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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 78)

Houston Chronicle Editorial Board Calls On Beto O’Rourke To Drop Out

Westlake Legal Group 5d525b342200005500f4ef9d Houston Chronicle Editorial Board Calls On Beto O’Rourke To Drop Out

The Houston Chronicle editorial board has called on Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke to pull out of the 2020 race, return to Texas and run for senator.

“So Beto, if you’re listening: Come home. Drop out of the race for president and come back to Texas to run for senator,” it wrote. “The chances of winning the race you’re in now are vanishingly small. And Texas needs you.”

O’Rourke failed to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) in the 2018 midterms and the board acknowledged it “wouldn’t be easy” for O’Rourke to beat Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) in 2020.

“But a lot has changed since 2018,” it added. “You had a lot to do with that — and Trump is no longer rock-solid in Texas. Neither are the Republicans who support him.” 

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Protesters Return To Hong Kong’s Airport, Causing Flight Cancellations For 2nd Day

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1161426998-b22712c855d281e61a7dd15462868bdac42679f7-s1100-c15 Protesters Return To Hong Kong's Airport, Causing Flight Cancellations For 2nd Day

Two flight attendants walk past a display board covered with memos and posters at Hong Kong’s international airport on Tuesday, a day after the airport closed due to pro-democracy protests. Philip Fong/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Fong/AFP/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Protesters Return To Hong Kong's Airport, Causing Flight Cancellations For 2nd Day

Two flight attendants walk past a display board covered with memos and posters at Hong Kong’s international airport on Tuesday, a day after the airport closed due to pro-democracy protests.

Philip Fong/AFP/Getty Images

Updated at 5:30 a.m. ET

Pro-democracy protesters on Tuesday returned in force to Hong Kong’s international airport, forcing it to cancel all flights for a second day amid a massive sit-in that has paralyzed one of the world’s busiest aviation hubs.

Hong Kong’s Airport Authority announced late Tuesday afternoon that check-in services had been suspended.

In a statement, the authority said “Airport operations … have been seriously disrupted, all departures have been cancelled. All passengers are advised to leave the terminal buildings as soon as possible.”

Early Tuesday, airport operations initially appeared to be slowly returning to normal after protests on Monday led to more than 300 flights being cancelled.

By Tuesday afternoon, however, hundreds were again occupying the airport’s departure areas, disrupting check-ins and security clearing. Meanwhile, at least 1,000 activists were still in the arrivals area of the airport, according to The South China Morning Post.

Frustrated passengers, holding their luggage above the seated demonstrators, tried to navigate the sea of protesters.

Following a police crackdown on protests elsewhere in the city over the weekend, the airport sit-in — which began on Friday and was meant to last three days — was briefly expanded, spilling over into the departures hall, but then seemed to tail off. By Tuesday afternoon in Hong Kong, however, the crowds of protesters had returned.

A total of 310 flights were cancelled in the 24 hours from midnight Monday in Hong Kong, according to the Post, a Hong Kong-based English-language daily.

Although the days of demonstrations in the airport were peaceful, police responded with force to protests in other parts of the city. Officers stormed a subway station at Kwai Fong, located in the city’s northern New Territories, firing tear gas and beating protesters with batons. In a protest on Sunday, one activist, a young woman, reportedly suffered a serious eye injury when police fired non-lethal rounds at protesters.

Hong Kong’s chief executive, Carrie Lam, defended police action against the demonstrators, saying authorities were trying to use “the lowest level of force” to deal with the protesters. But she echoed ominous statements last week from Beijing, warning that violence would lead Hong Kong “down a path of no return.”

Speaking at a news conference on Tuesday, Lam said the demonstrations, now in their tenth week, had pushed the city into “a state of panic and chaos.”

“Hong Kong, as an open, free, very tolerant, economically stable city will see severe wounds,” she predicted.

“After the violence has been stopped and the chaotic situation subsides… I will be responsible [for] rebuilding Hong Kong’s economy, to listen as attentively as possible to my people’s grievances and [for] trying to help Hong Kong to move on,” she said.

Lam’s comments followed a second week of strong admonishments from Beijing. Yang Guang, a spokesman for China’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs office, stepped up his harsh words about the protests, saying they “constituted serious crimes with sprouts of terrorism emerging.”

Meanwhile, the People’s Daily, considered a mouthpiece of the country’s ruling Communist Party, tweeted video of armored personnel carriers and other military vehicles rolling into Shenzhen, immediately adjacent to Hong Kong.

