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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 78)

US man faces new terrorism charges, allegedly the highest-ranking citizen fighting overseas

Westlake Legal Group terrorarrest-cropped-455am US man faces new terrorism charges, allegedly the highest-ranking citizen fighting overseas fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/us fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/san-diego fnc/us fnc Eliott Spagat Associated Press article 5885e558-29ca-5456-9019-4bb6f8e8eb99

A U.S. citizen on the FBI’s Most Wanted Terrorist List has been charged with additional crimes involving ties to Somalia’s al-Shabaab rebel group, according to a federal indictment unsealed Monday.

Jehad Serwan Mostafa, 37, a former San Diego resident, was indicted on similar charges in 2009.

Without providing specifics, the new counts accuse him of having key roles in al-Shabaab activities and providing material support from 2008 to 2017.

UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SASKIA JONES, 23, IDENTIFIED AS SECOND LONDON BRIDGE ATTACK VICTIM

The FBI said it learned this year that he is a leader in al-Shabaab’s “explosives department.”

“Today, Mostafa is believed to be the highest-ranking United States citizen fighting overseas for a terrorist organization,” said Scott Brunner, the agent in charge of the FBI office in San Diego.

The group claimed responsibility for two Sept. 30 attacks on U.S. and European military targets in Somalia, including one by an estimated 25 fighters who were killed when they tried to storm the Belidogle military airstrip, which hosts Somali and U.S. forces.

BORIS JOHNSON SAYS 74 CONVICTED TERRORISTS RELEASED FROM PRISON WILL HAVE LICENSE CONDITIONS REVIEWED

Mostafa was born in Waukesha, Wisc., and raised in San Diego, where authorities say he has relatives. He graduated from the University of California, San Diego, in 2005 and — according to an FBI poster offering a $5 million reward for information leading to his arrest — joined al-Shabaab around 2006, authorities said.

Mostafa was among a handful of young Muslims from the U.S. who took high-visibility roles inside the al-Qaida-linked insurgent force, authorities said.

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He was once president of the now-defunct Muslim Youth Council of San Diego, which said on its website that it was “dedicated to showing the world that Islam is a religion of peace and Muslims are a peaceful and productive part of society.”

Mostafa’s father, Halim Mostafa, a Kurdish Syrian, made a low-budget film, “Mozlym,” that was released in 2008 and billed as an effort to show how the true meaning of Islam is often lost amid misconceptions of non-Muslims in America.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group terrorarrest-cropped-455am US man faces new terrorism charges, allegedly the highest-ranking citizen fighting overseas fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/us fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/san-diego fnc/us fnc Eliott Spagat Associated Press article 5885e558-29ca-5456-9019-4bb6f8e8eb99   Westlake Legal Group terrorarrest-cropped-455am US man faces new terrorism charges, allegedly the highest-ranking citizen fighting overseas fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/us fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/san-diego fnc/us fnc Eliott Spagat Associated Press article 5885e558-29ca-5456-9019-4bb6f8e8eb99

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Greta Thunberg approaches Lisbon after 20-day trip across Atlantic

Westlake Legal Group AP19298851953803 Greta Thunberg approaches Lisbon after 20-day trip across Atlantic fox-news/world/environment/climate-change fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 95258397-dcad-58c0-b163-d32300a71646

The 16-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg neared the port of Lisbon, Portugal, early Tuesday after making a nearly three-week-long journey across the Atlantic Ocean in a catamaran in order to attend a United Nations climate change summit in Madrid.

Thunberg is two days late to the UN Climate Change Conference 2019, which began on Monday and will continue until Dec. 10. She will spend Tuesday in Lisbon before taking on an overnight train to Spain to attend the summit where she is to deliver a speech.

UN REPORT: WORLD ALREADY FAR BEHIND PROGRESS NEEDED TO REACH PARIS CLIMATE GOALS

The 45-foot-long La Vagabonde catamaran carrying Thunberg, British navigator Nikki Henderson and the Australian family who own the vessel, first set sail from Hampton, Va., on November 13. The teenager opted to make the 3,400 miles journey via yacht instead of taking a direct flight to Madrid as an act of protest against fossil fuel emissions that come with air travel.

“Heading into Lisbon!!” Thunberg wrote on Twitter just after sunrise.

She shared an image of city lights in Lisbon before daybreak writing: “Land ahoy!”

On Monday, Thunberg shared a selfie of her travel companions, writing: “Day 20. Our last day on the ocean! We can now almost smell land! We expect to arrive at Doca de Santo Amaro, Lisbon sometime between 8.00-10.00 tomorrow morning.”

