier extreme beers, which have reportedly been aged in wooden bourbon casks.

According to Forbes, Sam Adams’ only brewed 77 wooden casks of Utopias, which the outlet describes as having “distinct vanilla notes and subtle nutty and elegant dark fruit aromas.” The beer also claims to have an ABV (alcohol by volume) of 28 percent, significantly higher than the average beer (which is usually lower than 10 percent).

OKTOBERFEST VISITORS TRIED TO STEAL NEARLY 100K BEER STEINS

A spokesperson for Samuel Adams confirmed to Fox News that due to its high level of alcohol, this already hard-to-find beer is illegal in 15 states. This includes Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont and West Virginia.

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Of course, this isn’t the first beer to face legal limitations.

In mid-August, a Utah based brewery lost an appeal against a ruling that banned its polygamy-themed beer in North Carolina. Wasatch Brewery hoped to bring Polygamy Porter to stores in the state, but were unable to convince the North Carolina Alcohol Beverage Control Commission to allow it.

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Apparently, the state decided that the beer promoted polygamy, which is illegal.

Westlake Legal Group Utopias_Barrel Sam Adams' newest beer is illegal in 15 states Michael Hollan fox-news/food-drink/drinks/beer fox news fnc/food-drink fnc b46176f9-eb82-5453-a4dc-74c774d768d4 article   Westlake Legal Group Utopias_Barrel Sam Adams' newest beer is illegal in 15 states Michael Hollan fox-news/food-drink/drinks/beer fox news fnc/food-drink fnc b46176f9-eb82-5453-a4dc-74c774d768d4 article

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Top Democrat says Trump was ‘not in a good mood’ before Pelosi White House walkout

Westlake Legal Group a9f970ba-Smith-Trump-Pelosi Top Democrat says Trump was 'not in a good mood' before Pelosi White House walkout fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/us-regions/west/washington fox-news/shows/your-world fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 7a6fd198-76dd-5368-8a88-ad4fba39d1a0

House Armed Services Committee Chairman Adam Smith, D-Wash., told Fox News Thursday that President Trump’s mood soured a White House meeting on Syria that was capped by a walkout from three top congressional Democrats.

Smith told “Your World” host Neil Cavuto that Trump often speaks in a “disrespectful” way and that he was not surprised by the president’s purported demeanor.

“He was not in a good mood when he came into the room, that was obvious,” Smith said of the meeting, during which House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., walked out.

“Basically, the president said, ‘well, you guys asked for this meeting — I don’t know why we’re here — I don’t know what this meeting’s about, but you asked for it, so what do you want?’.”

Smith claimed the meeting “went downhill from there,” leading to some terse verbal exchanges.

KEVIN MCCARTHY: TOP DEMOCRATS WHO WALKED OUT OF WHITE HOUSE MEETING JUST ‘INFATUATED’ WITH IMPEACHMENT

“The biggest part of this is sort of the way the president talks to people,” he continued. “A lot of people have asked me if I was surprised — No, this is the way the president communicates and I don’t think it is helpful.”

However, Smith added many people from both parties who were present at the meeting were very interested in discussing “substantive issues.”

“We had this meeting because this is a very serious issue, in terms of what’s going on in Syria with the Kurds and Turkey and everybody,” he said, rejecting the notion the walkout was pre-planned.

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“This president has his way of talking — I completely support the speaker.”

Smith also described what precipitated the walkout by the Democrats, claiming Trump became upset when Schumer spoke about the Syria issue.

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“Chuck Schumer got into the issue of Syria and was somewhat accusatory of the president for abandoning the Kurds,” he said, adding Pelosi appeared to “second” the New York Democrat’s comments.

“That did upset the president,” he continued. “As far as the insults, it was definitely coming from the president.”

Smith also rejected House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s, R-Calif., recollection of events, saying “this president is disrespectful, it is how he operates 24/7.”

Westlake Legal Group a9f970ba-Smith-Trump-Pelosi Top Democrat says Trump was 'not in a good mood' before Pelosi White House walkout fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/us-regions/west/washington fox-news/shows/your-world fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 7a6fd198-76dd-5368-8a88-ad4fba39d1a0   Westlake Legal Group a9f970ba-Smith-Trump-Pelosi Top Democrat says Trump was 'not in a good mood' before Pelosi White House walkout fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/us-regions/west/washington fox-news/shows/your-world fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 7a6fd198-76dd-5368-8a88-ad4fba39d1a0

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Top Navy SEAL who oversaw the Osama bin Laden raid says the US is ‘under attack from the president’

Westlake Legal Group AIr_1v7kzVxKDuVz0EsLdPc8d0nbfUKJ7FjpWYEJgLI Top Navy SEAL who oversaw the Osama bin Laden raid says the US is 'under attack from the president' r/politics

Trump did not redefine what constitutes a Patriot.

Trump defines what constitutes an Unpatriot.

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His GOP enablers frequently behave unpatriotic, as do his media cheerleaders, while superficially pretending the opposite.

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Edit:

Unfortunately, the erosion of broadcasting standards, coupled with the effects of regulatory capture, has resulted in an increasingly monotonous media diet, heavy on misinformation and misdirection, which has successfully brainwashed a sizeable portion of the populace.

People by and large, (severely) overestimate their own ability to remain objective, and tend to treat an experienced emotion as a justification, rather than as a symptom highlighting a need to investigate its root cause.

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