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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 6)

‘The Masked Singer’ Unmasks Skeleton And He’s Bad To The Bone (Spoilers)

Westlake Legal Group 5da836362000000210505f22 ‘The Masked Singer’ Unmasks Skeleton And He’s Bad To The Bone (Spoilers)

The crooning carcass was eliminated in a showdown against Butterfly, Flamingo, Leopard, Black Widow and Thingamajig in a return of those costumed celebrities.

Without further ado, the clues to Skeleton’s identity: He said the show is his shot at being a headliner, he’s felt “overshadowed” and discovered that being in the background could make him “more instrumental in orchestrating those around me.”

He sang a decomposed “Are You Gonna Be My Girl,” and judge Jenny McCarthy correctly guessed the performer’s identity mid-song.

Finally, skeleton met with grave consequences. He had to unmask:

It was Paul Shaffer, longtime sidekick on David Letterman’s late night talk shows.

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Rep. Elijah Cummings, Capitol Hill veteran and Maryland Democrat, dies at age 68

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Rep. Elijah Cummings, Capitol Hill veteran and Maryland Democrat, dies at age 68

Quoting Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at Michael Cohen’s House hearing, Rep. Elijah Cummings said, “silence becomes betrayal.” USA TODAY

Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, who represented parts of Baltimore, the city where he was born and raised, died early Thursday at age 68.

The Maryland Democrat died at Gilchrist Hospice Care, which is affiliated with Johns Hopkins Hospital, at about 2:30 a.m. EDT from “complications concerning longstanding health challenges,” his office confirmed in a statement. 

Cummings, as chairman of the House Oversight Committee, most recently sparred with President Donald Trump as the 23-year veteran of Capitol Hill led multiple investigations into the president and his administration.

The son of a sharecropper, Cummings became a lawyer and then judge. He was elected to the Maryland House of Delegates in 1983, where he served until 1996, including a stint as speaker pro tempore from 1995 to 1996. He was elected to the House of Representatives in a 1996 special election to fill the seat vacated when Rep. Kweisi Mfume left Congress to head the NAACP.

His wife is Maya Rockeymoore Cummings, chairwoman of the Maryland Democratic Party.

“Congressman Cummings was an honorable man who proudly served his district and the nation with dignity, integrity, compassion and humility,” she said in a statement

“He worked until his last breath because he believed our democracy was the highest and best expression of our collective humanity and that our nation’s diversity was our promise, not our problem. It has been an honor to walk by his side on this incredible journey. I loved him deeply and will miss him dearly,” she said. 

In July, Trump lashed out at Cummings after the congressman criticized the administration’s handling of migrant detention centers and his committee authorized subpoenas for senior White House officials’ electronic communications. The president called Cummings a “brutal bully” and said Baltimore was a “rodent-infested mess” where “no human being would want to live.”

Those remarks were condemned as racist by many, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. The president denied being racist and inexplicably called Cummings “racist” in turn. 

Former Rep. Donna Edwards, D-Md., who served with Cummings from 2008-2017, said in a tweet that “Baltimore, Maryland, and our nation have lost a true warrior for truth and justice. Rep. Elijah Cummings rests with the angels.” 

“We lost a giant today,” tweeted presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif. “Congressman Elijah Cummings was a fearless leader, a protector of democracy, and a fighter for the people of Maryland. Our world is dimmer without him in it.”

Contributing: The Associated Press

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Britain’s Boris Johnson Hails New Brexit Deal With EU As Deadline Looms

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1176015737-433c6e5c5e87db1fe62f741664c25282e84c721f-s1100-c15 Britain's Boris Johnson Hails New Brexit Deal With EU As Deadline Looms

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said Thursday that he’d forged a new Brexit agreement with the European Union. Wiktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Wiktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Britain's Boris Johnson Hails New Brexit Deal With EU As Deadline Looms

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said Thursday that he’d forged a new Brexit agreement with the European Union.

Wiktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Updated at 9 a.m. ET

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson says he has reached an agreement with the European Union on a new Brexit deal that would allow the EU to continue collecting value-added tax from Northern Ireland and allow special treatment for certain goods going over the Irish border.

Johnson hailed the “new deal that takes back control,” and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker called it a “fair and balanced agreement.”

With the deal in hand, Juncker said, “there is no need for any kind of prolongation” — referring to the potential for delays or postponements that had been raised after the two sides failed to make headway in recent weeks.

Johnson’s government faces an Oct. 31 deadline for Brexit. If an agreement isn’t in place by then, Johnson would be forced to ask the EU for an extension to avoid the economic perils that a “no-deal” Brexit could bring.

Johnson and Juncker held a cordial news conference about the deal Thursday — but its reception among Johnson’s critics in the U.K. was less warm. And their responses could foreshadow the slim chances of the agreement making its way through Parliament. Johnson’s Conservative Party does not have a majority in the House of Commons.

“From what we know, it seems the prime minister has negotiated an even worse deal than Theresa May’s, which was overwhelmingly rejected,” said Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the opposition Labour Party, referring to Johnson’s predecessor as prime minister.

“This sell-out deal won’t bring the country together and should be rejected,” Corbyn said.

Meanwhile, Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party, which has argued against any “special status” for the province, quickly responded to news of a deal, saying it could not support the proposed agreement “as things stand.”

“[We] could not support what is being suggested on customs and consent issues and there is a lack of clarity on VAT,” the party’s leader, Arlene Foster and deputy leader, Nigel Dodds, said in a statement, referring to the value-added tax.

“We will continue to work with the government to try and get a sensible deal that works for Northern Ireland and protects the economic and constitutional integrity of the United Kingdom,” Foster and Dodds said.

“Now is the moment for us to get Brexit done,” Johnson said at the news conference with Juncker. He added that the next task — other than securing passage of the deal in Parliament — would be for the U.K. and EU to work out their future relationship.

“We are a quintessential European country, solid European friends, neighbors and supporters,” Johnson said.

After Johnson ended his remarks on that note, Juncker concluded the briefing by saying, “I have to say that I’m happy about the deal, but I’m sad about Brexit.”

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U.K. and E.U. Agree on Brexit Draft Deal, but Hurdles Remain

Westlake Legal Group 17brexit-sub-facebookJumbo U.K. and E.U. Agree on Brexit Draft Deal, but Hurdles Remain Politics and Government Northern Ireland Johnson, Boris Great Britain Withdrawal from EU (Brexit) Great Britain European Union Democratic Unionist Party (Northern Ireland) Brussels (Belgium)

BRUSSELS — Britain and the European Union agreed on the draft text of a Brexit deal on Thursday, an 11th-hour breakthrough in Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s effort to settle his country’s anguished, yearslong debate over Brexit and pave the way for its departure from the bloc.

The deal, details of which were published shortly after the announcement, must still clear several hurdles, including approval from Europe’s leaders and, most crucially, passage in the British Parliament. Mr. Johnson’s predecessor, Theresa May, had also struck a deal with Brussels but suffered three thunderous defeats in Parliament.

Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party, seen as vital to the passage of the agreement in Parliament, said it did not support the agreement. And the opposition Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, called on members of Parliament to reject it, saying, “It seems the prime minister has negotiated an even worse deal than Theresa May’s.”

Mr. Johnson announced the agreement on Twitter, saying that the parties had reached a “great new deal that takes back control” and that Parliament would now be clear to vote on the agreement on Saturday.

Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission’s president, confirmed that a deal had been struck and noted that a revised arrangement on Northern Ireland had been reached.

He wrote on Twitter: “Where there is a will, there is a #deal — we have one! It’s a fair and balanced agreement for the EU and the UK.”

Britain’s frantic efforts to negotiate a Brexit agreement with the European Union had appeared to hit a last-minute snag after the D.U.P. said in a statement on Thursday morning that it could not support the deal “as things stand.

