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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 60)

Deepening Divide Turns Impeachment Into Another Partisan Brawl

Westlake Legal Group 00dc-impeach1-facebookJumbo-v2 Deepening Divide Turns Impeachment Into Another Partisan Brawl United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Republican Party impeachment House of Representatives House Committee on the Judiciary Democratic Party Constitution (US)

WASHINGTON — Almost from the moment that Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her lieutenants decided this fall to pursue the impeachment of President Trump, they made a fateful judgment: If the president intended to do nothing but stonewall and subvert their inquiry, they were not going to be the ones politely sticking to lofty traditions.

Mr. Trump’s lawyers have made a similarly cold calculation. After a year of defying without consequence Congress’s attempts to investigate the president’s conduct, they have no intention of taking part in what they view as an illegitimate impeachment, initially conducted without a formal House vote in a break with recent precedent.

The clash comes to a head on Monday with a hearing in the Judiciary Committee where Democratic lawyers plan to present the case for impeaching Mr. Trump while the White House sits out the process. That will set in motion a rapid-fire set of actions likely to produce official charges against the president by week’s end and a nearly party-line vote in the full House before Christmas to impeach him.

It is an indication of how, in a deeply polarized nation where party rules above all else, a process enshrined in the Constitution as the most consequential way to address a president’s wrongdoing has devolved into another raucous partisan brawl.

“That is a tragedy,” said Philip Bobbitt, a Columbia University law professor and a leading expert on the history of impeachment. The framers of the Constitution were careful to design a process for removing a president from office that they hoped would rise above the nation’s petty political squabbles, he said.

“They did everything possible to prevent that from happening, and we are plunging headlong into it,” Mr. Bobbitt said.

Determined not to let Mr. Trump and his Republican allies in Congress derail their efforts with legal delays or time-consuming diversions, Democrats have abandoned all but a semblance of comity as they press forward quickly to charge the president with high crimes and misdemeanors.

They are set to begin debating articles of impeachment this week — with House Judiciary Committee members bracing for the possibility of late-night sessions in an office building near the Capitol — as they race to complete a streamlined proceeding based on their conclusion that Mr. Trump abused his power by trying to solicit help from Ukraine in the 2020 re-election.

Upset by the rapid pace of the inquiry and frustrated by Democratic rules he says are unfair — including the lack of subpoena power for the White House — Mr. Trump is simply refusing to engage. In a significant departure from previous impeachments, Mr. Trump’s lawyer signaled in a letter on Friday that the president would not take part in the House proceedings.

While Democrats who control the House are focused on a swift impeachment vote by year’s end, the White House is almost entirely consumed by the trial that would follow in the Republican-controlled Senate, where Mr. Trump’s team believes he would have the chance to defend himself and where Democrats would almost certainly fall short of the two-thirds vote they would need to remove him from office.

That proceeding, however, is also full of unknowns. At a meeting with senior White House officials and senators in the Roosevelt Room of the White House almost three weeks ago, Senator Ted Cruz, Republican of Texas, made clear that there are not enough Senate votes to approve some of the edgier witnesses that Democrats and Republicans want to call. While he mentioned no names, it was interpreted by those in the room to refer to people like Hunter Biden, the son of the former vice president, whom Mr. Trump pushed Ukraine to investigate.

In the House, though, the president is eager to see Republicans and his lawyers mount a robust assault on what he calls a “hoax” and a “scam” led by “crazy” and “dishonest” Democrats.

“What they are doing here is discrediting a system,” Mr. Bobbitt said of the White House impeachment strategy. “If the system is discredited, it cannot discredit me. It is brilliant in its way, but totally cynical and completely destructive of our values.”

Politics have always been a powerful factor in presidential impeachment inquiries, which have roiled the nation twice in the last 50 years.

But impeachment has occupied a special place in the American consciousness. Veterans of the process said there had been an understanding, even amid bouts of intense political combat, that both sides had an obligation to the Constitution that should be honored, regardless of partisan affiliation.

“No one was looking at the other side with the kind of contempt that both sides look at each other now,” said Julian Epstein, who served as the chief Democratic counsel to the House Judiciary Committee when Republicans tried to force Mr. Clinton from office.

Mr. Epstein fought fiercely to defend Mr. Clinton, but also worked closely on the process with his adversaries, including Paul J. McNulty, the chief counsel and spokesman for the committee Republicans. Mr. McNulty, now a college president, said the fight over impeachment had gone from “partisan but constructive” in 1998 to “partisan and destructive” now.

Both men said the biggest risk was that the process would get so damaged, and the personal attacks so severe, that impeachment would be seen in the future as just another partisan weapon to be deployed against every president.

“It becomes a quadrennial tool of political combat,” Mr. Epstein lamented, comparing the future of impeachment to the series of English civil wars for control of the throne in the 15th century. “Each side will try to find something on the other, and it will never end. It’s like a ‘War of the Roses’ that goes on forever.”

The dynamic was different in the summer of 1974, when a bipartisan majority of lawmakers in the House prepared to impeach President Richard M. Nixon for the Watergate burglary and its cover-up. Mr. Nixon resigned before the vote, but there was broad consensus in the House, and in the country, about what needed to happen. By the time Mr. Nixon left, just 24 percent of the country approved of the job he was doing.

