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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 490)

For Trump the Dealmaker, Troop Pullouts Without Much in Return

Westlake Legal Group merlin_161567295_14c45ea0-0b76-4e8f-bb7b-1a6b2bc86d93-facebookJumbo For Trump the Dealmaker, Troop Pullouts Without Much in Return United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces Turkey Trump, Donald J Syria South Korea North Korea Kurds Afghanistan War (2001- ) Afghanistan

WASHINGTON — The Taliban have wanted the United States to pull troops out of Afghanistan, Turkey has wanted the Americans out of northern Syria and North Korea has wanted them to at least stop military exercises with South Korea.

President Trump has now to some extent at least obliged all three — but without getting much of anything in return. The self-styled dealmaker has given up the leverage of the United States’ military presence in multiple places around the world without negotiating concessions from those cheering for American forces to leave.

For a president who has repeatedly promised to end the “endless wars,” the decisions reflect a broader conviction that bringing troops home — or at least moving them out of hot spots — is more important than haggling for advantage. In his view, decades of overseas military adventurism has only cost the country enormous blood and treasure, and waiting for deals would prolong a national disaster.

But veteran diplomats, foreign policy experts and key lawmakers fear that Mr. Trump is squandering American power and influence in the world with little to show for it. By pulling troops out unilaterally, they argue, Mr. Trump has emboldened America’s enemies and distressed its allies. Friends like Israel, they note, worry about American staying power. Foes like North Korea and the Taliban learn that they can achieve their goals without having to pay a price.

“It’s hard for me to divine any real strategic logic to the president’s moves,” said John P. Hannah, a senior counselor at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies and a former national security adviser to Vice President Dick Cheney. “The only real connective tissue I see is the almost preternatural isolationist impulse that he invariably seems to revert to when left to his own devices internationally — even to the point that it overrides his supposed deal making instincts.”

Reuben E. Brigety II, a former Navy officer and ambassador to the African Union under President Barack Obama who now serves as dean of the Elliott School for International Affairs at George Washington University, said just as worrisome as the decisions themselves was the seemingly capricious way they were made.

Mr. Trump, he said, often seems more interested in pleasing autocrats like Kim Jong-un of North Korea and President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey than in organizing any kind of coherent policymaking process to consider the pros and cons.

“When he canceled the South Korea military exercises, the only person he consulted was Kim Jong-un,” Mr. Brigety said. “The decision to abandon the Kurds came after a brief phone call with Erdogan. So they weren’t taken because he had personally reflected on the strategic disposition of American forces around the world. They were taken after he took the counsel of strongmen over that of his own advisers.”

All the complaints from the career national security establishment, however, carry little weight with Mr. Trump, who dismisses his critics as the same ones who got the country into a catastrophic war in Iraq. While that may not be true in all cases, Mr. Trump makes the case that 18 years after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, it is time to pull out even without extracting trade-offs in return.

“When I watch these pundits that always are trying to take a shot, I say — they say, ‘What are we getting out of it?’” Mr. Trump told reporters on Monday as he hosted a cabinet meeting. “You know what we’re getting out of it? We’re bringing our soldiers back home. That’s a big thing. And it’s going to probably work. But if it doesn’t work, you’re going to have people fighting like they’ve been fighting for 300 years. It’s very simple. It’s really very simple.”

The United States has about 200,000 troops stationed around the world, roughly half of them in relatively less dangerous posts in Europe or Asia where American forces have maintained a presence since the end of World War II. Tens of thousands of others are deployed in the Middle East, although only a fraction of them are in the active war zones of Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria.

It took only a few dozen Special Forces operators near the border in northern Syria to deter Turkey from assaulting America’s Kurdish allies there, but soon after Mr. Trump talked with Mr. Erdogan on Oct. 6, the president announced on a Sunday night that they would be pulled back. Turkey then launched a ferocious attack on the Kurds, and by the time a convoy of American troops moved away over the weekend, they were shown in a widely circulated video being pelted by angry Kurds throwing potatoes to express their sense of betrayal.

Mr. Trump did not ask Mr. Erdogan for anything in exchange. Instead, the diplomacy came only after the Turkish incursion began when he sent Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to Ankara to broker a cease-fire to give the Kurds time to evacuate a new safe zone to be controlled by Turkey along the Syrian border. Mr. Erdogan essentially got what he wanted.

In Afghanistan, Mr. Trump’s special envoy spent months negotiating a peace agreement with the Taliban militia that would provide guarantees that the country would not be used as a base for terrorist attacks against the United States if it reduced its troop presence to around 8,600. The talks fell apart, but Mr. Trump is drawing down American forces anyway, pulling out 2,000 troops in the last year, leaving 12,000 to 13,000. Plans are to keep shrinking the force to around 8,600 anyway.

