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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 7)

A Scotch Maker’s Challenge: First Brexit. Now Tariffs.

Westlake Legal Group 17whiskytariffs-1-facebookJumbo A Scotch Maker’s Challenge: First Brexit. Now Tariffs. World Trade Organization Trump, Donald J Scotch (Whiskey) Great Britain Withdrawal from EU (Brexit) GLASGOW, Scotland European Union Europe Customs (Tariff) Boeing Company

ISLAY, Scotland — Britain’s departure from the European Union has turned distiller Anthony Wills’s workdays into a marathon of logistics.

For months, he communicated with importers to ensure that his single malt, whisky distilled from barley harvested from his farm on the windswept isle of Islay, could be shipped to the Continent and the United States in time for the holidays.

Then, with the Oct. 31 deadline for Brexit fast approaching, the Trump administration imposed 25 percent tariffs on a menu of goods including French wine, Italian cheese and — in a move that could drive a Scotsman to drink — single malt whisky.

“It’s a blow,” said Mr. Wills, the owner of Kilchoman Distillery, who has built a formidable boutique business in the western Scotland countryside. “It doesn’t matter how you try and alleviate the issue, it’s still a big blow.”

The United States was allowed to apply the tariffs, expected to go into force on Friday, after a World Trade Organization ruling settled a yearslong dispute over subsidies for the aviation company Airbus. They create a double whammy for Scotland.

Whisky underpins the economy of Islay (pronounced EYE-la) and much of Scotland. Kilchoman and eight rival Scotch whisky distilleries have flourished here in the past decade. Tourists from the United States, Europe and Japan come to wonder at Islay’s coastal beauty, take pictures of hillsides filled with sheep and hairy Highland cattle that look as if they’ve had vigorous blow dries, and soak up the pricey local spirits.

Annual exports of Scotch whisky are worth 4.7 billion pounds, or about $5.9 billion, accounting for 70 percent of Scotland’s food and drink exports and 21 percent of Britain’s.

More than £1 billion worth of the strong stuff goes to the United States. Almost £1.4 billion is sold in the European Union.

As enthusiasm for single malt has grown, whisky tourism has rocketed. About two million visitors toured this year, double the number about a decade ago, according to the Scotch Whisky Association, a trade group. Most hail from Germany and the United States, and distillers like Mr. Wills have readily wrung profit from their thirst. Connoisseurs can be seen sipping whisky on tours of Kilchoman, the huge gleaming copper stills in action nearby.

And there is some romance to finding the right tipple. Tourists drive past peat bogs and deep blue lochs on their way to the distilleries. Water from the lochs is rendered into a fine fiery spirit. The peat and salty air flavor what they drink. Even a deep breath near a distillery offers a back-of-the-throat alcoholic tinge.

Mr. Wills has spent nearly half his career distilling this experience into something that newcomers can quaff. His single malt has become a popular export, and he can’t believe the predicament his distillery faces. He frets aloud about the cost of absorbing the 25 percent tariffs. He exports 80 percent of all that he makes, and sells about 40,000 bottles a year in the United States. Sales in America have helped spur growth for the past nine years.

Brexit has been a sort of self-imposed pain in the United Kingdom, he said. The Trump tariffs add salt to the wound. “We’re a growing business, and you need all the support you can get,” he added in exasperation.

Karen Betts, the chief executive of the Scotch Whisky Association, said the Trump administration’s decision to apply tariffs only to single malts was likely to hit smaller producers harder.

“The combination of tariffs in our most valuable market and mitigating the potential impact of Brexit is tough,” she said.

Distillers like Mr. Wills cannot lure their American customers to alternative, blended whiskies because they do not produce them, and single malt has been marketed as distinctive, focused on provenance.

Liam Hughes, chief executive of a small distiller in Glasgow, said his company had just sealed a deal to sell whisky to the United States when the tariffs were announced.

“We were all celebrating, and we wake up the next morning and find a 25 percent tariff overnight has been injected into the equation,” Mr. Hughes said in a telephone interview before flying to Japan to introduce Glasgow Distillery products there.