Twenty-four years later, as lawmakers grappled with whether to impeach Mr. Clinton, the rancor in Washington had deepened. Led by Speaker Newt Gingrich, Republicans seized on impeachment to bludgeon the popular Democratic president. Democrats accused Ken Starr, the independent counsel, of a witch hunt and insisted that the president’s decision to lie about his affair with an intern was not impeachable.

But partisanship — however raw and ugly — had not yet entirely consumed the process. There were Democrats who parted ways with Mr. Clinton and supported that inquiry. By contrast, when the House voted this October to lay out rules for Mr. Trump’s impeachment inquiry, not a single Republican supported it.

“While we never thought that the Democrats would support impeaching Clinton, we bent over backward to be procedurally fair,” said Representative Jim Sensenbrenner, Republican of Wisconsin and a member of the Judiciary Committee, who was one of the impeachment managers presenting the case against Mr. Clinton in the Senate in 1999. “That’s not happening this time.”

Democrats are unapologetic, vowing not to relent in their march toward impeachment and dismissing Republicans’ complaints about fairness as hypocritical, given that Mr. Trump has blocked witnesses and documents at every turn.

“You have to give them credit for nerve, if nothing else,” said Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California and the chairman of the Intelligence Committee.

Ms. Pelosi and other Democrats leading the inquiry note that they have repeatedly invited Mr. Trump to produce exculpatory evidence or present a defense, and he has done neither. Republicans, they argue, are trying to pervert the concept of fairness to disrupt and delay the inquiry, not to meaningfully participate in the process.

The speaker could walk on water to be fair, and Republicans would still “criticize her for not being able to swim,” said Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York, the chairman of the Democratic Caucus and an ally of Ms. Pelosi.

Angry that no one is defending his actions the way he believes they should, Mr. Trump periodically asks aides whether he should send witnesses to comply with congressional subpoenas. But that impulse then fades, as the president becomes convinced that such a move would not end the inquiry.

Mr. Trump and his close circle of advisers are convinced that the Ukraine inquiry is merely an extension of the investigation into Russian election meddling and the continuation of a three-year assault on his presidency that began the day he was inaugurated with the launch of an activist’s website, ImpeachDonaldTrumpNow.org.

His response has been an all-out attack on the process itself. He has ordered administration officials not to testify or hand over documents. And he is urging Republicans not to cooperate with their counterparts the way they did during Mr. Clinton’s impeachment.

Mr. McNulty said that dynamic had the potential to damage the nation’s politics for years, and could permanently alter the intent of the authors of the Constitution.

“It’s going to break everything in half,” Mr. McNulty said. “My hope would be, as a citizen, that when this is over, somehow, some way, we could stop and think about what impeachment was meant to be for.”

Catie Edmondson and Emily Cochrane contributed reporting.

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Border apprehensions dropped in November for 6th consecutive month, per DHS data

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095535465001_6095533089001-vs Border apprehensions dropped in November for 6th consecutive month, per DHS data fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/immigration/enforcement fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox news fnc/politics fnc article Adam Shaw 1c355a0c-266c-579e-942b-ac2ce7869aca

EXCLUSIVE: Law enforcement apprehended or turned away 42,649 migrants at the southern border in November, according to preliminary data reviewed by Fox News — a sixth month of declines that the administration is hailing as proof that the set of policies and initiatives to combat the border crisis is working.

The numbers (33,510 apprehended and 9,139 deemed inadmissible) represented a decline of roughly six percent since October, and a drop of over 70 percent since the height of the crisis in May, when more than 144,000 migrants were encountered.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) data showed that the number of apprehensions of Central American family units has decreased by approximately 85 percent since May. The numbers were lower compared to the last fiscal year (FY) as well. So far in FY 2020, enforcement actions have been 29 percent lower than FY 2019 at this time.

AS TRUMP ADMINISTRATION CONFRONTS MIGRANT CRISIS, DETENTION CENTERS ARE CLEARING OUT

The decline has come as the administration has taken a number of measures to end the border crisis and stem the flow of migrants north from Central America. Key to that has been ending the practice of “catch-and-release” by which migrants were held and then released into the U.S. as their hearings rolled on, often for years.

Officials attributed the decrease in apprehensions partly to the reduction of the pull factors drawing individuals up to the border. Now that most migrants have not been released inside the U.S., there has been less incentive for them to make that dangerous journey, and even if they do attempt it, the policies have made it easier for the government to send migrants home or to another country to await their hearings.

The cornerstone of the administration’s new approach has been the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP) — involving migrants being sent back to Mexico to await their hearings. Known as the “Remain in Mexico” policy, officials said that in addition to keeping migrants out of the U.S., it has reduced hearing times from years to just a few months.

AT HELM OF DHS, CHAD WOLF VOWS TO CONFRONT THE GANGS BEHIND ILLEGAL DRUGS, GUNS AND MIGRANTS

“The importance of MPP can’t be stated enough, it is what’s allowed us to take control of the crisis that we saw in April and May. The idea is to make sure we process individuals in a timely manner but make sure they wait south of the border,” Acting DHS Secretary Chad Wolf told Fox News last month.

