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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 51)

Joshua Rogers: Here’s why my wife and I still get into arguments – and how we’re growing out of them

Westlake Legal Group image Joshua Rogers: Here's why my wife and I still get into arguments – and how we're growing out of them Joshua Rogers fox-news/opinion fox-news/faith-values/family fox-news/entertainment/events/marriage fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 3650a173-f3f0-587b-933b-159e0450c0ca

My wife and I had only been dating for six weeks when we said “I love you” for the first time.

It happened on an emotionally charged night when we both shared some hard things from our pasts. When we both responded with unconditional grace; the momentum carried us away, and the next thing we knew, we were both putting our hearts on the line.

Our feelings took on even more momentum and only four months after we met, I surprised Raquel on the River Terrace of the Kennedy Center and asked her to marry me. She said yes and we celebrated with family members that night. It couldn’t have been more idyllic — until the next morning.

JOSHUA ROGERS: I KISSED MY WIFE, MY DAUGHTER SAW ME AND SAID ONE WORD I WON’T EVER FORGET

Almost instantly, we went from extending unconditional grace to wrestling for control over the wedding budget. For example, I insisted that we string up Christmas lights in someone’s back yard and cater the event with Subway sandwich trays. Raquel did not appreciate this particularly absurd request (and many others), but at the same time, she often provoked fights with her tendency to be unnecessarily hypercritical.

Things quieted down in the two weeks before the wedding — I guess we were too exhausted from wedding planning to keep bickering. But we didn’t even make it past the honeymoon before we started going at it again.

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In the 12 years since then, we haven’t arrived when it comes to conflict resolution, but we’ve come a long way. Our conflicts have gradually become more constructive and less petty; and in a few cases, conflict has ceased.

As I think about the incremental improvements we’ve made, I’ve been contemplating our growth. What are we getting right, and how can we do more of that? What has changed? There are three things that come to mind:

We’re more willing to genuinely apologize. In the words of Elton John, “sorry seems to be the hardest word.” It’s the hardest word because it’s an admission that I’m wrong. My pride can’t handle that. When I give in, however, there’s a freedom I discover. I don’t have to carry the weight of my precious image. I can, with an apology, actually eliminate the momentum of a fight because an apology often resolves the heart of a conflict.

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I’ve begun to accept the fact that Raquel’s actually right a lot of the time. When we first got married, every one of Raquel’s contradictory stances called for my opposition. In my view, my perspective was the clearest and rightest one. Yet, as I started reflecting on the times when I had written off her opinion during decision making, I saw that things often didn’t go well. I’ve since done a better job of honoring both of our perspectives. As a result, Raquel feels more respected, we make better decisions and both of us win.

As we work through conflict, we’re learning what always works (humility) and what never works (pridefulness).

We’re picking our battles more carefully. Earlier in our relationship, I was willing to go to the mat about anything — chores, church, restaurant choices — you name it. So much of it wasn’t worth it, and even if it was worth it (like working through wedding budgeting) we went about it the wrong way. Being willing to give up the fight — or at least the way we fight — reduces stress, brings peace, makes our relationship more loving, and with all of that, naturally strengthens our marriage.

When I think about it, actually, our fights haven’t been totally useless. As we work through conflict, we’re learning what always works (humility) and what never works (pridefulness). For example, last night, Raquel and I sat down to talk through our budget — something I was dreading. Our financial discussions have often been as bad during our marriage as they were during our engagement.

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But something happened: There was grace. We agreed on many things, and where there was disagreement, we were able to move on without necessarily getting everything resolved. (Speaking of being gracious, Raquel even cut me some slack when I almost fell asleep in the middle of our conversation!)

There’s hope for you and for us. With a little humility, we can continue to make progress — even if it happens one fight at a time.

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Westlake Legal Group image Joshua Rogers: Here's why my wife and I still get into arguments – and how we're growing out of them Joshua Rogers fox-news/opinion fox-news/faith-values/family fox-news/entertainment/events/marriage fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 3650a173-f3f0-587b-933b-159e0450c0ca   Westlake Legal Group image Joshua Rogers: Here's why my wife and I still get into arguments – and how we're growing out of them Joshua Rogers fox-news/opinion fox-news/faith-values/family fox-news/entertainment/events/marriage fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 3650a173-f3f0-587b-933b-159e0450c0ca

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Rebecca Grant: Is war in Afghanistan finally nearing an end?

Westlake Legal Group image Rebecca Grant: Is war in Afghanistan finally nearing an end? Rebecca Grant fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/world fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 239a12de-3f37-5da4-b6f6-55f8ea377db6

A seven-day “reduction in violence” between U.S. and Taliban forces in Afghanistan took effect Saturday morning and the two sides are scheduled to sign a peace deal Feb. 29.

While a peace deal with the Taliban is hard to swallow, this may be the best chance for peace in Afghanistan since U.S. forces entered the country in 2001 to topple the Taliban government then in power, following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

“Our primary objective is to end this senseless bloodshed,” Afghanistan’s President Ashraf Ghani tweeted Feb. 11.

WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT US-TALIBAN PEACE TALKS

When Operation Enduring Freedom began in October 2001, virtually no one expected it would endure for 19 years and become America’s longest war.

It seemed at first that we had won a quick victory when U.S. airpower, special operations troops on horseback, CIA operatives and Afghan Northern Alliance fighters deposed the Taliban regime in barely six weeks.

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The reason for Operation Enduring Freedom was that the Taliban government had allowed Usama bin Laden and Al Qaeda a safe haven in Afghanistan to plan and launch terrorist attacks – most notably the Sept. 11 attacks that killed almost 3,000 people at the World Trade Center in New York City, at the Pentagon near Washington, and near Shanksville, Pa.