His distillery spent more than £100,000 and prepared for 18 months to begin exporting to the United States. The company installed two new stills to double production to 1.2 million bottles a year. He hired six more people. The staff has been rushing to prepare molds and design new labels for the larger bottles required in the United States.

Mr. Hughes had been planning to release a special whisky with a barrel maker in Kentucky. “Now the cost of that release will increase by 25 percent, which could be prohibitive,” he said.

He likened the last few days in Scotland to being a small boat in stormy seas “being buffeted left, right and center.” “It obviously makes us extremely nervous,” Mr. Hughes said, being “caught up in a trade dispute that has nothing to do with us.”

Even consumers — or least a few happy tourists taking a dram this week on Islay — found the tariffs a rebuke to global ambitions and business.

“Some of our most important allies in the world” have been “betrayed by this administration because they can’t see the value in free trade and fair trade,” said Jeremy Henderson, 34, from Portland, Ore.

“I would drink Scotch sort of in defiance of that.”

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Kevin McCarthy: Top Democrats who walked out of White House meeting just ‘infatuated’ with impeachment

Westlake Legal Group 13f2d382-trump-pelosi Kevin McCarthy: Top Democrats who walked out of White House meeting just 'infatuated' with impeachment fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/senate fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/kevin-mccarthy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc dac31665-91b6-513d-9801-77aec5bf323d Charles Creitz article

The top Republican in the House of Representatives gave his account of a White House meeting in which House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. walked out.

Pelosi, Hoyer and Schumer left because they are “infatuated” with impeachment and couldn’t “handle” the president’s discussion about pulling troops out of Syria, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy claimed Wednesday on “The Ingraham Angle.”

He said the three Democratic lawmakers’ account in a press availability afterward was inaccurate.

“They left the meeting, other Democrats stayed and we had the most normal meeting you could ever have that was productive with the general of the joint chiefs, the secretary of defense and the president talking about how do we keep the homeland safe,” he said.

DEMS STORM OUT OF SYRIA MEETING WITH TRUMP: ‘WE HAVE TO PRAY FOR HIS HEALTH’

“The president starts out and he provides the letter he sent to the president of Turkey, Erdogan,” he continued, claiming Pelosi did not look at it when it came to her turn and instead put it face down on the table.

While speaking to the press, Hoyer gave his account of the events that led to the walkout.

More from Media

“I have served with six presidents,” the Maryland lawmaker said in a clip played by host Laura Ingraham. “Never… have I seen a president treat so disrespectfully a coequal branch of the government of the United States.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

He and Schumer claimed President Trump said some members of ISIS were “communists” and that the Democratic leadership might be happy to hear that.

On “The Ingraham Angle,” McCarthy, R-Calif., said Trump showed true leadership by remaining in the meeting room.

“These people are infatuated — they are fixated on impeaching this president instead of worrying about fixing our problems,” he said.

“Who is the leader? The person who stayed in the room and had a discussion. The people who left the room are the ones who can’t handle it.”

Westlake Legal Group 13f2d382-trump-pelosi Kevin McCarthy: Top Democrats who walked out of White House meeting just 'infatuated' with impeachment fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/senate fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/kevin-mccarthy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc dac31665-91b6-513d-9801-77aec5bf323d Charles Creitz article   Westlake Legal Group 13f2d382-trump-pelosi Kevin McCarthy: Top Democrats who walked out of White House meeting just 'infatuated' with impeachment fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/senate fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/kevin-mccarthy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc dac31665-91b6-513d-9801-77aec5bf323d Charles Creitz article

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Kevin McCarthy: Top Democrats who walked out of White House meeting just ‘infatuated’ with impeachment

Westlake Legal Group 13f2d382-trump-pelosi Kevin McCarthy: Top Democrats who walked out of White House meeting just 'infatuated' with impeachment fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/senate fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/kevin-mccarthy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc dac31665-91b6-513d-9801-77aec5bf323d Charles Creitz article

The top Republican in the House of Representatives gave his account of a White House meeting in which House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. walked out.

Pelosi, Hoyer and Schumer left because they are “infatuated” with impeachment and couldn’t “handle” the president’s discussion about pulling troops out of Syria, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy claimed Wednesday on “The Ingraham Angle.”

