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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 60)

LG smart refrigerator used for tweeting by teen whose mom banned electronics

Westlake Legal Group AP19190012629886 LG smart refrigerator used for tweeting by teen whose mom banned electronics Nicole Darrah fox-news/tech/technologies fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/tech fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/tech fnc article 2fd1411f-7523-5990-b412-650914b8bf71

A teenager who claims her mother took her electronics away seemingly resorted to what might be the last imaginable place to tweet from: a refrigerator.

The plight of 15-year-old Twitter user “Dorothy” was noticed earlier this month after she kept tweeting about how her mom kept taking gadgets away from her, leaving her unable to tweet.

NEW YORK TIMES DEMOTES HIGH-RANKING EDITOR FOLLOWING SOCIAL MEDIA CONTROVERSIES

The account, which appears to function as an Ariana Grande fan page, posted a tweet on Aug. 4 that read: “im leaving forever. my mom took my phone. ill miss u all sm. im crying. goodbye.”

Twitter, which shows where users’ tweets are sent from, showed that the teen’s tweet was sent from a Nintendo 3DS.

But later that day, Dorothy’s mom seemingly noticed her daughter was tweeting from the gaming device, and announced on Twitter her account “will be shut down now.”

Despite her mother’s guidance, the teen did not give up. On Aug. 5, she tweeted from her Wii U — thanking everyone for their support in her quest to tweet, no matter the consequences. In a follow-up tweet from her Wii U, she wrote her mom was at work and she planned to try looking for her phone.

But on Aug. 8, Dorothy’s predicament took another turn. Still without her electronics, the teen resorted to tweeting from her smart fridge.

“I do not know if this is going to tweet I am talking to my fridge what the heck my Mom confiscated all of my electronics again,” she said.

LG Electronics, the company behind the smart fridge, caught wind of Dorothy’s troubles, and tweeted “#FreeDorothy.” The main Twitter account tweeted it, too, describing the teen as “an icon.”

The teen told the Guardian, in a message sent through her cousin’s iPad, that her mom took her electronics away “so I’d pay more attention to my surroundings.”

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“I felt mortified! I was worried because I’ve been bored all summer and Twitter passes the time for me.”

It wasn’t clear when “Dorothy” would be allowed back on social media. In response to the Guardian asking how long she’d be grounded for, Dorothy said: “I may be late to reply, as it is difficult to find something to use Twitter.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19190012629886 LG smart refrigerator used for tweeting by teen whose mom banned electronics Nicole Darrah fox-news/tech/technologies fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/tech fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/tech fnc article 2fd1411f-7523-5990-b412-650914b8bf71   Westlake Legal Group AP19190012629886 LG smart refrigerator used for tweeting by teen whose mom banned electronics Nicole Darrah fox-news/tech/technologies fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/tech fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/tech fnc article 2fd1411f-7523-5990-b412-650914b8bf71

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South Carolina woman, 68, bit by alligator while walking dog near pond

Westlake Legal Group alligator-dinosaur-study South Carolina woman, 68, bit by alligator while walking dog near pond Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/south-carolina fox-news/science/wild-nature/reptiles fox news fnc/us fnc article 605b40bb-5d65-56fb-b61d-4de2ec0097c5

A South Carolina woman was walking her dog Monday night when an alligator attacked her near her home, officials said.

The 68-year-old woman was outside her home in Hilton Head Island, roughly 25 yards away from a pond in the Sun City retirement community, around 10 p.m., according to the Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office.

ALLIGATORS HAVE ‘TASTE’ FOR FLORIDA MEN, STUDY FINDS

Authorities caught the alligator, which was about 9 feet long, and euthanized it.

A spokesperson with the Bluffton Township Fire District, which responded to the scene, told WTOC the incident was not a “trend.”

“We surely look at those to see if there is a preventive message or effort that we can put forth to help folks avoid those scenarios. The unfortunate truth is they are wild animals, and wild indicates the fact that there is no trend, there is no way,” Cpt. Lee Levesque said.

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The alligator bit the woman on her leg and hand/wrist area, according to what she told authorities. She was transported to a hospital for medical treatment.

The sheriff’s office warns those in Beaufort County “to be mindful of alligators and to please be careful when walking near ponds and lagoons — especially at night when visibility is limited.”

Westlake Legal Group alligator-dinosaur-study South Carolina woman, 68, bit by alligator while walking dog near pond Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/south-carolina fox-news/science/wild-nature/reptiles fox news fnc/us fnc article 605b40bb-5d65-56fb-b61d-4de2ec0097c5   Westlake Legal Group alligator-dinosaur-study South Carolina woman, 68, bit by alligator while walking dog near pond Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/south-carolina fox-news/science/wild-nature/reptiles fox news fnc/us fnc article 605b40bb-5d65-56fb-b61d-4de2ec0097c5

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‘Families Are Torn Apart’: Wrenching Anne Frank Diary Quote Goes Viral After Immigration Raids in Mississippi

Westlake Legal Group klpgJMBKp1Lr7m7OuocxTgqvkMkRoB_wmErcn_KRw3s 'Families Are Torn Apart': Wrenching Anne Frank Diary Quote Goes Viral After Immigration Raids in Mississippi r/politics

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 84%. (I’m a bot)


Re-sharing it last week, in a tweet that was itself shared tens of thousands of times, King added, “Read this quote from Anne Frank in light of exactly what happened this week with the largest ICE raids in American history – where parents were literally taken while their kids were at school and the kids literally found out when nobody was there to pick them up.”

One district superintendent told the Clarion-Ledger he knew of six families with parents who were snared by the raids.

In an interview airing Tuesday night on NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt, Albence, the ICE director, said, “I’m a parent, most of our officers and agents are parents – some of the most difficult things that we have to do in our jobs to enforce the laws involve the separation of parents from children. However, we have to enforce the law.”


Extended Summary | FAQ | Feedback | Top keywords: parent#1raids#2told#3children#4school#5

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From not having kids to battling anxiety: Climate change is shaping life choices and affecting mental health

For some, ignoring climate change is not an option. It’s real, and preventing global warming from getting worse is a driving force in their lives.

Revelle Mast wanted to be an architect when she was a kid. She changed course in high school, deciding to pursue chemical engineering to address the threat of climate change. But, last year, she made another life decision: to go into politics. 

“I realized about a year ago that was not feasible on the time scale that climate change is happening,” Mast said. “Nine months ago, I quit my engineering job and went full time into political work.”