The policy has been challenged in the courts, with critics saying it violated migrants’ rights and also put them at risk of violence by sending them back to Mexico. A decision in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals is expected in the coming weeks.

Several Democrats seeking the White House in 2020 have attacked the policy, calling for it to be abolished. Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., has called for migrants to be allowed into the U.S. to make their claims “to qualified asylum officials, pursuant to international law.”

That policy by the administration has been combined with a host of other measures, including regional agreements with El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala attempting to take a regional approach to the border crisis, and involving migrants claiming asylum there instead of the U.S.

Last month the administration announced it has started to send migrants to Guatemala as part of its “safe third country” agreement with the Central American nation.

“The president’s strategy to address the historic flood of Central American family units illegally crossing the border has worked and catch and release is over,” a senior administration official told Fox News.

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“We are removing, returning, and repatriating more illegal aliens, including Central American families, than ever before, and illegal border crossing cases are completed faster than ever,” the official said.

Accompanying the regional agreements: more traditional deterrents such as a wall on the southern border. The administration has built almost 80 miles of wall and has been ramping up efforts to try building approximately 450 miles of the barrier by the end of next year.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095535465001_6095533089001-vs Border apprehensions dropped in November for 6th consecutive month, per DHS data fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/immigration/enforcement fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox news fnc/politics fnc article Adam Shaw 1c355a0c-266c-579e-942b-ac2ce7869aca   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095535465001_6095533089001-vs Border apprehensions dropped in November for 6th consecutive month, per DHS data fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/immigration/enforcement fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox news fnc/politics fnc article Adam Shaw 1c355a0c-266c-579e-942b-ac2ce7869aca

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It has come to this: Ted Cruz is Putin’s stooge

Westlake Legal Group 3pM9xk1TamjnI4IFBt3kWbTfD-eJQQB2gfsB2y2KUPI It has come to this: Ted Cruz is Putin’s stooge r/politics

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It has come to this: Ted Cruz is Putin’s stooge

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College Football Playoff seeding announced: LSU vs. Oklahoma and Ohio State vs. Clemson

When determining this year’s playoff field — LSU, Oklahoma, Ohio State, and Clemson were all locked as the teams set to reach the College Football Playoff (CFP). The only question remaining for selection committee members was what the seeding would be.

Ohio State entered Saturday as the No 1 seed. However, LSU’s beatdown of the No.4 ranked Georgia Bulldogs in the SEC championship game allowed them to leapfrog the Buckeyes and claim the top spot.

Westlake Legal Group 57b526cb-AP19342065285598 College Football Playoff seeding announced: LSU vs. Oklahoma and Ohio State vs. Clemson fox-news/sports/ncaa/oklahoma-sooners fox-news/sports/ncaa/ohio-state-buckeyes fox-news/sports/ncaa/lsu-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa/clemson-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox news fnc/sports fnc David Aaro b7fec21d-0e81-53f6-8c26-274e4596f597 article

LSU players celebrate after the Southeastern Conference championship NCAA college football game against Georgia, Saturday, Dec. 7, 2019, in Atlanta. LSU won 37-10. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Both teams were undefeated during the regular season, with Ohio State adding to their 19-game winning streak by defeating No. 10 ranked Wisconsin in the Big Ten championship game on Saturday.

LSU QB JOE BURROW COMPLETES ‘SELFIE’ PASS VS. GEORGIA IN SEC TITLE GAME

Westlake Legal Group AP19342204487489-1 College Football Playoff seeding announced: LSU vs. Oklahoma and Ohio State vs. Clemson fox-news/sports/ncaa/oklahoma-sooners fox-news/sports/ncaa/ohio-state-buckeyes fox-news/sports/ncaa/lsu-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa/clemson-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox news fnc/sports fnc David Aaro b7fec21d-0e81-53f6-8c26-274e4596f597 article

Ohio State players celebrate the team’s 34-21 win over Wisconsin in the Big Ten championship NCAA college football game, early Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/AJ Mast)

Due to their stronger win on Saturday and decided by the CFP selection committee members on Sunday — No. 1 LSU is set to face No. 4 Oklahoma in the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl in Atlanta. No. 2 Ohio State will play No. 3 Clemson in the PlayStation Fiesta Bowl in Glendale, Ariz.

“Our goal was to go to the SEC Championship and win it; that was one of our goals,” LSU coach Ed Orgeron told ESPN on Sunday. “… But we’re not done yet. That wasn’t our final destination. I’m very proud of our offense, I’m very proud of our defense and all our coaches, but we still have some work to do.”

The semifinal games are scheduled to take place on Dec. 28. The winners will advance to the College Football Playoff National Championship game on Monday, Jan. 13, at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans.

Westlake Legal Group ncaa-football-trophy-Reuters College Football Playoff seeding announced: LSU vs. Oklahoma and Ohio State vs. Clemson fox-news/sports/ncaa/oklahoma-sooners fox-news/sports/ncaa/ohio-state-buckeyes fox-news/sports/ncaa/lsu-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa/clemson-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox news fnc/sports fnc David Aaro b7fec21d-0e81-53f6-8c26-274e4596f597 article

Jan 8, 2019; San Jose, CA, USA; Detailed view of the 2019 College Football Playoff championship trophy at a press conference at the San Jose McEnery Convention Center. Clemson defeated Alabama 44-16 to win its second national title in three years. Mandatory Credit: Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports – 11961694

Based on their records, this field projects as one of the strongest in the history of the College Football Playoff. For the first time ever, there are four Power 5 conference (ACC, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12, SEC) champions represented in the playoff field and three of those teams are undefeated.