He said the three Democratic lawmakers’ account in a press availability afterward was inaccurate.

“They left the meeting, other Democrats stayed and we had the most normal meeting you could ever have that was productive with the general of the joint chiefs, the secretary of defense and the president talking about how do we keep the homeland safe,” he said.

DEMS STORM OUT OF SYRIA MEETING WITH TRUMP: ‘WE HAVE TO PRAY FOR HIS HEALTH’

“The president starts out and he provides the letter he sent to the president of Turkey, Erdogan,” he continued, claiming Pelosi did not look at it when it came to her turn and instead put it face down on the table.

While speaking to the press, Hoyer gave his account of the events that led to the walkout.

More from Media

“I have served with six presidents,” the Maryland lawmaker said in a clip played by host Laura Ingraham. “Never… have I seen a president treat so disrespectfully a coequal branch of the government of the United States.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

He and Schumer claimed President Trump said some members of ISIS were “communists” and that the Democratic leadership might be happy to hear that.

On “The Ingraham Angle,” McCarthy, R-Calif., said Trump showed true leadership by remaining in the meeting room.

“These people are infatuated — they are fixated on impeaching this president instead of worrying about fixing our problems,” he said.

“Who is the leader? The person who stayed in the room and had a discussion. The people who left the room are the ones who can’t handle it.”

Westlake Legal Group 13f2d382-trump-pelosi Kevin McCarthy: Top Democrats who walked out of White House meeting just 'infatuated' with impeachment fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/senate fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/kevin-mccarthy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc dac31665-91b6-513d-9801-77aec5bf323d Charles Creitz article   Westlake Legal Group 13f2d382-trump-pelosi Kevin McCarthy: Top Democrats who walked out of White House meeting just 'infatuated' with impeachment fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/senate fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/kevin-mccarthy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc dac31665-91b6-513d-9801-77aec5bf323d Charles Creitz article

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Britain’s Johnson Hails New Brexit Deal With EU

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1176015737-45f643faabd1808c7fce69fb9129f689cd350958-s1100-c15 Britain's Johnson Hails New Brexit Deal With EU

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson at 10 Downing Street in London on Tuesday. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Britain's Johnson Hails New Brexit Deal With EU

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson at 10 Downing Street in London on Tuesday.

NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Updated at 6:45 a.m. ET

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson says he has reached an agreement with the European Union on a new Brexit deal that would allow the EU to continue collecting value-added tax from Northern Ireland and allow special treatment for certain goods going over the Irish border.

Johnson hailed the “new deal that takes back control,” and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker called it a “fair and balanced agreement.”

But its reception among Johnson’s critics in the U.K. was less warm, likely foreshadowing the slim chances of the agreement making its way through Parliament.

Johnson’s Conservative Party does not have a majority in the House of Commons, His government faces an Oct. 31 deadline for Brexit after which the U.K. would leave without a deal — a move that many fear could be economically disastrous.

“From what we know, it seems the prime minister has negotiated an even worse deal than Theresa May’s, which was overwhelmingly rejected,” said Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the opposition Labour Party, referring to Johnson’s predecessor as prime minister.

“This sell-out deal won’t bring the country together and should be rejected,” Corbyn said.

Meanwhile, Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), which has argued against any “special status” for the province, quickly responded to news of a deal, saying it could not support the proposed agreement “as things stand.”

“[We] could not support what is being suggested on customs and consent issues and there is a lack of clarity on VAT,” the party’s leader, Arlene Foster and deputy leader, Nigel Dodds, said in a statement.

“We will continue to work with the government to try and get a sensible deal that works for Northern Ireland and protects the economic and constitutional integrity of the United Kingdom,” Foster and Dodds said.

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‘The Masked Singer’ Unmasks Skeleton And He’s Bad To The Bone (Spoilers)

Westlake Legal Group 5da836362000000210505f22 ‘The Masked Singer’ Unmasks Skeleton And He’s Bad To The Bone (Spoilers)

The crooning carcass was eliminated in a showdown against Butterfly, Flamingo, Leopard, Black Widow and Thingamajig in a return of those costumed celebrities.