In Asia, Mr. Trump voluntarily canceled traditional large-scale joint military exercises with South Korea at the behest of Mr. Kim even though the two have yet to reach any kind of concrete agreement in which North Korea would give up its nuclear weapons. The decision frustrated not only allies like South Korea and Japan but senior American diplomats and military officers, who privately questioned why North Korea should be given one of its key demands without having to surrender anything itself.

“Trump is a win-lose negotiator,” said Wendy R. Sherman, a former under secretary of state under Mr. Obama who helped broker the 2015 nuclear agreement with Iran that Mr. Trump abandoned last year. “That’s what he did as a real estate developer. He doesn’t see the larger landscape, the interconnections, the larger costs, the loss of greater benefits.”

When he has sat down at the negotiating table, Mr. Trump’s record on the world stage has been mixed or incomplete. He has sealed an accord to update to the North American Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada, revised a free-trade agreement with South Korea and reached a limited trade pact with Japan.

But in addition to the collapse of the Afghan talks, he has gotten nowhere in nuclear negotiations with North Korea, made no progress in a long, drawn-out Israeli-Palestinian peace initiative, has yet to even reach the table with Iran despite his stated desire and remains locked in a high-stakes, big-dollar negotiation with China over tariffs.

For Mr. Trump, though, the desire to “end the endless wars,” as he puts it, may override his instinct for deal-making. He talks repeatedly about the misery of families whose loved ones have been killed in the Middle East or elsewhere, and he seems to put decisions about deployments in a different category than trade deals or other negotiations. Getting them out of harm’s way is an end to itself.

“We’re going to bring our soldiers back home,” Mr. Trump said on Monday. “So far, there hasn’t been one drop of blood shed during this whole period by an American soldier. Nobody was killed. Nobody cut their finger. There’s been nothing. And they’re leaving rather, I think, not expeditiously — rather intelligently.”

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Apple’s Tim Cook to serve as chairman at Chinese business school amid Hong Kong protests

Apple CEO Tim Cook has been appointed chairman of the advisory board for Tsinghua University’s economics school in Beijing, according to the South China Morning Post and a Chinese-language meeting summary noted by Apple Insider.

Cook will apparently assume the role for a three year term, and recently served as chairman for a meeting, the South China Morning Post reports.

As the Post reports, Chinese government officials have served on the board. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has also served on the board in the past, the newspaper notes.

Still, the news comes at a time of widespread unrest in Hong Kong, as hundreds of thousands of protesters have taken to the streets to demand political rights and police accountability.

SALESFORCE CEO SAYS FACEBOOK MUST BE BROKEN UP: ‘THEY’RE AFTER YOUR KIDS’

Westlake Legal Group tim-cook-getty-images Apple's Tim Cook to serve as chairman at Chinese business school amid Hong Kong protests fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/person/tim-cook fox news fnc/tech fnc efd00024-d516-53aa-a41a-a0e2f8c8617b Christopher Carbone article

Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple Inc., is seen above. (Bloomberg via Getty Images)

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Apple faced a bipartisan uproar recently when it took down a crowdsourced map of Hong Kong police presense from the App Store — that had been used by pro-democracy protesters — after the company was criticized in Chinese state media.

On Friday, a group of lawmakers that included Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Tex., sent a letter to Cook to express their “strong concern” about Apple’s “censorship of apps.”

“We urge you in the strongest terms to reverse course,” the lawmakers wrote in the letter, “to demonstrate that Apple puts values above market access, and to stand with the brave men and women fighting for basic rights and dignity in Hong Kong.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19293484465428 Apple's Tim Cook to serve as chairman at Chinese business school amid Hong Kong protests fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/person/tim-cook fox news fnc/tech fnc efd00024-d516-53aa-a41a-a0e2f8c8617b Christopher Carbone article

Protesters set fire to a Xiaomi shop at Nathan road in Hong Kong, Sunday, Oct. 20, 2019. Hong Kong protesters again flooded streets on Sunday, ignoring a police ban on the rally and setting up barricades amid tear gas and firebombs. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

Cook, who reportedly met with Chinese regulators late last week, defended pulling the app in a letter to employees, writing: “Over the past several days we received credible information, from the Hong Kong Cybersecurity and Technology Crime Bureau, as well as from users in Hong Kong, that the app was being used maliciously to target individual officers for violence and to victimize individuals and property where no police are present.”

