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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 77)

Field locked in, but stage is still in flux, for Round 2 of Dem debates

The names of the 20 Democratic presidential candidates who will take part in the second round of primary debates is now official.

The Democratic National Committee and CNN, its media partner for the consecutive nights of showdowns JJuly 30-31 in Detroit, on Wednesday announced which candidates made the cut.

2020 DEMOCRATIC LONG-SHOTS SLAM DNC FOR RAISING DEBATE THRESHOLDS

They are, in alphabetical order:

1. Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado

2. Former Vice President Joe Biden

3. Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey

4. Gov. Steve Bullock of Montana

5. South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg

6. Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro

7. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio

8. Former Rep. John Delaney of Maryland

9. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii

10. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York

11. Sen. Kamala Harris of California

12. Former Gov. John Hickenlooper of Colorado

13. Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington State

14. Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota

15. Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas

16. Rep. Tim Ryan of Ohio

17. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont

18. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts

19. Best-selling spiritual author Marianne Williamson

20. Entrepreneur Andrew Yang

THE LATEST FROM FOX NEWS ON THE 2020 PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY DEBATES

While the lineup is set, however, the stage is not. A random drawing to determine the candidate lineup for each of the two nights of the debates will be conducted on CNN on Thursday evening.

With a record setting two-dozen candidates running for the Democratic nomination, the DNC has kept the first two rounds of debates to 20 contenders – 10 each night on consecutive nights.

The thresholds for the White House hopefuls to qualify: reaching 1 percent in three polls recognized by the national party committee, or receiving contributions from a minimum 65,000 unique donors as well as 200 unique donors in at least 20 states.

Fourteen of the candidates made the stage by satisfying both criteria. They are Biden, Booker, Buttigieg, Castro, Gabbard, Gillibrand, Harris, Inslee, Klobuchar, O’Rourke, Sanders, Warren, Williamson and Yang.

The only change to the field from the first round of debates — held in Miami in late June — is that Bullock has qualified and Rep. Eric Swalwell of California, who appeared in the first round, has dropped out.

The second round of debates may be the last for some of the longer-shot nomination hopefuls. The third round of debates which will be held in early September.

The DNC has raised the thresholds, mandating that to make the cut for the third and fourth rounds, candidates must receive contributions from a minimum 130,000 unique donors, as well as 400 unique donors in at least 20 states. And they also must also reach at least 2 percent in four qualifying polls.

The new criteria have been heavily criticized by some lower-tier candidates.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6060384870001_6060386296001-vs Field locked in, but stage is still in flux, for Round 2 of Dem debates Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc article 2880f543-d9d8-5115-97f7-7dfe4d328b74   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6060384870001_6060386296001-vs Field locked in, but stage is still in flux, for Round 2 of Dem debates Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc article 2880f543-d9d8-5115-97f7-7dfe4d328b74

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Jon Stewart Eviscerates Rand Paul for Blocking 9/11 Victim Funding: ‘It’s an Abomination’

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Field locked in, but stage is still in flux, for Round 2 of Dem debates

The names of the 20 Democratic presidential candidates who will take part in the second round of primary debates is now official.

The Democratic National Committee and CNN, its media partner for the consecutive nights of showdowns JJuly 30-31 in Detroit, on Wednesday announced which candidates made the cut.

2020 DEMOCRATIC LONG-SHOTS SLAM DNC FOR RAISING DEBATE THRESHOLDS

They are, in alphabetical order:

1. Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado

2. Former Vice President Joe Biden

3. Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey

4. Gov. Steve Bullock of Montana

5. South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg

6. Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro

7. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio

8. Former Rep. John Delaney of Maryland

9. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii

10. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York

11. Sen. Kamala Harris of California

12. Former Gov. John Hickenlooper of Colorado

13. Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington State

14. Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota

15. Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas

16. Rep. Tim Ryan of Ohio

17. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont

18. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts

19. Best-selling spiritual author Marianne Williamson

20. Entrepreneur Andrew Yang

THE LATEST FROM FOX NEWS ON THE 2020 PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY DEBATES

While the lineup is set, however, the stage is not. A random drawing to determine the candidate lineup for each of the two nights of the debates will be conducted on CNN on Thursday evening.