The mayor of Lisbon, Fernando Medina, as well as a group of Portuguese youth activists from Fridays for Future Lisbon, were set to greet Thunberg at the dock.

The conference in Madrid — organized by Antonio Guterres, UN secretary-general, and Pedro Sanchez, Spain’s caretaker prime minister – will bring together representatives from about 200 countries who signed the 2015 Paris climate accord, France 24 reported.

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“In one way, lots of things have changed, and lots of things have moved in the right direction,” Thunberg told AFP before setting sail from Virginia. “But also in a sense, we have gone a few more months without real action being taken and without people realizing the emergency we are in.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19298851953803 Greta Thunberg approaches Lisbon after 20-day trip across Atlantic fox-news/world/environment/climate-change fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 95258397-dcad-58c0-b163-d32300a71646   Westlake Legal Group AP19298851953803 Greta Thunberg approaches Lisbon after 20-day trip across Atlantic fox-news/world/environment/climate-change fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 95258397-dcad-58c0-b163-d32300a71646

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Missouri State ranked for first time in 15 years

Missouri State coach Amaka Agugua-Hamilton was playing for Hofstra the last time the Lady Bears appeared in the poll 15 years ago.

Now, the first-year coach has the team in The Associated Press women’s basketball Top 25 this week at No. 22. She inherited a really good squad that returned 12 players from last season’s Sweet 16 appearance.

“It’s tough because expectations are high as they had a great season coming off a Sweet 16,” Agugua-Hamilton said. “Coming in with a new philosophy and style of play than the last coach. I want them to buy in and believe in my vision.”

Agugua-Hamilton said that she’s tweaked a few things and that it was made easier because the players took to her and the staff.

“It made it an easy transition,” she said.

Agugua-Hamilton said that one of the goals for the season was to get the Lady Bears ranked — something she experienced many times as an assistant at Michigan State. That goal was reached Monday — the Lady Bears first ranking since the 2004 season.

“It has been 15 years, and I’m really excited that our program is being recognized and our players are being recognized for their hard work,” she said. “I think it’s hard to get ranked as a mid-major. When it happens its super exciting. My message to them is I want to stay ranked. Want our RPI to stay where it is. Build our resume for the NCAA Tournament.”

The Lady Bears’ (7-1) only loss this season came at Oregon State in the finals of the Preseason WNIT Tournament. To get to the final, Missouri State won at Boise State and Oklahoma.

“It’s almost like we played a postseason tournament early in the season. It helped us preparation wise,” Agugua-Hamilton said. “At the end of the day, we have a really good team and are not playing our best basketball yet. We got a lot of things to work on and continue to improve on defensively.”

The Lady Bears host Wichita State on Wednesday in their next game.

While Missouri State made the poll for the first time in a while, Stanford moved to No. 1; the Cardinal’s appearance atop the poll is its first in seven years.

“It’s exciting for our team to be ranked No. 1,” Stanford coach Tara VanDerveer said. “For our team, the No. 1 ranking comes with confidence and humility. We’re a humble team. We could have lost games this season so far, but found ways to win. I feel like I’m on the Peloton bike in the first five minutes of the ride, but there’s a lot of pedaling left. I love when I’m on the top of the leaderboard. It motivates me to pedal harder. It motivates us to work really hard.”

The Cardinal will have to wait a little bit to defend their ranking as they are on exam break for the next two weeks. VanDerveer said it’s a chance to fine tune some things and get better in areas.

Here are a few other tidbits from the poll:

STRONG UP TOP: The Pac-12 has three teams in the top five of the poll, with Stanford, Oregon (3) and Oregon State (5). It’s the first time since 2014 that a conference has three of the top five teams in the poll. The Southeastern Conference had three in the 2014-15 preseason poll.

MILESTONES: Doug Bruno, coach of No. 16 DePaul, earned his 700th career win at his alma mater on Sunday in a victory over rival Northwestern. Bruno is one of three active coaches in Division I to win 700 games at only one school, joining UConn’s Geno Auriemma and Villanova’s Harry Perretta. … Oregon State coach Scott Rueck earned his 500th career victory on Saturday against Liberty.

BIG TEN SUCCESS: With Michigan re-entering the Top 25 on Monday, the Big Ten has four teams in the poll. The conference has gotten off to a great start this year, winning 80% of its games, so far. That’s the best start in the 39-year history of women’s basketball in the Big Ten. Ten of the 14 schools are undefeated or have just one loss.

