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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 57)

Weed while pregnant: Far more common and concerning than many realize

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Weed while pregnant: Far more common and concerning than many realize
CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Weed while pregnant: Far more common and concerning than many realize

The amount of women using marijuana during their pregnancies in the United State has doubled. Veuer’s Natasha Abellard has the story. Buzz60, Buzz60

Claire Alcindor’s fourth pregnancy last year was the hardest. The only way she could keep food down was by smoking marijuana, which also helped with her depression.

She was living in Maryland, in a location where marijuana is legal, but still worried “people would think I’m a bad mom” – or worse. Friends warned Child Protective Services might start investigating her. But it seemed worth the risk, especially given the reported effects of some prescription nausea and depression drugs.

“I needed to eat, I needed to stay alive and survive this pregnancy,” says Alcindor, who now lives in Las Vegas.

As more communities legalize or decriminalize marijuana use across the country, federal regulators and many doctors, however, say pot is not a risk worth taking while pregnant.

“I would say we are really rolling the dice with our kids if we expose them to it.” said Dr. Neeraj Gandotra, chief medical officer at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration at the Department of Health and Human Services. “We have a preponderance of evidence marijuana does affect brain development.” 

Studies out this summer in the Journal of the American Medical Association also reported a sharp increase in the number of pregnant women smoking marijuana and an alarming link between cannabis use and preterm births, defined as 37 weeks or earlier. Canadian researchers compared the outcomes of birth by 5,639 mothers who reported cannabis use during pregnancy with 92,873 mothers who said they didn’t use it. 

The authors concluded marijuana is “likely unsafe” because pre-term births were twice as common in marijuana users vs. non users. (12% vs 6.1%). That’s despite finding a positive effect between marijuana use and lower incidences of preeclampsia – a dangerous condition that includes high blood pressure – and gestational diabetes,

There are a lot more skeptical women to convince, however. 

Between 2002 and 2017, pregnant women who used marijuana in the previous month increased from 3.4% to 7% overall and from nearly 6% to just over 12% during the first trimester, according to the new federal published in JAMA. There are more than 16,000 members of the group “Ganja Mamas” on the What to Expect website

Dr. Emily Dossett, a psychiatrist and professor at the University of Southern California’s medical school, now heads Women’s Health and Reproductive Psychiatry for Los Angeles County’s Department of Mental Health. She also works at the USC Medical Center, where an increasing percentage of her patients smoke marijuana during pregnancy. 

She’s had patients who were on medication for depression and anxiety or even prescriptions for epilepsy who stopped taking them for the “more natural choice” of marijuana, despite the lack of knowledge about exactly what’s in even medical marijuana.

“We don’t have any evidence it is safe, but many women at this point don’t even question it as a potential problem,” said Dossett. “It is often coupled is a distrust of the medical system and particularly medications for mental illness.”

Doctors are especially worried because THC – tetrahydrocannabinol, the ingredient in marijuana that gets people high – crosses the placenta. That means babies’ brains could be being altered, says Cynthia Rogers, director of the Perinatal Behavioral Health Service and Washington University in St. Louis, Mo.  

The parts of the brain exposed are involved in emotion processing and executive functioning, said Rogers. Recent studies looking at older children related behavioral problems to exposure to marijuana in utero, she says.

Yet even doctors who support medical marijuana say medical professionals aren’t warning women enough. They say there is misinformation and an overall lack of information regarding using cannabis products during pregnancy. Medical marijuana is now legal in 33 states. 

A National Institutes of Health study released June 2018 that included over 400 Colorado dispensaries found nearly 70% recommended treatment of morning sickness with cannabis.

“Women aren’t getting a consistent message,” says Dr. Jordan Tishler, president of the Association of Cannabis Specialists and an advocate for legalizing medical marijuana. 

Tishler, an emergency physician who teaches at Harvard Medical School, says marijuana dispensaries push their products for all sorts of ailments, including nausea caused by morning sickness.  “There’s an industry out there that wants to sell a lot of marijuana-based products regardless of whether it’s safe or good for anybody,” says Tishler.

CBD hype: Is this hemp plant derivative snake oil or a legit remedy?

Prescription opioid overdoses drop, as fentanyl deaths skyrocket

In the NIH study, officials called dispensaries and told them that they were pregnant and suffering from extreme nausea. Transcriptions of phone conversations were recorded. In one case, a dispensary employee told a woman, “Edibles wouldn’t hurt the child, they’d be going through your [digestive] tract.”

Dispensary employees also sometimes told women to consult with their healthcare provider, but few did so without being prompted. The study also found 36% of recommendations said cannabis use is safe during pregnancy. 

Weed vs. prescription drugs: What’s safer for nausea?  

Carmen, who is four months pregnant in Georgia, had to be hospitalized to treat nausea during her first pregnancy six years ago. She decided to use marijuana during this current pregnancy because she’s afraid about pharmaceutical side effects and also doesn’t want to be hospitalized again. USA TODAY is not using Carmen’s last name or hometown because marijuana isn’t legal in Georgia.

