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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 79)

New Disneyland Star Wars reportedly suffering breakdowns, long wait times

Westlake Legal Group Rise-of-the-Resistance-opening New Disneyland Star Wars reportedly suffering breakdowns, long wait times Michael Hollan fox-news/travel/general/theme-parks fox-news/travel/general/disney fox news fnc/travel fnc article 507fc705-3e10-5c22-b821-627675b5bbc6

Being part of a resistance is never easy.

Disneyland in California recently opened Rise of the Resistance, its latest addition to its Star Wars land. While fans have given the ride positive reviews, there are reports of issues with the virtual queue and breakdowns.

On opening day, the boarding group passes for the ride sold out within six minutes, The Orange County Register reports. Fans reportedly starting lining up starting at midnight for a chance to experience the new ride. The virtual queue opened at 8 a.m.

DISNEY TRYING TO STOP BABY YODA KNOCKOFF SOLD ON ETSY: REPORT

Fans could sign up for the virtual queue on the Disneyland app, where they would be assigned a boarding group number, which ranged from one to 160. Guests assigned a group number higher than 81 were reportedly placed on a “standby” status.

The ride reportedly broke down just before 10 a.m. and did not come back online for 50 minutes. Another breakdown occurred around 2:30 p.m. By this point, 61 boarding groups had moved through the ride, according to The Orange County Register.

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The news outlet reported that at around 5 p.m., guests registered for boarding groups 115 and above were told it was unlikely they would experience the ride that day.

The new ride experienced similar delays on Sunday, WDW News Today reports. According to the outlet, the park notified guests from certain “standby” groups around 1:30 p.m. that they would not be experiencing the ride that day.

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Fox News reached out to Disneyland for comment but did not immediately get a response.

Westlake Legal Group Rise-of-the-Resistance-opening New Disneyland Star Wars reportedly suffering breakdowns, long wait times Michael Hollan fox-news/travel/general/theme-parks fox-news/travel/general/disney fox news fnc/travel fnc article 507fc705-3e10-5c22-b821-627675b5bbc6   Westlake Legal Group Rise-of-the-Resistance-opening New Disneyland Star Wars reportedly suffering breakdowns, long wait times Michael Hollan fox-news/travel/general/theme-parks fox-news/travel/general/disney fox news fnc/travel fnc article 507fc705-3e10-5c22-b821-627675b5bbc6

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Avenatti allegedly took settlement money from football fans

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6092449950001_6092450544001-vs Avenatti allegedly took settlement money from football fans Lee Ross fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/trials fox-news/person/michael-avenatti fox news fnc/us fnc article 81f27020-fbca-58e6-b85c-6c2943526179

Disgraced attorney Michael Avenatti is accused of stealing money from dozens more clients than previously known, according to newly unsealed documents and recent interviews with Fox News.

It’s alleged that Avenatti, currently behind bars awaiting trial in New York on unrelated charges, directed up to $1.3 million in settlement funds – intended for approximately 170 clients – to cover his own expenses. It’s the latest example of alleged malfeasance by the lawyer who was once a fixture on cable news and flirted with a presidential run.

“We didn’t receive any of that,” Donald Albaugh, one of Avenatti’s clients, said by phone Monday.  Albaugh said he and his wife, Tracy, went to the 2011 Super Bowl in Dallas but, like hundreds of other ticket holders, had problems with their seats and sued the NFL.

“The whole thing is so ludicrous,” Arianne Dar told Fox News about taking her son to the game as a graduation present. Dar said she made sure to buy tickets that were not “obstructed view” but they ended up behind a metal pole. “I never heard about a settlement.”

H. Dean Steward, who Avenatti hired to represent him last year, did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

The Albaughs and Dar said they each submitted itemized costs to Avenatti and his legal team seeking reimbursement for about $10,000, but they haven’t seen a penny.

In May 2017, Avenatti, representing the ticket holders, entered into an agreement with the NFL for a settlement of about $1,550,000 and a dismissal of all legal claims. But, in a request for a search warrant of Avenatti’s computers and phones seized following his March 2019 arrest, IRS Special Agent Remoun Karlous told a federal judge that Avenatti paid out only a small fraction of that settlement.

“Avenatti used the remainder of the approximately $1.31 million dollars [he] and his law firm received from the settlement of the Super Bowl Litigation for [his] own personal and business purposes,” Karlous wrote.

AVENATTI TRIES TO SUE STORMY DANIELS FOR OVER $2 MILLION

Avenatti has not been charged with defrauding his clients in the Super Bowl case, but Karlous wrote, “The government will be seeking to admit this evidence at trial on the basis that this criminal conduct falls squarely within and is inextricably intertwined with” an already existing 36-count federal fraud indictment in Orange County, Calif. In one of those charges, Avenatti stood accused of hiding the existence of the NFL settlement from a bankruptcy court dealing with his now-former law firm.