The hard part, it turned out, was keeping the Taliban at bay long enough to bolster the U.S. –supported new Afghan government. Toppling the Taliban in November 2001 turned out to be just one chapter in years of fighting and shaky politics dating back to the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan 1979.

There’s no denying that U.S. officials underestimated the task of stabilizing Afghanistan enough to lock out terrorists. U.S. Army Gen. Tommy Franks, who led the Central Command in 2001, once said that America would never deploy more than 10,000 troops to Afghanistan. But we ended up putting in over 100,000 at the peak deployment in 2011 under President Barack Obama’s administration.

Yet the top goal for America never changed: make sure terrorists can never again use Afghanistan again as their base of operations.

Keeping Afghanistan from being an exporter of terrorism is still the U.S. aim. The chances of achieving this goal are now more promising than they’ve been in a long time – and here’s why.

The diplomacy is in place. If anyone can pull this deal together it’s the top American negotiator, special envoy Zalmay Khalilzad. Born in Afghanistan, he’s long been an American citizen and served as U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan, Iraq and the U.N. in President George W. Bush’s administration.

Khalilzad has all parties lined up this time. Since being appointed special representative for Afghanistan reconciliation in September 2018, he’s negotiated with the Taliban at their headquarters in Qatar and on trips to Moscow. He has also spent a lot of time in talks with Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan.

A peace deal with the Taliban was almost signed in September, but a Taliban attack caused President Trump to halt the process. However, Khalilzad was back to negotiations by October. If Khalilzad pulls off a peace settlement that finally ends fighting in Afghanistan he can teach President Trump something about the art of the deal.

President Ghani is on board. The talks so far have been between the U.S. and the Taliban, with Khalilzad keeping Ghani informed. If the truce holds, the Afghan government and Taliban will start talking.

For a while, Ghani was skeptical of the peace talks and held back. But after meetings with President Trump in Afghanistan in December and at the Davos Forum in January, Ghani has been supportive.

NATO troops are staying in Afghanistan. This is huge. The alliance is committed to supporting reconciliation of the warring sides in the country and military training through at least 2024.

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg fully backs the truce with the Taliban. Stoltenberg said this “could pave the way for a sustainable peace” and ensure Afghanistan “is never again a safe haven for terrorists.”

U.S. military support for Afghanistan will also continue, including sales of Apache helicopters to build up Afghanistan’s air force.

The Taliban can’t win this long war. That’s why they’ve agreed – so far – to the U.S. demand to stop fighting.

Credit Trump for a methodical military policy. The president was not keen on expanding military operations in Afghanistan, but he authorized more ground forces, airpower and tactics that put U.S. forces close to the front lines to train and assist the Afghan military.

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The strategy was backed up by a huge spike in U.S. airpower surveillance and strikes. Coalition forces dropped 19,561 bombs and missiles in Afghanistan from January 2017 to January 2020.  Those operations created the military pressure to back up Khalilzad’s diplomacy.

During the reduction in violence period from Saturday to Feb.29, U.S.-led coalition forces will be watching to make sure the Taliban don’t plant roadside bombs, conduct suicide bomb attacks, or take advantage of the lull to reposition or set up weapons caches for future attacks.

Nineteen years on, American forces have an astonishing ability to monitor the Taliban force posture with drones, helicopters and manned aircraft.

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The Feb. 29 peace deal won’t be the end. Afghanistan’s government will start talks with the Taliban and they have many issues to tackle.

Realistically, the hoped-for peace deal could all fall apart. However, the U.S.-Taliban agreement and the supporting mesh of diplomacy set up the best chance for both sides to put together a viable future for Afghanistan and its war-weary people. The deal is certainly worth a try.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY REBECCA GRANT

Westlake Legal Group image Rebecca Grant: Is war in Afghanistan finally nearing an end? Rebecca Grant fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/world fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 239a12de-3f37-5da4-b6f6-55f8ea377db6   Westlake Legal Group image Rebecca Grant: Is war in Afghanistan finally nearing an end? Rebecca Grant fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/world fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 239a12de-3f37-5da4-b6f6-55f8ea377db6

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

10 sites to watch movies for free

What should I watch? This question plagues us, no matter how we watch TV. Once we’ve binged our favorite series, seen all the recommended shows and movies, and browsed every genre we could find, we still hit a wall. What’s left? we think, as we impatiently await the third season of “Westworld.”

You may even be tempted to cancel a service that seems barren. Tap or click here for five things to know before canceling.

While some streaming services aren’t as popular as Netflix or Hulu, their archives are vast – and better yet, they’re free. These platforms are often robust and full of surprises, sort of like rummaging through a secondhand store.

Because they’re streaming, they’re about as easy to access as anything on the internet, although some may require a little extra gear, like a Roku or Amazon Fire TV stick. If you have a Fire TV Stick or Cube, tap or click for 10 features you might not know about using your Amazon streaming gadgets.

Here are 10 of the best sites for watching movies free. Make sure to bookmark your favorites so nights at home can be just as amazing as going out to the movies. Just remember, like all streaming services, content changes periodically.

1. Kanopy

If you love art house or classic movies, Kanopy is the best site for free streaming. With entries from the Criterion Collection as well as contemporary indies, Kanopy shows high-quality and critically acclaimed cinema, all at no cost to its users.

To use Kanopy, your local library, university or college needs to be connected to it. With a library card or your college email login, you can access Kanopy’s catalog at any time. Tap or click here to check if your library is connected.

Movies playing now: “Ladybird,” “Moonlight,” Fritz Lang’s “Metropolis.”

2. Popcornflix

For those who prefer more mainstream movies, Popcornflix perfectly fits its name. The ad-supported service accesses tons of movies and TV shows. You can stream through the web, but you can also download the app on Roku, Apple TV, Google Play, Amazon and Xbox if you’d like to watch on a TV screen.

We’ve recommended Popcornflix before, and we stand by that recommendation now. Tap or click here to test it out on your smartphone.