Carmen had to triple the dose of the prescription drug Zofran during her first pregnancy to relieve her extreme symptoms. She was so nauseous that she couldn’t consume food for long periods of time.

 “Using marijuana was more effective than taking multiple pills,” she said,

Carmen says she researched side effects of marijuana on the fetus when figuring out whether to use cannabis during pregnancy. But she said the studies she saw covered both smoking marijuana and smoking cigarettes, without differentiating. She said that because marijuana is more natural than the tobacco products in cigarettes, she didn’t know how to interpret the studies.

What especially worried Carmen were reports about birth defects in babies whose mothers had taken Zofran, the brand name for odansetron. But Samantha Parker, assistant professor epidemiology at Boston University and lead author of a study (add link) on odansetron “this is a relatively safe medication for treatment of nausea and vomiting during pregnancy.” 

In fact, HHS’ Gandotra says ondansetron and Phenergan, the branded version of promethazine, are his top choices for nausea in pregnant women. The others are diphenhydramine and metoclopramide. 

Up to 13% of pregnant women with nausea and vomiting take Zofran, said Parker. 

There is more data on the possible effects of prescription drugs on fetuses compared to effects from cannabis, even though doing actual studies on pregnant women raises ethical concerns.

HHS’ National Institute for Drug Abuse awarded grants to four universities including University of Washington, to study pregnant women who smoked marijuana during pregnancy with other pregnant women who didn’t. 

Pamela McColl, a Canadian child rights activist, is working with an international group of physicians and the advocacy group Smart Approaches to Marijuana, to stop the research because something that puts babies at risk shouldn’t be done unless it’s a medical necessity. She also says the researchers have a responsibility to report the very women they are studying under mandatory reporting laws. 

“We have enough science to go out there with public health messages that pregnant women should not touch marijuana,” says McColl, citing research including a May study of 12 million births that was published in the Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada. 

Tricia Wright, a Hawaii doctor who runs a research center for pregnant women struggling with substance addiction, says patients tell her their doctors haven’t told them cannabis use during pregnancy isn’t safe. 

National Institute for Drug Abuse Director Nora Volkow says marijuana during pregnancy “Is not worth the risk,” but also defended the agency’s research funding because “I don’t want us to cry wolf.” 

With mixed messaging on marijuana in the U.S., pregnant women in need of relief are not able to make fully-informed decisions, physicians say. 

“I don’t think any woman goes into pregnancy wanting to hurt her child, so if she’s using it it’s either because she doesn’t understand the science or hasn’t heard the science,” says Wright.

Rogers stressed that women experiencing negative side effects of pregnancy need to speak with an obstetrician. 

Many, however, are reticent about speaking to their doctors about marijuana use. Online pregnancy groups are filled with women worried about what will happen if they test positive for pot. Claire Alcindor says that’s one of the reasons she is so skeptical about the research on marijuana – there’s a far larger universe of babies she believes are unaffected by the exposure and not considered because their mothers didn’t speak up.

Alcindor, whose content creation firm is called Big Black Brands, is also the owner of Zarico herbal skincare products which include post-partum baths. She has about 10,000 followers on Facebook where “I always share my story” of her natural lifestyle, including home births. 

“I did a ton of research,” Alcindor says of marijuana. “It was my first pregnancy where i was exploring marijuana and i never read anything about it being harmful to the fetus,” she said. “The moms were a lot more calm, able to eat, able to be happier.”

“I’m worried about this from a public health standpoint that we are allowing our better judgement to be swayed and, most importantly, we are not fully realizing the risks and we won’t see the full impact until a generation later,” Gandotra said. 

If you or your family members are struggling with issues mentioned in this story and you would like to connect with others online, join USA TODAY’s “I Survived It” Facebook support group.

Get treatment options on SAMHSA’s website or by calling its national helpline at 1-800-662-HELP (4357 anytime for referrals and information in English and Spanish.

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2019/08/14/smoking-weed-morning-sickness-pregnancy-risks-preterm-births-brain-development-prescription-drugs/1906148001/

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Harry Styles Just Turned Down A Huge Movie Role

Westlake Legal Group 5d54141a2400006100b7cf76 Harry Styles Just Turned Down A Huge Movie Role

Former One Direction star Harry Styles won’t be diving into the role of Prince Eric in the live-action remake of “The Little Mermaid.”

The actor and rocker turned down the part, sources “with knowledge of the project” told The Wrap on Tuesday. Other outlets later verified the report.

“Styles is a fan of the project but respectfully declined,” The Wrap wrote, citing one of the unnamed sources. Styles’ agency did not immediately respond to HuffPost’s request for comment.

Earlier on Tuesday, both AMC Theatres and Regal Cinemas incorrectly tweeted that Styles had agreed to do the role. The tweets were later deleted.

The U.K.’s Press Association also confirmed through a “source close to Styles” that he rejected the offer, Sky News reported. Variety verified the report as well, adding that the project has already moved on without the boy band alum, who appeared in the 2017 film “Dunkirk.”

Styles would have played opposite Halle Bailey’s Ariel, a mermaid princess who just wants to be human.

Reports had circulated in July that Disney was courting Styles for Prince Eric.