Fox News’ Chris Ciaccia contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group tim-cook-getty-images Apple's Tim Cook to serve as chairman at Chinese business school amid Hong Kong protests fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/person/tim-cook fox news fnc/tech fnc efd00024-d516-53aa-a41a-a0e2f8c8617b Christopher Carbone article   Westlake Legal Group tim-cook-getty-images Apple's Tim Cook to serve as chairman at Chinese business school amid Hong Kong protests fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/person/tim-cook fox news fnc/tech fnc efd00024-d516-53aa-a41a-a0e2f8c8617b Christopher Carbone article

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All US armored vehicles evacuating northeast Syria have arrived in Iraq, defense official says

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096573104001_6096578600001-vs All US armored vehicles evacuating northeast Syria have arrived in Iraq, defense official says Lucas Tomlinson Frank Miles fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox news fnc/world fnc article a1d7e256-4a42-5113-bad5-fe5500da7c3d

All roughly 100 U.S. armored vehicles evacuating northeast Syria in a convoy have arrived in Iraq, a U.S. defense official tells Fox News.

Earlier today in Afghanistan, Defense Secretary Mark Esper said some U.S. troops will stay behind, and “remain in the towns that are located near the oil fields” in northeast Syria to protect them from ISIS, Syrian regime or Iranian forces.

Esper said the plan to guard the oil still needed President Trump’s approval.

A few hundred other U.S. troops will remain in southern Syria at a garrison near the border with Jordan, the president said last week in a statement.

“Our forces will remain in the towns that are located near the oil fields. The purpose of those forces, a purpose of those forces working with SDF, is to deny access to those oil fields by ISIS and others who may benefit from revenues that can be earned. I’ve made no decision with regard to various options. Those are things we would have to be presented to the president in due course,” Esper said earlier in the day.

US TROOPS LEAVING SYRIA FOR IRAQ IN ‘WEEKS NOT DAYS’, ESPER SAYS

The U.S. military convoy left over the weekend for the Iraqi border. They were met by Kurdish protesters in some cases pelting the trucks with rocks and tomatoes – anger over what they call a betrayal by Trump to leave them to be slaughtered by Turkish forces and mercenaries. Despite Trump saying he wanted to bring the forces home, Esper says the bulk of the roughly 700 U.S. troops in northeast Syria would be going to Western Iraq, not returning home to the U.S. Hundreds of other U.S. troops will remain in southern Syria.

Sunday, the top Kurdish general of the Syrian Democratic Forces, the main U.S. ally against ISIS in Syria told our colleague Jennifer Griffin in a phone interview from Syria that Turkey has violated the ceasefire negotiated by Vice President Mike Pence and Turkey’s president last week. More than 500 Kurdish civilians have been killed, and more than 400,000 displaced.

Gen. Mazloum Abdi said Turkey had tricked the U.S. by pulling back its troops from the border and having Kurdish forces destroy their bases before pulling back, as well. The joint U.S.-Turkish patrols near the border earlier this month gave valuable intelligence to Turkey to spy on Kurdish positions ahead of the invasion, Mazloum said.

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The oil fields have been the scene of fierce fighting. In February 2018 U.S. Special Operations soldiers and Kurdish forces came under attack, by a group of Russian mercenaries. U.S. apache gunships, fighter jets and bombers were called in to kill hundreds of the Russian and pro-Assad forces.

Trump hinted over the weekend about the plan by tweeting that US troops had “secured the Oil.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096573104001_6096578600001-vs All US armored vehicles evacuating northeast Syria have arrived in Iraq, defense official says Lucas Tomlinson Frank Miles fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox news fnc/world fnc article a1d7e256-4a42-5113-bad5-fe5500da7c3d   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096573104001_6096578600001-vs All US armored vehicles evacuating northeast Syria have arrived in Iraq, defense official says Lucas Tomlinson Frank Miles fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox news fnc/world fnc article a1d7e256-4a42-5113-bad5-fe5500da7c3d

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Andrew Yang rules out third-party or independent run if he’s not the Democratic nominee

Westlake Legal Group VmHZcoi38GDyarUbSdRA2fv059_Oik5rfswtAl8QLsg Andrew Yang rules out third-party or independent run if he’s not the Democratic nominee r/politics

“Hate” is not the word I’d use. I don’t trust him. He’s a businessman, he has no political experience, and it’s a struggle to find examples of him living his current, touted philosophy.

In a world where political deception is the norm, he presents a risk. This is of further concern when acknowledging that his message appeals to alt right in a weird way. I’m immediately skeptical of anyone who appeals to the alt-right because there are basically no issues for which I agree with them.

Lastly, I’m wary of a UBI. I believe we’re right to discuss it, and I’d love to see it studied rigorously before we apply such a thing. A UBI that replaces existing social safety nets is cause for concern, as it shifts the power of UBI in a regressive direction for many poor people who will see less of a benefit (relative to current safety nets) than the middle class who need it less. In such a scenario, I’d rather see a scaled basic income dependent on existing income.