Movies playing now: “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles,” “The Firm,” “Roman Holiday.”

3. Vimeo

Vimeo is a video platform like YouTube, allowing users to upload their own movies and clips to share in HD quality. You have to pay to watch some movies on the site, but many are free — particularly short films.

Bonus: It’s a great alternative if you’re not into the idea of Google knowing what you’re watching. Tap or click here for other Google alternatives for just about everything you do on the web.

Vimeo exists as a website and as an iOS and Android app. You can watch movies by streaming directly or downloading them for when you’re not on Wi-Fi.

Movies playing now: “Staff Pick Premieres,” a channel of “the best short films on the internet.”

4. Internet Archive

Do you love classic movies? Many golden age films are now live at Internet Archive, a site that captures all public domain media. Most copyright-free titles date back to the 1920s and 1930s. For classic movie buffs, it’s a treasure trove.

I interviewed Internet Archive founder Brewster Kahle about digital time travel. Tap or click here to listen to our fascinating conversation.

Movies playing now: “Plan 9 from Outer Space,” “The Three Stooges,” the Charlie Chaplin collection.

5. Sony Crackle

Sony Crackle, formerly known as Crackle, is another great site that supports itself with ads. If you really like action and thriller movies, and some older TV shows that are hard to find on other platforms, Sony Crackle is worth the occasional interruptions.

Movies playing now: “Black Mass,” “Concussion,” the “Friday the 13th” series.

6. Vudu

Though primarily a platform for buying movies and TV episodes, Vudu also has free content – once again, thanks to ads. Vudu has a diverse catalog and reports how long movies will remain free.

You can get Vudu on your computer, game consoles, streaming devices, smart TVs, Blu-ray players, phones and tablets. You just have to sign up for a free Vudu account to use the apps and site.

Movies playing now: “La La Land,” Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist,” “Batman Forever.”

7. IMDb

Working through IMDb.com or Amazon Fire products, IMDb TV is a way to watch critically acclaimed films free from the comfort of your home. Like most of these streaming sites, this one is ad-supported, but if you have Amazon Prime, you can watch movies free through Prime on IMDb TV without ads.

Fun fact: Amazon owns IMDb. Tap or click for a full list of companies you didn’t know the tech giant owns.

To watch movies, you need an IMDb or an Amazon account, and you can watch to your heart’s content. IMDb TV isn’t the easiest to navigate or search through, but their “Top Rated” category allows you to find movies other users love.

Movies playing now: “A Few Good Men,” “Memento,” “My So-Called Life.”

8. hoopla

Libraries offer tons of amazing services; just tap or click here to see a list of the freebies offered by your local library. Your library card can get you access to hoopla as well. hoopla is the digital service of Midwest Tape, a company that provides media products and services like DVDs, CDs and audio books to libraries.

Just sign up for hoopla with your email and library card, and you’ll have access to tons of movies and TV show seasons, plus the ability to use the hoopla app on your phone, tablet, Amazon Fire device, Roku, Chromecast, Apple TV and Android TV devices.

hoopla doesn’t work with every library system, so make sure to ask the next time you’re at the library.

Movies playing now: Varies by local library systems.

9. The Roku Channel

If you have a Roku, you have access to The Roku Channel, which gets you free movie and TV content. You can stream live shows on the Roku channel, as well as watch an ever-changing catalog of movies and TV shows, all at no cost.

If you use a Roku at home, it’s time to go beyond the instruction manual. Tap or click here for 8 pro tricks.

You can add your premium subscriptions to the Roku Channel, so you can watch things like HBO and Showtime all on your Roku — but free content is available even without them, though you may find similar options on Popcornflix, FilmRise, Vidmark, American Classics and YuYu.

Movies playing now: “The Joy Luck Club,” “Tombstone,” “Indecent Proposal.”

10. Good Old YouTube

YouTube has its share of feature-length films uploaded illegally, and those tend to disappear quickly thanks to YouTube’s algorithms. But the service also has a good number of licensed films you can watch for free.

To see what’s available, just go to the Movies & Shows channel, available from the YouTube homepage, and click “View All” next to the “Free to watch” category. Quality varies, but there are a few gems, plus tons of kid-friendly content.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch The Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on the Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group roku 10 sites to watch movies for free The Kim Komando Show fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 4cbb73f5-4944-5d78-984a-50987050a308   Westlake Legal Group roku 10 sites to watch movies for free The Kim Komando Show fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 4cbb73f5-4944-5d78-984a-50987050a308

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

What ‘Medicare for All’ Means After a Six-Year Strike for Health Benefits

Westlake Legal Group merlin_169254225_9ad92306-5adf-4eea-997b-2b8ffe902a3b-facebookJumbo What ‘Medicare for All’ Means After a Six-Year Strike for Health Benefits Strikes Sanders, Bernard Presidential Election of 2020 Organized Labor Nevada Las Vegas (Nev) Labor and Jobs Health Insurance and Managed Care Culinary Workers Union

LAS VEGAS — They each remember that moment, just after dawn on a September day in 1991, when they walked out of the Frontier Hotel and Casino. There was music and singing — “Solidarity forever,” went the song. That first day, the atmosphere was more like a celebration than a work protest. But the strike would go on to last six years, four months and 10 days — one of the longest labor disputes in American history.

There were fights along the picket line, with tourists throwing water and food at the strikers, who were more than willing to fight back. There were dozens of arrests. So much time went by that 107 babies were born to pickets and 17 people died during the strike.

They were fighting for wages, job security, pensions — and health care. In many ways those are the same key issues in the presidential campaign that comes on Saturday to Nevada, where health care has taken center stage in the contest, with Bernie Sanders forcefully pushing for a “Medicare for All” plan that would effectively eliminate private health care insurance. And in Las Vegas, talking about health care means talking about the Culinary Workers Union, the largest and most powerful union in the state.