Without further ado, the clues to Skeleton’s identity: He said the show is his shot at being a headliner, he’s felt “overshadowed” and discovered that being in the background could make him “more instrumental in orchestrating those around me.”

He sang a decomposed “Are You Gonna Be My Girl,” and judge Jenny McCarthy correctly guessed the performer’s identity mid-song.

Finally, skeleton met with grave consequences. He had to unmask:

It was Paul Shaffer, longtime sidekick on David Letterman’s late night talk shows.

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Rep. Elijah Cummings, Capitol Hill veteran and Maryland Democrat, dies at age 68

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Rep. Elijah Cummings, Capitol Hill veteran and Maryland Democrat, dies at age 68

Quoting Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at Michael Cohen’s House hearing, Rep. Elijah Cummings said, “silence becomes betrayal.” USA TODAY

Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, who represented parts of Baltimore, the city where he was born and raised, died early Thursday at age 68.

The Maryland Democrat died at Gilchrist Hospice Care, which is affiliated with Johns Hopkins Hospital, at about 2:30 a.m. EDT from “complications concerning longstanding health challenges,” his office confirmed in a statement. 

Cummings, as chairman of the House Oversight Committee, most recently sparred with President Donald Trump as the 23-year veteran of Capitol Hill led multiple investigations into the president and his administration.

The son of a sharecropper, Cummings became a lawyer and then judge. He was elected to the Maryland House of Delegates in 1983, where he served until 1996, including a stint as speaker pro tempore from 1995 to 1996. He was elected to the House of Representatives in a 1996 special election to fill the seat vacated when Rep. Kweisi Mfume left Congress to head the NAACP.

His wife is Maya Rockeymoore Cummings, chairwoman of the Maryland Democratic Party.

“Congressman Cummings was an honorable man who proudly served his district and the nation with dignity, integrity, compassion and humility,” she said in a statement

“He worked until his last breath because he believed our democracy was the highest and best expression of our collective humanity and that our nation’s diversity was our promise, not our problem. It has been an honor to walk by his side on this incredible journey. I loved him deeply and will miss him dearly,” she said. 

In July, Trump lashed out at Cummings after the congressman criticized the administration’s handling of migrant detention centers and his committee authorized subpoenas for senior White House officials’ electronic communications. The president called Cummings a “brutal bully” and said Baltimore was a “rodent-infested mess” where “no human being would want to live.”

Those remarks were condemned as racist by many, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. The president denied being racist and inexplicably called Cummings “racist” in turn. 

Former Rep. Donna Edwards, D-Md., who served with Cummings from 2008-2017, said in a tweet that “Baltimore, Maryland, and our nation have lost a true warrior for truth and justice. Rep. Elijah Cummings rests with the angels.” 

“We lost a giant today,” tweeted presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif. “Congressman Elijah Cummings was a fearless leader, a protector of democracy, and a fighter for the people of Maryland. Our world is dimmer without him in it.”

Contributing: The Associated Press

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Britain’s Boris Johnson Hails New Brexit Deal With EU As Deadline Looms

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1176015737-433c6e5c5e87db1fe62f741664c25282e84c721f-s1100-c15 Britain's Boris Johnson Hails New Brexit Deal With EU As Deadline Looms

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said Thursday that he’d forged a new Brexit agreement with the European Union. Wiktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Wiktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Britain's Boris Johnson Hails New Brexit Deal With EU As Deadline Looms

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said Thursday that he’d forged a new Brexit agreement with the European Union.

Wiktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Updated at 9 a.m. ET

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson says he has reached an agreement with the European Union on a new Brexit deal that would allow the EU to continue collecting value-added tax from Northern Ireland and allow special treatment for certain goods going over the Irish border.

Johnson hailed the “new deal that takes back control,” and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker called it a “fair and balanced agreement.”

With the deal in hand, Juncker said, “there is no need for any kind of prolongation” — referring to the potential for delays or postponements that had been raised after the two sides failed to make headway in recent weeks.

Johnson’s government faces an Oct. 31 deadline for Brexit. If an agreement isn’t in place by then, Johnson would be forced to ask the EU for an extension to avoid the economic perils that a “no-deal” Brexit could bring.