Westlake Legal Group Missouri-State-WBK Missouri State ranked for first time in 15 years fox-news/sports/ncaa-bk fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 48c0dc5e-505f-5d24-8bea-e8b8deaa25d7   Westlake Legal Group Missouri-State-WBK Missouri State ranked for first time in 15 years fox-news/sports/ncaa-bk fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 48c0dc5e-505f-5d24-8bea-e8b8deaa25d7

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Trump border wall $400 million contract handed to company owned by Republican donor who promoted firm on Fox News

Westlake Legal Group f0SeVbk9e0tBygLmCGnTWuroiih1jj5zLySmrfW6bCc Trump border wall $400 million contract handed to company owned by Republican donor who promoted firm on Fox News r/politics

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Fox News’ Neil Cavuto Fires Mean Messages Back At His Trump-Supporting Viewers

Westlake Legal Group 5de63182250000b23cd2ef44 Fox News’ Neil Cavuto Fires Mean Messages Back At His Trump-Supporting Viewers

Fox News host Neil Cavuto came for his critics once again on Monday’s episode of “Your World.”

Mean messages from viewers who don’t like his occasional criticism of President Donald Trump greeted the anchor on his return to air following a week-long vacation. So Cavuto, as he has done on multiple previous occasions, read several of them out.

“Just when I thought Fox had finally fired you, I come to discover it was just a vacation. Pity,” said one message.

Another read: “Hey, Mr. Never Trumper, how about never showing up for work? Hate to break it to you but no one misses you while you’re gone.”

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Sex Trafficking via Facebook Sets Off a Lawyer’s Novel Crusade

Westlake Legal Group 03facebooksuit-facebookJumbo Sex Trafficking via Facebook Sets Off a Lawyer’s Novel Crusade Zuckerberg, Mark E Suits and Litigation (Civil) Instagram Inc human trafficking Facebook Inc Computers and the Internet Annie McAdams

HOUSTON — Tech has led to a lot of trouble lately: hate speech, financial scams, undermined elections. Yet tech companies have largely avoided legal consequences, thanks to a landmark 1996 law that protects them from lawsuits.

Now that federal law, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, has a new threat: Annie McAdams, a personal-injury lawyer in Houston.

Ms. McAdams is waging a legal assault against Facebook and other tech companies, accusing them of facilitating the sex trafficking of minors. In a series of lawsuits in California, Georgia, Missouri and Texas, she is using a novel argument to challenge the 1996 law, and finding some early success. This year, a Texas judge has repeatedly denied Facebook’s motions to dismiss her lawsuits.

Section 230 states that internet companies are not liable for what their users post. Ms. McAdams argues that, in the case of pimps using Facebook and Instagram to lure children into prostitution, separate laws require Facebook to warn users of that risk and do more to prevent it.

“If you sell a lawn mower and the blade flies off and chops someone in the leg, you have the responsibility to fix it and warn people,” she said. “Nowhere else has an industry been afforded this luxury of protection from being held accountable for anything that they’ve caused.”

Ms. McAdams’s lawsuits are part of a broader, yearslong effort to use the courts to upend how the 23-year-old law governs the internet.

While Section 230 is increasingly debated in Washington and on the presidential campaign trail, legislation is not expected to significantly weaken the law anytime soon. Instead, lawyers are pushing ahead with federal and state lawsuits to challenge its protection of internet companies. After years of court rulings that strengthened the law, cracks have recently begun to show.

In 2016, a federal appeals court ruled that Section 230 didn’t protect a modeling website that two men used to lure women they drugged and sexually assaulted, because the site’s owners knew of the threat and failed to warn the women.

In March, a federal appeals court affirmed a ruling that Airbnb could be held liable if its users violated home-rental bans in Santa Monica, Calif. And in July, another federal appeals court rejected Amazon’s Section 230 arguments and said it could be held liable for selling defective products after a woman sued over a broken dog leash that partly blinded her. The court is rehearing the case at Amazon’s request.

“Plaintiffs keep taking cracks at it, and every time they don’t instantly lose, they pour more resources into that crack to see if they can split it open,” said Eric Goldman, a Santa Clara University law professor who supports the law.

Ms. McAdams’s case is one of the widest cracks today. Facebook asked Steven Kirkland, a state judge in Houston, to dismiss two of Ms. McAdams’s lawsuits because of its immunity under Section 230. The judge denied the company’s motions, though his rulings offered little insight into his thinking. He declined to elaborate in an interview.