The roughly 60,000 members of the union’s Local 226 rarely pay out of pocket for routine medical care. They can undergo surgery without receiving a hefty surprise bill months later. They can visit the same one-stop medical clinic for urgent care, vision, dental and the pharmacy. The clinic was a regular stop for many of the 2020 candidates.

So one way to understand why the leadership of the Culinary Union is fighting so hard against Medicare-for-all proposals is to look back to the 1990s.

The Frontier, one of the first casinos on what is now simply known as the Strip, had recently been sold to new owners. The Western-themed casino was popular for made-from-scratch baked goods and food.

Gloria Hernandez knew it best for something else: Working there meant she could become a member of the Culinary Union, which would give her medical benefits that were far better than what her husband had through his job.

“You knew immediately that when you started working there that you would get health insurance because this was a union hotel,” Ms. Hernandez said. She knew what it was like to be a member of a union in Mexico, where she was part of the government workers’ union.

Today, Frontier strikers have an almost mythic presence within the Culinary Union here — seen as exemplars of people who know how to fight effectively. Ms. Hernandez is now an organizer for the union. But while she comes down enthusiastically on the side of keeping their current health insurance plan, some of her fellow pickets have reached the opposite conclusion.

Terry Lemley, 59, has not one but two Sanders lawn signs in front of her house. During the strike, Ms. Lemley’s job was taking attendance on the line, helping to track that there were enough people to keep it going around the clock. Any Frontier employee who showed up at the picket line for 30 hours a week received $200 in strike pay. That was not enough to make ends meet, so most people found second jobs.

“I would do it again in a heartbeat,” Ms. Lemley said, sitting at her kitchen table one afternoon this past week. “But what we fought for, everybody should have. I don’t know why I would not want to give it to everybody.”

Once the strike ended in 1998, Ms. Lemley returned to her job as a cocktail waitress, a position she kept until the hotel shut down a decade later. She briefly had health insurance through Obamacare, she said, but has been uninsured for the past several years.

“I’ve seen both. I know what it is to do without,” she said. “Why would anyone in the union wish that on anyone else?”

Sonja Washington, 58, marched alongside Ms. Lemley for years, initially bringing her own children to the picket line. After getting arrested on the line, however, Ms. Washington said she decided to leave her children at home. Those children, who are now adults, spent their childhood with health care provided by the culinary health insurance program, Ms. Washington said. And Ms. Washington treasures her care.

“It’s terrific, but why I am going to stop there?” she said, sitting in Ms. Lemley’s kitchen. “The union taught me how to fight. So I want to be out there fighting for everybody.”

As a union organizer on the Strip, Elodia Muniz also views her work as fighting for more than just herself. “We are still over there and when we’re fighting, we’re not fighting for just us,” Ms. Muniz said in an interview at the Culinary Union headquarters this past week.

But Ms. Muniz is loath to view health insurance the same way as Ms. Lemley and Ms. Washington. When Mr. Sanders came to speak to the union late last year, Ms. Muniz stood up and forcefully asked how he would protect their insurance. Mr. Sanders replied by suggesting that members would have more money in their paychecks if they were not negotiating with employers over health care. Ms. Muniz was unimpressed.

“We like to keep what we have, what is real, what is true,” she said. “Not what we don’t know what it will be — it’s like a wish.”

Ms. Muniz and Ms. Hernandez raised children together on the picket line; Ms. Hernandez’s youngest son was born just days after the strike began. As the children grew, they would frequently visit the picket line, learning the union songs and crossing the street to ride in an elevator for entertainment.

“It was 24 hours a day, seven days a week, no matter what the weather was,” Ms. Hernandez recalled. “We have to be over there.”

The choices they gave the owners were sign, sell or shut down, Ms. Hernandez recalled.

“We wanted to have respect,” she said. “We knew we can have power together. We want to understand that.”

Though she feels lucky to have stayed healthy, Ms. Hernandez has watched other members of her family struggle with their health care needs. Her mother had Medicaid, and Ms. Hernandez watched with alarm as she struggled to find doctors and visit specialists.

“I don’t want that, no,” she said. “I want to have a choice. It’s like someone gives you a choice of the car — you want a Lexus or you want something less than that? Of course you want the nicer thing. It’s a big difference. You bet I will do anything I can to keep this because it’s a big difference.”

Ms. Lemley links her passion over the Sanders campaign directly to her time on the picket line. It was the union, she said, that taught her how to collectively fight for others. Having already cast her ballot in the early caucus, Ms. Lemley was planning to enjoy this weekend as a kind of honeymoon. On Friday, she married the man she met on the picket line decades ago.

Kitty Bennett contributed research.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

To This Group, Labor Is More Than a ‘White Man Who Works in a Factory’

Westlake Legal Group 00NDWA-1-facebookJumbo To This Group, Labor Is More Than a ‘White Man Who Works in a Factory’ Domestic Service

LAS VEGAS — The three women knocking on doors around Las Vegas on Tuesday afternoon wanted to talk to people about the importance of voting, especially in a state with low voter turnout. They gave all the logistical details — where to go, what time to get there — and explained how early voting worked.

“Make it a family affair!,” Crystal Crawford, a social worker and a nanny in her early 30s, said at almost every house where she stopped. “My family always, always took us to vote,” she said, “So I always tell people to bring the kids.”

She is well versed in how the caucuses will go Saturday, but she and the women she was canvassing with won’t be caucusing themselves.

They are all domestic workers from Georgia who traveled here this week with the National Domestic Workers Alliance, a nonprofit organization working to raise labor standards for nannies, housekeepers, home health aides and others.