Johnson and Juncker held a cordial news conference about the deal Thursday — but its reception among Johnson’s critics in the U.K. was less warm. And their responses could foreshadow the slim chances of the agreement making its way through Parliament. Johnson’s Conservative Party does not have a majority in the House of Commons.

“From what we know, it seems the prime minister has negotiated an even worse deal than Theresa May’s, which was overwhelmingly rejected,” said Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the opposition Labour Party, referring to Johnson’s predecessor as prime minister.

“This sell-out deal won’t bring the country together and should be rejected,” Corbyn said.

Meanwhile, Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party, which has argued against any “special status” for the province, quickly responded to news of a deal, saying it could not support the proposed agreement “as things stand.”

“[We] could not support what is being suggested on customs and consent issues and there is a lack of clarity on VAT,” the party’s leader, Arlene Foster and deputy leader, Nigel Dodds, said in a statement, referring to the value-added tax.

“We will continue to work with the government to try and get a sensible deal that works for Northern Ireland and protects the economic and constitutional integrity of the United Kingdom,” Foster and Dodds said.

“Now is the moment for us to get Brexit done,” Johnson said at the news conference with Juncker. He added that the next task — other than securing passage of the deal in Parliament — would be for the U.K. and EU to work out their future relationship.

“We are a quintessential European country, solid European friends, neighbors and supporters,” Johnson said.

After Johnson ended his remarks on that note, Juncker concluded the briefing by saying, “I have to say that I’m happy about the deal, but I’m sad about Brexit.”

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U.K. and E.U. Agree on Brexit Draft Deal, but Hurdles Remain

Westlake Legal Group 17brexit-sub-facebookJumbo U.K. and E.U. Agree on Brexit Draft Deal, but Hurdles Remain Politics and Government Northern Ireland Johnson, Boris Great Britain Withdrawal from EU (Brexit) Great Britain European Union Democratic Unionist Party (Northern Ireland) Brussels (Belgium)

BRUSSELS — Britain and the European Union agreed on the draft text of a Brexit deal on Thursday, an 11th-hour breakthrough in Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s effort to settle his country’s anguished, yearslong debate over Brexit and pave the way for its departure from the bloc.

The deal, details of which were published shortly after the announcement, must still clear several hurdles, including approval from Europe’s leaders and, most crucially, passage in the British Parliament. Mr. Johnson’s predecessor, Theresa May, had also struck a deal with Brussels but suffered three thunderous defeats in Parliament.

Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party, seen as vital to the passage of the agreement in Parliament, said it did not support the agreement. And the opposition Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, called on members of Parliament to reject it, saying, “It seems the prime minister has negotiated an even worse deal than Theresa May’s.”

Mr. Johnson announced the agreement on Twitter, saying that the parties had reached a “great new deal that takes back control” and that Parliament would now be clear to vote on the agreement on Saturday.

Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission’s president, confirmed that a deal had been struck and noted that a revised arrangement on Northern Ireland had been reached.

He wrote on Twitter: “Where there is a will, there is a #deal — we have one! It’s a fair and balanced agreement for the EU and the UK.”

Britain’s frantic efforts to negotiate a Brexit agreement with the European Union had appeared to hit a last-minute snag after the D.U.P. said in a statement on Thursday morning that it could not support the deal “as things stand.

The statement, hours before Mr. Johnson was to present the deal to European leaders at a summit meeting in Brussels, suggested that domestic politics once again threatened to torpedo the complex negotiations.

It was unclear whether the deal had been altered before the agreement with European leaders was reached. It was also unclear whether the Northern Irish party simply wanted to make a show of holding out for its position before ultimately acquiescing — or whether Mr. Johnson faced a serious rebellion from the skeptics in his ranks.

Mr. Johnson may have an advantage over his predecessor in securing parliamentary approval for the deal, because he has assiduously cultivated the most skeptical elements of his party.

For days, Mr. Johnson had worked frantically to bridge a gap over the thorny question of how to treat Northern Ireland in a post-Brexit Europe — a fiendishly complex issue that helped torpedo Mrs. May’s agreement and could still fracture Mr. Johnson’s Conservative-led coalition in Parliament.

People briefed on the talks said Mr. Johnson had given significant ground on the structure of a customs unions that would allow Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom, to continue to trade seamlessly with Ireland and other members of the European Union.