The original animated 1989 version of “The Little Mermaid” grossed more than $211 million worldwide at the box office. It won the Oscar for best musical score.

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These Four Candidates Are Scrambling to Make the Cut for the Next Democratic Debate

With the deadline to qualify for the next Democratic presidential debates looming just two weeks away, candidates on the bubble are mounting some of their final offensives, urgently seeking supporters who can help them make the cut.

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand of New York has poured more than $1 million into advertising in Iowa and New Hampshire. Julián Castro, the former housing secretary, bought a local ad in Bedminster, N.J., where President Trump is vacationing this week. And Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii has urged her supporters to try to improve their chances of being selected for online polls.

They and other lower-tier candidates are desperately searching for voters who can propel them to 2 percent support in qualifying polls, one of the Democratic National Committee’s requirements for the next set of debates, scheduled for Sept. 12 and 13 in Houston. The threshold for the June and July debates was merely 1 percent.

[Andrew Yang became the ninth Democrat to qualify for the September debates.]

Meanwhile, Tom Steyer, the former hedge fund investor turned impeachment activist, has spent millions of dollars flooding the internet with ads that have helped him catch up to his rivals after entering the race in July. On Tuesday his campaign announced that he had crossed the other threshold for qualification by collecting donations from more than 130,000 people.

The collective scramble to earn a spot on the stage next month underscores the importance the campaigns are placing on the next debates. Those who secure a lectern will have another opportunity to speak to a national audience, but those who miss out will face louder calls to withdraw as Democrats grow anxious for the field to narrow.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_158710440_5651bd92-2c86-446f-a0a8-b5f4c96391d7-articleLarge These Four Candidates Are Scrambling to Make the Cut for the Next Democratic Debate Steyer, Thomas F Presidential Election of 2020 Political Advertising Online Advertising Gillibrand, Kirsten E Gabbard, Tulsi (1981- ) Debates (Political) Castro, Julian

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand began an advertising campaign in Iowa and New Hampshire over the weekend.CreditMaddie McGarvey for The New York Times

“This is the brave new world of D.N.C. debate qualification standards,” said Jim Hobart, a partner at Public Opinion Strategies, a Republican polling firm. “Democratic presidential candidates are clearly going to do whatever they can to qualify for these debates, whether that’s spending millions of dollars on television ads or encouraging donors to sign up for these online polls.”

A New York Times analysis of polling and donation data shows that nine of the 24 Democratic candidates have already qualified for the next debates by collecting donations from at least 130,000 people and reaching 2 percent support in four qualifying polls. The deadline to meet those standards is Aug. 28.

Mr. Castro, Ms. Gabbard, Ms. Gillibrand and Mr. Steyer are all within striking distance. Mr. Castro and Mr. Steyer need only one more qualifying poll; Ms. Gabbard needs three more; and Ms. Gillibrand needs about 30,000 more donors as well as three more qualifying polls.

None of the other candidates except former Gov. John Hickenlooper of Colorado have hit 2 percent in any qualifying polls, and Mr. Hickenlooper had only about 14,000 individual donors as of June 30. The Times reported this week that he was considering dropping out of the race.

[These three cities are key for 2020 Democrats. They’re not in Iowa or New Hampshire.]

The campaigns are not necessarily seeing a return on their investment as they hunt for new donors; many are asking for $1 contributions. But the size of the donations does not matter for debate qualification, only the number of individual contributors. That has skewed campaigns’ strategies and encouraged them to create advertising they hope will go viral.

Mr. Castro’s new advertisement is set to appear Wednesday on Fox News in Bedminster, where Mr. Trump is staying at his golf course. In the ad, Mr. Castro speaks directly to the president, ticking off Mr. Trump’s words and actions that he says “stoked the fire of racists” and inspired the mass shooting that killed 22 people in El Paso this month.

“Innocent people were shot down because they look different from you. Because they look like me. They look like my family,” Mr. Castro says in the ad. “Words have consequences.”

Mr. Castro’s campaign said it spent $2,775 to run the ad a few times on Wednesday. His team said the ad was meant to send a message to Mr. Trump, who watches Fox News regularly, but campaign officials also expected it would resonate with voters.

Ms. Gillibrand’s new 30-second ad, titled “Imagine,” paints her as “a leader driven by compassion, brave enough to take on the impossible, who looks beyond herself to do what’s best for us.” Her campaign said the ad spending was intended in part to “bolster the campaign’s efforts to qualify for the fall debates.”

Ms. Gillibrand’s campaign had more than $8 million on hand at the end of June, and her aides have said that the 24 hours after the July debate were her strongest of the campaign in terms of bringing in new online donors and contributions.

She has spent heavily since then. Over the past month, her campaign spent $1 million on Facebook ads, according to data from the company, second only to Mr. Steyer’s campaign during that period.

Representative Tulsi Gabbard has been urging her supporters to take part in polls that could help her meet the qualification threshold. CreditMaddie McGarvey for The New York Times

Mr. Steyer’s team has said he plans to spend at least $100 million on the race. His campaign has already spent about $3 million advertising on Facebook and $820,000 on Google, according to data from those companies.