With a record setting two-dozen candidates running for the Democratic nomination, the DNC has kept the first two rounds of debates to 20 contenders – 10 each night on consecutive nights.

The thresholds for the White House hopefuls to qualify: reaching 1 percent in three polls recognized by the national party committee, or receiving contributions from a minimum 65,000 unique donors as well as 200 unique donors in at least 20 states.

Fourteen of the candidates made the stage by satisfying both criteria. They are Biden, Booker, Buttigieg, Castro, Gabbard, Gillibrand, Harris, Inslee, Klobuchar, O’Rourke, Sanders, Warren, Williamson and Yang.

The only change to the field from the first round of debates — held in Miami in late June — is that Bullock has qualified and Rep. Eric Swalwell of California, who appeared in the first round, has dropped out.

The second round of debates may be the last for some of the longer-shot nomination hopefuls. The third round of debates which will be held in early September.

The DNC has raised the thresholds, mandating that to make the cut for the third and fourth rounds, candidates must receive contributions from a minimum 130,000 unique donors, as well as 400 unique donors in at least 20 states. And they also must also reach at least 2 percent in four qualifying polls.

The new criteria have been heavily criticized by some lower-tier candidates.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6060384870001_6060386296001-vs Field locked in, but stage is still in flux, for Round 2 of Dem debates Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc article 2880f543-d9d8-5115-97f7-7dfe4d328b74   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6060384870001_6060386296001-vs Field locked in, but stage is still in flux, for Round 2 of Dem debates Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc article 2880f543-d9d8-5115-97f7-7dfe4d328b74

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House votes to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close House votes to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt

President Donald Trump abandoned his controversial bid to demand citizenship details from all respondents in next year’s census Thursday, instead ordering federal agencies to compile the information using existing databases. (July 11) AP, AP

WASHINGTON — The House of Representatives voted to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in criminal contempt of Congress on Wednesday, delivering an unusual rebuke to two of the government’s top officials and stiffening the capital’s partisan divide.

Lawmakers, by a vote of 230 to 198, said Barr and Ross had defied subpoenas seeking information about the failed attempt by President Donald Trump’s administration to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census, the once-a-decade survey that helps divvy up political power and billions of dollars in government spending. 

Wednesday’s vote was the first time since 2012 that the full House has held a sitting attorney general in contempt and asked that he be prosecuted, and the first time the chamber had held a commerce secretary in contempt. 

The vote, led by the House’s Democratic majority, came one day after the House staged an acrimonious vote to condemn President Donald Trump’s Twitter attacks against four Democratic congresswomen of color as racist. Another measure of the toxic political environment was on display before the contempt action when members blocked a proposal to impeach Trump. 

White House spokeswoman Stephanie Grisham called the rebukes of the two Cabinet members “ridiculous and yet another lawless attempt to harass the president and his administration.”

In a joint letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., Barr and Ross urged a postponement of the vote, calling it “unreasonable, counterproductive and contrary” to the normal workings of congressional oversight.

“By taking this action, the House is both unnecessarily undermining inter-branch comity and degrading the constitutional separation of powers and its own institutional integrity,” Barr and Ross wrote just before the vote. “We strongly disagree with any suggestion that our departments have obstructed this investigation.”

Barr already has been cited for contempt by both the House Judiciary and Oversight committees for failing to produce information about both the census and special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of Russian election interference.

More: House panel votes contempt for Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross

More: House Judiciary Committee sets Wednesday contempt vote for Attorney General William Barr

The criminal contempt citations, which are are punishable by a year in jail and up to $100,000 in fines, are unlikely to result in prosecution as Barr oversees the Justice Department, which would be in charge of bringing a case. 