Hong Kong, a former British colony, was returned to China in 1997 under an agreement between London and Beijing guaranteeing the city a high degree of autonomy. Under a pledged “one country, two systems” approach, China was to allow Hong Kong to pass its own laws and maintain its own judicial system.

However, pro-democracy activists say Beijing has reneged on many of those promises and that Hong Kong’s China-appointed chief executive and hand-picked Legislative Council have become a rubber stamp for Beijing.

The latest protests were sparked by an extradition law that would have allowed some people accused of crimes in Hong Kong to be tried in mainland China. Although the Hong Kong government has backed off the proposed law, protesters want to see it killed altogether. Their demands have also expanded to include a freely elected legislature and direct elections for the chief executive.

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CHP officer, gunman dead in shootout near freeway: report

Westlake Legal Group CHP-Patrol CHP officer, gunman dead in shootout near freeway: report fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article a6afc5f2-c1ce-551f-b742-1da97190cad3

A California Highway Patrol officer was gunned down Monday in a shootout off the 215 Freeway, The Los Angeles Times reported.

The scene was chaotic. The Times reported that the suspect was stopped by an officer on a motorcycle. At some point, the suspect grabbed a rifle from inside the car and fired upon the officer approaching the vehicle. Other officers arrived at the scene and witnesses described a chaotic situation. One driver said bullets “flew through their windows.”

“We know his motive for this crime,” Riverside Police Chief Sergio Diaz said Monday night.

The shooter opened fire shortly after 5:30 p.m. after a CHP officer pulled over a white GMC pickup truck and decided to impound it.

“He called for a tow truck and was filling out the necessary paperwork” when the driver pulled a rifle from the truck and opened fire, said Scott Parker, assistant chief at the CHP’s Inland Division. The officer called for help and three other CHP officers arrived, who immediately faced gunfire and two were hit, Parker said.

A Riverside police officer and three Riverside County sheriff’s deputies also arrived and traded shots with the man before killing him at the scene, Diaz said.

“It was a long and horrific gun battle,” the chief said.

Video showed the gunman, apparently clad in black and wielding a military assault-style rifle, trading fire with officers and then retreating to crouch behind the front of his truck for cover, still trading shots.

Video after the shooting showed bullet holes in the front windows of two patrol cars and large holes blown in their back windows.

Parker said the first CHP officer who was wounded was taken by helicopter to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Another officer was hospitalized in critical condition but the third had only minor injuries.

Authorities didn’t immediately release the names of the slain CHP officer or the gunman.

However, family members identified the officer as 33-year-old Andre Moye, Jr., who was married and had been with the CHP about four years, KABC-TV reported.

Police earlier had said at least one civilian had been slightly injured by flying glass.

Parker said two civilians received superficial injuries and “they’re going to be OK.” Parker said.

Authorities did not immediately say what prompted the officer to stop and impound the truck. Investigators didn’t immediately know where the gunman came from or where he was headed, Diaz said.

After the shooting, dozens of law enforcement officers gathered outside of the hospital in nearby Moreno Valley. Snipers were posted on the roof as a precaution.

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Dozens lined up and saluted as the officer’s flag-draped body was removed from the hospital and placed in a hearse. Motorcycle officers then led a procession as the hearse was driven to the county coroner’s office.

Fox News’ Edmund DeMarche and the  Associated Press contributed to this report

A gunfight ensued.

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Assemblywoman Melissa Melendez, R-Lake Elsinore, tweeted, “Please say some prayers for the CHP officers involved, according to the report.

The Times reported that two additional officers were injured in the shooting. Their conditions were  not immediately known,

Westlake Legal Group CHP-Patrol CHP officer, gunman dead in shootout near freeway: report fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article a6afc5f2-c1ce-551f-b742-1da97190cad3   Westlake Legal Group CHP-Patrol CHP officer, gunman dead in shootout near freeway: report fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article a6afc5f2-c1ce-551f-b742-1da97190cad3

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Flights In Hong Kong Resume As Protests Subside

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1161426998-b22712c855d281e61a7dd15462868bdac42679f7-s1100-c15 Flights In Hong Kong Resume As Protests Subside

Two flight attendants walk past a display board covered with memos and posters at Hong Kong’s international airport on Tuesday, a day after the airport closed due to pro-democracy protests. Philip Fong/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Philip Fong/AFP/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Flights In Hong Kong Resume As Protests Subside

Two flight attendants walk past a display board covered with memos and posters at Hong Kong’s international airport on Tuesday, a day after the airport closed due to pro-democracy protests.