In the seven-day period ending on Sunday, he spent $1.1 million on Facebook, roughly five times as much as the second highest-spending Democratic candidate in that period, Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind. On Sunday alone, Mr. Steyer spent about $140,000 on Facebook — more than what many candidates, including Senator Kamala Harris of California and former Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas, spent on the platform in the past month.

Mr. Steyer has also spent about $6.5 million on television advertising since he hit the trail, according to Medium Buying, a Republican media buying agency.

A spokesman for Mr. Steyer’s campaign declined to comment on its spending and the amount of money it had raised in contributions. But other campaigns took note that Mr. Steyer had reached the donor threshold so quickly.

“The D.N.C. donor requirement may have been added with the right intentions, but there’s no doubt that it’s created a situation in which billionaires can buy their way onto the debate stage,” Gov. Steve Bullock of Montana said in a statement on Tuesday. “We’re kidding ourselves if we’re calling a $10 million purchase of 130,000 donors a demonstration of grass-roots support.”

Tom Steyer, the former hedge fund investor, has spent millions of dollars flooding the internet with ads.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

Ms. Gabbard — who left the campaign trail this week to report for a two-week training exercise with the National Guard — is in need of better polling results. In an effort to improve those prospects, her team sent an email to supporters this month imploring them to “take the time to answer if you receive a call from a pollster or are presented with an online poll.”

The email also listed “ways you can increase your chances of being selected for a debate-qualifying poll.” It encouraged supporters to fill out surveys from the online polling firms Survey Monkey and YouGov in an effort to be selected for their presidential primary polls.

Doug Rivers, YouGov’s chief scientist, said in an email that he and his team were aware of messages like the one sent by the Gabbard campaign. But he said the company’s systems made it extremely unlikely that a newly registered respondent would be surveyed in a qualifying poll. Even then, he said, there would be too few new panelists to skew the results.

A spokeswoman for Survey Monkey said it randomly selects its respondents and prevents those selected from responding multiple times.

Thomas Kaplan contributed reporting.

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Germany and China Hit Hard by Trade War, New Data Indicates

Westlake Legal Group 14germanecon1-promo-facebookJumbo-v3 Germany and China Hit Hard by Trade War, New Data Indicates United States Trump, Donald J Merkel, Angela International Trade and World Market Gross Domestic Product Germany China

FRANKFURT — In ominous signs of the damage being done by the trade war between China and the United States, data released on Wednesday indicated that the German economy is hurtling toward recession and that growth at Chinese factories is slowing at a pace not seen in almost two decades.

Germany’s economy shrank 0.1 percent from April through June and it has been treading water for the past year, the government’s official statistics agency said. Deutsche Bank analysts predicted that the economy would continue to shrink in the current quarter, meeting the technical definition of a recession.

In China, factory output in July fell to its slowest pace in 17 years, according to government data. Although the Chinese economy posted trade figures that were stronger than expected last week, the industrial output figure was another sign that China’s overall growth rate continues to slow under the weight of Beijing’s trade war with the United States and the country’s debt problems.

It is not surprising that China and Germany are stumbling under the weight of the trade pressures. China is the world’s largest exporter of goods and services, just ahead of the United States, and Germany is No. 3. Both have been countries hit directly by President Trump’s tariffs, and more broadly by the disruption to the global economy that the trade conflict has caused.

Still, the fresh data helped drive down stock prices around Europe. The main stock indexes in Frankfurt, Paris and London were all down 1 percent or more in midday trading.

In the United States, the S&P 500 dropped more than 1.5 percent in early trading. Yields on United States government bonds also fell, a signal that investors were lowering their expectations for growth. Bond yields, which drop as prices rise, have been tumbling since a recent escalation of the conflict pushed investors seeking a safe haven toward government bonds.

The troubles of Germany and China are a bad omen for the rest of the world, because of the outsize roles the countries play in global commerce.

Automobiles, Germany’s biggest export product, are a prime example of the collateral damage being done by the broader trade war. The German carmakers Volkswagen, Daimler and BMW all earn at least a third of their revenue in China, where auto sales have been slipping after years of explosive growth. One major factor in the slide is the barrage of trade threats that have unsettled Chinese consumers, discouraging them from buying big-ticket goods.

Germany’s economic performance was the worst of any eurozone country during the second quarter, separate data from the European Union statistics agency indicated.

That is an embarrassment for Germany, which has long lectured other countries on how to manage their economies. The slumping growth will probably increase calls for Chancellor Angela Merkel’s government to increase spending to stimulate the economy.

“Today’s G.D.P. report definitely marks the end of a golden decade for the German economy,” Carsten Brzeski, chief economist at ING Germany, said in a note to clients. “The pressure on the German government to act will increase.”

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ICE offices, workers hit by wave of violence and threats: ‘We know where all your children live’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6071936684001_6071934925001-vs ICE offices, workers hit by wave of violence and threats: ‘We know where all your children live’ fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/politics fnc article Adam Shaw 875cc7c7-f166-5e56-b72e-5accafbba05a

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) workers are facing a rapidly escalating series of threats, including protesters menacing their children and shots being fired at their offices, amid a rising tide of anti-ICE rhetoric from the left fueled by congressional Democrats, media voices and presidential hopefuls.