As global warming – the gradual increase in temperature of the Earth’s atmosphere –accelerates, people are grappling with the idea that disastrous conditions may appear as soon as 2040. The reality of this potentially existential crisis greatly impacts the way some people, especially those who have dedicated their lives to stopping climate change, make life decisions – whether that’s going vegan, living in a certain part of the country or deciding against having children. It even impacts their mental health.

Westlake Legal Group giphy From not having kids to battling anxiety: Climate change is shaping life choices and affecting mental health

Heating up: Climate is warming faster than it has in the last 2,000 years

For some people, ignoring climate change is not an option. It’s real, it’s happening, and preventing the crisis from getting worse is a driving force in their lives. 

Deciding what to do with their lives

“There’s a strong chance that society, as we know, it is going to be in shambles,” said Faith Ward, a 19-year-old climate activist with the youth movement Zero Hour. “What position am I going to be in for the sake of leadership?”

Ward is from Plantation, Florida, a city in the thick of the climate crisis because of its coastal location. At Zero Hour’s Youth Climate Summit in Miami earlier in July, the team was told to picture a place they consider sacred that is especially threatened by global warming, she said. While others pictured distant nature reserves, Ward was picturing her hometown. 

“Everyone else was picturing some place far off,” Ward said. “But I was standing there, it wasn’t my imagination. I’d pushed that thought down, but just standing there and thinking about it, I broke down crying in front of the group.”

Even though rising sea levels and hurricane intensities frighten her, Ward said the climate crisis has made her determined to stay home and protect her community. Her fight against climate change is personal, she said. 

“I don’t think any natural disaster could break the emotional ties I have here,” Ward said.

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Faith Ward, a 19-year-old climate activist with the youth movement Zero Hour

I don’t think any natural disaster could break the emotional ties I have here.

Lauren Maunus, also from South Florida in Palm City, was introduced to climate change’s harm by observing it in her hometown. In fourth grade, her town was struck by two back-to-back Category 4 hurricanes. At first she saw this as an opportunity to miss school for a month and tube down the streets. But she soon realized while her family’s house remained unharmed and their car intact, this was not the case for some of her classmates in lower income neighborhoods.

“With those back-to-back massive storms, I saw injustice even if I didn’t have the language for it, and from that point I was always fighting for environmental justice and climate justice,” Maunus said. “I couldn’t get that image of disparity out of my mind.”

Maunus dived deeper into environmental issues in college and learned how the crisis implicates every part of our society. Now, she’s a political and legislative coordinator for the Sunrise Movement, a youth-led movement advocating political action on climate change.

‘Breaking’ the heat index: US heat waves to skyrocket as globe warms, study suggests

Isabella Fallahi, 16, is the communications director for Zero Hour. Fallahi lives in Indianapolis, Indiana, a state that ranks 48th for quality of life and 46th for air quality. She was re-diagnosed with asthma this year because of worsening allergies triggered by climate change, she said. 

Fallahi said being personally impacted by climate change’s effects has made her even more determined in her activism.

“I have to go off to college and still won’t be able to escape the air quality that has damaged my respiratory system and my lungs for years now,” Fallahi said. “It’s going to forever play a role in what I do and how I do things.”

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Deciding to address climate anxiety

Christene Dejong would be awake at 2 in the morning, panicking over impending environmental “apocalyptic scenarios.” 

She was always aware of environmental concerns, the Amherst, Massachusetts, native said.

But after the 2017 Paris Climate Agreement withdrawal coupled with the 2019 U.N. report that says up to 1 million species are at risk of extinction, “some switch flipped and I just started freaking out all the time.” 

The Paris agreement aims to combat global warming by gradually reducing emissions of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane, which come from the burning of fossil fuels such as oil, coal and natural gas. President Donald Trump announced in June that the U.S. would withdraw from the deal.

A Yale survey released in December found nearly 70% of Americans are “worried” about climate change, 29% are “very worried” – up eight percentage points from just six months earlier – and 51% said they felt “helpless.”

This anxiety has gained so much traction in the national consciousness that it is starting to needle its way into popular media. On an episode of the popular HBO drama “Big Little Lies,” the daughter of one of the main characters has a panic attack while learning about climate change.

Westlake Legal Group 1a8cc8ea-e8d0-4c37-8f7a-ef0370af257d-Screen_Shot_2019-08-09_at_7.05.08_PM From not having kids to battling anxiety: Climate change is shaping life choices and affecting mental health

Revelle Mast, left, and Lauren Maunus of Sunrise Movement, a youth-led movement advocating political action on climate change. Alex Brizee

Susan Clayton, professor of psychology at the College of Wooster, said mental health issues surrounding climate change can stem from both climate change events directly experienced and concern about the changing climate in general. 

“You don’t have to be directly affected by climate change in order to be worried about climate change,” she said.

Psychotherapist, ecotherapist and author Linda Buzzell who is from Santa Barbara, California, has struggled with “eco-anxiety” herself. 

“I think it’s beginning to dawn on us that we’re not going to be here very long if our habitat is basically killed off and dying,” she said. 

Linda Buzzell, psychotherapist, ecotherapist and author

I think it’s beginning to dawn on us that we’re not going to be here very long if our habitat is basically killed off, and dying

This can manifest as trauma from events, post-traumatic stress disorder, compounded stress and depression, or even death by suicide, Clayton said. 

She wrote in a study that in some cases, feelings of loss, because of natural disasters or knowledge of climate change impacts, persist for so long and so severely “that individuals have trouble resuming their normal lives.”

Chris Paluszeck says his eco-anxiety manifested mostly because of his kids’ births – his son was born five years ago and his daughter three – which he says has “been a wake- up call.”

“You want to have them inherit a world at least as good as what you had, hopefully better,” he said. “But to read about it and understand what’s coming our way, it seems like it might not be the case. And that really hit me hard.”

Mental health at stake: Climate change may take a toll on our mental health, too

Paluszeck, of Burbank, California, has attended meetings of the Good Grief Network, a support group based in Nebraska for people to talk about their climate anxieties. It is known for its 10 step model for personal resilience and empowerment. 

The founders, Laura Schmidt and Aimee Lewis Reau say that “Good Grief is what happened when we kept digging into these issues” of climate change and anxiety surrounding it. They two are originally from Michigan but moved to Nebraska to work on this project.

 Their goals are to make people confront the “collective despair” that is felt by those who feel that climate change is inevitable, as well as “come together in community,” according to Reau.

Paluszeck said the Good Grief Network has helped him mitigate the anxiety he feels every day by talking and sharing stories.

“Joining a circle of people that also feel the way you feel really helps you not feel so alone,” he said.