The statement, hours before Mr. Johnson was to present the deal to European leaders at a summit meeting in Brussels, suggested that domestic politics once again threatened to torpedo the complex negotiations.

It was unclear whether the deal had been altered before the agreement with European leaders was reached. It was also unclear whether the Northern Irish party simply wanted to make a show of holding out for its position before ultimately acquiescing — or whether Mr. Johnson faced a serious rebellion from the skeptics in his ranks.

Mr. Johnson may have an advantage over his predecessor in securing parliamentary approval for the deal, because he has assiduously cultivated the most skeptical elements of his party.

For days, Mr. Johnson had worked frantically to bridge a gap over the thorny question of how to treat Northern Ireland in a post-Brexit Europe — a fiendishly complex issue that helped torpedo Mrs. May’s agreement and could still fracture Mr. Johnson’s Conservative-led coalition in Parliament.

People briefed on the talks said Mr. Johnson had given significant ground on the structure of a customs unions that would allow Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom, to continue to trade seamlessly with Ireland and other members of the European Union.

It was a dramatic culmination to down-to-the-wire talks that began on Tuesday morning, with some European officials predicting that the two sides would not be able to close the gap on customs issues in time to finalize a draft deal before the critical summit meeting of European leaders on Thursday and Friday.

The value of the British pound soared on the news of a deal to a five-month high, trading at $1.29 to the dollar. The rise reversed a slump earlier in the day, when the Democratic Unionist Party signaled that it would not back Mr. Johnson’s draft deal.

The Democratic Unionists, who have proved to be a pivotal blocking force in previous attempts to negotiate a Brexit agreement, said they were troubled by elements of the deal on how to handle Northern Ireland in a post-Brexit world.

“As things stand, we could not support what is being suggested on a customs and consent issues, and there is a lack of clarity on VAT,” the party said in a statement issued earlier on Thursday, referring to the value-added tax.

The party said it would continue working with the government on an acceptable agreement.

Mr. Johnson has consulted closely the Democratic Unionists and other skeptical elements of his Conservative Party-led coalition as a deal has taken shape. On Wednesday, optimism had grown amid signs in Brussels that the deadlock over Britain’s planned departure from the bloc could be on the verge of breaking.

Brussels has pushed Mr. Johnson so far that it “makes sense they are unhappy,” Mujtaba Rahman, an analyst with the Eurasia Group, a political risk consultancy, said of the Democratic Unionists. But he said it was unclear how serious the setback was, because “the D.U.P. does have to be seen fighting.”

The intervention from the Democratic Unionists underscored the problems that Mr. Johnson faces in trying to get any deal through Parliament, where he does not have a majority. Without the support of the D.U.P., Mr. Johnson has little hope of getting any agreement ratified by Parliament.

It is also a reminder that he faces many of the problems confronted by Mrs. May. In December 2017, the Democratic Unionists derailed her efforts to reach a deal to allow her to proceed to another phase in the Brexit negotiations.

That happened while she was holding a working lunch with Mr. Juncker. She was forced to pause discussions with the European Commission president, and keep diplomats waiting, to take a call from Arlene Foster, the Democratic Unionist Party’s leader.

Mrs. May then returned with a revised plan several days later, at which point Ms. Foster said that the new version ensured that there would be no border between Britain and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom.

Essentially, Mr. Johnson’s proposed agreement would leave Northern Ireland aligned with European Union laws and regulations on most trade issues, even as it moved out of the European single market and into a customs union with Britain.

Under the proposed terms, there would be customs checks on goods flowing from Britain to Northern Ireland to ensure that they meet the rules if those goods were ultimately destined for the European Union.

There would be a complex series of rules on tariffs and value-added tax payments to compensate for differences in tariff rates between the European and British customs unions, though negotiators had struggled on Tuesday to resolve the issue of how to rebate value-added tax payments.

The arrangement would also be subject to consent by the Northern Ireland Assembly, but in a way that would prevent the Democratic Unionists, who have opposed previous such proposals, from simply vetoing it at the first possible opportunity.