It was a dramatic culmination to down-to-the-wire talks that began on Tuesday morning, with some European officials predicting that the two sides would not be able to close the gap on customs issues in time to finalize a draft deal before the critical summit meeting of European leaders on Thursday and Friday.

The value of the British pound soared on the news of a deal to a five-month high, trading at $1.29 to the dollar. The rise reversed a slump earlier in the day, when the Democratic Unionist Party signaled that it would not back Mr. Johnson’s draft deal.

The Democratic Unionists, who have proved to be a pivotal blocking force in previous attempts to negotiate a Brexit agreement, said they were troubled by elements of the deal on how to handle Northern Ireland in a post-Brexit world.

“As things stand, we could not support what is being suggested on a customs and consent issues, and there is a lack of clarity on VAT,” the party said in a statement issued earlier on Thursday, referring to the value-added tax.

The party said it would continue working with the government on an acceptable agreement.

Mr. Johnson has consulted closely the Democratic Unionists and other skeptical elements of his Conservative Party-led coalition as a deal has taken shape. On Wednesday, optimism had grown amid signs in Brussels that the deadlock over Britain’s planned departure from the bloc could be on the verge of breaking.

Brussels has pushed Mr. Johnson so far that it “makes sense they are unhappy,” Mujtaba Rahman, an analyst with the Eurasia Group, a political risk consultancy, said of the Democratic Unionists. But he said it was unclear how serious the setback was, because “the D.U.P. does have to be seen fighting.”

The intervention from the Democratic Unionists underscored the problems that Mr. Johnson faces in trying to get any deal through Parliament, where he does not have a majority. Without the support of the D.U.P., Mr. Johnson has little hope of getting any agreement ratified by Parliament.

It is also a reminder that he faces many of the problems confronted by Mrs. May. In December 2017, the Democratic Unionists derailed her efforts to reach a deal to allow her to proceed to another phase in the Brexit negotiations.

That happened while she was holding a working lunch with Mr. Juncker. She was forced to pause discussions with the European Commission president, and keep diplomats waiting, to take a call from Arlene Foster, the Democratic Unionist Party’s leader.

Mrs. May then returned with a revised plan several days later, at which point Ms. Foster said that the new version ensured that there would be no border between Britain and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom.

Essentially, Mr. Johnson’s proposed agreement would leave Northern Ireland aligned with European Union laws and regulations on most trade issues, even as it moved out of the European single market and into a customs union with Britain.

Under the proposed terms, there would be customs checks on goods flowing from Britain to Northern Ireland to ensure that they meet the rules if those goods were ultimately destined for the European Union.

There would be a complex series of rules on tariffs and value-added tax payments to compensate for differences in tariff rates between the European and British customs unions, though negotiators had struggled on Tuesday to resolve the issue of how to rebate value-added tax payments.

The arrangement would also be subject to consent by the Northern Ireland Assembly, but in a way that would prevent the Democratic Unionists, who have opposed previous such proposals, from simply vetoing it at the first possible opportunity.

The Democratic Unionists are crucial to Mr. Johnson’s effort to win a majority for the deal in Parliament. Their opposition to similar previous versions of a Brexit agreement forced Mrs. May to overhaul that agreement to place all of Britain in the European customs union for a period of time.

Mrs. May’s deal was, nevertheless, soundly defeated in Parliament three times.

Mr. Johnson was seen as having a better chance of cobbling together a majority, in part because he was a vocal supporter of Brexit before the 2016 referendum and thus has greater credibility with euroskeptic elements of the Conservative coalition.

The Democratic Unionist Party campaigned for Brexit in the 2016 referendum campaign, and Mr. Johnson has presented his plan as the last chance to deliver on that mandate from voters. In Northern Ireland as a whole, however, 56 percent of voters in the referendum favored remaining in the European Union.

Yet, for the party, which is strongly committed to maintaining Northern Ireland’s status as a part of the United Kingdom, the issues being negotiated by Mr. Johnson are existential. That is because if they bind Northern Ireland much more closely to Ireland, its southern neighbor, some fear that it would inevitably lead to a united Ireland.