Dejong said finding a community with other mothers concerned about climate change has helped her cope with feelings of panic. She urges others to find the “hundreds of thousands of people who are doing something” about the issue and join their cause. 

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Deciding to make lifestyle changes

The first thing Kim Cobb, a climate scientist at the Georgia Institute of Technology, did was start riding her bike to work. Then she replaced her light bulbs, her sister’s light bulbs and her parents’ light bulbs with LEDs. Her next step was reducing the flying she did by 35%. She also calls herself an aspiring vegan.

“After 2016, which brought the heat-related death of much of the coral reef I’ve worked at for 20 years and then the election of this administration, I kind of had to find another gear of climate engagement,” Cobb said. 

On the front lines: These grandparents are dropping everything to fight climate change

Cobb said she’s usually met with amazement when telling people about her lifestyle changes. She’s one of the few people in her neighborhood with solar panels on her roof, whose expenses have left her husband “with his jaw on the floor,” she said. Cobb noted the government doesn’t make it easy for people to lead more climate friendly lives.

Westlake Legal Group f173fd50-2e38-4fd3-add9-54c5e68ba411-DSC_9758 From not having kids to battling anxiety: Climate change is shaping life choices and affecting mental health

The office space of Sunrise Movement, a youth-led movement advocating political action on climate change, in Washington, D.C. Alex Brizee

“It’s not that we’re doing a hell of a lot to give people a lot of choice in the matter,” Cobb said. “What would it look like if we had really safe bike infrastructure? What would happen if we really subsidized rooftop solar? We would move the market. People want solutions to climate change. People are concerned about climate change. And yet policy is dragging.”

To shift policy and systemic change, Cobb has thrown herself into influencing lawmakers, starting in her own community. She was elected traffic chair of her neighborhood’s board and said she frequents city hall to advocate for biker safety. 

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Deciding not to have children

The decision of whether or not to have children can be tough for activists.

Some have given up on having kids altogether. British musician Blythe Pepino, 33, created BirthStrike, a group of people who’ve decided against having kids in the wake of the climate crisis. She’s also an activist with the Extinction Rebellion, a movement using civil disobedience to protest climate change inaction. 

“Mainly, I want to be an activist,” Pepino said. “I’m also afraid for the child I would bring into the world.”

Westlake Legal Group 2a589703-d0cf-4292-be8a-1625bf78cd3f-EPA_USA_NEW_YORK_YOUTH_CLIMATE_CHANGE_PROTEST_1 From not having kids to battling anxiety: Climate change is shaping life choices and affecting mental health

Students at a climate change protest at Columbus Circle in New York on May 24, 2019. JUSTIN LANE, EPA-EFE

Like Cobb, Pepino has made climate-related lifestyle changes. She’s vegan and she doesn’t fly anymore,  meaning she probably won’t accomplish international recognition as a musician – a fact she has accepted. Pepino says the decision to not have kids became harder to accept, though, when she met her current partner. 

Mast, who is a trans woman, had to make her decision on having kids when transitioning. She decided against it, and so she didn’t bank sperm. 

“That was a decision I made when I was 24 that I’m not having kids because the climate can’t take it,” said Mast, who’s from the San Francisco Bay Area. “By not having kids, I can devote that much more of my life toward fixing this crisis.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

The Rise of the Virtual Restaurant

SAN FRANCISCO — At 9:30 on most weeknights, Ricky Lopez, the head chef and owner of Top Round Roast Beef in San Francisco, stacks up dozens of hot beef sandwiches and sides of curly fries to serve hungry diners.

He also breads chicken cutlets for another of his restaurants, Red Ribbon Fried Chicken. He flips beef patties on the grill for a third, TR Burgers and Wings. And he mixes frozen custard for a dessert shop he runs, Ice Cream Custard.

Of Mr. Lopez’s four operations, three are “virtual restaurants” with no physical storefronts, tables or chairs. They exist only inside a mobile app, Uber Eats, the on-demand meal delivery service owned by Uber.

“Delivery used to be maybe a quarter of my business,” Mr. Lopez, 26, said from behind Top Round’s counter, as his staff assembled roast beef and chicken sandwiches and placed them in white paper bags for Uber Eats drivers to deliver. “Now it’s about 75 percent of it.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_158243436_a5bd37b8-92d0-4048-bf55-7f7feb514945-articleLarge The Rise of the Virtual Restaurant Uber Eats restaurants Mobile Applications DoorDash (Mobile App) Delivery Services Deliveroo (Roofoods Ltd)

“Delivery used to be maybe a quarter of my business,” Mr. Lopez said. “Now it’s about 75 percent of it.”CreditCayce Clifford for The New York Times

Food delivery apps like Uber Eats, DoorDash and Grubhub are starting to reshape the $863 billion American restaurant industry. As more people order food to eat at home, and as delivery becomes faster and more convenient, the apps are changing the very essence of what it means to operate a restaurant.

No longer must restaurateurs rent space for a dining room. All they need is a kitchen — or even just part of one. Then they can hang a shingle inside a meal-delivery app and market their food to the app’s customers, without the hassle and expense of hiring waiters or paying for furniture and tablecloths. Diners who order from the apps may have no idea that the restaurant doesn’t physically exist.

The shift has popularized two types of digital culinary establishments. One is “virtual restaurants,” which are attached to real-life restaurants like Mr. Lopez’s Top Round but make different cuisines specifically for the delivery apps. The other is “ghost kitchens,” which have no retail presence and essentially serve as a meal preparation hub for delivery orders.

“Online ordering is not a necessary evil. It’s the most exciting opportunity in the restaurant industry today,” said Alex Canter, who runs Canter’s Deli in Los Angeles and a start-up that helps restaurants streamline delivery app orders onto one device. “If you don’t use delivery apps, you don’t exist.”

Many of the delivery-only operations are nascent, but their effect may be far-reaching, potentially accelerating people’s turn toward order-in food over restaurant visits and preparing home-cooked meals.

Uber and other companies are driving the change. Since 2017, the ride-hailing company has helped start 4,000 virtual restaurants with restaurateurs like Mr. Lopez, which are exclusive to its Uber Eats app.

Janelle Sallenave, who leads Uber Eats in North America, said the company analyzes neighborhood sales data to identify unmet demand for particular cuisines. Then it approaches restaurants that use the app and encourages them to create a virtual restaurant to meet that demand.

Other companies are also jumping in. Travis Kalanick, the former Uber chief executive, has formed CloudKitchens, a start-up that incubates ghost kitchens.