“It’s always noteworthy when a 230 dismissal isn’t granted in a case involving someone like Facebook, because we just presume Facebook won’t be liable for what its users are doing,” Mr. Goldman said.

Facebook responded to the judge’s decision in Houston with a nearly 50-page petition to a Texas appeals court, arguing that Judge Kirkland had erred. “The claims here asserted against Facebook have no basis in law,” Facebook’s lawyers wrote in the petition.

A Facebook spokeswoman added that the company “has zero tolerance for any behavior or content that exploits children on our platform” and that it used sophisticated technology and a partnership with a children’s advocacy group “to aggressively combat this behavior and protect children.”

Ms. McAdams’s approach could prove significant. If the Texas rulings hold up on appeal, they could persuade judges in other states and potentially even draw the Supreme Court to weigh in, said Jeff Kosseff, a United States Naval Academy law professor who wrote a book on Section 230.

If judges began allowing such product-liability claims to get around Section 230, it would probably mean many more companies would be held legally responsible for harms that occurred on their sites, particularly if plaintiffs could show the companies’ decisions or policies had led to those harms, according to Mr. Kosseff and two other law professors who spoke to The New York Times.

Judge Kirkland said he expected Facebook’s appeals would continue to the Texas Supreme Court, meaning a trial would most likely wait until 2021.

“My clients know it’s going to be a 10-year fight,” Ms. McAdams said. “I’m not looking for a settlement. I’m looking for a day in court.”

Ms. McAdams, 43, poses an unusual challenge for the tech companies. She is not an Ivy League lawyer with a history of Supreme Court cases; she is a personal-injury attorney who has taken on drunken drivers, real estate developers, insurance companies and a church after a coffin floated away in a flood.

Over fajitas at her favorite Tex-Mex joint in Houston, she said she had acquired the restaurant’s secret margarita recipe in legal discovery when she sued the place for serving a man too much alcohol.

She dismisses academics critical of her approach, and she delivers bold pronouncements — particularly to a reporter with a voice recorder — in a disarming Texas drawl.

In the Facebook case, she predicted a jury would award her clients billions of dollars. “They have to do everything to keep me from that jury,” she said, “because once facts are known, it’s over.” She said she was “building the blueprint” for lawyers in other states to sue social-media companies on similar grounds.

Ms. McAdams first pursued lawsuits against the hotels where pimps set up shop. Then, when interviewing potential clients, she noticed a common thread: Almost all the girls had met their pimps on Facebook or Instagram.

She still wasn’t exactly sure how to build a case, until she watched Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, testify to Congress last year. “I couldn’t believe he went on the record saying I’m responsible for the content,” she said. “I have 17 references under oath.”

After she sued, Facebook enlisted about a dozen outside lawyers, including in Houston, Dallas and Austin, and flooded her with court filings. “Every time they file, we’ll punch back,” she said.

Her lawsuits accuse Facebook of violating Texas sex-trafficking and product-liability laws. Section 230 basically protects tech companies from being sued for what people do on their platforms; Ms. McAdams argues that her case is about what Facebook didn’t do to protect its users.

“We’re not trying to hold Facebook accountable for something some random person posted,” she said. “We’re trying to hold Facebook accountable for their independent actions and omissions in the facilitation of trafficking.”

She said laws required Facebook to do more to stop predators who use its products to find victims and to warn people of that risk. For instance, she said, Facebook could require users to verify their identities and better restrict adults from connecting with minors.

While Congress amended Section 230 last year to allow federal lawsuits against tech companies that facilitate sex trafficking, Ms. McAdams is suing Facebook in state court.

The product-liability argument has not always succeeded. While her argument appeared to persuade one judge, a second Texas judge overseeing another of her lawsuits against Facebook rejected it. He is letting her continue the suit under different claims.

Carrie Goldberg, a New York lawyer, tried a similar legal argument when suing the dating app Grindr for enabling her client’s ex-boyfriend to send more than 1,000 men to her client’s door looking for sex. Two federal courts cited Section 230 and dismissed the suit, and the Supreme Court declined to hear the case in October.

Ms. Goldberg said that if a product-liability argument succeeded against tech companies, it could force companies to make their sites safer. Such product-liability law are “how we have seatbelts and windshield wipers; it’s because of court cases where companies have been held liable for dangerous conditions,” she said.