The action arises from a battle within the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee where Trump asserted executive privilege last month to shield documents relating to the citizenship question secret.

Oversight Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md., Wednesday characterized the administration’s conduct as “obstruction.”

“I do not take this decision lightly,” Cummings said. “Holding any Cabinet secretary in criminal contempt of Congress is a serious and somber matter – one that I have done everything in my power to avoid. But in this case, the attorney general and Secretary Ross have blatantly obstructed our ability to do congressional oversight.”

Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, the panel’s top Republican, said committee Democrats had taken the initial action in an attempt to sway the Supreme Court, which was considering the citizenship question at the times.

The Supreme Court ultimately blocked the administration’s bid to add the citizenship query, ruling 5 to 4 that the administration had offered a “contrived” reason for its decision to ask the question. President Trump said this month that the administration would abandon that effort. 

The Constitution calls for the census to count everyone in the country every decade. The administration’s decision to ask people whether they are citizens in 2020 had been contentious because of Democratic concerns that it could discourage participation by illegal immigrants who fear deportation. Republicans, however, said the census has included a citizenship question from 1820 to 1950, along with the question appearing on more detailed forms in more recent decades.

The census also is key to apportioning seats in Congress, providing data to map individual House districts, and to distributing billions of dollars in federal spending each year.

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close House votes to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt

A House committee has voted to hold two top Trump administration officials in contempt of Congress for failing to comply with subpoenas for documents related to the decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. (June 12) AP, AP

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/07/17/house-holds-william-barr-and-wilbur-ross-contempt-census-citizenship/1754563001/

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Chicago mayor: Police ‘are losing the streets’ to major eruptions of violence

Chicago’s new mayor is taking issue with the city’s police department as the city continues to see far more homicides than New York and Los Angeles, as well as major eruptions of other violence.

“One weekend does not make a trend,” Mayor Lori Lightfoot said Tuesday, according to Fox 32. “But we’ve now had a couple weekends where it feels like we are losing the streets.”

The mayor made the comments while in New York to attend the opening of the Bloomberg Harvard City Leadership Initiative, which is funded by billionaire former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg “to equip [mayors] with the tools and expertise to effectively lead complex cities.”

Westlake Legal Group Johnson-Lightfoot_Getty Chicago mayor: Police 'are losing the streets' to major eruptions of violence Frank Miles fox-news/us/crime/chicagos-crime-wave fox news fnc/us fnc article 9cd2b211-ca6d-55e4-a812-b39d90c2c9e6

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, right, and Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson. (Getty)

Lightfoot’s comments also came off the back of one of the city’s bloodiest weekends so far this year, in which more than 40 people shot, nine of them fatally.

Right before Independence Day, 50 people were shot. And despite the deployment of an extra 1,200 officers in the city, at least 43 people were shot over Memorial Day weekend, seven of them fatally.

OCASIO-CORTEZ CONTINUES TWITTER SPAT WITH TRUMP, LINKS GOP TO WHITE SUPREMACY

More than 1,500 extra Chicago Police officers hit the streets, parks and lakefront for the July 4 holiday, typically one of the most violent weekends of the year.

Police also executed three separate operations in June that resulted in a total of 170 arrests on gun and narcotics charges, the seizure of 38 guns and hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of illegal drugs. The most recent effort, called “Operation Independence,” ended right before the holiday with the arrests of 77 people — 34 of whom are convicted felons.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Lightfoot said she is not ready to change police leadership but wants to focus on reducing the bloodshed, saying: “It’s no secret that I’m pushing [Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson] and his leadership team to do better.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Johnson-Lightfoot_Getty Chicago mayor: Police 'are losing the streets' to major eruptions of violence Frank Miles fox-news/us/crime/chicagos-crime-wave fox news fnc/us fnc article 9cd2b211-ca6d-55e4-a812-b39d90c2c9e6   Westlake Legal Group Johnson-Lightfoot_Getty Chicago mayor: Police 'are losing the streets' to major eruptions of violence Frank Miles fox-news/us/crime/chicagos-crime-wave fox news fnc/us fnc article 9cd2b211-ca6d-55e4-a812-b39d90c2c9e6