Avenatti’s office manager had witnessed the behavior, Karlous alleged, writing, “In response to a question as to whether she was aware of Avenatti taking money from client funds, [the manager] said that the plaintiffs in the Super Bowl litigation had not all been paid out … even though there had been money available to pay them.”

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Paul Colavecchi said he did get money back from Avenatti, but only after his sister, who went with him to the Super Bowl, threatened to report Avenatti to the State Bar of California. None of the Avenatti clients reached by Fox News said they saw any paperwork from Avenatti or his firm after the settlement.

The California fraud case is just one of three criminal cases Avenatti has been facing. He’s scheduled to go to trial in New York next week on charges that he tried to extort $25 million from Nike. But, the timing of that case was thrown into question when Avenatti was arrested in Los Angeles last week on allegations of violating his bond. Avenatti also stood accused of stealing money from adult-film star Stormy Daniels, who he represented in her litigation against President Trump.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6092449950001_6092450544001-vs Avenatti allegedly took settlement money from football fans Lee Ross fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/trials fox-news/person/michael-avenatti fox news fnc/us fnc article 81f27020-fbca-58e6-b85c-6c2943526179   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6092449950001_6092450544001-vs Avenatti allegedly took settlement money from football fans Lee Ross fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/trials fox-news/person/michael-avenatti fox news fnc/us fnc article 81f27020-fbca-58e6-b85c-6c2943526179

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Kelly Ripa reveals she’s stopped drinking since co-hosting ‘Live’ with Ryan Seacrest

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1038171826 Kelly Ripa reveals she's stopped drinking since co-hosting 'Live' with Ryan Seacrest Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/kelly-ripa fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/diet-fitness fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9072cce8-d909-5c15-a66c-738bd90387d0

Kelly Ripa revealed she has quit drinking alcohol.

On Monday’s episode of “Live with Kelly and Ryan,” the 49-year-old Emmy winner joked there was a downtick in total wine purchased in 2019.

“They are saying Americans bought less wine in the last year,” she told co-host Ryan Seacrest. “It’s the first drop in a quarter of a century. Now, I believe this is because I quit drinking, that I caused this slip. I have influenced the market.”

KELLY RIPA REVEALS HER INTENSE WORKOUT ROUTINE, SAYS HER BODY ‘LOOKS LIKE PETER PAN NO MATTER WHAT’ SHE DOES

“I’m not saying I’ve driven people out,” she added. “I’m saying I stopped buying wine and there’s a 25 percent dip.”

Seacrest, who became her co-host in 2017, quipped, “I started the show and she quit drinking. What does that tell you?”

Ripa didn’t further explain why she chose to stop drinking a few years ago. Meanwhile, according to a New York Times interview last year, Seacrest loves his wine. He told the outlet he breaks his strict diet and enjoys himself on the weekends.

KELLY RIPA, 48, UNVEILS BIKINI BODY IN SKIMPY WHITE SWIMSUIT

“During the week, it’s impossible, but Fridays and Saturdays, it’s fantastic to have a two-hour meal, family-style, with a fantastic bottle of wine,” Seacrest said.

Ripa has previously spoken about her strict diet.

“It has changed my life, it’s changed the whole way I think about food,” Ripa said in 2015 of the high-alkaline diet she follows, which focuses on vegetables like beets, broccoli, cucumbers, kale, kiwis and bell peppers while avoiding acidic foods like yogurt, fish and sugar.

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“I like to drink coffee. I occasionally will have fish. The alkaline diet is primarily a vegan diet, but I like cream in my coffee. I like to have a glass of wine,” she added at the time. “So I don’t adhere to it strictly, but when I do a cleanse, it will be seven days, and then I go back to my normal life. But my normal life, like I said, is not that different than the alkaline cleanse.”

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1038171826 Kelly Ripa reveals she's stopped drinking since co-hosting 'Live' with Ryan Seacrest Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/kelly-ripa fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/diet-fitness fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9072cce8-d909-5c15-a66c-738bd90387d0   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1038171826 Kelly Ripa reveals she's stopped drinking since co-hosting 'Live' with Ryan Seacrest Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/kelly-ripa fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/diet-fitness fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9072cce8-d909-5c15-a66c-738bd90387d0

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CNN poll: 51% say Senate should remove Trump from office

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CNN poll: 51% say Senate should remove Trump from office

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Virginia Gun Rally Live Updates: 22,000 Protesters Oppose New Laws

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_167455953_f4394824-606a-42ea-bd2a-15b938795530-articleLarge Virginia Gun Rally Live Updates: 22,000 Protesters Oppose New Laws Virginia Van Cleave, Philip Second Amendment (US Constitution) RICHMOND, Va. Richmond, Va, Gun Rally (January, 2020) Politics and Government gun control Fringe Groups and Movements Demonstrations, Protests and Riots

Elizabeth Szmurlo and Hunter Mitchell of Richmond, Va., gathered with gun-rights advocates at the State Capitol on Monday to oppose proposals for gun control.Credit…Alyssa Schukar for The New York Times

Thousands of pro-gun advocates, many of them armed, converged on the Virginia State Capitol on Monday, flooding a secure area around the building and packing the surrounding streets with firearms, flags and political posters in a pointed message to state lawmakers who are weighing new gun control proposals.