In recent years the group has worked to pass the Domestic Workers Bills of Rights, which would include a minimum wage, paid time off and eligibility for over time in nine states and two cities. And now through Care in Action, the advocacy branch of the group, it is focusing on harnessing the political power of the people — largely women of color — it represents.

The workers’ group brought its biannual assembly to Nevada this week, hosted a presidential forum and organized canvassing efforts.

“We want to tell folks their vote is worth it,” said Jess Morales Rocketto, executive director of Care in Action. One of the group’s goals, she said, is to help show domestic workers that the political system was “intentionally built to exclude the type of voters and workers that we organize.”

Ms. Morales Rocketto sees voting as a way domestic workers can have a more powerful role in the decisions that directly affect them.

Consuelo Perez, a nanny who is part of the Dominican Development Center, an affiliate of N.D.W.A. in Massachusetts, feels that her job is “dreaming for other people’s children.”

Ms. Perez, who was in Las Vegas for the group’s assembly, has a daughter with special needs whom she comes home to every day after taking care of another family’s children. “You grow to love this second family, but it hurts to know that those opportunities can’t come to your own.”

She supports Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, she said, not only because of his labor advocacy but also because “Medicare for All,” his signature policy proposal, would help her take care of her daughter.

“We are taking care of kids who could be the future senators and presidents of the United States. I can’t dream like that for my own daughter,” she said. “That’s why we have to do this work.”

Ahead of the 2020 election, the organization’s political arm has focused on garnering candidate support for a federal version of a Domestic Workers Bill of Rights, a path to citizenship for domestic workers and their families, and universal child care.

Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., Mr. Sanders, Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., have all said that they endorse the federal Domestic Workers Bill of Rights. Senator Kamala Harris of California, who dropped out last December, is one of the sponsors of the bill.

“Everything we’re doing in the policy arena to make jobs better is complemented by everything we’re doing to turn out voters and get people engaged, get people feeling like they have a voice in our democracy,” Ai-jen Poo, the founder and chief executive of the group said in an interview this week.

At the presidential forum hosted by Care in Action here on Tuesday morning, the room was filled with orange: The women in the crowd were all wearing Care in Action shirts. A mix of Spanish, Tagalog and other languages filled the room, with excited whispers about seeing the candidates. Ms. Warren and Tom Steyer attended in person and Mr. Sanders called in from Reno. The crowd cheered for Ms. Warren, and roared for Mr. Sanders when he appeared via conference call, a photo of him projected onstage.

Part of what Ms. Poo and her organization want to change — or correct, in their view — is what politicians picture when they talk about labor and American workers. Too often, Ms. Poo said, it’s the image of a “white man who works in a factory or is a coal worker,” not a diverse working class doing service or domestic jobs. One way to change that image: Get more domestic workers to vote.

“When we talk about building power in the economy, voting is a part of that,” said Alicia Garza, a co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement and a special projects director for the domestic workers’ group.

Ms. Poo said that this is the first time presidential candidates have really been talking about domestic workers since the 1970s, but that she is eager for more discussion of what the working class means in 2020.

“We are writing the DNA of the new economy because really so much of the dynamics that face workers today, domestic workers have been dealing with forever,” she said.

June Barrett, a Jamaican immigrant and former home care nurse who now is involved full-time with the workers alliance, emphasized how valuable domestic labor is, and how undervalued it can be.

“Many of the people we work with wouldn’t be able to do basic things without us,” she said, describing the importance and intimacy of home care work. She spoke about a 90-something patient she would often find on the floor when she arrived at work.

“What we need to do is place value on the work” she said. “There is no value placed on women like myself who do this work.”

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What ‘Medicare for All’ Means After a Six-Year Strike for Health Benefits

Westlake Legal Group merlin_169254225_9ad92306-5adf-4eea-997b-2b8ffe902a3b-facebookJumbo What ‘Medicare for All’ Means After a Six-Year Strike for Health Benefits Strikes Sanders, Bernard Presidential Election of 2020 Organized Labor Nevada Las Vegas (Nev) Labor and Jobs Health Insurance and Managed Care Culinary Workers Union

LAS VEGAS — They each remember that moment, just after dawn on a September day in 1991, when they walked out of the Frontier Hotel and Casino. There was music and singing — “Solidarity forever,” went the song. That first day, the atmosphere was more like a celebration than a work protest. But the strike would go on to last six years, four months and 10 days — one of the longest labor disputes in American history.

There were fights along the picket line, with tourists throwing water and food at the strikers, who were more than willing to fight back. There were dozens of arrests. So much time went by that 107 babies were born to pickets and 17 people died during the strike.

They were fighting for wages, job security, pensions — and health care. In many ways those are the same key issues in the presidential campaign that comes on Saturday to Nevada, where health care has taken center stage in the contest, with Bernie Sanders forcefully pushing for a “Medicare for All” plan that would effectively eliminate private health care insurance. And in Las Vegas, talking about health care means talking about the Culinary Workers Union, the largest and most powerful union in the state.

The roughly 60,000 members of the union’s Local 226 rarely pay out of pocket for routine medical care. They can undergo surgery without receiving a hefty surprise bill months later. They can visit the same one-stop medical clinic for urgent care, vision, dental and the pharmacy. The clinic was a regular stop for many of the 2020 candidates.

So one way to understand why the leadership of the Culinary Union is fighting so hard against Medicare-for-all proposals is to look back to the 1990s.

The Frontier, one of the first casinos on what is now simply known as the Strip, had recently been sold to new owners. The Western-themed casino was popular for made-from-scratch baked goods and food.

Gloria Hernandez knew it best for something else: Working there meant she could become a member of the Culinary Union, which would give her medical benefits that were far better than what her husband had through his job.

“You knew immediately that when you started working there that you would get health insurance because this was a union hotel,” Ms. Hernandez said. She knew what it was like to be a member of a union in Mexico, where she was part of the government workers’ union.