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House Votes to Block Arms Sales to Gulf Nations, Setting Up Trump’s Third Veto

Westlake Legal Group 17dc-saudi--facebookJumbo House Votes to Block Arms Sales to Gulf Nations, Setting Up Trump’s Third Veto Yemen War and Emergency Powers (US) Vetoes (US) United States Politics and Government United States International Relations United Arab Emirates Trump, Donald J Saudi Arabia Mohammed bin Salman (1985- ) Law and Legislation Human Rights and Human Rights Violations House of Representatives Arms Trade

WASHINGTON — The House gave final passage on Wednesday to a series of measures that would block the sale of billions of dollars of arms to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, sending to President Trump a fresh rebuke of his administration’s efforts to circumvent Congress to help Persian Gulf allies prosecute a disastrous war in Yemen.

A scattering of Republicans and the House’s lone independent, Justin Amash of Michigan, joined Democrats in three back-to-back votes, submitting for the record their stewing anger at Mr. Trump’s resolute support of Saudi Arabia and his use of emergency powers to sidestep Congress, this time with a declaration of an emergency over Iran.

“If the administration wants to sell these weapons, they should follow the law — not misuse it — and come to Congress,” said Representative Eliot L. Engel, the New York Democrat who is the chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee. The Iran emergency, he continued, was “phony” and devised “to trample on this body’s constitutional duties.”

It is the second time in recent months that Congress has passed bipartisan legislation condemning the administration’s relationship with Saudi Arabia. Lawmakers in both parties have been incensed that the president has done nothing to punish the kingdom for the grisly killing of Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi dissident and Virginia-based Washington Post columnist, even after the Central Intelligence Agency concluded that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the killing.

In April, lawmakers voted to end American military involvement in Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen by invoking the rarely used War Powers Act of 1973, only to see Mr. Trump veto the resolution.

No other foreign policy issue has created as large a rift between the president and Congress, and the vote to block the arms sales deepens the divide. But the outrage on Capitol Hill has limits, particularly in the president’s own party. The measures approved on Wednesday, and already passed by the Senate, are likely to meet the same fate as the resolution to end military support to the war in Yemen: death by veto. Republicans are unlikely to provide enough votes to override what would be Mr. Trump’s third veto of his presidency.

The White House announced the munitions sales in May, invoking an emergency provision in the Arms Export Control Act to allow American companies to sell $8.1 billion worth of munitions in 22 pending transfers. Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates are waging an air war in Yemen that has come under sharp criticism from Congress and human rights organizations. A State Department official, R. Clarke Cooper, testified before the Senate last week that the munitions had yet to be delivered, nearly 50 days after the emergency had been declared.

Members of Congress from both parties had been holding up arms sales from American companies to Persian Gulf nations and trying to end United States military support for the Saudi-led coalition that is fighting the Houthi rebels in Yemen, which has resulted in what the United Nations calls the world’s worst man-made humanitarian disaster. But by declaring an emergency over Iran, a move that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo pushed hard for, the administration was able to blow through lawmakers’ holds and the 30-day review period Congress normally receives to examine a sale.

Representative Michael McCaul of Texas, the top Republican on the Foreign Affairs Committee, urged his colleagues to vote down the resolutions even though he had previously described the use of emergency authority “unfortunate” and argued that not all 22 sales necessitated emergency certifications.

“The decision to move forward with these arms sales is part of a larger effort to deter Iran,” Mr. McCaul said. “A key part of that effort is to empower greater burden sharing by enhancing the defense capabilities of our allies. These sales provide more options for deterring Iran that do not all depend on U.S. intervention.”

Lawmakers have never successfully blocked an arms sale, but presidents historically have worked with Congress to make concessions after legislators voice opposition. Administrations have also seldom used the emergency provision in the Arms Export Control Act.