Of course, it would be right to criticize a plan like mine on the merit that universality is much cheaper to implement since there’s no means testing, which is historically problematic. However, it feels like wasteful overkill to piss money on millions of people who genuinely don’t need it rather than seeing it go to infrastructure, the poor, healthcare, etc. All while deleting existing social safety nets, and you’ve got what I would call a dubious plan.

Not to say he’s wrong, evil, or has ulterior motives. Just that I don’t trust him as much as I would want to trust a candidate. So I’ll stick with Bernie who I could set a watch to as far as consistency and predictability goes. I trust him, and it’s not hard to. I’ll stick with Warren, whose actions in the senate have created a predictable trajectory, even if it’s shorter than Bernie’s.

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Andrew Yang rules out third-party or independent run if he’s not the Democratic nominee

Westlake Legal Group VmHZcoi38GDyarUbSdRA2fv059_Oik5rfswtAl8QLsg Andrew Yang rules out third-party or independent run if he’s not the Democratic nominee r/politics

“Hate” is not the word I’d use. I don’t trust him. He’s a businessman, he has no political experience, and it’s a struggle to find examples of him living his current, touted philosophy.

In a world where political deception is the norm, he presents a risk. This is of further concern when acknowledging that his message appeals to alt right in a weird way. I’m immediately skeptical of anyone who appeals to the alt-right because there are basically no issues for which I agree with them.

Lastly, I’m wary of a UBI. I believe we’re right to discuss it, and I’d love to see it studied rigorously before we apply such a thing. A UBI that replaces existing social safety nets is cause for concern, as it shifts the power of UBI in a regressive direction for many poor people who will see less of a benefit (relative to current safety nets) than the middle class who need it less. In such a scenario, I’d rather see a scaled basic income dependent on existing income.

Of course, it would be right to criticize a plan like mine on the merit that universality is much cheaper to implement since there’s no means testing, which is historically problematic. However, it feels like wasteful overkill to piss money on millions of people who genuinely don’t need it rather than seeing it go to infrastructure, the poor, healthcare, etc. All while deleting existing social safety nets, and you’ve got what I would call a dubious plan.

Not to say he’s wrong, evil, or has ulterior motives. Just that I don’t trust him as much as I would want to trust a candidate. So I’ll stick with Bernie who I could set a watch to as far as consistency and predictability goes. I trust him, and it’s not hard to. I’ll stick with Warren, whose actions in the senate have created a predictable trajectory, even if it’s shorter than Bernie’s.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

House Democrats reject resolution to censure Schiff over his handling of impeachment inquiry

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close House Democrats reject resolution to censure Schiff over his handling of impeachment inquiry

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff says that “things have just gone from very, very bad to much, much worse” with the White House’s acknowledgment that it held up military aid to Ukraine. (Oct. 17) AP, AP

WASHINGTON – House Republicans tried to force a floor vote Monday on a resolution to censure House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff over his handling of the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. But Democrats tabled it, essentially killing the resolution.

In a 218-185 vote, the resolution was tabled along party lines.

The resolution said they dissaprove of Schiff’s “conduct that misleads the American people in a way that is not befitting an elected Member of the House of Representatives.”

The GOP has bemoaned Schiff’s handling of the impeachment inquiry into Trump.

They have accused him of portraying a “false retelling” of the July 25 phone call between Trump and Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky after Schiff paraphrased the call rather than quoting the summary during opening remarks at a recent House Intelligence Committee hearing.

Schiff defended his remarks, insisting they were intended as “parody,” and that critics should have recognized that.  

The GOP has also taken issue with Schiff saying his committee did not have any contact with the whistleblower at the center of the inquiry prior to the submission of the complaint when it later emerged that the whistleblower had contacted a House Intelligence Committee aide.

Three House committees – Foreign Affairs, Intelligence and Oversight and Reform – have been meeting privately for weeks with current and former administration officials to gather information about how Trump urged Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden, a political rival. Republicans have argued that the meetings should be public and transcripts should be released. 

Schiff has said the transcripts of the closed-door depositions will eventually be public.

More: ‘Crazy’ and a ‘hand grenade’: Here’s how House impeachment witnesses describe elements of Trump’s Ukraine policy

Schiff tweeted shortly after the vote that when Republicans “lacked the courage to confront the most dangerous and unethical president in American history, They consoled themselves by attacking those who did.”

The resolution Republicans introduced was privileged, meaning they were able to fast track the measure to a full chamber vote instead of going through committees. Democrats, who hold a majority in the chamber, had been expected to vote to table it on party lines.

The resolution stated that “members of the Intelligence Committee have lost faith in his objectivity and capabilities as Chairman.”