Today, Frontier strikers have an almost mythic presence within the Culinary Union here — seen as exemplars of people who know how to fight effectively. Ms. Hernandez is now an organizer for the union. But while she comes down enthusiastically on the side of keeping their current health insurance plan, some of her fellow pickets have reached the opposite conclusion.

Terry Lemley, 59, has not one but two Sanders lawn signs in front of her house. During the strike, Ms. Lemley’s job was taking attendance on the line, helping to track that there were enough people to keep it going around the clock. Any Frontier employee who showed up at the picket line for 30 hours a week received $200 in strike pay. That was not enough to make ends meet, so most people found second jobs.

“I would do it again in a heartbeat,” Ms. Lemley said, sitting at her kitchen table one afternoon this past week. “But what we fought for, everybody should have. I don’t know why I would not want to give it to everybody.”

Once the strike ended in 1998, Ms. Lemley returned to her job as a cocktail waitress, a position she kept until the hotel shut down a decade later. She briefly had health insurance through Obamacare, she said, but has been uninsured for the past several years.

“I’ve seen both. I know what it is to do without,” she said. “Why would anyone in the union wish that on anyone else?”

Sonja Washington, 58, marched alongside Ms. Lemley for years, initially bringing her own children to the picket line. After getting arrested on the line, however, Ms. Washington said she decided to leave her children at home. Those children, who are now adults, spent their childhood with health care provided by the culinary health insurance program, Ms. Washington said. And Ms. Washington treasures her care.

“It’s terrific, but why I am going to stop there?” she said, sitting in Ms. Lemley’s kitchen. “The union taught me how to fight. So I want to be out there fighting for everybody.”

As a union organizer on the Strip, Elodia Muniz also views her work as fighting for more than just herself. “We are still over there and when we’re fighting, we’re not fighting for just us,” Ms. Muniz said in an interview at the Culinary Union headquarters this past week.

But Ms. Muniz is loath to view health insurance the same way as Ms. Lemley and Ms. Washington. When Mr. Sanders came to speak to the union late last year, Ms. Muniz stood up and forcefully asked how he would protect their insurance. Mr. Sanders replied by suggesting that members would have more money in their paychecks if they were not negotiating with employers over health care. Ms. Muniz was unimpressed.

“We like to keep what we have, what is real, what is true,” she said. “Not what we don’t know what it will be — it’s like a wish.”

Ms. Muniz and Ms. Hernandez raised children together on the picket line; Ms. Hernandez’s youngest son was born just days after the strike began. As the children grew, they would frequently visit the picket line, learning the union songs and crossing the street to ride in an elevator for entertainment.

“It was 24 hours a day, seven days a week, no matter what the weather was,” Ms. Hernandez recalled. “We have to be over there.”

The choices they gave the owners were sign, sell or shut down, Ms. Hernandez recalled.

“We wanted to have respect,” she said. “We knew we can have power together. We want to understand that.”

Though she feels lucky to have stayed healthy, Ms. Hernandez has watched other members of her family struggle with their health care needs. Her mother had Medicaid, and Ms. Hernandez watched with alarm as she struggled to find doctors and visit specialists.

“I don’t want that, no,” she said. “I want to have a choice. It’s like someone gives you a choice of the car — you want a Lexus or you want something less than that? Of course you want the nicer thing. It’s a big difference. You bet I will do anything I can to keep this because it’s a big difference.”

Ms. Lemley links her passion over the Sanders campaign directly to her time on the picket line. It was the union, she said, that taught her how to collectively fight for others. Having already cast her ballot in the early caucus, Ms. Lemley was planning to enjoy this weekend as a kind of honeymoon. On Friday, she married the man she met on the picket line decades ago.

Kitty Bennett contributed research.

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To This Group, Labor Is More Than a ‘White Man Who Works in a Factory’

Westlake Legal Group 00NDWA-1-facebookJumbo To This Group, Labor Is More Than a ‘White Man Who Works in a Factory’ Domestic Service

LAS VEGAS — The three women knocking on doors around Las Vegas on Tuesday afternoon wanted to talk to people about the importance of voting, especially in a state with low voter turnout. They gave all the logistical details — where to go, what time to get there — and explained how early voting worked.

“Make it a family affair!,” Crystal Crawford, a social worker and a nanny in her early 30s, said at almost every house where she stopped. “My family always, always took us to vote,” she said, “So I always tell people to bring the kids.”

She is well versed in how the caucuses will go Saturday, but she and the women she was canvassing with won’t be caucusing themselves.

They are all domestic workers from Georgia who traveled here this week with the National Domestic Workers Alliance, a nonprofit organization working to raise labor standards for nannies, housekeepers, home health aides and others.

In recent years the group has worked to pass the Domestic Workers Bills of Rights, which would include a minimum wage, paid time off and eligibility for over time in nine states and two cities. And now through Care in Action, the advocacy branch of the group, it is focusing on harnessing the political power of the people — largely women of color — it represents.

The workers’ group brought its biannual assembly to Nevada this week, hosted a presidential forum and organized canvassing efforts.

“We want to tell folks their vote is worth it,” said Jess Morales Rocketto, executive director of Care in Action. One of the group’s goals, she said, is to help show domestic workers that the political system was “intentionally built to exclude the type of voters and workers that we organize.”

Ms. Morales Rocketto sees voting as a way domestic workers can have a more powerful role in the decisions that directly affect them.

Consuelo Perez, a nanny who is part of the Dominican Development Center, an affiliate of N.D.W.A. in Massachusetts, feels that her job is “dreaming for other people’s children.”

Ms. Perez, who was in Las Vegas for the group’s assembly, has a daughter with special needs whom she comes home to every day after taking care of another family’s children. “You grow to love this second family, but it hurts to know that those opportunities can’t come to your own.”