Ms. McAdams is hedging her bets. In addition to her three suits against Facebook in Texas and one in Tennessee, she has sued Salesforce in Texas, California and St. Louis, accusing the business-software company of helping the prostitution site Backpage do business. Those suits have had mixed results so far. Salesforce declined to comment. Last week, she sued the email company MailChimp in Georgia for also helping a Backpage imitator. A MailChimp spokeswoman declined to comment specifically on the suit but said the company doesn’t allow illegal activity on its platform.

Next up, Ms. McAdams and her co-counsel, David Harris, are talking about suing other large tech and financial firms for their roles in sex trafficking. “The bigger they are, the harder they fall,” she said.

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Treinen, Sanchez, Russell, Sánchez become free agents

Former All-Stars Blake Treinen, Aaron Sanchez and Addison Russell were among 56 players who became free agents along with current Gold Glove second baseman Yolmer Sánchez when their teams declined to offer 2020 contracts Monday rather than make them eligible for salary arbitration.

Baltimore, faced with a similar decision, traded second baseman Jonathan Villar to Miami, which claimed first baseman Jesús Aguilar off waivers from Tampa Bay.

One big-name free agent found a home: All-Star infielder Mike Moustakas and the Cincinnati Reds agreed to a $64 million, four-year contract, a person familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the agreement had not been announced.

For the second straight offseason, the Reds are making a splash as they try to shake themselves out of a rut of six straight losing seasons. Their first move involves getting a player from NL Central rival Milwaukee. The 31-year-old Moustakas could fill a hole at second base that opened when Scooter Gennett got hurt and then was traded last season.

Cincinnati scored the fourth-fewest runs in the NL despite one of the league’s most hitter-friendly ballparks. Bulking up on offense, stabilizing the outfield and overhauling the bullpen are the Reds’ priorities in the offseason.

Ahead of the deadline to offer 2020 contracts to unsigned players on 40-man rosters, San Diego obtained second baseman Jurickson Profar from Oakland for catching prospect Austin Allen, then agreed to a $5.7 million, one-year contract. Cleveland acquired catcher Sandy León from Boston for minor league right-hander Adenys Bautista and agreed to a $2 million deal.

About two dozen players agreed to contracts, and the total of players eligible for arbitration dropped from about 230 at the start of the day to approximately 165.

Seattle chose not to offer a contract to infielder Tim Beckham, who has 32 games remaining on a drug suspension, and San Francisco let go outfielder Kevin Pillar.

Milwaukee was the most active team in cutting its budget for arbitration-eligible players, allowing a quintet to go free: left-hander Álex Claudio, right-handers Junior Guerra and Jimmy Nelson, infielder Tyler Saladino and third baseman Travis Shaw. The Brewers also agreed to a $2.2 million, one-year deal with shortstop Orlando Arcia and a $1.4 million, one-year contract with outfielder Ben Gamel, whose deal includes a $2.55 million team option for 2021.

After starting the day with 10 arbitration-eligible players, the Brewers finished with three: right-hander Corey Knebel and lefties Josh Hader and Brent Suter.

“I’d say that payroll flexibility helps and isn’t a bad thing as we evaluate potential acquisitions throughout the offseason,” Brewers general manager David Stearns said. “The way the arbitration system is set up, sometimes you’re forced to make difficult decisions if it doesn’t appear that allocating the payroll to specific players in the way the arbitration would dictate would be the most effective use of those dollars.”

Baltimore jettisoned its top player in Villar in exchange for minor league pitcher Easton Lucas. Villar played in all 162 games this year and led the 108-loss Orioles with 176 hits, five triples and 40 stolen bases. He likely will command a salary of about $10 million in arbitration.

“He was a tremendously exciting player for us, a joy to have,” Orioles general manager Mike Elias said. “It was hard to let him go, but we’ve got to keep an eye on our strategic objectives, which is prioritize the future right now.”

Russell, a 2016 All-Star, was banned for 40 games last offseason under Major League Baseball’s domestic violence policy after a series of allegations made by ex-wife Melisa Reidy. The 25-year-old returned to the Chicago Cubs in May and batted a career-low .237 with nine homers, 23 RBIs and a .699 OPS.

Russell earned $4 million in 2019 and was likely to gain a raise in arbitration, probably to around $5 million.

“We decided to non-tender Addison Russell today simply because the role we expected him to play for the 2020 Cubs was inconsistent with how he would have been treated in the salary arbitration process,” Cubs president of baseball operations Theo Epstein said in a statement.