The measure was introduced last week by Arizona Republican Rep. Andy Biggs, who chairs the conservative House Freedom Caucus. The vote to consider the resolution was delayed following the death of Rep. Elijah Cummings, out of respect.

Biggs said in a statement that Schiff’s “calculated words and actions over the past two years have brought this body into disrepute, and he must be held accountable.”

Trump tweeted his support for the resolution Monday prior to the vote, “Censure (at least) Corrupt Adam Schiff! After what he got caught doing, any pol who does not so vote cannot be honest….are you listening Dems?”

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a statement following the vote that “What the Republicans fear most is the truth. The President betrayed the oath of office, our national security and the integrity of our elections, and the GOP has not even tried to deny the facts. Instead, Republicans stage confusion, undermine the Constitution and attack the person of whom the President is most afraid.”

“The American people want the truth. The House will proceed with our impeachment inquiry to find the facts and expose the truth, guided by our Constitution and the facts.  This is about patriotism, not politics or partisanship,” she continued. 

Independent congressman Justin Amash, who recently left the Republican party and supports impeaching the President, voted with Democrats. 

A censure vote is designed to allow Congress to publicly condemn a member’s behavior. 

Contributing: Christal Hayes, Bart Jansen, Nicholas Wu, Deirdre Shesgreen

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/10/21/house-democrats-reject-resolution-censure-schiff-over-inquiry-handling/4058638002/

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Daniel Krauthammer talks about how his late father would view politics today

Westlake Legal Group krauthammer-book Daniel Krauthammer talks about how his late father would view politics today fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/washington-dc fox-news/sports/mlb/washington-nationals fox-news/shows/special-report fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz b1768df0-a036-58d9-831d-ad9870ae182f article

Daniel Krauthammer, son of the a longtime Fox News contributor Charles Krauthammer, spoke to Bret Baier about the paperback release of his father’s book and the state of American politics.

Krauthammer said Monday on “Special Report” hundreds of people have spoken to him as he traveled from city to city to promote “The Point of It All: A Lifetime of Great Loves and Endeavors,” and have asked him what his father would think of the current political environment.

“After the hardcover edition came out last winter, I traveled around the country… to promote it and talk to admires of my father, people who read him and watched him on TV,” he said.

“It was really moving and touching for me to realize how much of an impact he had on so many people.”

DANIEL KRAUTHAMMER: IN SEARCH OF CIVILITY — IN OUR POLITICS NOW, WE ARE INCREASINGLY TALKING PAST EACH OTHER

Krauthammer said people have told him they feel “lost” without his father, who died in 2018 at the age of 68 after a battle with cancer.

He said his father would always go to the core of a political issue and opine without regard to a particular party or ideology, but through a few basic principles.

His father, he said, strived to be truthful, without “pulling punches,” or “shaping his opinions just to please someone or please public opinion.”

To that extent, Baier noted then-candidate Donald Trump had an up-and-down relationship with the elder Krauthammer.

In June 2017, Trump called the late columnist “highly overrated pundit.”

TRUMP SAYS PELOSI SHOULD INVESTIGATE OBAMA’S SYRIA RED LINE

“As far as Charles Krauthammer, I’m not a fan of his,” Trump told Fox & Friends at the time.

However, in another interview with Baier, he thanked Krauthammer for putting ‘money’ on him during “Special Report’s” Candidate Casino.

“I saw that — I couldn’t believe it. Thank you Charles, I’m going to make you look good, Charles,” Trump said.

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In response, Daniel Krauthammer told Baier those two exchanges validated the way his father viewed politics and politicians.

“My father really — as he said many times — his job was to call a folly a folly, and it didn’t matter which side that was on,” he said.

AOC ENDORSING BERNIE SANDERS IS ‘NOT A GAME CHANGER,’ JUAN WILLIAMS SAYS

“And he certainly called out President Trump many times for those follies… but he also saw overreactions on the other side.

“He separated out what was real policy difference that’s valid and should be met that way, and things that really were beyond the pale and really should be criticized.”

Krauthammer remarked Trump’s responses in those interviews also showed people, “never knew where my dad was going to land on a certain issue.”

He added his father would likely continue that practice in the present, shying away from attacking politicians’ character and instead trying to have a debate on the issues.

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“Trying to persuade, not to overpower — to meet people where they began with their assumptions,” he said.

In addition, one final thing his father would most definitely have a word on, his son said, was another recent development in Washington.

Last week, Charles Krauthammer’s beloved Nationals baseball team completed a four-game sweep of the St. Louis Cardinals — advancing to the World Series.

“I know he would be happy as a ten-year-old boy,” Daniel Krauthammer remarked.