OHIO STATE RALLIES TO BEAT WISCONSIN 34-21 FOR BIG TEN CROWN

Westlake Legal Group eaafb5d2-AP19342169938111 College Football Playoff seeding announced: LSU vs. Oklahoma and Ohio State vs. Clemson fox-news/sports/ncaa/oklahoma-sooners fox-news/sports/ncaa/ohio-state-buckeyes fox-news/sports/ncaa/lsu-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa/clemson-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox news fnc/sports fnc David Aaro b7fec21d-0e81-53f6-8c26-274e4596f597 article

Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence (16) is seen following the Atlantic Coast Conference championship NCAA college football game in Charlotte, N.C., Saturday, Dec. 7, 2019. Clemson won 62-17. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

The Oklahoma Sooners were the only team to lose a game this season.

Westlake Legal Group AP19341678536344 College Football Playoff seeding announced: LSU vs. Oklahoma and Ohio State vs. Clemson fox-news/sports/ncaa/oklahoma-sooners fox-news/sports/ncaa/ohio-state-buckeyes fox-news/sports/ncaa/lsu-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa/clemson-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox news fnc/sports fnc David Aaro b7fec21d-0e81-53f6-8c26-274e4596f597 article

Oklahoma running back Kennedy Brooks (26) celebrates with offensive lineman Creed Humphrey (56) after rushing for a touchdown against Baylor during the first half of an NCAA college football game for the Big 12 Conference championship, Saturday, Dec. 7, 2019, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Jeffrey McWhorter)

LSU is a 10-point favorite over Oklahoma, while Clemson — the previous champion — is a 2-point favorite against Ohio State, according to the opening lines at Caesars Sportsbook.

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ESPN’s Football Power Index projects Ohio State as having a 35 percent chance to win the title. LSU is second at 29 percent with  Clemson right behind them at 28 percent. Oklahoma has the lowest projected chance to win the title at just 9 percent.

Westlake Legal Group 57b526cb-AP19342065285598 College Football Playoff seeding announced: LSU vs. Oklahoma and Ohio State vs. Clemson fox-news/sports/ncaa/oklahoma-sooners fox-news/sports/ncaa/ohio-state-buckeyes fox-news/sports/ncaa/lsu-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa/clemson-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox news fnc/sports fnc David Aaro b7fec21d-0e81-53f6-8c26-274e4596f597 article   Westlake Legal Group 57b526cb-AP19342065285598 College Football Playoff seeding announced: LSU vs. Oklahoma and Ohio State vs. Clemson fox-news/sports/ncaa/oklahoma-sooners fox-news/sports/ncaa/ohio-state-buckeyes fox-news/sports/ncaa/lsu-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa/clemson-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox news fnc/sports fnc David Aaro b7fec21d-0e81-53f6-8c26-274e4596f597 article

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Deepening Divide Turns Impeachment Into Another Partisan Brawl

Westlake Legal Group 00dc-impeach1-facebookJumbo-v2 Deepening Divide Turns Impeachment Into Another Partisan Brawl United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Republican Party impeachment House of Representatives House Committee on the Judiciary Democratic Party Constitution (US)

WASHINGTON — Almost from the moment that Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her lieutenants decided this fall to pursue the impeachment of President Trump, they made a fateful judgment: If the president intended to do nothing but stonewall and subvert their inquiry, they were not going to be the ones politely sticking to lofty traditions.

Mr. Trump’s lawyers have made a similarly cold calculation. After a year of defying without consequence Congress’s attempts to investigate the president’s conduct, they have no intention of taking part in what they view as an illegitimate impeachment, initially conducted without a formal House vote in a break with recent precedent.

The clash comes to a head on Monday with a hearing in the Judiciary Committee where Democratic lawyers plan to present the case for impeaching Mr. Trump while the White House sits out the process. That will set in motion a rapid-fire set of actions likely to produce official charges against the president by week’s end and a nearly party-line vote in the full House before Christmas to impeach him.

It is an indication of how, in a deeply polarized nation where party rules above all else, a process enshrined in the Constitution as the most consequential way to address a president’s wrongdoing has devolved into another raucous partisan brawl.

“That is a tragedy,” said Philip Bobbitt, a Columbia University law professor and a leading expert on the history of impeachment. The framers of the Constitution were careful to design a process for removing a president from office that they hoped would rise above the nation’s petty political squabbles, he said.

“They did everything possible to prevent that from happening, and we are plunging headlong into it,” Mr. Bobbitt said.

Determined not to let Mr. Trump and his Republican allies in Congress derail their efforts with legal delays or time-consuming diversions, Democrats have abandoned all but a semblance of comity as they press forward quickly to charge the president with high crimes and misdemeanors.