Treinen, a 31-year-old right-hander, had a 4.91 ERA for Oakland this year, up from 0.78 ERA in his All-Star season of 2018. Treinen was expected to command roughly $7.5 million in arbitration.

Sanchez, a 27-year-old right-hander, was an All-Star for Toronto in 2016 and was dealt to Houston on July 31. He went 2-0 in four starts and 18 2/3 innings, including the first six innings of a combined no-hitter against Seattle in his Astros debut. But the team said on Sept. 5 that he needed shoulder surgery.

Among others cut loose were Philadelphia third baseman Maikel Franco and second baseman César Hernández, Arizona outfielder Steven Souza Jr., and Minnesota first baseman C.J. Cron.

Westlake Legal Group Addison-Russell Treinen, Sanchez, Russell, Sánchez become free agents fox-news/sports/mlb/tampa-bay-rays fox-news/sports/mlb/seattle-mariners fox-news/sports/mlb/san-francisco-giants fox-news/sports/mlb/san-diego-padres fox-news/sports/mlb/oakland-athletics fox-news/sports/mlb/miami-marlins fox-news/sports/mlb/cleveland-indians fox-news/sports/mlb/cincinnati-reds fox-news/sports/mlb/boston-red-sox fox-news/sports/mlb/baltimore-orioles fox-news/sports/mlb fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 3330af96-8d99-5ecf-b092-64edaddd62b1   Westlake Legal Group Addison-Russell Treinen, Sanchez, Russell, Sánchez become free agents fox-news/sports/mlb/tampa-bay-rays fox-news/sports/mlb/seattle-mariners fox-news/sports/mlb/san-francisco-giants fox-news/sports/mlb/san-diego-padres fox-news/sports/mlb/oakland-athletics fox-news/sports/mlb/miami-marlins fox-news/sports/mlb/cleveland-indians fox-news/sports/mlb/cincinnati-reds fox-news/sports/mlb/boston-red-sox fox-news/sports/mlb/baltimore-orioles fox-news/sports/mlb fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 3330af96-8d99-5ecf-b092-64edaddd62b1

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Jaguars switching back to rookie QB Minshew amid 4-game skid

The Mississippi Mustache is back in Jacksonville’s starting lineup.

Rookie sensation Gardner Minshew will start Sunday when the reeling Jaguars host the Los Angeles Chargers. He replaces ineffective and highly paid quarterback Nick Foles following the team’s fourth consecutive lopsided loss.

Coach Doug Marrone made the announcement Monday, one day after a 28-11 home loss to Tampa Bay in which the Jaguars (4-8) managed 242 yards, turned the ball over four times and were flagged a season-high 16 times for 125 yards. It was Jacksonville’s 18th loss in its past 24 games.

“We feel with Gardner’s mobility and elusiveness, it gives us a better chance of winning with the way we’re playing right now because we’re all not doing a good enough job,” Marrone said.

Asked whether the job would be Minshew’s for the remainder of the season, Marrone said, “We’re planning on him playing.”

It was the obvious move following Sunday’s debacle against Tampa Bay. Foles ended Jacksonville’s first three drives with turnovers that the Buccaneers turned into touchdowns. Marrone benched Foles at halftime, trailing 25-0.

Marrone said Foles handled the demotion like a pro.

“It’s brutal; it’s tough,” Marrone said. “He’s a competitor. He worked his (butt) off to come back. He’s a great pro, so he’s going to do everything he can to help us win. And at the same time, he’s got to be ready in case there’s an injury. I think the world of him. I think he’s a really good quarterback. He obviously can win in this league. But we have to have some help around him.”

Minshew, who went 4-4 as the starter while Foles recovered from a broken left collarbone suffered in the opener, rallied the team and had a chance to make it a seven-point game in the fourth quarter. But his would-be TD pass slipped through Dede Westbrook’s hands and resulted in an interception.

Minshew finished 16 of 27 passing for 147 yards, with a touchdown to Westbrook and the interception. He was sacked twice and fumbled on the team’s final play.

Foles completed 7 of 14 passes for 93 yards and was sacked three times. The 2018 Super Bowl MVP has thrown for 661 yards, with two touchdowns, two interceptions, two fumbles and eight sacks in three games since coming off injured reserve.

He doesn’t look comfortable in the pocket and playing behind a shaky offensive line highlights his lack of mobility.

“They’re part of it when you look at protections,” Marrone said. “But’s it’s really a lot of things. You’ve got to get open. You’ve got to protect. … We’ve got to be able to run the ball better. There’s a lot of things that come into it. … It’s not the way we want to be playing.”