Footage published Tuesday by Breitbart News shows protesters in Florida from groups such as Never Again Action and Black Lives Matter Alliance of Broward County threatening workers and former employees of the GEO Group, a private contractor used by ICE.

TOM HOMAN: ICE, BORDER PATROL ARE TARGETS FOR LEFT-WING EXTREMISTS: WHERE’S THE OUTRAGE FROM DEMS?

One protester threatened the family of GEO Group’s former general counsel, John Bulfin.

“We know where all your children live throughout the country … John Bulfin you have kids in [bleeped out], you have kids in [bleeped out],” the protester yelled. “We know everything about you and you won’t just be seeing us here.”

“We know where you sleep at night,” another protester shouted. “We know what kind of dog food you buy your dogs.”

“We’re not actually joking,” the protester said before shouting the location of where Bulfin lives. “John Bulfin you go to [bleeped out], you go to church on [bleeped out], you live on [bleeped out] the road. We are not joking.”

Another can be heard yelling: “When immigrant bodies are under attack, what do we do?”

“Fight back,” other protesters responded.

Breitbart reports that the footage was taken a day before shots were fired early Tuesday at an ICE office and GEO Group office in San Antonio, Texas, in what the FBI has called a “targeted attack.”

The shooting occurred around 3 a.m. at an ICE building where two floors house administrative and executive offices, according to the San Antonio Express-News. The outlet reported another shooting occurred at a separate facility where an ICE contractor is located.

“All of the shots that we have found are on the floors where ICE had offices,” FBI Special Agent in Charge Chris Combs said. “This is no question a very targeted attack. It’s not a secret facility, you can go online, it’s [the address is] out there. So they did some research, they knew what floors ICE was on, they knew what buildings they were and they hit those.”

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services acting Director Ken Cuccinelli tweeted out pictures of the bullet holes.

The incidents are the latest escalation in anti-ICE sentiment that has shifted from calls to abolish the agency and claims that it is “caging children” to threats and violence within the space of a year.

Last month, a man was killed by Washington state authorities when he threw incendiary devices at both an immigration center and nearby propane tanks. In Colorado, protesters demonstrating outside an ICE facility replaced the American flag with the Mexican flag. Also last month, protesters were arrested after trying to storm an ICE building in Washington, D.C.

Department of Homeland Security Acting Secretary Kevin McAleenan said on “Fox & Friends” Wednesday that people need to tone down “dangerous” rhetoric that demonizes ICE officials.

FBI INVESTIGATING SHOOTING AT ICE OFFICE IN SAN ANTONIO AS ‘TARGETED ATTACK’

“The environment where we’re demonizing our law enforcement for doing their jobs and enforcing the law on the books is concerning,” he said. “It can be dangerous and it can result in people taking action that are not supported by facts that are not in response to anything inappropriate that the men and women of ICE are doing and we’ve got to tone that down.”

In an op-ed for Fox News Wednesday, Former ICE Director Thomas Homan said that he had to deal with death threats when he was in charge of the agency and had to receive round-the-clock armed protection for weeks.

He also noted increasingly heated rhetoric from elected Democrats and presidential hopefuls about the work ICE does.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“In addition to the threats of violence, we see elected officials at the local, state and national level calling the Border Patrol, ICE and anyone that enforces our immigration law Nazis, racists, and obscene names,” he wrote.

He also asked where the outrage was from Democrats, who recently have partly blamed President Trump for creating anti-immigrant sentiment that encouraged the mass shooting in El Paso, Texas.

“Here’s the bottom line: Hate is hate, terrorism is terrorism, and murder is murder. Politicians who condemn attacks on themselves and institutions and policies they support have an obligation to condemn such attacks on their opponents just as vigorously.”

Fox News’ Louis Casiano contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6071936684001_6071934925001-vs ICE offices, workers hit by wave of violence and threats: ‘We know where all your children live’ fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/politics fnc article Adam Shaw 875cc7c7-f166-5e56-b72e-5accafbba05a   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6071936684001_6071934925001-vs ICE offices, workers hit by wave of violence and threats: ‘We know where all your children live’ fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/politics fnc article Adam Shaw 875cc7c7-f166-5e56-b72e-5accafbba05a

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Boy’s rare disease took 5 years to diagnose, family says

Westlake Legal Group 7ec95975-pediatric_istock Boy's rare disease took 5 years to diagnose, family says fox-news/health/medical-research/transplants fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox-news/health/digestive-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 755b532d-cf36-5c18-a396-8889c86cb4fa

A 6-year-old boy’s family is pinning their hope on a bone marrow transplant as a possible cure for a disease so rare that it took five years for doctors to find a diagnosis for him. Cohen Bramlee, the youngest of his family’s five siblings, first landed in the hospital at 4 months old, according to PEOPLE.