They are set to begin debating articles of impeachment this week — with House Judiciary Committee members bracing for the possibility of late-night sessions in an office building near the Capitol — as they race to complete a streamlined proceeding based on their conclusion that Mr. Trump abused his power by trying to solicit help from Ukraine in the 2020 re-election.

Upset by the rapid pace of the inquiry and frustrated by Democratic rules he says are unfair — including the lack of subpoena power for the White House — Mr. Trump is simply refusing to engage. In a significant departure from previous impeachments, Mr. Trump’s lawyer signaled in a letter on Friday that the president would not take part in the House proceedings.

While Democrats who control the House are focused on a swift impeachment vote by year’s end, the White House is almost entirely consumed by the trial that would follow in the Republican-controlled Senate, where Mr. Trump’s team believes he would have the chance to defend himself and where Democrats would almost certainly fall short of the two-thirds vote they would need to remove him from office.

That proceeding, however, is also full of unknowns. At a meeting with senior White House officials and senators in the Roosevelt Room of the White House almost three weeks ago, Senator Ted Cruz, Republican of Texas, made clear that there are not enough Senate votes to approve some of the edgier witnesses that Democrats and Republicans want to call. While he mentioned no names, it was interpreted by those in the room to refer to people like Hunter Biden, the son of the former vice president, whom Mr. Trump pushed Ukraine to investigate.

In the House, though, the president is eager to see Republicans and his lawyers mount a robust assault on what he calls a “hoax” and a “scam” led by “crazy” and “dishonest” Democrats.

“What they are doing here is discrediting a system,” Mr. Bobbitt said of the White House impeachment strategy. “If the system is discredited, it cannot discredit me. It is brilliant in its way, but totally cynical and completely destructive of our values.”

Politics have always been a powerful factor in presidential impeachment inquiries, which have roiled the nation twice in the last 50 years.

But impeachment has occupied a special place in the American consciousness. Veterans of the process said there had been an understanding, even amid bouts of intense political combat, that both sides had an obligation to the Constitution that should be honored, regardless of partisan affiliation.

“No one was looking at the other side with the kind of contempt that both sides look at each other now,” said Julian Epstein, who served as the chief Democratic counsel to the House Judiciary Committee when Republicans tried to force Mr. Clinton from office.

Mr. Epstein fought fiercely to defend Mr. Clinton, but also worked closely on the process with his adversaries, including Paul J. McNulty, the chief counsel and spokesman for the committee Republicans. Mr. McNulty, now a college president, said the fight over impeachment had gone from “partisan but constructive” in 1998 to “partisan and destructive” now.

Both men said the biggest risk was that the process would get so damaged, and the personal attacks so severe, that impeachment would be seen in the future as just another partisan weapon to be deployed against every president.

“It becomes a quadrennial tool of political combat,” Mr. Epstein lamented, comparing the future of impeachment to the series of English civil wars for control of the throne in the 15th century. “Each side will try to find something on the other, and it will never end. It’s like a ‘War of the Roses’ that goes on forever.”

The dynamic was different in the summer of 1974, when a bipartisan majority of lawmakers in the House prepared to impeach President Richard M. Nixon for the Watergate burglary and its cover-up. Mr. Nixon resigned before the vote, but there was broad consensus in the House, and in the country, about what needed to happen. By the time Mr. Nixon left, just 24 percent of the country approved of the job he was doing.

Twenty-four years later, as lawmakers grappled with whether to impeach Mr. Clinton, the rancor in Washington had deepened. Led by Speaker Newt Gingrich, Republicans seized on impeachment to bludgeon the popular Democratic president. Democrats accused Ken Starr, the independent counsel, of a witch hunt and insisted that the president’s decision to lie about his affair with an intern was not impeachable.

But partisanship — however raw and ugly — had not yet entirely consumed the process. There were Democrats who parted ways with Mr. Clinton and supported that inquiry. By contrast, when the House voted this October to lay out rules for Mr. Trump’s impeachment inquiry, not a single Republican supported it.

“While we never thought that the Democrats would support impeaching Clinton, we bent over backward to be procedurally fair,” said Representative Jim Sensenbrenner, Republican of Wisconsin and a member of the Judiciary Committee, who was one of the impeachment managers presenting the case against Mr. Clinton in the Senate in 1999. “That’s not happening this time.”

Democrats are unapologetic, vowing not to relent in their march toward impeachment and dismissing Republicans’ complaints about fairness as hypocritical, given that Mr. Trump has blocked witnesses and documents at every turn.

“You have to give them credit for nerve, if nothing else,” said Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California and the chairman of the Intelligence Committee.

Ms. Pelosi and other Democrats leading the inquiry note that they have repeatedly invited Mr. Trump to produce exculpatory evidence or present a defense, and he has done neither. Republicans, they argue, are trying to pervert the concept of fairness to disrupt and delay the inquiry, not to meaningfully participate in the process.

The speaker could walk on water to be fair, and Republicans would still “criticize her for not being able to swim,” said Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York, the chairman of the Democratic Caucus and an ally of Ms. Pelosi.

Angry that no one is defending his actions the way he believes they should, Mr. Trump periodically asks aides whether he should send witnesses to comply with congressional subpoenas. But that impulse then fades, as the president becomes convinced that such a move would not end the inquiry.