Minshew, meanwhile, extends plays with his legs and does some of his best work while improvising. A sixth-round draft pick from Washington State, Minshew has thrown for 2,432 yards and 14 touchdowns. Turnovers have been the main issue: he has five interceptions and 12 fumbles (seven lost).

The Jaguars signed Foles to a four-year, $88 million contract in free agency that included $50.125 million guaranteed. It made sense for them to go back to the former Philadelphia backup once he was healthy, if anything, just to see what he could do.

Switching back to Minshew could complicate the situation moving forward.

Foles’ contract pays him $15.125 million in 2020 — fully guaranteed — and he will count nearly $22 million against the salary cap. That’s a huge payout for a guy not guaranteed to be the starter. Cutting him would cost the Jaguars nearly $34 million against the cap and trading him would cost nearly $19 million.

Westlake Legal Group Gardner-Minshew Jaguars switching back to rookie QB Minshew amid 4-game skid fox-news/sports/nfl/jacksonville-jaguars fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/nick-foles fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 66e97bad-82de-5732-b8be-df62d0ee8dc8   Westlake Legal Group Gardner-Minshew Jaguars switching back to rookie QB Minshew amid 4-game skid fox-news/sports/nfl/jacksonville-jaguars fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/nick-foles fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 66e97bad-82de-5732-b8be-df62d0ee8dc8

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Scaramucci Hits Pro-Trump Republicans With Damning Nazi Collaborator Comparison

Westlake Legal Group 5de62999250000b23cd2ef25 Scaramucci Hits Pro-Trump Republicans With Damning Nazi Collaborator Comparison

Anthony Scaramucci on Monday likened Republican lawmakers in Congress who continue to back President Donald Trump at all costs over the Ukraine scandal to the governing Nazi collaborators in the French Vichy Republic during World War II.

The former White House communications director — who served just 10 days in the role in 2017 and is now heavily critical of the Trump administration — expressed his surprise at how GOP politicians continue to disavow the oath of the Constitution that has “been so sacred” and “worked so well for so many years” during the impeachment inquiry into the president.

Scaramucci described them as “Vichy Republicans” on CNN’s “New Day.”

“Remember the Vichy Republic?” he asked host Alisyn Camerota in video Mediaite shared online. “When Hitler took over Paris and took over France, there was a Vichy group of French that were helping him administrate the French government.”

Camerota called it “a strong charge.”

“I’m not comparing anybody to Hitler,” Scaramucci replied. “I’m just suggesting that they’re falling in line in a way that is absolutely despicable as it relates to the Constitution.” 

Scaramucci also accused current Republicans of “writing profiles in cowardice.”

“Five years from now, people are going to look back and say, ’OK, what were you actually thinking when you were telling those lies about Ukraine or when you were telling those lies for President Trump? What were you actually thinking?′ And there’s going to be no answer for that,” he said.

“The only answer they can come up with is, ‘Well, I wanted to stay in power. I was afraid of a presidential tweet. I was afraid to be intimidated by the president and I thought it was the right thing to do to look loyal in a situation where there’s great illegality going on,’” Scaramucci added. “They’re taking cover with each other so there’s comfort in a crowd. So if one or two of them break out from the crowd, then you’ll see a cascade. But it’s just ridiculous what’s going on.”

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Andy Puzder: Nancy Pelosi’s USMCA, Big Labor problem – Will Trump win this one after all?

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6106109445001_6106108658001-vs Andy Puzder: Nancy Pelosi's USMCA, Big Labor problem – Will Trump win this one after all? fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article Andy Puzder 8a970530-1142-5584-bb20-bed76dfaf211 /FOX NEWS/WORLD/GLOBAL ECONOMY/Trade

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has a problem. If she holds a vote on the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), the trade agreement President Trump negotiated to replace NAFTA, passage could appear as a victory for the president in the midst of highly partisan impeachment proceedings. On the other hand, if she fails to hold a vote, she could face blame for leading a do nothing Congress. Given the trade pacts benefits for American workers, that failure could cost Democrats the House in 2020.

According to the United States International Trade Commission, the USMCA would increase GDP by $68.2 billion and employment by 176,000 jobs. It would “likely have a positive impact on U.S. trade, both with USMCA partners and with the rest of the world” benefiting “all broad industry sectors within the U.S. economy.” The largest “gains in output, exports, wages, and employment” would be in the manufacturing sector. That matters in those industrial swing states. No wonder it likely would pass with overwhelming bipartisan support, if Pelosi simply called it up for a vote.