The Democratic Unionists are crucial to Mr. Johnson’s effort to win a majority for the deal in Parliament. Their opposition to similar previous versions of a Brexit agreement forced Mrs. May to overhaul that agreement to place all of Britain in the European customs union for a period of time.

Mrs. May’s deal was, nevertheless, soundly defeated in Parliament three times.

Mr. Johnson was seen as having a better chance of cobbling together a majority, in part because he was a vocal supporter of Brexit before the 2016 referendum and thus has greater credibility with euroskeptic elements of the Conservative coalition.

The Democratic Unionist Party campaigned for Brexit in the 2016 referendum campaign, and Mr. Johnson has presented his plan as the last chance to deliver on that mandate from voters. In Northern Ireland as a whole, however, 56 percent of voters in the referendum favored remaining in the European Union.

Yet, for the party, which is strongly committed to maintaining Northern Ireland’s status as a part of the United Kingdom, the issues being negotiated by Mr. Johnson are existential. That is because if they bind Northern Ireland much more closely to Ireland, its southern neighbor, some fear that it would inevitably lead to a united Ireland.

If the Democratic Unionists have collectively decided that the proposals are unacceptable, they will have to change to secure support.

Mr. Johnson has vowed to withdraw Britain from the European Union, with or without a deal, by Oct. 31, and his negotiators have labored to seal an agreement by this week so that he is not forced to ask Brussels for an extension, as would be required under a measure that Parliament passed last month.

Anna Schaverien contributed reporting from London.

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Britain’s Johnson Hails New Brexit Deal With EU As Deadline Looms

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1176015737-23bf2aae2424a30120ffff7a1efae370c2b24e62-s1100-c15 Britain's Johnson Hails New Brexit Deal With EU As Deadline Looms

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson at 10 Downing Street in London on Tuesday. Wiktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Wiktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Britain's Johnson Hails New Brexit Deal With EU As Deadline Looms

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson at 10 Downing Street in London on Tuesday.

Wiktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Updated at 9 a.m. ET

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson says he has reached an agreement with the European Union on a new Brexit deal that would allow the EU to continue collecting value-added tax from Northern Ireland and allow special treatment for certain goods going over the Irish border.

Johnson hailed the “new deal that takes back control,” and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker called it a “fair and balanced agreement.”

With the deal in hand, Juncker said, “there is no need for any kind of prolongation” — referring to the potential for delays or postponements that had been raised after the two sides failed to make headway in recent weeks.

Johnson’s government faces an Oct. 31 deadline for Brexit. If an agreement isn’t in place by then, the U.K. would leave without a deal — a move that many fear could be economically disastrous.

Johnson and Juncker held a cordial news briefing about the deal Thursday — but its reception among Johnson’s critics in the U.K. was less warm. And their responses could foreshadow the slim chances of the agreement making its way through Parliament. Johnson’s Conservative Party does not have a majority in the House of Commons.

“From what we know, it seems the prime minister has negotiated an even worse deal than Theresa May’s, which was overwhelmingly rejected,” said Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the opposition Labour Party, referring to Johnson’s predecessor as prime minister.

“This sell-out deal won’t bring the country together and should be rejected,” Corbyn said.

Meanwhile, Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), which has argued against any “special status” for the province, quickly responded to news of a deal, saying it could not support the proposed agreement “as things stand.”

“[We] could not support what is being suggested on customs and consent issues and there is a lack of clarity on VAT,” the party’s leader, Arlene Foster and deputy leader, Nigel Dodds, said in a statement.

“We will continue to work with the government to try and get a sensible deal that works for Northern Ireland and protects the economic and constitutional integrity of the United Kingdom,” Foster and Dodds said.

“Now is the moment for us to get Brexit done,” Johnson said at a joint news briefing with Juncker. He added that the next task — other than securing passage of the deal in Parliament — would be for the U.K. and EU to work out their future relationship.

“We are a quintessential European country, solid European friends, neighbors and supporters,” Johnson said.