Mr. Trump and his close circle of advisers are convinced that the Ukraine inquiry is merely an extension of the investigation into Russian election meddling and the continuation of a three-year assault on his presidency that began the day he was inaugurated with the launch of an activist’s website, ImpeachDonaldTrumpNow.org.

His response has been an all-out attack on the process itself. He has ordered administration officials not to testify or hand over documents. And he is urging Republicans not to cooperate with their counterparts the way they did during Mr. Clinton’s impeachment.

Mr. McNulty said that dynamic had the potential to damage the nation’s politics for years, and could permanently alter the intent of the authors of the Constitution.

“It’s going to break everything in half,” Mr. McNulty said. “My hope would be, as a citizen, that when this is over, somehow, some way, we could stop and think about what impeachment was meant to be for.”

Catie Edmondson and Emily Cochrane contributed reporting.

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House Judiciary Chairman: Jury Would Find Trump Guilty In ‘3 Minutes Flat’

Westlake Legal Group 5ded477f24000004025a2a7d House Judiciary Chairman: Jury Would Find Trump Guilty In ‘3 Minutes Flat’

House Judiciary Chairman Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) on Sunday said the ongoing impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump has produced a “rock solid case” against the president regarding his dealings with Ukraine.

“I think the case we have if presented to a jury would be a guilty verdict in about three minutes flat,” Nadler said during an interview on CNN’s “State Of The Union.”

He shrugged off Republicans who claim there’s no evidence to prove Trump withheld U.S. military aid to get Ukraine to publicly commit to investigating former Vice President Joe Biden, one of his Democratic rivals.

“All this nonsense about hearsay evidence ― there is considerable direct evidence,” Nadler said. 

He added: “The reason we don’t have even more direct evidence is the president has ordered everybody in the executive branch not to cooperate with Congress in the impeachment inquiry, something that is unprecedented in American history and is a contempt of Congress by itself.”

The ongoing impeachment inquiry is set to continue in the House this week. Nadler said his committee on Monday would examine the House Intelligence Committee’s report, which was compiled after two weeks of public testimonies from witnesses.

Nadler said he would likely bring articles of impeachment before his committee this week, but would not specify how many or what they would say.

Asked whether Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election would be included, Nadler wouldn’t say.

“It’s all of a pattern,” he told CNN’s Dana Bash. “The central allegation is that the president put himself above his country several times, that he sought foreign interference in our elections several times ― both for 2016 and 2020 ― that he sought to cover it up all the time and that he continually violated his oath of office.”

“All this presents a pattern that poses a real and present danger to the integrity of the next election, which is one reason why we can’t just wait for the next election to settle matters,” he added.

Trump has repeatedly claimed he did nothing wrong by asking Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky during a July 25 phone call to investigate Biden and his son. The call was the subject of a whistleblower complaint filed by a CIA analyst in August and became the centerpiece of the impeachment inquiry.

Several current and former State Department officials testified before the House Intelligence Committee last month that the White House used U.S. military aid as leverage to get Ukraine to publicly commit to investigating Biden, a frontrunner in the Democratic presidential primary.

If the House Judiciary Committee votes to move forward with articles of impeachment, the inquiry will move to the full House. House Democrats reportedly hope the impeachment vote will take place before Christmas so a Senate trial can begin in early 2020.

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Sammy the dog barks alarm, saving Georgia family from fire inside home

A dog named Sammy was being credited with sensing danger and, as a result, helping to save a Georgia family of five from a fire that caused extensive damage to their home.

Savannah firefighters said the household pet’s loud barking alerted the five family members to the raging fire in the rear of the home early Friday. They had been sleeping.

“They all escaped unharmed,” Savannah Fire Rescue said.

Westlake Legal Group Fire-Savannah-Fire-Rescue Sammy the dog barks alarm, saving Georgia family from fire inside home Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox news fnc/us fnc article 666644ff-e625-5d60-81ce-b5c646c57c91

Household pet Sammy was credited with alerting his owner and family to a raging fire in their home Friday in Savannah, Georgia.  (Savannah Fire Rescue)

ENGLISH DOG TURNS ON MICROWAVE, SPARKS KITCHEN FIRE, OFFICIALS SAY

A photo on the department’s Facebook page showed Sammy seated in the back of a pickup looking toward the camera as firefighters battled the fire behind him.

Another dog and two cats were not so lucky.

ARKANSAS TODDLER, 1, DIES IN HOUSE FIRE TRYING TO RESCUE FAMILY DOG: REPORT

“Firefighters tried but were unable to revive them,” fire officials said, according to WJCL-TV.

The house sustained extensive smoke and fire damage, according to firefighters.

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They blamed the fire on a freezer.