When President Ronald Reagan notified Congress in 1984 of the administration’s intent to sell Saudi Arabia the stinger missile system, citing Iraqi attacks on Iranian oil facilities and Iranian attacks on Kuwaiti and Saudi ships, the legislative opposition was so swift that Mr. Reagan withdrew the sales from consideration. Two years later, when his administration announced its intent to make the sale a second time, Congress moved to block it, spurring a veto.

With the threat of Mr. Trump’s vetoes looming large — and apparently little appetite to override them — some lawmakers have been casting about for an alternative the president might accept.

This month, Senator Jim Risch, an Idaho Republican and Trump loyalist who is the chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, introduced legislation that would seek to reset the United States’ relationship with Saudi Arabia. It would also punish members of the royal family, denying visas to those in the Saudi government up to the minister level until the administration can certify that the country has made progress on broad human rights issues.

That legislation is expected to be considered by the committee next week. But underscoring how divided lawmakers are on how to respond, Senator Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican who is one of the president’s closest congressional allies, and Senator Robert Menendez of New Jersey, the top Democrat on the panel, will most likely push to amend the legislation to match their harsher legislation that would place sanctions on the crown prince and suspend arms sales to the country.

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Netflix Loses Subscribers in U.S. as Growth Slows

Westlake Legal Group 17netflix-facebookJumbo Netflix Loses Subscribers in U.S. as Growth Slows Netflix Inc Company Reports

Netflix, the streaming juggernaut that has upended the entertainment industry, showed signs of vulnerability Wednesday when it significantly undershot the number of customers it had expected to sign up for the second quarter.

The company said it had added 2.7 million subscribers worldwide for the three months ending in June, well short of the five million that investors were expecting.

Netflix also said it had lost 126,000 paid subscribers in the United States during the period, the first time it has shed domestic customers since it started putting out original programming seven years ago.

Netflix’s stock fell more than 10 percent after the market closed, a drop of more than $17 billion in market value.

The second quarter is typically the company’s weakest time of year but its performance this time was unusually poor. Netflix announced in January that it was raising prices by anywhere from 13 to 18 percent, depending on the subscription plan, with increases hitting existing subscribers in late March. In its statement on its second-quarter earnings, the company acknowledged that the higher rates had something to do with its failure to meet expectations.

Netflix decided to charge more at least partly because it burns a lot of cash, much of it borrowed, and spends wildly on Hollywood talent. Last year, the company signed Ryan Murphy, the prolific producer behind “Glee” and the anthology series “American Crime Story” and “American Horror Story,” to a five-year deal said to be worth nearly $300 million.

After wooing him away from 21st Century Fox, Netflix signed another name producer, Shonda Rhimes, the creator of ABC’s “Grey’s Anatomy,” away from the Walt Disney Company, giving her a nine-figure deal.

Netflix released its second-quarter report a little more than a week after the news that it would lose the North American rights to “Friends,” the NBC sitcom that has had a highly remunerative afterlife in syndication and online.

“Friends” was the second-most-watched show on Netflix in 2018, according to Nielsen, which is probably why the company was willing to pay as much as $100 million to stream the show worldwide in 2019. But starting next year, American and Canadian customers will be able to find it only on HBO Max.

Starting next year, Netflix’s North American subscribers will also have to go elsewhere for “The Office,” another NBC show that has shown durability as a rerun and was especially popular among the streaming service’s subscribers.

Netflix noted in its report that its second-quarter slate of programming, lacking fresh episodes of two of its original hits, “The Crown” and “Stranger Things,” was not as robust as it had been the previous quarter.

It also revised its forecast for the current quarter, when the new season of “Stranger Things” was made available. The company said it now expected to add more than seven million customers during the summer months, slightly up from its previous estimate.