Westlake Legal Group krauthammer-book Daniel Krauthammer talks about how his late father would view politics today fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/washington-dc fox-news/sports/mlb/washington-nationals fox-news/shows/special-report fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz b1768df0-a036-58d9-831d-ad9870ae182f article   Westlake Legal Group krauthammer-book Daniel Krauthammer talks about how his late father would view politics today fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/washington-dc fox-news/sports/mlb/washington-nationals fox-news/shows/special-report fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz b1768df0-a036-58d9-831d-ad9870ae182f article

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Former Kentucky GOP candidate for governor endorses Democrat against Republican incumbent

A former Republican candidate for Kentucky governor has endorsed incumbent Gov. Matt Bevin‘s Democratic rival.

William Woods announced his endorsement of Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear in a video posted Monday to Twitter.

“This election isn’t about politics to me, It’s about doing the right thing,” Woods said. “I’m ready for a governor who will respect all of us, regardless of political affiliation.”

Woods finished a distant third in May’s gubernatorial primary with just over 14,000 votes, compared to 136,000 votes for Bevin.

In his message, Woods cited Beshear’s support for public schools and law enforcement. The reference to schools refers to last year’s tensions between teachers and state Republican lawmakers over several education bills.

At one point, teachers across the state called in sick in protest against changes to the management of their pension system, forcing some school districts to close several times.

Westlake Legal Group AP19289009821800 Former Kentucky GOP candidate for governor endorses Democrat against Republican incumbent Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/kentucky fox news fnc/politics fnc article 9b8dbd97-dd98-5934-ba73-51ac8c154502

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin, left, and Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear participate in a debate at the Singletary Center for the Arts on the University of Kentucky campus in Lexington, Ky., on Oct. 15. (Ryan C. Hermens/Lexington Herald-Leader via AP, Pool)

Bevin criticized the “sickouts” and state educators, saying they left “students in the lurch.”

In a statement to Fox News, Bevin’s campaign manager, Davis Paine, said the governor is “proud to have the support of real Kentucky leaders on both sides of the aisle, Republicans and Democrats.”

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“It’s not news that Andy Beshear has earned the support of an unknown anti-Trump liberal,” Paine added.

President Trump has thrown his support to Bevin and plans to hold a rally on Nov. 4  —  the day before the election — at Rupp Arena in Lexington.

Westlake Legal Group AP19289009821800 Former Kentucky GOP candidate for governor endorses Democrat against Republican incumbent Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/kentucky fox news fnc/politics fnc article 9b8dbd97-dd98-5934-ba73-51ac8c154502   Westlake Legal Group AP19289009821800 Former Kentucky GOP candidate for governor endorses Democrat against Republican incumbent Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/kentucky fox news fnc/politics fnc article 9b8dbd97-dd98-5934-ba73-51ac8c154502

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Boeing’s Crisis Grows: Tense Meetings, Falling Stock, Angry Lawmakers

Westlake Legal Group 21boeing-1-facebookJumbo Boeing’s Crisis Grows: Tense Meetings, Falling Stock, Angry Lawmakers Muilenburg, Dennis A Boeing Company Boeing 737 Max Groundings and Safety Concerns (2019)

When Boeing’s board gathered on Monday, it confronted a grim reality. The crash of two 737 Max jets had already thrown the company into the biggest crisis in its 103-year history, and things only seemed to be getting worse.

During tense meetings at the Boeing facilities in San Antonio, where the company makes Air Force One, executives and directors spent more than five hours discussing how to manage a worrisome cascade of bad news in recent weeks.

It was revealed on Friday that before the Max was certified, a pilot who played a central role in the plane’s development had voiced concerns about an automated system that played a part in both crashes. The revelation undermined an essential part of Boeing’s defense, opened the company to more legal exposure and sent the stock price plummeting as Wall Street grew more concerned about when the plane would get back in the air.

Some at Boeing have expressed concern that the messages may have further complicated efforts to return the Max to service, according to three people familiar with the matter, who requested anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly.

The Max remains grounded seven months after the second of the two crashes, which killed 346 people. Boeing has said that any delays beyond this year could lead it to temporarily halt production of the plane, which would have enormous economic and financial consequences for the company, its employees and its suppliers.

Boeing will report its latest quarterly financial results on Wednesday, and analysts expect the Max crisis to continue to batter the company’s sales and profits. Amid all this, Dennis A. Muilenburg, the company’s chief executive, is preparing to testify before Congress next week.

The messages from the pilot, Mark Forkner, were revealed just a week after Boeing stripped Mr. Muilenburg of his additional title of chairman. That move followed a damning report from a multiagency task force that arrived at scathing conclusions about Boeing, the Federal Aviation Administration and the certification of the Max.