Yet even as delivery apps create new kinds of restaurants, they are hurting some traditional establishments, which already contend with high operating expenses and brutal competition. Restaurants that use delivery apps like Uber Eats and Grubhub pay commissions of 15 percent to as much as 30 percent on every order. While digital establishments save on overhead, small independent eateries with narrow profit margins can ill afford those fees.

“There’s a concern that it could be a system where restaurant owners are trapped in an unstable, unsuitable business model,” Mark Gjonaj, the chairman of the New York City Council’s small-business committee, said at a four-hour hearing on third-party food delivery in June.

Delivery apps may also undermine the connection between diner and chef. “A chef can occasionally walk out of the dining room and observe a diner enjoying his or her food,” said Shawn Quaid, a chef who oversaw a ghost kitchen in Chicago. Delivery-only facilities “take away the emotional connection and the creative redemption.”

Uber and other delivery apps maintain that they are helping restaurants, not hurting them.

“We exist for demand generation,” said Ms. Sallenave. “Why would a restaurant be working with us if we weren’t helping them increase their orders?”

Delivery-only establishments in the United States date to at least 2013, when a start-up, the Green Summit Group, began work on a ghost kitchen in New York. With Grubhub’s backing, Green Summit produced food that was marketed online under brand names like Leafage (salads) and Butcher Block (sandwiches).

But Green Summit burned through hundreds of thousands of dollars a month, said Jason Shapiro, a consultant who worked for the company. Two years ago, it shut down when it couldn’t attract new investors, he said.

In Europe, the food-delivery app Deliveroo also started testing ghost kitchens. It erected metal kitchen structures called Rooboxes in some unlikely locations, including a derelict parking lot in East London. Last year, Deliveroo opened a ghost kitchen in a warehouse in Paris, where Uber Eats has also tried delivery-only kitchens.

Ghost kitchens have also emerged in China, where online food delivery apps are widely used in the country’s densely populated megacities. China’s food delivery industry hit $70 billion in orders last year, according to iResearch, an analysis firm. One Chinese ghost kitchen start-up, Panda Selected, recently raised $50 million from investors including Tiger Global Management, according to Crunchbase.

Those experiments have spread. Over the last two years, Family Style, a food start-up in Los Angeles, has opened ghost kitchens in three states. It has created more than half a dozen pizza brands with names like Lorenzo’s of New York, Froman’s Chicago Pizza and Gabriella’s New York Pizza, which can be found on Uber Eats and other apps.

CloudKitchens, which Mr. Kalanick founded after leaving Uber in 2017, has leased kitchen space to several established restaurants in Los Angeles, including the farm-to-table chain Sweetgreen, to try the delivery-only model. The Los Angeles facility is one of several ghost kitchens used by Sweetgreen, whose chief executive, Jonathan Neman, has spoken enthusiastically about them.

And Kitchen United, a ghost-kitchen company in Pasadena, Calif., is working with brick-and-mortar restaurants to set up delivery-only establishments. It aims to establish 400 such “kitchen centers” across the country over the next few years.

When it comes types of food, “consumers don’t appear to be saying they’re looking for additional options,” said Jim Collins, Kitchen United’s chief executive. “They appear to be looking for new modes of consumption.”

For Paul Geffner, the growing popularity of food-delivery apps has hurt. He has run Escape From New York Pizza, a small restaurant chain in the Bay Area, for three decades, relying on delivery orders as a major source of revenue.

In May, Paul Geffner, the owner of Escape From New York Pizza, closed two of the Bay Area chain’s locations. CreditJim Wilson/The New York Times

After he offered delivery through the apps in 2016, his business teetered. Two of his five pizzerias, which together had generated annual profits of $50,000 to $100,000, lost as much as $40,000 a year as customers who had ordered directly from Escape From New York switched to the apps. That forced Mr. Geffner to pay the commissions.

“We saw a direct correlation between the delivery services and the reduction of our income,” Mr. Geffner said. “It was like death by a thousand cuts.”

In May, he closed the two locations. Later that month, one was replaced with a kitchen that mostly does delivery.

Mr. Lopez opened Top Round, a franchise that originated in Los Angeles, in 2017 in San Francisco’s Mission neighborhood. For the first eight months, he said, he lost tens of thousands of dollars.

Last year, Uber approached Mr. Lopez and told him there was demand for late-night orders of burgers and ice cream in his area. Uber, which does not provide financial help to virtual restaurants, has claimed that the digital operations increase sales for restaurateurs by an average of more than 50 percent.

Mr. Geffner’s former pizzeria in San Francisco’s Mission neighborhood, which the new owner is turning into a ghost kitchen.CreditJim Wilson/The New York Times

Mr. Lopez said he figured he already had the ingredients for burgers and ice cream in stock. So it was a no-brainer to create the virtual restaurants for Uber Eats.

Now he uses Top Round’s kitchen to serve hundreds of new customers across San Francisco. Though he wouldn’t disclose financial information, Mr. Lopez said he had hired another employee to handle the influx of delivery orders. Those orders have stabilized the restaurant’s income so that he no longer works 110-hour weeks just to keep the business afloat.

“We used to close at 9 p.m., but demand has pushed us to stay open later — we close at 2 a.m. now,” Mr. Lopez said. “Most of the night, the kitchen is banging.”

Read more on food delivery apps:
DoorDash Buys a Rival, Caviar, for $410 Million

Aug 1, 2019

My Frantic Life as a Cab-Dodging, Tip-Chasing Food App Deliveryman

Jul 21, 2019

One Surprise Standout for Uber: Food Delivery

Sep 23, 2017

Mike Isaac reported from San Francisco, and David Yaffe-Bellany from New York. Raymond Zhong contributed reporting from Dongguan, China.

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Kitna returns to NFL with Cowboys, seeks growth in Prescott

Jon Kitna unfolded a piece of paper detailing that day’s practice plan because he thought it was a good way to illustrate why the former Dallas quarterback was back in the NFL with the Cowboys after coaching high school football for seven years.

Dak Prescott‘s new position coach never stopped communicating with Jason Garrett, who replaced the fired Wade Phillips as head coach while Kitna was starting for an injured Tony Romo halfway through a lost season in 2010. Now Kitna is on the staff of a man he calls a mentor — even though Garrett is only seven years older.

“Like, literally, I could bring one of my coaches here from the last seven years and I could hand them this, and they’d know exactly what this is and how it works and what we’re doing,” Kitna said as he held out the paper. “He gave me all that stuff.”

When Garrett and the Cowboys were dealing with another Romo injury and needed an emergency backup for a 2013 regular-season finale with a playoff berth on the line, Kitna traveled from Washington state, where he was coaching his high school alma mater, to wear the headset for one Sunday.