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House Votes to Kill Trump Impeachment Resolution

WASHINGTON — The House on Wednesday killed an attempt to impeach President Trump for statements that the chamber condemned this week as racist, turning aside an accusation that he had brought “ridicule, disgrace and disrepute” to his office.

But 95 Democrats signaled their support for impeachment, while 137 opposed it — a dramatic split signaling trouble ahead for a divided party.

The 332-95 vote to table the impeachment article drafted by Representative Al Green, Democrat of Texas, constituted the first action by the House since Democrats took control in January on a measure to impeach Mr. Trump, a significant move that Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California and other party leaders have toiled to avoid. By agreeing to table the article, Ms. Pelosi and the Democrats put off — at least for now — a prolonged and divisive debate over whether Mr. Trump’s conduct warrants his expulsion.

But the measure highlighted the rifts among Democrats about how to deal with Mr. Trump, between progressives who want to challenge him more aggressively and moderates desperate to quash talk of impeachment and stick to a poll-tested agenda that includes improving health coverage and raising wages for working people.

Ms. Pelosi has been caught in the middle as she tries to maintain some semblance of control over the party’s agenda as Mr. Trump dictates the terms of the debate. Those dynamics have already dominated the House’s business this week. For two days, Democrats feuded with the president over nativist posts on Twitter about four freshman Democratic congresswomen of color, culminating in a nasty floor fight on Tuesday that left progressives energized but moderates fretting over wasted precious time.

“You have to give him credit: He’s a great distractor,” Ms. Pelosi, Democrat of California, said of Mr. Trump on Wednesday. She waved off questions about whether the Democrats’ policy priorities were being eclipsed by the president’s antics, saying, “We’re not having him set our agenda; we’re setting our own agenda.”

Mr. Green’s resolution makes no mention of Robert S. Mueller III’s report or other instances of possible abuses of power by the president that are being studied by the House Judiciary Committee as possible grounds for impeachment. Instead, it contains a single article that refers to the vote on Tuesday to condemn Mr. Trump’s tweets as racist, and concludes: “Donald John Trump has, by his statements, brought the high office of the president of the United States in contempt, ridicule, disgrace, and disrepute, has sown seeds of discord among the people of the United States, has demonstrated that he is unfit to be president, and has betrayed his trust as president of the United States to the manifest injury of the people of the United States, and has committed a high misdemeanor in office.”

Ms. Pelosi said that she had no quarrel with Mr. Green, but that the House was already taking sufficient steps to hold Mr. Trump accountable for his conduct.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157759251_949fed4e-96c0-4ba4-95ed-d8ebc62b11f4-articleLarge House Votes to Kill Trump Impeachment Resolution United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J impeachment House of Representatives Green, Al Ethics and Official Misconduct

Representative Al Green, Democrat of Texas, submitted an article of impeachment against President Trump.CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

“We have six committees that are working on following the facts in terms of any abuse of power, obstruction of justice and the rest that the president may have engaged in,” she said. “That is the serious path that we are on.”

Even supporters of opening an impeachment inquiry into Mr. Trump conceded that Wednesday’s vote would likely have little effect on their own efforts.

“At some point, we have to be more focused on success than noise, and I just think this will feel a lot more like noise,” said Representative Dan Kildee, Democrat of Michigan and an impeachment supporter.

Speaking with reporters on Wednesday morning, Mr. Green acknowledged differences with Democratic leaders but framed his decision to force the impeachment vote as strictly a matter of conscience. After listening to what he called Mr. Trump’s racist attacks on four Democratic congresswomen, he said he felt he could not wait to act.

“I will do this even if I am the only person involved in the process because there are some times on some issues when it is better than to stand alone than not stand at all,” he said.

He added: “We cannot wait. As we wait, we risk having the blood of somebody on our hands, and it could be a member of Congress.”

Mr. Green had advice for moderate Democrats worried about how a vote on any resolution referring to impeachment would affect their re-election prospects.

“If you voted yesterday to condemn the president, you voted yesterday for that resolution. The people who are going to vote against you are already going to vote against you,” he said. “Deciding today that you are not going to impeach will not exonerate you.”