DOG IN TEXAS DIES FROM TOXIC ALGAE FOUND IN RIVER, OWNER CLAIMS: ‘I BLAME MYSELF’

His puzzling symptoms included food intolerance that would sometimes send his body into shock and required him to receive his meals and nutrients entirely through a central line catheter. He spent much of his young life in and out of the hospital, but doctors couldn’t nail down the underlying cause until researchers at the Undiagnosed Diseases Network at Duke University got a hold of his case. They determined that Cohen had a variance in an immune system gene, which was confirmed by Dr. Stella Davies at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital to be the cause of his ailments, PEOPLE reported.

From there, his medical team determined that a bone marrow transplant may be the cure he needs. Two of Cohen’s siblings were found to be matches for a bone marrow transplant, with 16-year-old Todd Christopher chosen as the donor.

TENNESSEE COUPLE’S METH ADDICTION, RECOVERY PHOTOS GO VIRAL: ‘IT GETS BETTER’

“It was the first time that we really had hope that this was going to have a cure,” Carrie Bramlee, Cohen’s mother, told PEOPLE. “He’s been very sick and we came close to losing him several times, so now knowing that there is a chance for him to not only be healthier but be cured is unimaginable.”

The family has kept their supporters updated through the “Super Cohen’s Crusade” Facebook page, which includes snapshots of his everyday life. He is currently making his way through a pre-bone marrow transplant bucket list which includes a visit to Build-A-Bear and a fishing trip. According to the page, the transplant is tentatively scheduled for the second week of September.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Our superhero might be medically fragile but make no mistake about it, he is a strong, brave and an amazing little guy that brings so much joy to all who know him,” a blog post on the page reads. “We are blessed to call him our son. I pray his strength inspires all who hear his story!”

Westlake Legal Group 7ec95975-pediatric_istock Boy's rare disease took 5 years to diagnose, family says fox-news/health/medical-research/transplants fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox-news/health/digestive-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 755b532d-cf36-5c18-a396-8889c86cb4fa   Westlake Legal Group 7ec95975-pediatric_istock Boy's rare disease took 5 years to diagnose, family says fox-news/health/medical-research/transplants fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox-news/health/digestive-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 755b532d-cf36-5c18-a396-8889c86cb4fa

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Most Americans are living paycheck to paycheck, survey shows

Katie Brockman , The Motley Fool Published 10:00 a.m. ET Aug. 14, 2019

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Most Americans are living paycheck to paycheck, survey shows
CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Most Americans are living paycheck to paycheck, survey shows

The way you spend your first few paychecks could set a pattern for years to come. Here’s how to make the most of your hard-earned dollars. USA TODAY

Even if you’re struggling financially, you can still find ways to save for the future.

When you have a seemingly endless list of bills to pay and financial responsibilities to take care of, it can be tough to make sure there’s enough money to go around.

The average American is struggling to make ends meet each month, with 59% of U.S. adults saying they live paycheck to paycheck, according to a recent survey from Charles Schwab. Furthermore, nearly half of survey participants say they carry credit card debt and struggle to keep up with the payments.

If you’re having a hard enough time paying the bills and putting food on the table without racking up debt, saving for the future is probably the last thing on your mind. Only 38% of people have an emergency fund, according to Charles Schwab, and one in five Americans don’t have a dime saved for retirement, according to a survey from Northwestern Mutual.

Money tips: 42% of parents admit they weren’t financially ready to have a child

Having a baby?: Here are 5 ways to prepare for parental leave

However, although many people are living paycheck to paycheck and struggling to save, there’s one mistake you could be making that’s hurting your financial health.

Think you have nothing to save? That may not be the case

Despite the fact that the majority of Americans say they’re living paycheck to paycheck, the average person spends $483 per month on non-essential expenses, Charles Schwab found.

It’s easy to let your spending get out of hand, especially if you’re not tracking your expenses to see where your money goes. It may feel as if you’re stretching every dollar and can’t afford to set any money aside in your retirement fund or savings account, but you’re probably spending more than you think on things you don’t need.

To get a clearer picture of exactly how much you’re spending each month and what you’re spending money on, start tracking your expenses and create a budget. These days, it’s easier than ever to track your spending, and there are several apps that will do it for you.

Once you have a list of all your expenses, the next step is to categorize them by importance. Break these costs down by whether they’re truly necessary and whether you have the ability to lower them. Some costs, like your phone bill, might be necessary, but you may be able to shop around to find a better deal and save some money each month. Other costs, like your mortgage, aren’t as flexible.

When it comes to non-essential costs, be honest with yourself about how much you can afford to spend. If you can’t live without your morning latte or takeout once or twice a week, that’s OK – you don’t have to completely eliminate it from your budget. In fact, sometimes it’s beneficial to splurge every so often, because then you’re more likely to stick to your budget. If you slash everything but the bare necessities, you may give up after a few weeks and go back to your old frivolous ways. At the same time, if you’re struggling to pay your essential expenses because you’re spending too much on non-essential costs, you need to make some cuts somewhere.

How to save more money on a tight budget

If you’ve already trimmed the fat from your budget and you’re still struggling to come up with enough cash to pay your bills and save for the future, you need to take more drastic measures.