A year later, Kitna returned to Texas as coach at Waxahachie High School, just south of Dallas. After three years there, he coached at a private school in Arizona before the Cowboys promoted Kellen Moore to offensive coordinator after just one year as QB coach.

Re-enter Kitna, whose playing career overlapped with Garrett’s for almost a decade — although they were never teammates — before Garrett became his offensive coordinator in Dallas.

“At that time, I always said to myself at some point he is going to stop playing,” Garrett said. “At some point we got to get him back on board. He’s got great knowledge of the game. He’s got a great way to connect with people. The way he interacts with players. The way he interacts with coaches.”

Garrett’s been known to say many of the same things about Prescott after two NFC East titles in three seasons, along with NFL Rookie of the Year honors in 2016 when he led Dallas to a franchise-record 11-game winning streak.

Kitna is coming along at an important time, the 46-year-old looking like the perfect complement for someone exactly 20 years younger.

Viewed by the front office as the face of the franchise for the next decade and perhaps beyond, Prescott seeks his first big contract after significantly outplaying his fourth-round rookie deal. The Cowboys believe they have the pieces to end a nearly 25-year Super Bowl drought.

Prescott keeps coming back to footwork when asked how he thinks Kitna is going to make him better.

“He does a great job of staying on top of us every practice, going in the film room and making sure we touch up on it as well,” Prescott said. “I’m seeing the improvement. It feels great.”

When he finally decided to make the jump, Kitna went from coaching teenagers to a two-time Pro Bowler looking for answers on how to get past the divisional playoffs after losing in that round twice.

The difference wasn’t lost on a former player who never made the Pro Bowl, had a losing record (54-70), lost both his playoff starts and threw almost as many interceptions (165) as touchdowns (169). A career that spanned 14 seasons also included stops in Seattle, Cincinnati and Detroit.

“The thing I had to get over was, and it was quick, ‘I have something to offer,'” Kitna said, chuckling at the memory of showing up with Garrett’s staff at the Pro Bowl before the Cowboys had announced his hiring, feeling as if “the staff doesn’t even know who you are.”

“Especially for me, I’m a severe introvert. I set the scale for it. I just had to get over it. And Dak’s been great. I do have not only something to offer. I think I have a lot to offer. And I think we’re growing together.”

Kitna has another duty in helping the Cowboys settle on Prescott’s backup. Cooper Rush had the job the past two seasons and appears in line for a third, particularly after Mike White struggled in the preseason opener at San Francisco last weekend.

Rush and White were on the roster last season, but the Cowboys might not have the luxury of keeping three quarterbacks this season. This is where Kitna’s voice becomes important again.

“At the end of the day, this is Dak’s team and we need to make sure that he’s ready to go come Week 1,” White said. “I think (Kitna) does a great job of spending time with me and Coop as well, whether it was extra meeting times on the field after practice, before practice. He’s really dialed in with it all.”

During his three years as a high school coach in Texas, Kitna usually took at least a day each season to bring his staff to a Cowboys practice. His last two years of that were Prescott’s first two seasons in the NFL. For Kitna, the familiarity ran deeper than that.

“I don’t know that I ever stopped coaching high school kids like I was in the NFL,” Kitna said. “My high school kids would come here right now and go, ‘Oh, that’s that play. That’s that play. That’s that play.’ We didn’t have quite the volume. But we had heavy volume.

“At the end of the day, you have to be able to teach what you have up here. It’s not OK to just have knowledge. You have to be able to give knowledge. I think that’s the same way as high school or here.”

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Dak-Prescott2 Kitna returns to NFL with Cowboys, seeks growth in Prescott fox-news/sports/nfl/dallas-cowboys fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/dak-prescott fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 9d58a527-4b14-5fd4-ac55-b28731e2b7cc   Westlake Legal Group NFL-Dak-Prescott2 Kitna returns to NFL with Cowboys, seeks growth in Prescott fox-news/sports/nfl/dallas-cowboys fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/dak-prescott fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 9d58a527-4b14-5fd4-ac55-b28731e2b7cc

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The Rise of the Virtual Restaurant

SAN FRANCISCO — At 9:30 on most weeknights, Ricky Lopez, the head chef and owner of Top Round Roast Beef in San Francisco, stacks up dozens of hot beef sandwiches and sides of curly fries to serve hungry diners.

He also breads chicken cutlets for another of his restaurants, Red Ribbon Fried Chicken. He flips beef patties on the grill for a third, TR Burgers and Wings. And he mixes frozen custard for a dessert shop he runs, Ice Cream Custard.

Of Mr. Lopez’s four operations, three are “virtual restaurants” with no physical storefronts, tables or chairs. They exist only inside a mobile app, Uber Eats, the on-demand meal delivery service owned by Uber.

“Delivery used to be maybe a quarter of my business,” Mr. Lopez, 26, said from behind Top Round’s counter, as his staff assembled roast beef and chicken sandwiches and placed them in white paper bags for Uber Eats drivers to deliver. “Now it’s about 75 percent of it.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_158243436_a5bd37b8-92d0-4048-bf55-7f7feb514945-articleLarge The Rise of the Virtual Restaurant Uber Eats restaurants Mobile Applications DoorDash (Mobile App) Delivery Services Deliveroo (Roofoods Ltd)

“Delivery used to be maybe a quarter of my business,” Mr. Lopez said. “Now it’s about 75 percent of it.”CreditCayce Clifford for The New York Times

Food delivery apps like Uber Eats, DoorDash and Grubhub are starting to reshape the $863 billion American restaurant industry. As more people order food to eat at home, and as delivery becomes faster and more convenient, the apps are changing the very essence of what it means to operate a restaurant.

No longer must restaurateurs rent space for a dining room. All they need is a kitchen — or even just part of one. Then they can hang a shingle inside a meal-delivery app and market their food to the app’s customers, without the hassle and expense of hiring waiters or paying for furniture and tablecloths. Diners who order from the apps may have no idea that the restaurant doesn’t physically exist.

The shift has popularized two types of digital culinary establishments. One is “virtual restaurants,” which are attached to real-life restaurants like Mr. Lopez’s Top Round but make different cuisines specifically for the delivery apps. The other is “ghost kitchens,” which have no retail presence and essentially serve as a meal preparation hub for delivery orders.

“Online ordering is not a necessary evil. It’s the most exciting opportunity in the restaurant industry today,” said Alex Canter, who runs Canter’s Deli in Los Angeles and a start-up that helps restaurants streamline delivery app orders onto one device. “If you don’t use delivery apps, you don’t exist.”