So why is the speaker delaying a vote? President Trump has a theory. Speaking to reporters last week, he said “[e]verybody knows it is a great deal. She knows it is a great deal, she’s said it. She hasn’t wanted to do it because, I understand, a couple of the unions, the AFL-CIO, they are asking her to hold it for a while because it’ll make Trump look bad.”

ALASKA GOV. MIKE DUNLEAVY: US-MEXICO-CANADA TRADE DEAL WOULD BRING GREAT BENEFITS – DEMS SHOULD OK IT

On Nov. 7, the AFL-CIO Industrial Union Council sent a letter signed by 12 union leaders warning House members that they would oppose passage of the USMCA in its current form. Despite the positive impact the USMCA would have for American workers, big labor claims that it fails to sufficiently protect workers — in Mexico.

The USMCA stands as stark evidence that President Trump has lived up to his campaign promise to fight for American workers. Its passage would stand as a victory for President Trump, a Congress unable to accomplish much else and, most importantly, for American workers.

The unions are insisting that trade pact require the Mexican government to implement a program of labor inspections that “will free Mexican workers to challenge protection contracts.” Their purported concern is that “[t]he situation of workers can only be improved when they have the right to join together freely for collective action.” The theory is that if Mexico fails to protect its workers, Mexican labor will be cheaper and out-compete American labor on price.

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Fair enough. That’s certainly what happened under NAFTA. So, what protections does the USMCA actually provide?

Well, among other things, it requires that the parties implement reforms to their labor laws that provide for the “effective right to collectively bargain” and guarantee their workers’ “freedom of association” including the “right to strike.” It prohibits “all forms of forced and compulsory labor.” It requires that the parties adopt and maintain labor standards as recognized by the International Labor Organization’s Declaration on Rights at Work and that the parties not “waive or otherwise derogate” from their labor laws. It also includes first of its kind language requiring that the parties address violence against workers who exercise their labor rights.

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There is an appendix covering “Worker Representation In Collective Bargaining in Mexico” which specifies extensive actions Mexico must take to assure workers’ rights. Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador recently sent a letter to congressional Democrats stating that Mexico has met its USMCA commitments on labor issues and has allocated additional funds to implement USMCA required changes in its labor laws. To further assuage the unions’ concerns with enforcement, Mexico’s undersecretary of foreign relations for North America has stated that Mexico is open to adding labor-dispute panels.

Can union leaders really enhance their status as defenders of American workers by opposing a trade deal that so obviously benefits those workers? 

The USMCA’s labor protections are comprehensive. The unions’ demands are superfluous, but perhaps not surprising. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2018 union membership hit a historic low of 10.5 percent. Membership in both private (6.4 percent) and public sector (33.9 percent) unions hit historic lows.

The reality is that union leaders are desperately seeking relevance. They must claim at least some meaningful input into this trade deal – negotiated by a president whose election they opposed. Otherwise, passage could exacerbate their growing irrelevance. But can union leaders really enhance their status as defenders of American workers by opposing a trade deal that so obviously benefits those workers?

Labor leaders would be well served to recall that ignoring the appeal of a candidate who promised to fight for fairer trade deals didn’t work out so well in the last election. Despite claims by AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka in 2016 that union members armed with “the facts” would “tumble down” candidate Trump’s “house of cards,” 42 percent of union households voted for President Trump, helping propel him into the White House. It was the strongest union support for any Republican president since Ronald Reagan.

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The USMCA stands as stark evidence that President Trump has lived up to his campaign promise to fight for American workers. Its passage would stand as a victory for President Trump, a Congress unable to accomplish much else and, most importantly, for American workers. If the unions can’t get on board with that, so be it.

Speaker Pelosi, it’s time to hold that vote and bring the deal home.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6106109445001_6106108658001-vs Andy Puzder: Nancy Pelosi's USMCA, Big Labor problem – Will Trump win this one after all? fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article Andy Puzder 8a970530-1142-5584-bb20-bed76dfaf211 /FOX NEWS/WORLD/GLOBAL ECONOMY/Trade   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6106109445001_6106108658001-vs Andy Puzder: Nancy Pelosi's USMCA, Big Labor problem – Will Trump win this one after all? fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article Andy Puzder 8a970530-1142-5584-bb20-bed76dfaf211 /FOX NEWS/WORLD/GLOBAL ECONOMY/Trade

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