First, figure out your biggest challenge when it comes to saving more money. Is it because you don’t have enough cash to pay all your essential bills and still sock away savings? If that’s the case, see if it’s possible to pick up a side hustle, and put that extra cash toward your savings. Not everyone can simply find another job, but sometimes something as simple as walking dogs in your neighborhood or selling your used clothing online can help you earn a few hundred dollars per month – which goes a long way when you invest it for the future.

On the other hand, if your struggle is keeping your spending in check so you don’t go overboard on unnecessary costs, try to come up with a way to hold yourself accountable. Sometimes, that’s as simple as setting spending limits for each category of your budget. If you’re using an app to track your spending, you can set limits for yourself and see how much you have left to spend in each category every time you log in.

Also, if your goal is to save more for the future, make saving a category within your budget. If you treat saving as another bill you have to pay, you’ll be forced to save at least a little each month. Even if you can’t save much right now, it’s good to get into the habit of regularly stashing some money away. See if you can automate your savings every month.

Setting money aside for the future isn’t the most exciting way to spend your paycheck, but it is crucial if you want to save for retirement and prepare for any unexpected expenses that will inevitably arise. It may seem like an impossible task to save more if you’re living paycheck to paycheck, but with a few sacrifices and strategic spending techniques, it’s easier than you may think.

The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

The Motley Fool is a USA TODAY content partner offering financial news, analysis and commentary designed to help people take control of their financial lives. Its content is produced independently of USA TODAY.

Offer from the Motley Fool: The $16,728 Social Security bonus most retirees completely overlook

If you’re like most Americans, you’re a few years (or more) behind on your retirement savings. But a handful of little-known “Social Security secrets” could help ensure a boost in your retirement income. For example: one easy trick could pay you as much as $16,728 more… each year! Once you learn how to maximize your Social Security benefits, we think you could retire confidently with the peace of mind we’re all after.

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Most Americans are living paycheck to paycheck, survey shows

Katie Brockman , The Motley Fool Published 10:00 a.m. ET Aug. 14, 2019

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Most Americans are living paycheck to paycheck, survey shows
CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Most Americans are living paycheck to paycheck, survey shows

The way you spend your first few paychecks could set a pattern for years to come. Here’s how to make the most of your hard-earned dollars. USA TODAY

Even if you’re struggling financially, you can still find ways to save for the future.

When you have a seemingly endless list of bills to pay and financial responsibilities to take care of, it can be tough to make sure there’s enough money to go around.

The average American is struggling to make ends meet each month, with 59% of U.S. adults saying they live paycheck to paycheck, according to a recent survey from Charles Schwab. Furthermore, nearly half of survey participants say they carry credit card debt and struggle to keep up with the payments.

If you’re having a hard enough time paying the bills and putting food on the table without racking up debt, saving for the future is probably the last thing on your mind. Only 38% of people have an emergency fund, according to Charles Schwab, and one in five Americans don’t have a dime saved for retirement, according to a survey from Northwestern Mutual.

Money tips: 42% of parents admit they weren’t financially ready to have a child

Having a baby?: Here are 5 ways to prepare for parental leave

However, although many people are living paycheck to paycheck and struggling to save, there’s one mistake you could be making that’s hurting your financial health.

Think you have nothing to save? That may not be the case

Despite the fact that the majority of Americans say they’re living paycheck to paycheck, the average person spends $483 per month on non-essential expenses, Charles Schwab found.

It’s easy to let your spending get out of hand, especially if you’re not tracking your expenses to see where your money goes. It may feel as if you’re stretching every dollar and can’t afford to set any money aside in your retirement fund or savings account, but you’re probably spending more than you think on things you don’t need.

To get a clearer picture of exactly how much you’re spending each month and what you’re spending money on, start tracking your expenses and create a budget. These days, it’s easier than ever to track your spending, and there are several apps that will do it for you.

Once you have a list of all your expenses, the next step is to categorize them by importance. Break these costs down by whether they’re truly necessary and whether you have the ability to lower them. Some costs, like your phone bill, might be necessary, but you may be able to shop around to find a better deal and save some money each month. Other costs, like your mortgage, aren’t as flexible.

When it comes to non-essential costs, be honest with yourself about how much you can afford to spend. If you can’t live without your morning latte or takeout once or twice a week, that’s OK – you don’t have to completely eliminate it from your budget. In fact, sometimes it’s beneficial to splurge every so often, because then you’re more likely to stick to your budget. If you slash everything but the bare necessities, you may give up after a few weeks and go back to your old frivolous ways. At the same time, if you’re struggling to pay your essential expenses because you’re spending too much on non-essential costs, you need to make some cuts somewhere.

How to save more money on a tight budget

If you’ve already trimmed the fat from your budget and you’re still struggling to come up with enough cash to pay your bills and save for the future, you need to take more drastic measures.

First, figure out your biggest challenge when it comes to saving more money. Is it because you don’t have enough cash to pay all your essential bills and still sock away savings? If that’s the case, see if it’s possible to pick up a side hustle, and put that extra cash toward your savings. Not everyone can simply find another job, but sometimes something as simple as walking dogs in your neighborhood or selling your used clothing online can help you earn a few hundred dollars per month – which goes a long way when you invest it for the future.