Many of the delivery-only operations are nascent, but their effect may be far-reaching, potentially accelerating people’s turn toward order-in food over restaurant visits and preparing home-cooked meals.

Uber and other companies are driving the change. Since 2017, the ride-hailing company has helped start 4,000 virtual restaurants with restaurateurs like Mr. Lopez, which are exclusive to its Uber Eats app.

Janelle Sallenave, who leads Uber Eats in North America, said the company analyzes neighborhood sales data to identify unmet demand for particular cuisines. Then it approaches restaurants that use the app and encourages them to create a virtual restaurant to meet that demand.

Other companies are also jumping in. Travis Kalanick, the former Uber chief executive, has formed CloudKitchens, a start-up that incubates ghost kitchens.

Yet even as delivery apps create new kinds of restaurants, they are hurting some traditional establishments, which already contend with high operating expenses and brutal competition. Restaurants that use delivery apps like Uber Eats and Grubhub pay commissions of 15 percent to as much as 30 percent on every order. While digital establishments save on overhead, small independent eateries with narrow profit margins can ill afford those fees.

“There’s a concern that it could be a system where restaurant owners are trapped in an unstable, unsuitable business model,” Mark Gjonaj, the chairman of the New York City Council’s small-business committee, said at a four-hour hearing on third-party food delivery in June.

Delivery apps may also undermine the connection between diner and chef. “A chef can occasionally walk out of the dining room and observe a diner enjoying his or her food,” said Shawn Quaid, a chef who oversaw a ghost kitchen in Chicago. Delivery-only facilities “take away the emotional connection and the creative redemption.”

Uber and other delivery apps maintain that they are helping restaurants, not hurting them.

“We exist for demand generation,” said Ms. Sallenave. “Why would a restaurant be working with us if we weren’t helping them increase their orders?”

Delivery-only establishments in the United States date to at least 2013, when a start-up, the Green Summit Group, began work on a ghost kitchen in New York. With Grubhub’s backing, Green Summit produced food that was marketed online under brand names like Leafage (salads) and Butcher Block (sandwiches).

But Green Summit burned through hundreds of thousands of dollars a month, said Jason Shapiro, a consultant who worked for the company. Two years ago, it shut down when it couldn’t attract new investors, he said.

In Europe, the food-delivery app Deliveroo also started testing ghost kitchens. It erected metal kitchen structures called Rooboxes in some unlikely locations, including a derelict parking lot in East London. Last year, Deliveroo opened a ghost kitchen in a warehouse in Paris, where Uber Eats has also tried delivery-only kitchens.

Ghost kitchens have also emerged in China, where online food delivery apps are widely used in the country’s densely populated megacities. China’s food delivery industry hit $70 billion in orders last year, according to iResearch, an analysis firm. One Chinese ghost kitchen start-up, Panda Selected, recently raised $50 million from investors including Tiger Global Management, according to Crunchbase.

Those experiments have spread. Over the last two years, Family Style, a food start-up in Los Angeles, has opened ghost kitchens in three states. It has created more than half a dozen pizza brands with names like Lorenzo’s of New York, Froman’s Chicago Pizza and Gabriella’s New York Pizza, which can be found on Uber Eats and other apps.

CloudKitchens, which Mr. Kalanick founded after leaving Uber in 2017, has leased kitchen space to several established restaurants in Los Angeles, including the farm-to-table chain Sweetgreen, to try the delivery-only model. The Los Angeles facility is one of several ghost kitchens used by Sweetgreen, whose chief executive, Jonathan Neman, has spoken enthusiastically about them.

And Kitchen United, a ghost-kitchen company in Pasadena, Calif., is working with brick-and-mortar restaurants to set up delivery-only establishments. It aims to establish 400 such “kitchen centers” across the country over the next few years.

When it comes types of food, “consumers don’t appear to be saying they’re looking for additional options,” said Jim Collins, Kitchen United’s chief executive. “They appear to be looking for new modes of consumption.”

For Paul Geffner, the growing popularity of food-delivery apps has hurt. He has run Escape From New York Pizza, a small restaurant chain in the Bay Area, for three decades, relying on delivery orders as a major source of revenue.

In May, Paul Geffner, the owner of Escape From New York Pizza, closed two of the Bay Area chain’s locations. CreditJim Wilson/The New York Times

After he offered delivery through the apps in 2016, his business teetered. Two of his five pizzerias, which together had generated annual profits of $50,000 to $100,000, lost as much as $40,000 a year as customers who had ordered directly from Escape From New York switched to the apps. That forced Mr. Geffner to pay the commissions.

“We saw a direct correlation between the delivery services and the reduction of our income,” Mr. Geffner said. “It was like death by a thousand cuts.”

In May, he closed the two locations. Later that month, one was replaced with a kitchen that mostly does delivery.

Mr. Lopez opened Top Round, a franchise that originated in Los Angeles, in 2017 in San Francisco’s Mission neighborhood. For the first eight months, he said, he lost tens of thousands of dollars.

Last year, Uber approached Mr. Lopez and told him there was demand for late-night orders of burgers and ice cream in his area. Uber, which does not provide financial help to virtual restaurants, has claimed that the digital operations increase sales for restaurateurs by an average of more than 50 percent.

Mr. Geffner’s former pizzeria in San Francisco’s Mission neighborhood, which the new owner is turning into a ghost kitchen.CreditJim Wilson/The New York Times

Mr. Lopez said he figured he already had the ingredients for burgers and ice cream in stock. So it was a no-brainer to create the virtual restaurants for Uber Eats.

Now he uses Top Round’s kitchen to serve hundreds of new customers across San Francisco. Though he wouldn’t disclose financial information, Mr. Lopez said he had hired another employee to handle the influx of delivery orders. Those orders have stabilized the restaurant’s income so that he no longer works 110-hour weeks just to keep the business afloat.

“We used to close at 9 p.m., but demand has pushed us to stay open later — we close at 2 a.m. now,” Mr. Lopez said. “Most of the night, the kitchen is banging.”

Read more on food delivery apps:
DoorDash Buys a Rival, Caviar, for $410 Million

Aug 1, 2019

My Frantic Life as a Cab-Dodging, Tip-Chasing Food App Deliveryman

Jul 21, 2019

One Surprise Standout for Uber: Food Delivery

Sep 23, 2017

Mike Isaac reported from San Francisco, and David Yaffe-Bellany from New York. Raymond Zhong contributed reporting from Dongguan, China.