She supports Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, she said, not only because of his labor advocacy but also because “Medicare for All,” his signature policy proposal, would help her take care of her daughter.

“We are taking care of kids who could be the future senators and presidents of the United States. I can’t dream like that for my own daughter,” she said. “That’s why we have to do this work.”

Ahead of the 2020 election, the organization’s political arm has focused on garnering candidate support for a federal version of a Domestic Workers Bill of Rights, a path to citizenship for domestic workers and their families, and universal child care.

Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., Mr. Sanders, Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., have all said that they endorse the federal Domestic Workers Bill of Rights. Senator Kamala Harris of California, who dropped out last December, is one of the sponsors of the bill.

“Everything we’re doing in the policy arena to make jobs better is complemented by everything we’re doing to turn out voters and get people engaged, get people feeling like they have a voice in our democracy,” Ai-jen Poo, the founder and chief executive of the group said in an interview this week.

At the presidential forum hosted by Care in Action here on Tuesday morning, the room was filled with orange: The women in the crowd were all wearing Care in Action shirts. A mix of Spanish, Tagalog and other languages filled the room, with excited whispers about seeing the candidates. Ms. Warren and Tom Steyer attended in person and Mr. Sanders called in from Reno. The crowd cheered for Ms. Warren, and roared for Mr. Sanders when he appeared via conference call, a photo of him projected onstage.

Part of what Ms. Poo and her organization want to change — or correct, in their view — is what politicians picture when they talk about labor and American workers. Too often, Ms. Poo said, it’s the image of a “white man who works in a factory or is a coal worker,” not a diverse working class doing service or domestic jobs. One way to change that image: Get more domestic workers to vote.

“When we talk about building power in the economy, voting is a part of that,” said Alicia Garza, a co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement and a special projects director for the domestic workers’ group.

Ms. Poo said that this is the first time presidential candidates have really been talking about domestic workers since the 1970s, but that she is eager for more discussion of what the working class means in 2020.

“We are writing the DNA of the new economy because really so much of the dynamics that face workers today, domestic workers have been dealing with forever,” she said.

June Barrett, a Jamaican immigrant and former home care nurse who now is involved full-time with the workers alliance, emphasized how valuable domestic labor is, and how undervalued it can be.

“Many of the people we work with wouldn’t be able to do basic things without us,” she said, describing the importance and intimacy of home care work. She spoke about a 90-something patient she would often find on the floor when she arrived at work.

“What we need to do is place value on the work” she said. “There is no value placed on women like myself who do this work.”

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Jeffrey Epstein estate’s bills, employees going unpaid over ‘insufficient funds,’ lawyers say: report

Westlake Legal Group AP20009804971668 Jeffrey Epstein estate's bills, employees going unpaid over 'insufficient funds,' lawyers say: report fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/u-s-virgin-islands fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 165f8cf0-d73b-58cd-9b63-9d6b274307a0

Lawyers for late convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein’s $600 million U.S. Virgin Islands estate said liens imposed by the local attorney general have left them unable to pay the estate’s bills, employees at his various properties or for legal defense from his accusers, according to a filing made public Friday.

Co-executors Darren K. Indyke and Richard D. Kahn’s lawyers wrote several payments, including for electricity and pest control, that have been returned for “insufficient funds” and asked the Superior Court of the Virgin Islands, which imposed the criminal-activity liens, to strike them down or at least allow the executors to pay for the estate’s administration, The Miami Herald reported.

The filing also said the estate is unable to pay the caretakers at his residences in Florida, New Mexico and New York and power could soon be turned off.

“The harm caused by the Government’s Lien-imposed freeze on the Estate’s account at FirstBank is no longer theoretical — it is now immediate and real,” the filing said, adding they “can no longer pay for the defense of the twenty-two lawsuits pending against the Estate arising from claims of sexual abuse by Mr. Epstein, including the forfeiture action asserted by the Government as the basis for the imposition of the Liens.”

JEFFREY EPSTEIN ESTATE WORTH $57M MORE THAN A PREVIOUS ESTIMATE: REPORT

The lien, imposed Jan. 31, was part of a civil enforcement action brought by U.S. Virgin Islands Attorney General Denise George, expanded in February to name Indyke and Kahn as co-conspirators.

George alleged Indyke and Kahn conspired with Epstein to help him exploit minors and she doesn’t want either of them involved in the estate’s proposed victims’ compensation fund.

She said the lawyers could try to drain the fund before making restitution with alleged victims who were as young as 12 in the Virgin Islands and explained the lien was necessary to get an inventory of the estates’ assets, The Herald reported.

George also said Epstein’s lawyers tried to fraudulently get tax breaks after he started living in the Virgin Islands following his release from a Florida jail in 2009.

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Epstein served 13 months with work release privileges for prostitution charges.

After a subsequent arrest on sex-trafficking charges, Epstein, 66, was found hanging in his New York City prison cell in August and was later declared dead, investigators said.

Westlake Legal Group AP20009804971668 Jeffrey Epstein estate's bills, employees going unpaid over 'insufficient funds,' lawyers say: report fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/u-s-virgin-islands fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 165f8cf0-d73b-58cd-9b63-9d6b274307a0   Westlake Legal Group AP20009804971668 Jeffrey Epstein estate's bills, employees going unpaid over 'insufficient funds,' lawyers say: report fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/u-s-virgin-islands fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 165f8cf0-d73b-58cd-9b63-9d6b274307a0

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Laura Ingraham mocks Dems’ inability to guarantee same-day Nevada results: ‘Are we a Third World country?’

Westlake Legal Group image Laura Ingraham mocks Dems' inability to guarantee same-day Nevada results: 'Are we a Third World country?' Victor Garcia fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc f0585157-db39-50c4-883e-dcd8cc2c383f article

Do Saturday’s Nevada Democratic primary caucuses even matter? That’s the question Fox News host Laura Ingraham raised Friday night, on the eve of the voting — as many other questions hovered over the contest.