Philip Fong/AFP/Getty Images

Operations at Hong Kong International Airport were resuming Tuesday after a days-long pro-democracy protest forced hundreds of flights to be cancelled at one of the world’s busiest air hubs.

Following a police crackdown on protests elsewhere in the city, the airport sit-in — which began on Friday and was meant to last three days — was briefly expanded, spilling over into the departures hall, which prevented check-ins and security clearing.

A total of 310 flights were cancelled in the 24 hours since midnight Monday in Hong Kong, according to The South China Morning Post. The Hong Kong-based English-language daily said some protesters remained in the airport’s arrival area.

Although the days of demonstrations in the airport were peaceful, police responded with force to protests in other parts of the city. Officers stormed a subway station at Kwai Fong, located in the city’s northern New Territories, firing tear gas and beating protesters with batons. In a protest on Sunday, one activist, a young woman, reportedly suffered a serious eye injury when police fired non-lethal rounds at protesters.

Hong Kong’s chief executive, Carrie Lam, defended police action against the demonstrators, saying authorities were trying to use “the lowest level of force” to deal with the protesters. But she echoed ominous statements last week from Beijing, warning that violence would lead Hong Kong “down a path of no return.”

Speaking at a news conference on Tuesday, Lam said the demonstrations, now in their tenth week, had pushed the city into “a state of panic and chaos.”

“Hong Kong, as an open, free, very tolerant, economically stable city will see severe wounds,” she predicted.

“After the violence has been stopped and the chaotic situation subsides… I will be responsible [for] rebuilding Hong Kong’s economy, to listen as attentively as possible to my people’s grievances and [for] trying to help Hong Kong to move on,” she said.

Lam’s comments followed a second week of strong admonishments from Beijing. Yang Guang, a spokesman for China’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs office, stepped up his harsh words about the protests, saying they “constituted serious crimes with sprouts of terrorism emerging.”

Hong Kong, a former British colony, was returned to China in 1997 under an agreement between London and Beijing guaranteeing the city a high degree of autonomy. Under a pledged “one country, two systems” approach, China was to allow Hong Kong to pass its own laws and maintain its own judicial system.

However, pro-democracy activists say Beijing has reneged on many of those promises and that Hong Kong’s China-appointed chief executive and hand-picked Legislative Council have become a rubber stamp for Beijing.

The latest protests were sparked by an extradition law that would have allowed some people accused of crimes in Hong Kong to be tried in mainland China. Although the Hong Kong government has backed off the proposed law, protesters want to see it killed altogether. Their demands have also expanded to include a freely elected legislature and direct elections for the chief executive.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Pressley calls McConnell the ‘common enemy’ during mass shootings

Westlake Legal Group RT-.-Ayanna-Pressley Pressley calls McConnell the 'common enemy' during mass shootings Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox-news/entertainment/politics-on-late-night fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 99ced9ea-3792-5997-ae75-cfa8b915d95a

Rep. Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., declared Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., was the “common enemy” during mass shootings during her Monday night appearance on “The Daily Show.”

After claiming that President Trump’s rhetoric is “exactly why” the El Paso mass shooting took place earlier this month, Pressley agreed with “Daily Show” host Trevor Noah, who suggested that guns are the “common factor” in mass shootings.

“Yes, guns are the common factor and the common enemy in all of this is Mitch McConnell,” Pressley said, which sparked applause from the audience. “So please give him a call and tell him I sent you.”

PROTESTERS GATHER OUTSIDE MCCONNELL’S KENTUCKY HOME, ONE CALLS FOR HIS STABBING ‘IN THE HEART’

She continued, “Why haven’t we acted? This gun violence is a public health crisis and epidemic. It’s an urban issue, it’s a rural issue, it’s a suburban issue, it’s transcendent… it is pervasive and it is growing.”

The “Squad” member went on to praise New Zealand for “banning assault weapons” shortly after its mass shooting in March and blamed inaction in the U.S. on “a deficit of political courage and leadership.”

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“We need to hold two narratives: there are mass shootings and there’s community-based violence. And we also know that there’s more guns than people,” Pressley told Noah. “And as long as that’s the case, you are going to see an intersectionality of violence.”