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President jokes about serving third term, rambles ignorantly about wind power and defends baseless Epstein conspiracy theory

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Jeffrey Epstein Death: 2 Guards Slept Through Checks and Falsified Records

Westlake Legal Group 13epstein-developments-facebookJumbo Jeffrey Epstein Death: 2 Guards Slept Through Checks and Falsified Records Suicides and Suicide Attempts Sex Crimes prostitution Prisons and Prisoners Metropolitan Correctional Center (Manhattan, NY) human trafficking Epstein, Jeffrey E (1953- ) Child Abuse and Neglect Barr, William P

The two staff members who were guarding the jail unit where Jeffrey Epstein apparently killed himself fell asleep and failed to check on him for about three hours, then falsified records to cover up their mistake, according to several law enforcement and prison officials with knowledge of the matter.

Those disclosures came on Tuesday as the two employees were placed on administrative leave and the warden of the jail, the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan, was temporarily reassigned, pending the outcome of the investigation into Mr. Epstein’s death, the Justice Department announced.

The two staff members in the special housing unit where Mr. Epstein was held — 9 South — falsely recorded in a log that they had checked on the financier, who was facing sex trafficking charges, every 30 minutes, as was required, the officials said. Such false entries in an official log could constitute a federal crime.

In fact, the two people guarding Mr. Epstein had been asleep for some or all of the three hours, three of the officials said.

The attorney general, William P. Barr, on Monday ordered the Justice Department’s inspector general to look into how Mr. Epstein had managed to commit suicide while in custody and why he had been taken off a suicide watch 12 days earlier.

“We will get to the bottom of what happened,” Mr. Barr said.

The warden, Lamine N’Diaye, will be transferred to a Bureau of Prisons office in Philadelphia while the F.B.I. and the Justice Department’s inspector general conduct inquiries. The Justice Department said in a statement that it might take additional punitive actions.

Prison staff discovered Mr. Epstein, 66, dead in his cell at the Metropolitan Correctional Center at 6:30 a.m. on Saturday, officials said. He had apparently hanged himself with a bedsheet, likely fastening the sheet to a top bunk and pitching himself forward, law enforcement and prison officials said.

Mr. Epstein had been awaiting trial on charges he had sexually abused scores of teenage girls at his mansions in Manhattan and Palm Beach, Fla.

He had apparently tried to commit suicide once before, on July 23, shortly after he was denied bail, which resulted in him being placed on suicide watch, prison officials familiar with the incident have said.

Six days later, prison officials determined that he was no longer a threat to his own life and returned him to a cell in the 9 South housing unit with another inmate, officials said. That inmate was later transferred out of the cell, leaving Mr. Epstein alone on Friday night.

Though it is standard practice to house people who have recently been taken off suicide watch with another person, the prison did not replace Mr. Epstein’s cellmate.

The Justice Department, which oversees the Bureau of Prisons, did not immediately identify the two correctional officers who were placed on administrative leave.

Two prison officials familiar with the incident said the two staff members had not looked in on Mr. Epstein for about three hours before he was found.

One of the staff members was a former correctional officer who had taken a different position at the detention center that did not involve guarding detainees. He had volunteered to work again as a correctional officer for the extra overtime pay, a law enforcement official and an employee at the jail said.

The second officer, a woman who was assigned to that wing, had been ordered to work overtime because the jail was short staffed.

Before Jail Suicide, Jeffrey Epstein Was Left Alone and Not Closely Monitored

Aug 11, 2019

James Petrucci, the warden at a federal prison in Otisville, N.Y., has been named acting warden of the Manhattan jail, officials said.

Some union leaders for prison workers expressed dismay with Mr. Barr’s decision to allow the warden to continue working, even as the two staff members were placed on leave.

“It makes me angry that they reassigned the warden,” said Jose Rojas, an official in the prison employees’ union and a teacher at the Coleman prison complex in Sumterville, Fla. “They didn’t put him on administrative leave like the others. The warden made the call to take Epstein off suicide watch and to remove his cellmate. That is egregious.”

Since Saturday, Mr. Barr has been briefed multiple times a day on the inquiries into Mr. Epstein’s death, a Justice Department official said.

In addition to the investigations by the Justice Department, the inspector general and the F.B.I., two other reviews of Mr. Epstein’s death were underway, a Justice Department official said.

A team of psychologists from the Bureau of Prisons visited the Manhattan jail on Tuesday to review each step of the decision to take Mr. Epstein off suicide watch.

On Wednesday, an “after-action team” — led by the bureau’s Southeast regional director — is scheduled to be at the prison to determine whether employees and officials followed protocols in the days and weeks before Mr. Epstein died, the official said.

Mr. Epstein’s death has drawn sharp criticism from Republican and Democratic lawmakers.

On Monday, the chairman and ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee sent a letter to the acting director of the Bureau of Prisons, Hugh Hurwitz, demanding answers about how Mr. Epstein could have been unsupervised long enough to take his own life.

The letter said Mr. Epstein’s apparent suicide had brought to light “severe miscarriages” or deficiencies in how inmates are managed at the jail and had “allowed the deceased to ultimately evade facing justice.”

It was signed by Representatives Jerrold Nadler, a New York Democrat, and Doug Collins, a Georgia Republican.

Mr. Nadler and Mr. Collins demanded that the Bureau of Prisons hand over by Aug. 21 any details about Mr. Epstein’s mental health evaluations and his housing, as well as the bureau’s protocols for handling inmates considered at risk of suicide.

They also requested to be told how Mr. Epstein was being monitored and what the surveillance cameras may have recorded in or near Mr. Epstein’s cell.

At the same time, Senator Ben Sasse, a Nebraska Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, urged Mr. Barr on Tuesday to rip up an agreement federal prosecutors in Florida had reached with Mr. Epstein in 2008 that shielded not only him, but also any other co-conspirators who may have helped him lure teenage girls into prostitution.

“This crooked deal cannot stand,” Mr. Sasse said in his letter.

William K. Rashbaum and Christina Goldbaum contributed reporting.

In Short-Staffed Jail, Epstein Was Left Alone for Hours; Guard Was Substitute

Aug 12, 2019

Jeffrey Epstein Dead in Suicide at Jail, Spurring Inquiries

Aug 10, 2019

Why the Jeffrey Epstein Investigation Is Not Over

Aug 11, 2019

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As Debate Deadline Nears, Democratic Candidates Scramble to Make the Cut

With the deadline to qualify for the next Democratic presidential debates looming just two weeks away, candidates on the bubble are mounting some of their final offensives, urgently seeking supporters who can help them make the cut.