Westlake Legal Group Fire-Savannah-Fire-Rescue Sammy the dog barks alarm, saving Georgia family from fire inside home Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox news fnc/us fnc article 666644ff-e625-5d60-81ce-b5c646c57c91   Westlake Legal Group Fire-Savannah-Fire-Rescue Sammy the dog barks alarm, saving Georgia family from fire inside home Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox news fnc/us fnc article 666644ff-e625-5d60-81ce-b5c646c57c91

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Vegan influencer eats meat for 30 days, shocks fans by saying she’s healthier than she’s ‘felt in years’

Westlake Legal Group chicken-fingers Vegan influencer eats meat for 30 days, shocks fans by saying she's healthier than she's 'felt in years' Michael Hollan fox-news/health/nutrition-and-fitness/diet-trends fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc be630f41-22a1-5616-944a-31b925906e1f article

Well, that’s a big change.

A formerly vegan influencer revealed to her fans that she spent 30 days eating nothing but meat and animal products. She also revealed that the new diet had some surprisingly positive effects on her health.

Alyse Parker, who has over 200K Instagram followers and over 700K Youtube subscribers, explained her decision on Instagram. In a post, she revealed that she decided to try the Carnivore Diet after hearing about all of the health benefits from friends who switched from being vegan to eating only meat and animal products.

Parker explained, “I had my own fair share of health struggles and eventually reached a breaking point where I was willing to try anything to function properly again.”

MOM FINDS NOTE FROM DAYCARE WORKER IN SON’S LUNCHBOX: ‘PUT HIM ON A DIET AND GO AWAY’

People on the Carnivore Diet only allow themselves to eat meat and animal products, like eggs and dairy.

“I swallowed my pride and decided I’d give it a shot,” she continued. “Full-on carnivore. I woke up the next morning feeling more mentally clear, focused, wholesome, and healthy than I had felt in years.”

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On Youtube, where she elaborated on her experience, many of her fans reacted negatively, with one simply commenting, “This is so disappointing.”

Another commenter wrote, “If you had to kill every animal you ate in this video… We all know you would go back to vegan immediately. I’ve also been vegan for 4.5 years now, no meat for 6. I’ve never been this healthy in my life, and I have the blood work to prove it.”

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Another user added, “You should see a doctor after and show us those results rather than you on a scale and your abs. This probably isn’t helping your eating disorder.”

Westlake Legal Group chicken-fingers Vegan influencer eats meat for 30 days, shocks fans by saying she's healthier than she's 'felt in years' Michael Hollan fox-news/health/nutrition-and-fitness/diet-trends fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc be630f41-22a1-5616-944a-31b925906e1f article   Westlake Legal Group chicken-fingers Vegan influencer eats meat for 30 days, shocks fans by saying she's healthier than she's 'felt in years' Michael Hollan fox-news/health/nutrition-and-fitness/diet-trends fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc be630f41-22a1-5616-944a-31b925906e1f article

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A Farewell to Feministing and the Heyday of Feminist Blogging

Westlake Legal Group 08FEMINISTMEDIA-01-facebookJumbo A Farewell to Feministing and the Heyday of Feminist Blogging Women and Girls Valenti, Jessica Traister, Rebecca Shutdowns (Institutional) Rookie (Magazine) Jezebel (Blog) Feministing

Soon after Anna Holmes took on the job of building the website Jezebel, in 2007, she set it apart from established publications like Vogue and Elle with a post offering $10,000 to anyone who would send in the best unretouched version of a women’s magazine cover photo. And with that, Jezebel had marked its territory: feminist cultural criticism, with an edge.

“It seems quaint now, because there are tons of media outlets influenced by Jezebel,” Ms. Holmes said. “But at the time, there was no proof that it was marketable.”

Within three years, Jezebel had surpassed its sibling publication, Gawker.com, the flagship site of Gawker Media, in monthly page views. Ms. Holmes said she wasn’t fully aware of her site’s success until it was parodied on NBC’s “30 Rock” as JoanOfSnark. “It’s this really cool feminist website,” Liz Lemon, the protagonist played by Tina Fey, says. “Women talk about how far we’ve come and which celebrities have the worst beach bodies.”

In the aughts and the earlier part of this decade, other online feminist publications sprang to life — Feministing, The Hairpin, The Toast and many others — covering everything from paid leave to the Kardashians in a conversational voice that was sometimes rude, sometimes funny and never didactic.

Now many of those sites are dead or dying, and Jezebel is under new management, part of a stable of publications run by the hedge fund-controlled ownership group, G/O Media, that recently set off a staff exodus at the sports site Deadspin. Feminist media has been especially hard hit by the financial turbulence in the news industry.

Samhita Mukhopadhyay, a former executive editor of Feministing and now the executive editor of Teen Vogue, said she missed the years when those publications were connecting with readers, calling it “the heyday” of independent feminist media.

“It was this amazing moment where we were making careers out of blogging in our underwear. Now it’s not a good time for start-up media,” she said, adding, “I worry that people are afraid to align themselves with publications that are explicitly feminist.”

The gradual collapse has continued into this year. Feministing, an independent blog founded in 2004, plans to shut down in the weeks to come. At its peak, the site had 1.2 million unique monthly visitors, with most revenue coming from ads and reader donations. The co-executive editors, Lori Adelman and Maya Dusenbery, said Feministing helped popularize the term “slut shaming,” ran early interviews with chart-toppers like Lizzo and pushed for coverage of Gamergate, a cybermob that targeted women.

“It was unclear how we could have such a ferocious audience and not be onto something,” Ms. Mukhopadhyay said. “Many of us involved in the feminist blogosphere are now in mainstream media, and that’s exciting. That said, we need independent media because they’re an important check.”