If the Democratic Unionists have collectively decided that the proposals are unacceptable, they will have to change to secure support.

Mr. Johnson has vowed to withdraw Britain from the European Union, with or without a deal, by Oct. 31, and his negotiators have labored to seal an agreement by this week so that he is not forced to ask Brussels for an extension, as would be required under a measure that Parliament passed last month.

Anna Schaverien contributed reporting from London.

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Britain’s Johnson Hails New Brexit Deal With EU As Deadline Looms

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1176015737-23bf2aae2424a30120ffff7a1efae370c2b24e62-s1100-c15 Britain's Johnson Hails New Brexit Deal With EU As Deadline Looms

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson at 10 Downing Street in London on Tuesday. Wiktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Wiktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Britain's Johnson Hails New Brexit Deal With EU As Deadline Looms

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson at 10 Downing Street in London on Tuesday.

Wiktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Updated at 9 a.m. ET

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson says he has reached an agreement with the European Union on a new Brexit deal that would allow the EU to continue collecting value-added tax from Northern Ireland and allow special treatment for certain goods going over the Irish border.

Johnson hailed the “new deal that takes back control,” and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker called it a “fair and balanced agreement.”

With the deal in hand, Juncker said, “there is no need for any kind of prolongation” — referring to the potential for delays or postponements that had been raised after the two sides failed to make headway in recent weeks.

Johnson’s government faces an Oct. 31 deadline for Brexit. If an agreement isn’t in place by then, the U.K. would leave without a deal — a move that many fear could be economically disastrous.

Johnson and Juncker held a cordial news briefing about the deal Thursday — but its reception among Johnson’s critics in the U.K. was less warm. And their responses could foreshadow the slim chances of the agreement making its way through Parliament. Johnson’s Conservative Party does not have a majority in the House of Commons.

“From what we know, it seems the prime minister has negotiated an even worse deal than Theresa May’s, which was overwhelmingly rejected,” said Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the opposition Labour Party, referring to Johnson’s predecessor as prime minister.

“This sell-out deal won’t bring the country together and should be rejected,” Corbyn said.

Meanwhile, Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), which has argued against any “special status” for the province, quickly responded to news of a deal, saying it could not support the proposed agreement “as things stand.”

“[We] could not support what is being suggested on customs and consent issues and there is a lack of clarity on VAT,” the party’s leader, Arlene Foster and deputy leader, Nigel Dodds, said in a statement.

“We will continue to work with the government to try and get a sensible deal that works for Northern Ireland and protects the economic and constitutional integrity of the United Kingdom,” Foster and Dodds said.

“Now is the moment for us to get Brexit done,” Johnson said at a joint news briefing with Juncker. He added that the next task — other than securing passage of the deal in Parliament — would be for the U.K. and EU to work out their future relationship.

“We are a quintessential European country, solid European friends, neighbors and supporters,” Johnson said.

After Johnson ended his remarks on that note, Juncker concluded the briefing by saying, “I have to say that I’m happy about the deal, but I’m sad about Brexit.”

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Brexit breakthrough: Boris Johnson agrees ‘great new deal’ with EU; British MPs to vote Saturday

Britain and the European Union have struck a Brexit deal, Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced Thursday.

The agreement is “great new deal that takes back control,” Johnson tweeted, adding: “Now Parliament should get Brexit done on Saturday so we can move on to other priorities like the cost of living, the NHS, violent crime and our environment.”

This is a developing story; please check back for updates.

Westlake Legal Group AP19288395887477 Brexit breakthrough: Boris Johnson agrees 'great new deal' with EU; British MPs to vote Saturday Nicole Darrah fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/europe/brexit fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/topic/the-european-union fox-news/person/boris-johnson fox news fnc/world fnc da394389-b36b-50f3-8cb0-d53105ed9a6b article   Westlake Legal Group AP19288395887477 Brexit breakthrough: Boris Johnson agrees 'great new deal' with EU; British MPs to vote Saturday Nicole Darrah fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/europe/brexit fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/topic/the-european-union fox-news/person/boris-johnson fox news fnc/world fnc da394389-b36b-50f3-8cb0-d53105ed9a6b article

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