Last week, protestors gathered outside McConnell’s home, where one called for him to be stabbed in the heart.

Westlake Legal Group RT-.-Ayanna-Pressley Pressley calls McConnell the 'common enemy' during mass shootings Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox-news/entertainment/politics-on-late-night fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 99ced9ea-3792-5997-ae75-cfa8b915d95a   Westlake Legal Group RT-.-Ayanna-Pressley Pressley calls McConnell the 'common enemy' during mass shootings Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox-news/entertainment/politics-on-late-night fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 99ced9ea-3792-5997-ae75-cfa8b915d95a

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Women accuse opera legend Placido Domingo of sexual harassment, retaliation in AP report

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Women accuse opera legend Placido Domingo of sexual harassment, retaliation in AP report

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For decades, Placido Domingo, one of the most celebrated and powerful men in opera, has tried to pressure women into sexual relationships by dangling jobs and then sometimes punishing the women professionally when they refused his advances, numerous accusers told The Associated Press.

Regarded as one of the greatest opera singers of all time, Domingo also is a prolific conductor and the director of the Los Angeles Opera. The multiple Grammy winner is an immensely respected figure in his rarefied world, described by colleagues as a man of prodigious charm and energy who works tirelessly to promote his art form.

But his accusers and others in the industry say there is a troubling side to the 78-year-old Domingo — one they say has long been an open secret in the opera world.

Eight singers and a dancer have told the AP that they were sexually harassed by the long-married, Spanish-born superstar in encounters that took place over three decades beginning in the late 1980s, at venues that included opera companies where he held top managerial positions.

More: List: All of the Hollywood power players accused of sexual assault or harassment

One accuser said Domingo stuck his hand down her skirt and three others said he forced wet kisses on their lips — in a dressing room, a hotel room and at a lunch meeting.

“A business lunch is not strange,” said one of the singers. “Somebody trying to hold your hand during a business lunch is strange — or putting their hand on your knee is a little strange. He was always touching you in some way, and always kissing you.”

In addition to the nine accusers, a half-dozen other women told the AP that suggestive overtures by Domingo made them uncomfortable, including one singer who said he repeatedly asked her out on dates after hiring her to sing a series of concerts with him in the 1990s.

The AP also spoke to almost three dozen other singers, dancers, orchestra musicians, backstage staff, voice teachers and administrators who said they witnessed inappropriate sexually tinged behavior by Domingo and that he pursued younger women with impunity.

Domingo did not respond to detailed questions from the AP about specific incidents, but issued a statement saying: “The allegations from these unnamed individuals dating back as many as thirty years are deeply troubling, and as presented, inaccurate.

“Still, it is painful to hear that I may have upset anyone or made them feel uncomfortable — no matter how long ago and despite my best intentions. I believed that all of my interactions and relationships were always welcomed and consensual. People who know me or who have worked with me know that I am not someone who would intentionally harm, offend, or embarrass anyone.

“However, I recognize that the rules and standards by which we are — and should be — measured against today are very different than they were in the past. I am blessed and privileged to have had a more than 50-year career in opera and will hold myself to the highest standards.”

Seven of the nine accusers told the AP they feel their careers were adversely impacted after they rejected Domingo’s advances, with some saying that roles he promised never materialized and several noting that while they went on to work with other companies, they were never hired to work with him again.

Only one of the nine women would allow her name to be used — Patricia Wulf, a mezzo-soprano who sang with Domingo at the Washington Opera. The others requested anonymity, saying they either still work in the business and feared reprisals or worried they might be publicly humiliated and even harassed.

The accusers’ stories lay out strikingly similar patterns of behavior that included Domingo persistently contacting them — often calling them repeatedly at home late at night — expressing interest in their careers and urging them to meet him privately under the guise of offering professional advice.

None of the women could offer documentation, such as phone messages, but the AP spoke to many colleagues and friends that they confided in. In addition, the AP independently verified that the women worked where they said they did and that Domingo overlapped with them at those locations.Two of the women said they briefly gave in to Domingo’s advances, feeling they couldn’t risk jeopardizing their careers by saying no to the most powerful man in their profession.

One of them said she had sex with him twice, including at the Biltmore hotel in Los Angeles. When Domingo left for a performance, the woman said, he put $10 on the dresser, saying, “I don’t want you to feel like a prostitute, but I also don’t want you to have to pay to park.”