The Establishment, an independent blog focused on gender and race, stopped publishing in April with a farewell post bemoaning the “Sisyphean” difficulty of making money with a site focused on “intersectional feminist media.” In May, Vice Media’s women’s site, Broadly, was folded into the larger Vice brand.

The Hairpin, with recurring features like “Ask a Queer Chick” and “Interview With a Virgin,” shut down last year, as did Lenny Letter, the newsletter and website started by Lena Dunham and her producing partner, Jenni Konner. Rookie Magazine, the diarylike site started by the fashion-blogger-turned-actress Tavi Gevinson when she was 15, also ended its run. XoJane, known for first-person essays like “My Rapist Friended Me On Facebook (And All I Got Was This Lousy Article),” signed off in 2016.

The closings have come at a time when even digital giants like BuzzFeed and Vox have made adjustments to navigate the increasingly turbulent digital media business.

“As the media industry is grappling with different issues, it’s these feminist publications that are shuttered first,” Lindsay Schrupp, the former editor in chief of Broadly, said. “It contributes to the long history of erasing women’s work.”

The Frisky is still around (sort of), but it has lost its old identity under its new owner, Nebojsa Vujinovic, a Serbian music producer. Recent headlines on the site include “Justin Bieber Has a New Tattoo!” and “Meghan Markle and Adele Had a Secret Meeting!” That’s a long way from the mix of political and sharp lifestyle coverage that filled the welcome page before the sale.

Molly Elizalde, the former editorial and creative director of Lenny Letter, said she had recently tried to help a female journalist place an essay, only to realize, “There’s a huge hole.”

To some degree, the sites were undone by their own popularity. Larger media organizations like The New York Times, The Washington Post and Condé Nast took notice of the rising generation of women journalists — and hired them. (The Times hired gender editors in 2017; The Washington Post has a gender columnist and a product called The Lily that is targeted at women.)

And with the rise of the #MeToo movement, the concerns of the scrappy upstarts became the stuff of prizewinning investigations conducted by major news outlets. At the same time, women’s glossies at the big magazine publishers absorbed elements of that voice, a sensibility that also informed television series like “Fleabag” and “Broad City.”

“A lot of these closures were less about any sort of failure and actually about our success,” Ms. Schrupp, the former Broadly editor, said. “These places became so successful at showing women’s experiences as full, real experiences that other companies had to keep up. But it’s sad that they’re the ones who suffer for it.”

Ms. Holmes noted the change that has taken place since the early days of Jezebel, when her use of the word “feminism” in an early memo “set off alarm bells” at Gawker Media, as did her posting of a story on menstruation.

Editors may have also adjusted their view of which stories are right for women’s publications. Stella Bugbee, the editor in chief of The Cut, the popular site that is part of New York Media, said web data shows that a reader interested in beauty products will also click on a political story. So The Cut runs “The Body Politic,” a column by Rebecca Traister, the author of “Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Anger,” alongside one by Daise Bedolla called “Why Is Your Skin So Good.”

“I don’t think of us entirely as a women’s publication,” Ms. Bugbee said. “My main agenda for The Cut has always been to create an environment where women can hear themselves think, and those thoughts aren’t dictated by gender, necessarily.”

Historically, Ms. Traister said, it “has never blown anyone’s mind” that a newspaper subscriber would be interested in two things at once — say, stocks and sports — because the reader, presumed male, was understood to have varied interests.

“The integration of feminist political commentary and investigative reporting with other stuff, whether it’s fashion or beauty or sports, is part of a necessary expansion of the mainstream media to include women as full human beings,” Ms. Traister said.

Hanna Rosin, a co-founder of Slate’s DoubleX vertical, described Jezebel and other early women’s blogs as “lady spaces where people get rowdy.” That rowdiness, Ms. Rosin said, has largely been traded for the landmark investigations published by large publications able to afford the cost of having reporters and editors focus on a single story for months at a time. She cited the articles on Harvey Weinstein in The Times and The New Yorker as “earth-shattering,” adding that they were made possible thanks to the “coming of age” of women’s media.

But some journalists from the early wave worry that the voice of the feminist blogs has been diluted on its way to the mainstream.

“I remember The Washington Post started this women’s blog and it was in lipstick font,” said Jessica Valenti, who co-founded Feministing with her sister, Vanessa Valenti. She was referring to a site called She the People that the Post started in 2012 whose logo had a lipstick underline. “I was like, ‘Ugh, this is what happens when mainstream publications try to take on an insurgent young thing.’”

Julianne Escobedo Shepherd, the current editor in chief of Jezebel, concurred, saying, “There’s an edge that feminism brings to coverage. And it naturally will get softened when it’s no longer run by the feminists it’s targeting.”

Despite the recent shutterings, the particular voice of the feminist blogs has not disappeared. The godmother of them all, Bust, started as a ‘zine by Debbie Stoller and Laurie Henzel in the Riot Grrrl days, is hanging in there 26 years after its founding. The magazine’s motto — “For women with something to get off their chests” — sums up an ethos that seems unlikely to die, no matter what troubles come for the media industry.

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