Removing Mr. Muilenburg as chairman was the first sign that the Boeing board was working with more urgency, and beginning to address the question of who, if anyone, would be held accountable for the crisis consuming the company.

Boeing has tried to minimize the fallout from Mr. Forkner’s messages. On Sunday, the company said in a statement that it understood the concern about the messages. “We especially regret the difficulties that the release of this document has presented for the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and other regulators,” the company said.

Boeing said it had not yet spoken to Mr. Forkner, who now works at Southwest Airlines, about the messages. But the company said that a statement from Mr. Forkner’s lawyer suggested he was complaining about problems he had encountered with the Max in a flight simulator. Boeing also said in its statement that the simulator Mr. Forkner used that day was still undergoing testing at the time.

Wall Street analysts downgraded Boeing stock on Monday, as shares in the company continued to slide. After losing 8 percent on Friday, the stock fell another 4 percent on Monday.

Of particular concern was whether the revelations might further delay the Max’s return to service. Boeing and the F.A.A. have been suggesting that the Max could be recertified by the end of the year.

But the F.A.A. administrator, Stephen Dickson, was frustrated that the regulator learned about the messages only last week, months after the Department of Justice reviewed them, and sent Mr. Muilenburg a terse letter demanding an explanation. Boeing faces multiple lawsuits and investigations, including one by the Justice Department.

“We see increasing risk that the F.A.A. won’t follow through with a certification flight in November and lift the emergency grounding order in December,” UBS said in a note downgrading the stock. “We think a push out of the return to service could increase the likelihood of a pause on the 737 Max production system.”

Seth M. Seifman, an analyst at JPMorgan Chase, said the revelation of the messages “makes it more challenging for regulators to endorse the 737 Max near term.”

Shares in several major Boeing suppliers also fell on Monday, including Spirit AeroSystems, which makes the plane’s fuselage, and General Electric, which makes the Max engines through a joint venture.

“Shutting down production entirely would have a terrible impact on the supply chain and the industry,” said Scott Hamilton, managing director of the Leeham Company, an aviation consulting firm. “It would be a horrific disaster.”

Boeing has already said that the Max crisis has cost it at least $8 billion, a figure that is expected to rise.

As Boeing tries to contains the financial fallout, it is also preparing to send Mr. Muilenburg before members of Congress, who are preparing intensely for the hearings.

On Oct. 8, staff members for the House Transportation and Infrastructure committee gathered for a meeting on Capitol Hill for a briefing by Phil Barnett, who worked in Congress for years before starting a consulting firm, Co-Equal, that helps lawmakers prepare for hearings.

At the briefing, Mr. Barnett and his colleagues walked the congressional staff members through effective questioning techniques, and played video clips from past hearings demonstrating moments when lawmakers got the upper hand on executives.

Mr. Muilenburg has held several sessions with Boeing staff and outside advisers in Washington and Chicago. At times, Boeing staff have tried to create an atmosphere akin to a congressional hearing, peppering Mr. Muilenburg with questions as if they were the lawmakers.

Mr. Muilenburg has also been working with outside lawyers to prepare for the scrutiny by lawmakers. Among the challenges facing Mr. Muilenburg will be whether he can convince Congress that he has responded to the crisis with urgency and authenticity.

Even before Friday, Mr. Muilenburg was facing a steep challenge before Congress. An engineer by training who did not come up through the commercial aviation business, Mr. Muilenburg has struggled to come off as empathetic.

The messages have made his task even more complicated, and the fact that they came out just before Mr. Muilenburg is to testify “intensifies focus on potential leadership changes,” said Mr. Seifman of JPMorgan Chase.

“It goes back to this running question which is: ‘What else haven’t they told us?’” said Mr. Hamilton. “This just reinforces my view that Muilenburg should go.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Boeing’s Crisis: Tense Meetings, Falling Stock, Angry Lawmakers

Westlake Legal Group 21boeing-1-facebookJumbo Boeing’s Crisis: Tense Meetings, Falling Stock, Angry Lawmakers Muilenburg, Dennis A Boeing Company Boeing 737 Max Groundings and Safety Concerns (2019)

When Boeing’s board gathered on Monday, it confronted a grim reality. The crash of two 737 Max jets had already thrown the company into the biggest crisis in its 103-year history, and things only seemed to be getting worse.

During tense meetings at the Boeing facilities in San Antonio, where the company makes Air Force One, executives and directors spent more than five hours discussing how to manage a worrisome cascade of bad news in recent weeks.

It was revealed on Friday that before the Max was certified, a pilot who played a central role in the plane’s development had voiced concerns about an automated system that played a part in both crashes. The revelation undermined an essential part of Boeing’s defense, opened the company to more legal exposure and sent the stock price plummeting as Wall Street grew more concerned about when the plane would get back in the air.