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand of New York has poured more than $1 million into advertising in Iowa and New Hampshire. Julián Castro, the former housing secretary, bought a local ad in Bedminster, N.J., where President Trump is vacationing this week. And Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii has urged her supporters to try to improve their chances of being selected for online polls.

They and other lower-tier candidates are desperately searching for voters who can propel them to 2 percent support in qualifying polls, one of the Democratic National Committee’s requirements for the next set of debates, scheduled for Sept. 12 and 13 in Houston. The threshold for the June and July debates was merely 1 percent.

[Andrew Yang became the ninth Democrat to qualify for the September debates.]

Meanwhile, Tom Steyer, the former hedge fund investor turned impeachment activist, has spent millions of dollars flooding the internet with ads that have helped him catch up to his rivals after entering the race in July. On Tuesday his campaign announced that he had crossed the other threshold for qualification by collecting donations from more than 130,000 people.

The collective scramble to earn a spot on the stage next month underscores the importance the campaigns are placing on the next debates. Those who secure a lectern will have another opportunity to speak to a national audience, but those who miss out will face louder calls to withdraw as Democrats grow anxious for the field to narrow.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_158710440_5651bd92-2c86-446f-a0a8-b5f4c96391d7-articleLarge As Debate Deadline Nears, Democratic Candidates Scramble to Make the Cut Steyer, Thomas F Presidential Election of 2020 Political Advertising Online Advertising Gillibrand, Kirsten E Gabbard, Tulsi (1981- ) Debates (Political) Castro, Julian

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand began an advertising campaign in Iowa and New Hampshire over the weekend.CreditMaddie McGarvey for The New York Times

“This is the brave new world of D.N.C. debate qualification standards,” said Jim Hobart, a partner at Public Opinion Strategies, a Republican polling firm. “Democratic presidential candidates are clearly going to do whatever they can to qualify for these debates, whether that’s spending millions of dollars on television ads or encouraging donors to sign up for these online polls.”

A New York Times analysis of polling and donation data shows that nine of the 24 Democratic candidates have already qualified for the next debates by collecting donations from at least 130,000 people and reaching 2 percent support in four qualifying polls. The deadline to meet those standards is Aug. 28.

Mr. Castro, Ms. Gabbard, Ms. Gillibrand and Mr. Steyer are all within striking distance. Mr. Castro and Mr. Steyer need only one more qualifying poll; Ms. Gabbard needs three more; and Ms. Gillibrand needs about 30,000 more donors as well as three more qualifying polls.

None of the other candidates except former Gov. John Hickenlooper of Colorado have hit 2 percent in any qualifying polls, and Mr. Hickenlooper had only about 14,000 individual donors as of June 30. The Times reported this week that he was considering dropping out of the race.

[Who’s in? Who’s out? Keep up with the 2020 field with our candidate tracker.]

The campaigns are not necessarily seeing a return on their investment as they hunt for new donors; many are asking for $1 contributions. But the size of the donations does not matter for debate qualification, only the number of individual contributors. That has skewed campaigns’ strategies and encouraged them to create advertising they hope will go viral.

Mr. Castro’s new advertisement is set to appear Wednesday on Fox News in Bedminster, where Mr. Trump is staying at his golf course. In the ad, Mr. Castro speaks directly to the president, ticking off Mr. Trump’s words and actions that he says “stoked the fire of racists” and inspired the mass shooting that killed 22 people in El Paso this month.

“Innocent people were shot down because they look different from you. Because they look like me. They look like my family,” Mr. Castro says in the ad. “Words have consequences.”

Mr. Castro’s campaign said it spent $2,775 to run the ad a few times on Wednesday. His team said the ad was meant to send a message to Mr. Trump, who watches Fox News regularly, but campaign officials also expected it would resonate with voters.

Ms. Gillibrand’s new 30-second ad, titled “Imagine,” paints her as “a leader driven by compassion, brave enough to take on the impossible, who looks beyond herself to do what’s best for us.” Her campaign said the ad spending was intended in part to “bolster the campaign’s efforts to qualify for the fall debates.”

Ms. Gillibrand’s campaign had more than $8 million on hand at the end of June, and her aides have said that the 24 hours after the July debate were her strongest of the campaign in terms of bringing in new online donors and contributions.

She has spent heavily since then. Over the past month, her campaign spent $1 million on Facebook ads, according to data from the company, second only to Mr. Steyer’s campaign during that period.

Representative Tulsi Gabbard has been urging her supporters to take part in polls that could help her meet the qualification threshold. CreditMaddie McGarvey for The New York Times

Mr. Steyer’s team has said he plans to spend at least $100 million on the race. His campaign has already spent about $3 million advertising on Facebook and $820,000 on Google, according to data from those companies.

In the seven-day period ending on Sunday, he spent $1.1 million on Facebook, roughly five times as much as the second highest-spending Democratic candidate in that period, Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind. On Sunday alone, Mr. Steyer spent about $140,000 on Facebook — more than what many candidates, including Senator Kamala Harris of California and former Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas, spent on the platform in the past month.

Mr. Steyer has also spent about $6.5 million on television advertising since he hit the trail, according to Medium Buying, a Republican media buying agency.

A spokesman for Mr. Steyer’s campaign declined to comment on its spending and the amount of money it had raised in contributions. But other campaigns took note that Mr. Steyer had reached the donor threshold so quickly.

“The D.N.C. donor requirement may have been added with the right intentions, but there’s no doubt that it’s created a situation in which billionaires can buy their way onto the debate stage,” Gov. Steve Bullock of Montana said in a statement on Tuesday. “We’re kidding ourselves if we’re calling a $10 million purchase of 130,000 donors a demonstration of grass-roots support.”

Tom Steyer, the former hedge fund investor, has spent millions of dollars flooding the internet with ads.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

Ms. Gabbard — who left the campaign trail this week to report for a two-week training exercise with the National Guard — is in need of better polling results. In an effort to improve those prospects, her team sent an email to supporters this month imploring them to “take the time to answer if you receive a call from a pollster or are presented with an online poll.”

The email also listed “ways you can increase your chances of being selected for a debate-qualifying poll.” It encouraged supporters to fill out surveys from the online polling firms Survey Monkey and YouGov in an effort to be selected for their presidential primary polls.

Doug Rivers, YouGov’s chief scientist, said in an email that he and his team were aware of messages like the one sent by the Gabbard campaign. But he said the company’s systems made it extremely unlikely that a newly registered respondent would be surveyed in a qualifying poll. Even then, he said, there would be too few new panelists to skew the results.

A spokeswoman for Survey Monkey said it randomly selects its respondents and prevents those selected from responding multiple times.

Thomas Kaplan contributed reporting.

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