After Johnson ended his remarks on that note, Juncker concluded the briefing by saying, “I have to say that I’m happy about the deal, but I’m sad about Brexit.”

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Brexit breakthrough: Boris Johnson agrees ‘great new deal’ with EU; British MPs to vote Saturday

Britain and the European Union have struck a Brexit deal, Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced Thursday.

The agreement is “great new deal that takes back control,” Johnson tweeted, adding: “Now Parliament should get Brexit done on Saturday so we can move on to other priorities like the cost of living, the NHS, violent crime and our environment.”

This is a developing story; please check back for updates.

Westlake Legal Group AP19288395887477 Brexit breakthrough: Boris Johnson agrees 'great new deal' with EU; British MPs to vote Saturday Nicole Darrah fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/europe/brexit fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/topic/the-european-union fox-news/person/boris-johnson fox news fnc/world fnc da394389-b36b-50f3-8cb0-d53105ed9a6b article   Westlake Legal Group AP19288395887477 Brexit breakthrough: Boris Johnson agrees 'great new deal' with EU; British MPs to vote Saturday Nicole Darrah fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/europe/brexit fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/topic/the-european-union fox-news/person/boris-johnson fox news fnc/world fnc da394389-b36b-50f3-8cb0-d53105ed9a6b article

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South Korean soccer team tells of ‘rough’ match in Pyongyang

South Korea’s national soccer team described their World Cup qualifier against North Korea in Pyongyang as a “rough” match played under strange conditions that may be raised with FIFA.

The historic match ended in a scoreless draw Tuesday at huge Kim Il Sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match was also under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the playing conditions upon their return to Seoul on Thursday.

“The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged,” Tottenham striker Son Heung-min said.

“It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury,” Son told reporters at Incheon International Airport.

The team’s general manager Choi Young-il said the South Korean soccer association, known as KFA, will discuss whether to submit a complaint to FIFA over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

North Korea kept out South Korean media and spectators and refused a live broadcast from the stadium.

FIFA President Gianni Infantino also attended the match, and on Tuesday issued a statement saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands.”

“We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists,” Infantino said.

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0:0.”

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean soccer officials, but South Korean TV channel KBS canceled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s quality, according to the broadcaster and KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services

The North had been expected to have a unique home advantage in the 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of South Korean fans, but South Korean players and soccer officials were surprised to realize there would be no home crowd support, either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, couldn’t return with three points, but admitted that their opponents’ physical play got into the players’ heads.

Choi, a former defender who played for South Korea during the 1994 World Cup held in the United States, said the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war,” violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee first when competing for balls in air.

“I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

When they weren’t playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo Hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their cellphones at the South Korean Embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials didn’t inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.

North Korea in recent months has severed virtually all cooperation with the South amid deadlocked nuclear negotiations with the United States, and repeatedly ignored the South’s calls for discussions on media coverage issues and allowing South Korean cheer squads ahead of the game.

South Korean Unification Minister Kim Yeon-chul, Seoul’s point man on North Korea, said during a parliamentary session on Thursday that the way the North handled the game was “very disappointing” and reflected the stalemate in inter-Korean relations.

Some experts say the North was expressing its political displeasure with the South by shutting out rival reporters and fans, but opted to compete in an empty stadium at home in an effort to level the playing field and avoid questions about fairness.

Others say North Korea might have been concerned about the possibility of its national team losing to the South in front of a massive home crowd, which would have been a humiliating development for leader Kim Jong Un, who has a passion for sports.

The awkward buildup to the game “demonstrates the immense discontent North Korea has for (South Korea)” for its failure to break away from its U.S. ally and restart inter-Korean economic projects held back by U.S.-led sanctions, said Choi Kang, vice president of Seoul’s Asan Institute for Policy Studies.

During qualification for the 2010 World Cup, North Korea chose to host games against South Korea in Shanghai, refusing to hoist the South Korean flag and play the South Korean anthem on its soil.