More: Does your generation determine how you perceive sexual harassment

The women making the accusations — who said they were emboldened to speak out by the #MeToo movement — were mostly young and starting their careers at the time.

Several said they took extreme measures to avoid Domingo, including asking colleagues to stick with them while at work and not answering their home phones. The dancer called her avoidance technique “the bob and weave, the giggle and get out,” and one soprano labeled it “walking the tightrope.”

One singer who is among Domingo’s accusers was 23 and performing in the LA Opera chorus when she first met the superstar in 1988. She said she remembers wiping his saliva off her face from a sloppy, wet stage kiss after which he whispered in her ear, “I wish we weren’t on stage.”

Domingo started calling her at home frequently, she said, although she had not given him her number. “He would say things like, ‘Come to my apartment. Let’s sing through some arias. I’ll give you coaching. I’d like to hear what you can do for casting,'” she said.

Whenever he returned to Los Angeles over the course of the next three years, she said he was uncomfortably affectionate, slipping a hand around her waist or kissing her on the cheek too close to her mouth. He would enter her dressing room uninvited, she said, which she said she assumed was to catch her undressed.

The mezzo-soprano said she strenuously tried to avoid being alone with him, while also striving not to insult him. But he did not take the hint, she said.

She said she agreed to meet Domingo about 11 p.m. one night “and then I had a full-blown panic attack. I freaked out, and I just kept not answering the phone. He just filled up the machine, calling me until 3:30 in the morning.”

In 1991, she said, “I finally gave in and slept with him. I ran out of excuses. It was like, ‘OK, I guess this is what I have to do.'”

She said she had sex with Domingo on two occasions, at his Los Angeles apartment and at the Biltmore hotel, where he left the money on the dresser.

Another young singer at the LA Opera, where Domingo was the incoming artistic director, said he immediately started calling her at home after she met him at a rehearsal in 1988.

“He would say, ‘I’m going to talk to you as the future artistic director of the company'” and discuss possible roles, she said. “Then he would lower his voice and say, ‘Now I’m going to talk to you as Placido,'” she said, and ask her to meet him — for a drink, to see a movie, to come to his apartment so he could cook her breakfast.

During one of his frequent visits to her dressing room, he admired her costume, leaning forward to kiss her cheeks and placing one hand on the side of her breast, she said.

The singer — who was 27 and just starting her career — said she felt trapped.

“I was totally intimidated and felt like saying no to him would be saying no to God. How do you say no to God?” she said.

As the calls wore on, she stopped picking up the phone. In person, she gave excuses, she said: She was busy, she was tired, she was married. Finally, she said, she surrendered to “a feeling of impending doom” that “I wasn’t going to have an opera career if I didn’t give in.”

She said she went to his apartment, where they engaged in “heavy petting” and “groping.”

In the days and weeks after, she said Domingo repeatedly called her. “I felt like prey. I felt like I was being hunted by him,” she said.

The singer said that once Domingo took over control of casting decisions at the LA Opera in 2000, he never hired her again.

Another singer who worked in Los Angeles in the mid-2000s told the AP that she already knew of Domingo’s reputation when he took an extreme interest in her career and made sure she always had an excuse for leaving right after work.

One night after rehearsal, however, he caught her off-guard by asking her for a ride home, she said, which she found “ridiculous. Why would Placido Domingo not have a ride home? But what was I going to do?”

In the car, she said, he put his hand on her leg, told her to pull over near his building and then “leaned in and tried to kiss me.” She said he asked her upstairs, which she avoided by saying she had other plans.

Several weeks later, she said, Domingo approached her on a night he knew she was scheduled to stay late and invited her to his apartment to run through an aria.

She went, she said, because “I felt like I have dragged this out and avoided him for six weeks and he is Placido and he is my boss and he is offering to work with me on this role.”

After he poured two glasses of wine, she said, “He sat down at the grand piano and we really did sing this aria, and we worked on it. And he gave me coaching and was very complimentary.”

But then, she said, “When it was over, he stood up and slid his hand down my skirt, and that was when I had to get out of there.”

“I went home and was terrified to go back to work,” she said. “I was frozen in terror for that whole contract.”

Since then, she has sung at New York’s Metropolitan Opera, the San Francisco Opera and elsewhere, but said she has never again been hired to sing at the Los Angeles house or with Domingo.