Mr. Green, who first drafted articles of impeachment after Mr. Trump’s comments about the clash between white supremacists and protesters in Charlottesville, Va., has twice before forced similar votes. But in both cases, Republicans controlled the chamber and voted overwhelmingly to table his resolutions.

“It’s time for us to deal with his bigotry,” Mr. Green said on Wednesday. “This president has demonstrated that he’s willing to yell ‘fire’ in a crowded theater, and we have seen what can happen to people when bigotry is allowed to have a free rein. We all ought to go on record. We all ought to let the world know where we stand when we have a bigot in the White House.”

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House votes to kill Rep. Al Green’s resolution to impeach Trump

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6014751663001_6014752863001-vs House votes to kill Rep. Al Green's resolution to impeach Trump fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly a0788405-52dc-5f71-83bb-85cdb4e3d5b1

The House of Representatives on Wednesday voted to set aside a resolution by Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, to introduce article of impeachment against President Trump – the third time the Houston-area lawmaker has taken a shot at impeaching the president, but the first since Democrats regained control of the House.

Lawmakers voted 332-95 to table Green’s resolution, which was widely opposed by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and other top Democrats worried that the measure would force vulnerable swing-district lawmakers into peril ahead of the 2020 elections. The bipartisan vote shelved any chance of bringing forth articles of impeachment against Trump in the near future.

“The president has committed an impeachable offense,” Green said on the House floor earlier on Wednesday. “Yesterday, we condemned him for that. Today is our opportunity to punish him.”

137 Democrats voted in favor of tabling the resolution compared to just 95 who voted against shelving it. Only one lawmaker, Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., voted present.

Instead of moving ahead with articles of impeachment, most democrats have appeared to prefer waiting to see if a stronger case for removal could be developed that would win broader public support, and they’re eagerly awaiting next week’s scheduled testimony to two House committees by former Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

“With all due respect in the world for him, we have six committees that are working on following the facts in terms of any abuse of power, obstruction of justice and the rest that the president may have engaged in,” Pelosi said. “That is the serious path that we’re on.”

TRUMP DOUBLES DOWN ON ‘GO BACK’ TWEETS AMID OUTRAGE, CALLS ON ‘RADICAL’ REPS TO APOLOGIZE

Recent polling has shown majorities opposed impeachment. Even if the House voted to impeach Trump, which would amount to filing formal charges, the Republican-run Senate would be unlikely to remove him from office.

The showdown over Green’s resolution also came amid tensions between Pelosi and the same four progressive congresswomen of color whom Trump singled out in a tweet and implored them to “go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came. Then come back and show us how it is done.” All four of the women Trump apparently singled out – Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts – are American citizens and three of the four were born in the United States.

The four have waged an increasingly personal clash with Pelosi over how assertively the House should try restraining Trump’s ability to curb immigration. But, if anything, Trump’s tweets may have eased some of that tension, with Pelosi telling Democrats at a closed-door meeting Tuesday, “We are offended by what he said about our sisters,” according to an aide who described the private meeting to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

The freshman lawmakers also have been vocal advocates for Trump’s impeachment.

“Opening an impeachment inquiry is exactly what we must do when the President obstructs justice, advises witnesses to ignore legal subpoenas, & more,” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted last month.

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The House late Tuesday voted to condemn Trump’s comments after a bizarre floor fight when Pelosi was found to have violated a House rule over decorum.