The fate of the game in Pyongyang was uncertain until last month when the governing body of Asian soccer informed the KFA that the North decided it would host the qualifier as scheduled.

South Korea’s two Group H matches against North Korea will be crucial in qualifying for the World Cup. The second match between the Koreas is scheduled for June 4 in South Korea.

South Korea has dominated the past 17 inter-Korean matches with seven wins, one loss and nine draws.

Group H also includes Lebanon, Turkmenistan and Sri Lanka.

Westlake Legal Group SOC-Son-Heung-min2 South Korean soccer team tells of 'rough' match in Pyongyang fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/sports/soccer fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 5b73b58a-6cec-5825-9859-2aa88ede146c   Westlake Legal Group SOC-Son-Heung-min2 South Korean soccer team tells of 'rough' match in Pyongyang fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/sports/soccer fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 5b73b58a-6cec-5825-9859-2aa88ede146c

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Prominent Hong Kong Protest Leader Beaten By Unknown Assailants

Westlake Legal Group rts2i8br-1-_sq-316edf50d809b9a6c3993e5b3942984a7bd4b065-s1100-c15 Prominent Hong Kong Protest Leader Beaten By Unknown Assailants

Jimmy Sham speaks at a news conference, outside Hong Kong’s Legislative Council building, in June. Thomas Peter/Reuters hide caption

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Thomas Peter/Reuters

Westlake Legal Group  Prominent Hong Kong Protest Leader Beaten By Unknown Assailants

Jimmy Sham speaks at a news conference, outside Hong Kong’s Legislative Council building, in June.

Thomas Peter/Reuters

A brutal attack on one of Hong Kong’s most prominent pro-democracy leaders, who was reportedly beaten with hammers by a group of unknown assailants, is being widely condemned by the territory’s government, opposition lawmakers and Amnesty International.

Jimmy Sham, who leads the Civil Human Rights Front, or CHRF, and has been actively involved in the months-long anti-government protest movement, was left bloodied and dazed after the attack Wednesday evening in Hong Kong’s congested Mong Kok district.

Police said Sham was bleeding from his arms and legs after four or five people intercepted him as he was en route to a CHRF meeting.

“During the attack, bystanders tried to save [Sham], but the assailants threatened them to stop them from doing so,” Figo Chan, described as a colleague of Sham’s, was quoted by the Hong Kong Free Press as saying.

“When Jimmy Sham was taken onto the ambulance, he told me: ‘five demands, not one less,'” Chan said, referring to a slogan popular with pro-democracy protesters, who are pushing for greater freedom in the territory.

Sham was taken to a hospital and by Thursday morning was seen in a wheelchair speaking with his lawyer, according to the South China Morning Post. In a post on his Facebook page, he said he had been given stitches and was in pain, but that he was buoyed by the protesters’ cause and by the love he’d been shown while in the hospital.

Hong Kong’s No. 2 official, Chief Secretary Matthew Cheung Kin-chung, said the attack was “totally unacceptable” and Amnesty International called it “shocking in its brutality.”

“The authorities must promptly conduct an investigation into this horrifying attack, bring all those responsible to justice and send a clear message that targeting activists will have consequences,” Amnesty said in a statement. “Anything less would send a chilling signal that such attacks are tolerated by the authorities.”

The attack is reminiscent of incidents in July in which some three dozen people were wounded when groups of white-shirted men lashed out at pro-democracy protesters across the city, punching and pummeling them with clubs, before fading away.

Although the assailants who descended on Sham remain unknown, protesters and pro-democracy lawmakers were quick to suggest a tie to the government, which has sought for months to quell the demonstrations — many of which have been peaceful, though others have turned violent and led to clashes between police and mostly young activists.

Sham’s group, the CHRF, said in a statement: “It is not hard to link this incident to a spreading political terror in order to threaten and inhibit the legitimate exercise of natural and legal rights.”