At the Washington Opera, where Domingo served as artistic and then general director for 15 years, mezzo-soprano Patricia Wulf said the star would confront her night after night with the same whispered question.

“Every time I would walk off stage, he would be in the wings waiting for me,” she said. “He would come right up to me, as close as could be, put his face right in my face, lower his voice and say, ‘Patricia, do you have to go home tonight?'”

She said she regularly would rebuff him, but that his pursuit remained relentless.

It got to a point, Wulf said, that she would try to hide from Domingo behind a pillar. She also would hide in her dressing room and peek to make sure he was not in the hallway before she left, she said.

“As soon as you walk away and get away, you think, ‘Did I just ruin my career?’ And that went on through that entire production.”

A dancer who worked with the superstar in several cities said a flirtatious Domingo called her late at night on-and-off for about a decade in the 1990s, leaving brazen messages that she would listen to in shock with her husband.

Domingo would ask her to meet him, including in his hotel room, but she said she would only go to lunch with him, always framed as a business meal. Still, she said, his hands would wander to her knee or he would hold her hand or kiss her cheek in ways that made her uncomfortable.

She said she would wonder to her husband: “‘Does he understand the risk he’s putting me in, that he could wreck my marriage, wreck my career? “

“When you’re working for the most powerful man in the opera, you try to play ball,” she said.

One afternoon when they were working together at the Washington Opera, she said Domingo asked her to meet for lunch at his hotel restaurant to discuss work. After the meal, he said he needed to stop at his room before they walked to a rehearsal.

“He took me up to his room, ostensibly to pick up his stuff, and he invites me in,” she said. “And he starts hugging me and kissing me.”

She pushed him away, she said, and insisted she had to get to rehearsal.

“When I clearly was not going to have sex with him, he just walked me to the elevator and went back to his room,” she said. “The elevator doors opened, and I dropped. I just fell to the floor in the elevator and was sweating profusely.”

A former opera administrator said he was aware for years that Domingo was “constantly chasing” the dancer. And a conductor who is friends with the dancer said he recalled after she “said no to Domingo, she had the rug pulled out for several years.”

After the hotel incident, the dancer said she didn’t work with the superstar for several years.

“There were years when I was a wreck about it and scared that I’d never be hired again,” the dancer said. Eventually, she said, she was “let back into his good graces.”

“What he did is wrong,” she said. “He used his power, he stalked women, he put women in positions of vulnerability. People have dropped out of the business and been just erased because of submitting or not submitting to him.”

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/music/2019/08/13/women-accuse-opera-legend-placido-domingo-sexual-harassment-ap/1994509001/

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Members of Israeli parliament to Congress: Resolution opposing Israel boycott is ‘dangerous to Israel’

Nearly two dozen members of Israel’s parliament sent a letter to Congress thanking them for the recent resolution opposing an international effort to boycott Israel but warned that some of the language in the resolution “would be far more dangerous” to the country.

Fox News obtained the letter Monday; it was dated Aug. 8.

The U.S. House of Representatives overwhelmingly approved the bipartisan resolution last month opposing the pro-Palestinian Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement (BDS) as Democrats tried to tamp down increasingly heated political rhetoric over differences with the longtime U.S. ally.

The resolution put the House on record opposing the BDS movement and its efforts to target U.S. companies doing business with Israel. The movement has grown in recent years, and many supporters of Israel have seen it as an attempt to delegitimize the Jewish state.

HOUSE OVERWHELMINGLY OKS RESOLUTION OPPOSING ISRAEL BOYCOTT IN RARE BIPARTISAN VOTE

The letter read, “We, members of the Israeli Parliament (Knesset), would like to thank you for your continued support of Israel, especially combatting attempts to delegitimize Israel and against the global Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement (BDS).”

It went on to address a “concern” regarding the “anti-BDS resolution.”

“We believe it contains a grave error because it expresses, among other things, support for a so-called ‘Two-State Solution,’ meaning the establishment of a ‘Palestinian state’ in the heart of tiny Israel,” the letter said.

The members of Israel’s parliament wrote, “We would like to make our position clear that the establishment of a Palestinian state would be far more dangerous to Israel than BDS.”

The letter then outlined several reasons, including security concerns.

“The establishment of an additional Arab (so-called Palestinian) state in the region would severely damage the national security of both Israel and the United States,” members of Israel’s parliament wrote, adding that “such a state would undoubtedly be a dysfunctional terrorist state, which would distance peace and undermine stability in the Middle East.”