Some at Boeing have expressed concern that the messages may have further complicated efforts to return the Max to service, according to three people familiar with the matter, who requested anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly.

The Max remains grounded seven months after the second of the two crashes, which killed 346 people. Boeing has said that any delays beyond this year could lead it to temporarily halt production of the plane, which would have enormous economic and financial consequences for the company, its employees and its suppliers.

Boeing will report its latest quarterly financial results on Wednesday, and analysts expect the Max crisis to continue to batter the company’s sales and profits. Amid all this, Dennis A. Muilenburg, the company’s chief executive, is preparing to testify before Congress next week.

The messages from the pilot, Mark Forkner, were revealed just a week after Boeing stripped Mr. Muilenburg of his additional title of chairman. That move followed a damning report from a multiagency task force that arrived at scathing conclusions about Boeing, the Federal Aviation Administration and the certification of the Max.

Removing Mr. Muilenburg as chairman was the first sign that the Boeing board was working with more urgency, and beginning to address the question of who, if anyone, would be held accountable for the crisis consuming the company.

Boeing has tried to minimize the fallout from Mr. Forkner’s messages. On Sunday, the company said in a statement that it understood the concern about the messages. “We especially regret the difficulties that the release of this document has presented for the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and other regulators,” the company said.

Boeing said it had not yet spoken to Mr. Forkner, who now works at Southwest Airlines, about the messages. But the company said that a statement from Mr. Forkner’s lawyer suggested he was complaining about problems he had encountered with the Max in a flight simulator. Boeing also said in its statement that the simulator Mr. Forkner used that day was still undergoing testing at the time.

Wall Street analysts downgraded Boeing stock on Monday, as shares in the company continued to slide. After losing 8 percent on Friday, the stock fell another 4 percent on Monday.

Of particular concern was whether the revelations might further delay the Max’s return to service. Boeing and the F.A.A. have been suggesting that the Max could be recertified by the end of the year.

But the F.A.A. administrator, Stephen Dickson, was frustrated that the regulator learned about the messages only last week, months after the Department of Justice reviewed them, and sent Mr. Muilenburg a terse letter demanding an explanation. Boeing faces multiple lawsuits and investigations, including one by the Justice Department.

“We see increasing risk that the F.A.A. won’t follow through with a certification flight in November and lift the emergency grounding order in December,” UBS said in a note downgrading the stock. “We think a push out of the return to service could increase the likelihood of a pause on the 737 Max production system.”

Seth M. Seifman, an analyst at JPMorgan Chase, said the revelation of the messages “makes it more challenging for regulators to endorse the 737 Max near term.”

Shares in several major Boeing suppliers also fell on Monday, including Spirit AeroSystems, which makes the plane’s fuselage, and General Electric, which makes the Max engines through a joint venture.

“Shutting down production entirely would have a terrible impact on the supply chain and the industry,” said Scott Hamilton, managing director of the Leeham Company, an aviation consulting firm. “It would be a horrific disaster.”

Boeing has already said that the Max crisis has cost it at least $8 billion, a figure that is expected to rise.

As Boeing tries to contains the financial fallout, it is also preparing to send Mr. Muilenburg before members of Congress, who are preparing intensely for the hearings.

On Oct. 8, staff members for the House Transportation and Infrastructure committee gathered for a meeting on Capitol Hill for a briefing by Phil Barnett, who worked in Congress for years before starting a consulting firm, Co-Equal, that helps lawmakers prepare for hearings.

At the briefing, Mr. Barnett and his colleagues walked the congressional staff members through effective questioning techniques, and played video clips from past hearings demonstrating moments when lawmakers got the upper hand on executives.

Mr. Muilenburg has held several sessions with Boeing staff and outside advisers in Washington and Chicago. At times, Boeing staff have tried to create an atmosphere akin to a congressional hearing, peppering Mr. Muilenburg with questions as if they were the lawmakers.

Mr. Muilenburg has also been working with outside lawyers to prepare for the scrutiny by lawmakers. Among the challenges facing Mr. Muilenburg will be whether he can convince Congress that he has responded to the crisis with urgency and authenticity.

Even before Friday, Mr. Muilenburg was facing a steep challenge before Congress. An engineer by training who did not come up through the commercial aviation business, Mr. Muilenburg has struggled to come off as empathetic.

The messages have made his task even more complicated, and the fact that they came out just before Mr. Muilenburg is to testify “intensifies focus on potential leadership changes,” said Mr. Seifman of JPMorgan Chase.

“It goes back to this running question which is: ‘What else haven’t they told us?’” said Mr. Hamilton. “This just reinforces my view that Muilenburg should go.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com