“And it looks like Democrats could be facing a repeat of the fiasco we saw in Iowa two weeks back, if you can believe it,” Ingraham added on “The Ingraham Angle.”

“Experts are warning of potential technical snafus,” she continued. “Now, the DNC already voided 1,000 early votes. And party chair Tom Perez? He told the AP he won’t commit to same-day election results.

“Are we a Third World country? We can’t announce the election results the night of the election?”

“Are we a Third World country? We can’t announce the election results the night of the election?”

— Laura Ingraham

TRUMP RIPS DEMS’ ‘REALITY SHOW’

Ingraham then predicted another primary victory for Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., saying either Sanders — who previously won in Iowa and New Hampshire — or former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg will ultimately be the Democrats’ 2020 presidential nominee.

“Bernie is sure to win tomorrow. And after that, the order of finish doesn’t make that much of a difference,” Ingraham said. “And I feel confident declaring tonight that this race is shaping up to be a two-man show, Sanders versus Bloomberg.”

“This race is shaping up to be a two-man show, Sanders versus Bloomberg.”

— Laura Ingraham

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The host also weighed in on former Vice President Joe Biden‘s chances of bouncing back with a win in South Carolina later this month.

“Well, after Nevada, the Democratic primary race moves to South Carolina,” Ingraham said. “Now, that state was supposed to be Joe Biden’s firewall, but as Biden, his lead shrinks in the Palmetto State, Bloomberg is reportedly telling his rich friends to stop giving money to Biden’s campaign and just slowly let the patient bleed out.”

“Well, South Carolina could end up being Uncle Joe’s last stand. That is, if he even makes it there.”

Westlake Legal Group image Laura Ingraham mocks Dems' inability to guarantee same-day Nevada results: 'Are we a Third World country?' Victor Garcia fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc f0585157-db39-50c4-883e-dcd8cc2c383f article   Westlake Legal Group image Laura Ingraham mocks Dems' inability to guarantee same-day Nevada results: 'Are we a Third World country?' Victor Garcia fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc f0585157-db39-50c4-883e-dcd8cc2c383f article

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Rod Blagojevich, Anderson Cooper spar over ex-gov’s record, criminal case: ‘Just bulls—‘

Westlake Legal Group image-8 Rod Blagojevich, Anderson Cooper spar over ex-gov's record, criminal case: 'Just bulls---' fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/politics/judiciary/state-and-local fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 951e68ca-c30b-5265-9493-89533e1e96c3

Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich and CNN anchor Anderson Cooper engaged in a lengthy and contentious back-and-forth Friday night over the recently freed Democrat’s record and claims he’s made about his criminal case.

Their frustration with one another appeared to reach a boiling point, with Cooper accusing Blagojevich on air of spouting “bulls—,” and Blagojevich using the same profane term in his reply.

CNN did not bleep the remarks.

During their discussion, Blagojevich continued to maintain his innocence regarding the corrupion charges on which he was convicted, telling Cooper he was a “political prisoner” of an unjust criminal justice system — until President Trump commuted his sentence this week, freeing Blagojevich from prison.

ROD BLAGOJEVICH’S SENTENCE COMMUTED: WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT FORMER ILLINOIS GOVERNOR’S CASE

The CNN host balked at the claim, accusing Blagojevich of essentially comparing himself to Nelson Mandela — the late South African leader who was long imprisoned because of a racist apartheid system.

“I bet if you were to ask Nelson Mandela whether he thought it was fair in the early ‘60s in South Africa he would say what I’m saying today,” Blagojevich fired back.

Cooper interjected: “I’ve just got to stop you. As someone who worked in South  Africa and saw apartheid, the idea that you are comparing yourself to somebody who has actually been railroaded by an apartheid system is just nuts and, frankly offensive.”

Blagojevich reminded Cooper that it was he, not Blagojevich, who brought Mandela’s name into the conversation.

Blagojevich then told Cooper a more apt comparison would be to U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., whose own federal corruption case was thrown out by a Newark federal judge in 2018. The U.S. Justice Department ultimately opted against retrying the Menendez case.

“What I’m saying is, I was thrown in prison and spent nearly eight years in prison for practicing politics — for seeking campaign contributions without a quid pro quo. No express quid pro quo — and I was given the same standards Senator Menendez was given,” Blagojevich said. “I could very well have been in the U.S. Senate instead of where I was.”

Blagojevich repeated his claim that he was the victim of corrupt federal prosecutors with “uncontrolled” power, and began to invoke chief prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald before Cooper cut him off to ask about a previous remark.

Cooper said Blagojevich was not only convicted by a jury of Illinoians but had his case upheld by a circuit court and denied a hearing by the Supreme Court.

“Your argument doesn’t hold up,” he said.

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Later in the interview, when Blagojevich defended his “requests for campaign contributions,” a bemused Cooper interjected “extorting a children’s hospital.” Blagojevich again went on defense, saying there was no “quid pro quo” in that situation.

Cooper later claimed Blagojevich was engaging in the usage of a “whole new alternate universe of facts” and failing to admit guilt.

“That may be big in politics today but it’s still frankly just bulls—,” Cooper said.

“It’s not bulls—, I lived it myself, it’s not bulls— at all,” Blagojevich shot back.

Westlake Legal Group image-8 Rod Blagojevich, Anderson Cooper spar over ex-gov's record, criminal case: 'Just bulls---' fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/politics/judiciary/state-and-local fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 951e68ca-c30b-5265-9493-89533e1e96c3   Westlake Legal Group image-8 Rod Blagojevich, Anderson Cooper spar over ex-gov's record, criminal case: 'Just bulls---' fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/politics/judiciary/state-and-local fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 951e68ca-c30b-5265-9493-89533e1e96c3

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