It was signed by 21 members of the Knesset (Israeli parliament), which included former security officials.

Westlake Legal Group Scheneider-Nadler-Zeldin-Wagner_Getty Members of Israeli parliament to Congress: Resolution opposing Israel boycott is 'dangerous to Israel' Talia Kaplan fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/legislation fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox news fnc/world fnc article 72481a11-989e-5216-99d1-02441fb314f9

From left to right: Reps. Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y.; Brad Schneider, D-Ill.; Lee Zeldin, R-N.Y.; and Ann Wagner, R-Mo., had introduced the resolution this past March. (Getty, File)

Reps. Brad Schneider, D-Ill.; Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y.; Lee Zeldin, R-N.Y.; and Ann Wagner, R-Mo., had introduced the resolution in March.

None of the four lawmakers immediately responded to Fox News’ request for comment.

“A two-state solution remains the best way to justly resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and ensure a future for two peoples living side-by-side in peace, security and prosperity,” the resolution said. “By denying the Jewish claim to a homeland, the BDS Movement is fundamentally incompatible with a two-state solution and pushes the cause of peace for both Israel and the Palestinians further out of reach. This resolution makes clear that Congress remains committed to a two-state solution and opposes zero-sum efforts to delegitimize the state of Israel.”

The resolution passed on a vote of 398-17. Reps. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., were among the 16 Democrats who voted against the resolution.

Liberal lawmakers, most notably Omar and Tlaib, both newly elected Muslim-Americans, have spoken out in support of the BDS movement, as they’ve criticized Israel’s treatment of Palestinians.

LAW PROFESSOR ON ILHAN OMAR’S ANTI-ISRAEL RESOLUTION: BOYCOTT WOULD ‘DISCRIMINATE AGAINST JEWS’

The resolution has been pushed by The American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), the influential Israel lobby in Washington.

“Unfortunately, in the last few years, AIPAC is independently advancing the two-state solution,” Yossi Dagan, the head of the Samaria Regional Council in the northern West Bank, said. He was one of the people who wrote the letter to members of Congress.

Dagan added, “The Two-State Concept is not the policy of the current government coalition, nor is it stated as policy in the agreements between the coalition partners.”

An AIPAC spokesman declined to comment when Fox News’ contacted the organization for a response to the letter and Dagan’s comments.

Yishai Fleisher, spokesman for the Jewish community in Hebron, which is in the southern West Bank, told Fox News he respected the House resolution “because it gives a chance for pro-Israel Democrats to express themselves” but at the same time, “bipartisanship can’t be the ultimate arbiter of Israeli security policy.”

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Fleisher continued, “At the end, the two-state solution is a horrible and dangerous idea, which has only suppressed Jews and Arabs.”

Fox News’ Ben Evansky, Frank Miles and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Scheneider-Nadler-Zeldin-Wagner_Getty Members of Israeli parliament to Congress: Resolution opposing Israel boycott is 'dangerous to Israel' Talia Kaplan fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/legislation fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox news fnc/world fnc article 72481a11-989e-5216-99d1-02441fb314f9   Westlake Legal Group Scheneider-Nadler-Zeldin-Wagner_Getty Members of Israeli parliament to Congress: Resolution opposing Israel boycott is 'dangerous to Israel' Talia Kaplan fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/legislation fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox news fnc/world fnc article 72481a11-989e-5216-99d1-02441fb314f9

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Epstein called criminalizing sex with teen girls a ‘cultural aberration’: report

Jeffrey Epstein, the disgraced financier, had previously slammed criminalizing sex with teen girls as a “cultural aberration,” according to a reporter who recalled the convicted pedophile’s comments a year before his apparent suicide.

Epstein was “unapologetic” and defiant to the end in his beliefs on men sleeping with underage girls, according to New York Times reporter James Stewart.

“He said that criminalizing sex with teenage girls was a cultural aberration and that at times in history it was perfectly acceptable,” Stewart reported in the Times on Monday.

Stewart spoke with Epstein at his Manhattan townhouse in 2018, a year before he reportedly killed himself inside of his New York City jail cell on Saturday.

DR. MARC SIEGEL: EPSTEIN DEATH IN NY PRISON UNDER EXTREMELY TIGHT SECURITY ‘UNUSUAL’

“He said that criminalizing sex with teenage girls was a cultural aberration and that at times in history it was perfectly acceptable,” Stewart wrote. “He pointed out that homosexuality had long been considered a crime and was still punishable by death in some parts of the world.”