Speaking to fellow lawmakers in Hong Kong’s legislature on Thursday, Claudia Mo, a prominent member of the chamber’s pan-democracy camp, said she and her colleagues “can’t help feeling that this entire thing is part of a plan to shed blood at Hong Kong’s peaceful protests.”

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Megathread: Rep. Elijah Cummings, a Maryland Democrat and House Oversight Chairman, dies at 68

Westlake Legal Group HGE1CsXr1yM2mwx_1rqloVCelN-Y8lyz6Pi3eVwFeQk Megathread: Rep. Elijah Cummings, a Maryland Democrat and House Oversight Chairman, dies at 68 r/politics

“Most people who are hating on you, they are not worried about where you are. They’re worried about where you’re going”.

  • Elijah Cummings

He is such an excellent role model for young black men and women. My condolences to his family and his constituents in the city of Baltimore.

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Elijah E. Cummings, Powerful Democrat Who Investigated Trump, Dies at 68

Westlake Legal Group 00Cummings1-sub-facebookJumbo Elijah E. Cummings, Powerful Democrat Who Investigated Trump, Dies at 68 United States Politics and Government House of Representatives Democratic Party Deaths (Obituaries) Cummings, Elijah E Congressional Black Caucus Baltimore (Md)

Representative Elijah E. Cummings, a son of sharecroppers who rose to become one of the most powerful Democrats in Congress and a key figure in the impeachment investigation of President Trump, died on Thursday in Baltimore, his spokeswoman said. He was 68.

His death resulted from “complications concerning longstanding health challenges,” the spokeswoman, Trudy Perkins, said in a statement, without elaborating on the cause.

As chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform, Mr. Cummings, of Maryland, had sweeping power to investigate Mr. Trump and his administration — and he used it.

A critical ally of Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Mr. Cummings spent his final months in Congress sparring with the president, calling Mr. Trump’s effort to block congressional lines of inquiry “far worse than Watergate.” He was sued by Mr. Trump as the president tried to keep his business records secret.

With his booming voice and a speaking cadence with hints of the pulpit, Mr. Cummings was a compelling figure on Capitol Hill. For more than two decades, he represented a section of Baltimore with more than its share of social problems. He campaigned tirelessly for stricter gun control laws and help for those addicted to drugs.

He grabbed the national spotlight in 2015 when he took to the streets of Baltimore, where, bullhorn in hand, he pleaded for calm after riots erupted in his neighborhood after the funeral of Freddie Gray, a young black man who died in police custody. Hours earlier, Mr. Cummings had delivered Mr. Gray’s eulogy.

In July, after Mr. Cummings attacked President Trump for the conditions seen in immigrant detention centers on the southern border, Mr. Trump struck back, calling the congressman’s district a “disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess” where “no human being would want to live.” Mr. Cummings vociferously defended his hometown.

Mr. Cummings had been ailing recently, and was sometimes seen using a wheelchair and an oxygen tank. He was away from Congress for nearly three months following heart surgery in the fall of 2017. Soon afterward, he was admitted to Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore for what his office described as a bacterial infection in his knee.

A hulking, bear-like man, Mr. Cummings had served in Congress since winning a special election in 1996 to fill the seat vacated by Kweisi Mfume, who resigned to become president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Mr. Cummings’s Seventh District includes most of West Baltimore and suburbs west of the city, as well as Howard County.

Since his initial victory in 1996, Mr. Cummings had not been seriously challenged in either a primary or general election, according to The Almanac of American Politics. In 2003 and 2004, he was chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus. He was an early supporter of Barack Obama for president and was co-chairman of Mr. Obama’s campaign in Maryland in 2008.

Elijah Eugene Cummings, the son of sharecroppers from South Carolina who moved north to improve prospects for themselves and their children, who would eventually number seven, was born in Baltimore on Jan. 18, 1951, and grew up in the city.

He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Howard University in Washington, where he was student government president, with a degree in political science. He earned a law degree from the University of Maryland and was a practicing attorney while serving for 14 years in the Maryland House of Delegates, where he was the first African-American in the state’s history to be named speaker pro-tem.

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