Despite a lobbying effort by Trump and party leaders for a unified GOP front, four Republicans voted to condemn his remarks: moderate Reps. Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania, Fred Upton of Michigan, Will Hurd of Texas and Susan Brooks of Indiana, who is retiring. Also backing the measure was Michigan’s independent Rep. Justin Amash, who left the GOP this month after becoming the party’s sole member of Congress to back a Trump impeachment inquiry.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6014751663001_6014752863001-vs House votes to kill Rep. Al Green's resolution to impeach Trump fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly a0788405-52dc-5f71-83bb-85cdb4e3d5b1   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6014751663001_6014752863001-vs House votes to kill Rep. Al Green's resolution to impeach Trump fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly a0788405-52dc-5f71-83bb-85cdb4e3d5b1

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House Votes To Table Trump Impeachment Resolution

The House of Representatives voted to table a resolution to impeach President Donald Trump by a vote of 334-95 on Wednesday ― the latest show of simmering discontent among some Democrats about the refusal of their party’s leadership to challenge the president. 

The resolution was offered by Rep. Al Green (D-Texas) in response to racist comments made by Trump on Twitter, in which he told four Democratic congresswomen to “go back” to their countries of origin.

“Donald John Trump has, by his statements, brought the high office of the President of the United States in contempt, ridicule, disgrace and disrepute; has sown discord among the people of the United States; has demonstrated that he is unfit to be President; and has betrayed his trust as President of the United States to the manifest injury of the people of the United States; and has committed a high misdemeanor in office,” Green said while introducing his resolution on the floor of the House on Tuesday.

The resolution was not welcomed by Democratic Party leadership, which is trying to avoid talk of impeaching the president.

This is the third time Green has offered an impeachment resolution since Trump took office. The previous two resolutions were tabled ― or removed from the floor by a vote ― by wide majorities. But each successive resolution has seen an increasing number of lawmakers voting against tabling.

A new high of 95 lawmakers ― all Democrats ― voted against tabling the resolution on Wednesday. That was up from the 66 lawmakers who voted against tabling a resolution in January 2018. It’s also higher than the total number of lawmakers publicly calling for an impeachment inquiry.

The most notable vote against tabling the resolution was that of House Judiciary Committee chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.). Nadler has not publicly backed an impeachment inquiry, which would be handled by his committee.

Democrats have been split over whether or not to launch an impeachment inquiry into Trump since special counsel Robert Mueller’s “Report on the Investigation into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election” was released by the Department of Justice. The report noted 10 potential instances where Trump could have obstructed justice into the investigation and explained that the only constitutional manner to deal with a president breaking the law is through Congress’ impeachment power.

Westlake Legal Group 5d2f7a4f2600004900044b8c House Votes To Table Trump Impeachment Resolution

ASSOCIATED PRESS Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) is opposed to opening an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

In total, 83 House members ― 82 Democrats and one Republican turned independent ― have called for Congress to launch an impeachment inquiry into the president. 

Most members calling for an impeachment inquiry argue that the president’s acts as described in Mueller’s report are crimes and need to be investigated. Some have also noted that the president’s alleged violations of the Emoluments Clause and open racism are impeachable offenses. A formal impeachment inquiry would also strengthen Congress’ hand in the courts to obtain documents and testimony from current and former White House officials.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) has led the opposition to impeachment as more Democrats have called for an inquiry. 

While Pelosi has stated that Trump “engaged in a criminal cover-up” and that while she would like to see him in prison, she has also decided that his alleged crimes do not merit a formal impeachment inquiry. 

Instead, she’s claimed Trump is “self-impeaching;” that “impeachment’s too good for him;” that he “wants to be impeached so he can be exonerated by the Senate;” or that impeachment is “the easy way out.” She’s also said she is “done with him.”

Ahead of the House’s vote on Green’s impeachment resolution, Pelosi further explained her position against launching an impeachment inquiry.

“We have six committees that are working on following the facts in terms of any abuse of power, obstruction of justice, and the rest that the president may have engaged in,” she said at a news conference on Wednesday.

This process, however, has been stalled by the president, who has blocked former staffers from testifying and refused to hand over relevant documents. Democrats have threatened to hold those like ex-White House counsel Don McGahn in contempt, but have not yet done so. They have filed no legal motions to secure White House documents or to force former administration officials to testify. 

This article has been updated with Nadler’s vote against tabling the impeachment resolution.

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