Stewart also recalled that when he showed up at Epstein’s residence he was greeted by a young girl with blond hair and an Eastern European accent.

“I can’t say how old she was, but my guess would be late teens or perhaps 20. Given Mr. Epstein’s past, this struck me as far too close to the line,” he wrote.

Epstein, 66, was reportedly found hanging in his jail cell this past weekend with a bedsheet wrapped around his neck and secured to the top of a bunk bed. He was being held in connection with charges of sex trafficking and conspiracy.

Fox News’ Talia Kaplan contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group df517604-AP19222471790918 Epstein called criminalizing sex with teen girls a 'cultural aberration': report Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox news fnc/us fnc article 891bc79a-f3b0-518b-9707-032eb58ee4f3   Westlake Legal Group df517604-AP19222471790918 Epstein called criminalizing sex with teen girls a 'cultural aberration': report Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox news fnc/us fnc article 891bc79a-f3b0-518b-9707-032eb58ee4f3

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This Day in History: Aug. 13

On this day, Aug. 13 …

2016: Michael Phelps wins his record 23rd (and final) Olympic gold medal.

Also on this day:

Westlake Legal Group Bambi This Day in History: Aug. 13 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox-news/sports fox news fnc/us fnc article 92d92e8a-e88d-5bfa-8333-859885cd2036
  • 1942: The film “Bambi” opens at Radio City Music Hall. 
  • 1962: The border between East and West Berlin is closed and marked with a barbed wire fence. 
Westlake Legal Group mantle-1 This Day in History: Aug. 13 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox-news/sports fox news fnc/us fnc article 92d92e8a-e88d-5bfa-8333-859885cd2036
  • 1995: Yankee great Mickey Mantle dies of cancer.
  • 2008: Michael Phelps becomes the first athlete in Olympic history to win 11 career gold medals.
Westlake Legal Group michael-phelps-reuters-876 This Day in History: Aug. 13 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox-news/sports fox news fnc/us fnc article 92d92e8a-e88d-5bfa-8333-859885cd2036   Westlake Legal Group michael-phelps-reuters-876 This Day in History: Aug. 13 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox-news/sports fox news fnc/us fnc article 92d92e8a-e88d-5bfa-8333-859885cd2036

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Hannity: Biden’s biggest opponent is himself

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6072117099001_6072110387001-vs Hannity: Biden's biggest opponent is himself Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 7db0cfbd-e0f2-5f9e-8387-7534760fd762

Fox News’ Sean Hannity took aim Monday night at Democratic presidential frontrunner Joe Biden for a string of gaffe’s this past week, saying his campaign is in turmoil.

“[Biden’s] biggest opponent right now continues to be himself as the so-called Democratic front runner is still making gaffe after gaffe after gaffe; blunder after blunder,” Hannity said on his television show Monday night.

MSNBC ANCHOR DEFENDS BIDEN AFTER LATEST GAFFE, SAYS TRUMP CAMPAIGN ‘SEIZED ON A FEW WORDS’

“His team is running scared. They don’t know what to do at this point. And putting his campaign in non-stop damage control.”

This past Thursday, Biden told a crowd that “poor kids were just as bright and talented as white kids.”

Last week, Biden mistakenly said the recent mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, took place in Houston and Michigan.

LAWRENCE JONES: BIDEN LACKS AUTHENTICITY

Hannity said Biden can’t run on his past work in the Obama administration, saying that it resulted in “failure.”

“Biden can’t run on the Obama-Biden failed record either because…[that is] a record of failure,” Hannity said.

The Fox News host also blasted Biden’s career as a senator and his controversial relationship to the late Senator Robert Byrd, adding that if President Trump did the same things he would be in trouble.

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“[Biden] even praised the former Klansman, leader of the Democratic Party Robert ‘KKK’ Byrd calling him a great friend of his at his funeral. Imagine if Donald Trump did that,” Hannity said.

Fox News’ Louis Casiano contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6072117099001_6072110387001-vs Hannity: Biden's biggest opponent is himself Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 7db0cfbd-e0f2-5f9e-8387-7534760fd762   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6072117099001_6072110387001-vs Hannity: Biden's biggest opponent is himself Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 7db0cfbd-e0f2-5f9e-8387-7534760fd762

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