On the other hand, if your struggle is keeping your spending in check so you don’t go overboard on unnecessary costs, try to come up with a way to hold yourself accountable. Sometimes, that’s as simple as setting spending limits for each category of your budget. If you’re using an app to track your spending, you can set limits for yourself and see how much you have left to spend in each category every time you log in.

Also, if your goal is to save more for the future, make saving a category within your budget. If you treat saving as another bill you have to pay, you’ll be forced to save at least a little each month. Even if you can’t save much right now, it’s good to get into the habit of regularly stashing some money away. See if you can automate your savings every month.

Setting money aside for the future isn’t the most exciting way to spend your paycheck, but it is crucial if you want to save for retirement and prepare for any unexpected expenses that will inevitably arise. It may seem like an impossible task to save more if you’re living paycheck to paycheck, but with a few sacrifices and strategic spending techniques, it’s easier than you may think.

The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

The Motley Fool is a USA TODAY content partner offering financial news, analysis and commentary designed to help people take control of their financial lives. Its content is produced independently of USA TODAY.

Offer from the Motley Fool: The $16,728 Social Security bonus most retirees completely overlook

If you’re like most Americans, you’re a few years (or more) behind on your retirement savings. But a handful of little-known “Social Security secrets” could help ensure a boost in your retirement income. For example: one easy trick could pay you as much as $16,728 more… each year! Once you learn how to maximize your Social Security benefits, we think you could retire confidently with the peace of mind we’re all after.

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Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2019/08/14/paycheck-to-paycheck-most-americans-struggle-financially-survey-says/39940123/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Recession Fears Hit Wall Street Following Poor Economic Data From China, Germany

Westlake Legal Group 5d5411502200003100f583cc Recession Fears Hit Wall Street Following Poor Economic Data From China, Germany

Aug 14 (Reuters) – Wall Street was set to open sharply lower on Wednesday, as poor economic data from China and Germany put the focus back on the impact of a bruising Sino-U.S. trade war which is pushing some major economies towards the brink of recession.

The outlook for Germany’s export reliant economy was also grim and Chinese industrial output growth cooled to a more than 17-year low, adding to headwinds for U.S. multinationals that rely on global demand.

The U.S. bond market showed red flags, with two-year Treasury yields rising above those for 10-year paper for the first time since 2007, pointing to the risk of recession.

Wall Street’s main indexes surged more than 1.5% on Tuesday after Washington delayed the introduction of tariffs on some Chinese consumer goods.

“It’s almost as if global investors either don’t buy the tariff delay as a sign of real progress in the U.S.-China trade war or have been too consumed by further evidence of global economic weakness to care,” BMO Capital Markets strategist Stephen Gallo said.

At 8:28 a.m. ET, Dow e-minis were down 361 points, or 1.37%. S&P 500 e-minis were down 39.25 points, or 1.34% and Nasdaq 100 e-minis were down 119 points, or 1.54%.

Banks were among the losers in trading before the bell, with Bank of America Corp, Citigroup Inc, JPMorganChase & Co, Goldman Sachs, Wells Fargo & Co and Morgan Stanley down between 2.3% and 3.1%.

Shares of Apple Inc were down 2.3% after boosting markets a day earlier with a 4% rise.

Chipmakers were also trading lower, with Micron TechnologyInc, Broadcom Inc and Nvidia Corp down more than 2%.

Macy’s Inc tumbled 12.9% after the department store operator cut its full-year profit forecast as it discounted heavily to clear excess spring season inventory.

Rivals Target Corp and Nordstrom Inc slipped between 3.8% and 4.5%.

(Reporting by Medha Singh and Arjun Panchadar in Bengaluru; Editing by Anil D’Silva)

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Stocks Slide as Bond Market Signals Rising Concern About Growth

Westlake Legal Group 14Markets-facebookJumbo Stocks Slide as Bond Market Signals Rising Concern About Growth United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Standard&Poor's 500-Stock Index Politics and Government International Trade and World Market Dow Jones Stock Average Customs (Tariff) Banking and Financial Institutions

Stocks dropped on Wednesday, as the bond market signaled rising concern about the economy and data from Germany showed the country could be veering toward a recession.

The German government reported that its economy shrank in the three months ending in June. The largest economy in the eurozone, Germany has become particularly vulnerable to the trade war playing out between the United States and China because of its dependence on manufacturing and exports. A second quarter of decline would mean Germany is technically in a recession.

[Read more about how Germany is heading toward a recession.]

The news sent shares in major European markets lower. The main stock indexes in Frankfurt, Paris and London were all down 1 percent or more in midday trading. The S&P 500 dropped more than 1.5 percent in early trading.

Yields on United States government bonds also fell, signaling downgraded expectations for growth. The bond yields, which move lower as prices rise, have been tumbling ever since the trade dispute suddenly escalated in recent weeksand investors turned to the government bond market in search of a safe haven.

On Wednesday, the decline left yields on 10-year bonds below those on two-year bonds, in what’s known as an inversion of the yield curve. The yield curve is the bond market’s most reliable indicator of a recession, having preceded every economic decline in the United States of the last 60 years.

[Read more about the intensifying recession warning in the bond market.]

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