The rally in Richmond, organized to oppose a series of measures being considered in the State Legislature, became a rallying cry for Second Amendment rights nationwide, inspiring cross-country flights from Colorado and road trips from Texas and attracting a crowd of about 22,000 people.

A threat of potential violence had been looming over Virginia’s capital city for days, fueled by reports that white supremacists, armed militia groups and other extremists planned to attend. But there were no official reports of skirmishes or major incidents as of Monday afternoon.

Hoping to head off trouble, the state set up a security perimeter around the Capitol grounds and banned weapons — including firearms — from the area inside. Police officers guarded the area with the help of bomb-sniffing dogs, and people entering the perimeter through the single entrance were screened with metal detectors.

The organizers of the rally, the Virginia Citizens Defense League, and other participants said they tried to keep the event peaceful.

Vincent Carter, 36, who was picking up trash at the end of the event, said that participants were well aware that “the world was watching” and that any violence would have been blamed on gun rights groups.

“A lot of time was spent in planning for safety — to not let a certain type of person sort of mingle in with us,” he said. “If we didn’t know them, we didn’t let them come with us. We have a lot of guys who are ex-military, so that helped keep things in order.”

Even so, plenty of demonstrators came armed to Richmond, and officials worried that confrontations could develop just outside the perimeter entrance or in the surrounding streets where weapons were allowed.

During the rally, David Triebs and his two sons held a giant banner across the street from the perimeter entrance, reading “Come and Take It,” a reference to a defiant slogan used by Texan revolutionaries in 1835 when the Mexican authorities demanded the handover of a cannon.

Mr. Triebs and his sons drove for 24 hours straight through to Richmond from Fredericksburg, Texas, he said, drinking Red Bulls along the way to stay awake. He said relatives were worried about him coming to Virginia.

“The internet stuff I read made it sound like tanks were rolling in the streets and neo-Nazis were marching and antifa has descended,” he said. “But none of that stuff happened. It was like a family gathering.”

As they packed up their banner to leave after the rally, one of his sons struggled with two tall flagpoles, nearly knocking into a passing pedestrian.

“Careful — don’t hit anybody in the last five minutes,” Mr. Triebs said. “If you assault someone with a flagpole, that would be the only thing that made the news.”

The landmark 2008 Supreme Court decision holding that the Second Amendment protected an individual’s right to keep and bear arms is known as the Heller decision, after Dick Heller, the lead plaintiff in the lawsuit that overturned a gun-control law in the District of Columbia.

When Mr. Heller addressed the rally in Richmond on Monday, the crowd listened with rapt attention.

He got a big reaction when he quoted part of the amendment’s text: “Let’s yell it to them, so the media and left legislature can hear it: The right of the people to keep and bear arms will not be infringed!” The crowd roared the end of the sentence along with him.

And when he asked the crowd, “Do we need gun control in Virginia?,” the crowd roared back, “No!”

Another speaker, Sheriff Scott Jenkins of Culpeper County, Va., who has long been outspoken in advocating gun rights, told the crowd, “I ask that you all return to your homes and ask your elected officials, where is the line they will not cross?”

After the official speeches, as people began to leave the secure perimeter, participants made impromptu speeches in the street, denouncing abortion and the governor in addition to gun control. Some participants picked up litter and scraped discarded orange “Guns save lives” stickers off the pavement. “No confiscation! No registration!” the crowd chanted.

While armed men and women thronged the capital’s streets, gun-control advocates mostly stayed away, although a counterprotest was planned for 3 p.m., hours after the gun-rights rally ended.

Lori Hass, the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence’s state director for Virginia, said in a news release that gun rights activists “have amplified and fanned the flames of insurrectionism and civil war in a way that is irresponsible and dangerous.”

“Now, citizens who represent the overwhelming majority of Virginians are prevented from lobbying their officials because of credible threats to their safety,” Ms. Hass said.

Those concerns prompted organizers of an annual vigil in support of gun restrictions, which was scheduled for Monday, to call it off this year. Instead, gun control supporters mostly commented online.

Shannon Watts, the founder of Moms Demand Action, wrote on Twitter that “gun extremists” had gathered “in an attempt to intimidate lawmakers out of doing what voters elected them to do: pass common-sense gun laws that will keep our families safe.”

Some members of the Virginia Legislature also weighed in.

Lee J. Carter, a Democratic member of the House of Delegates, is a former Marine who describes himself as a socialist. He noted online that the demonstrators in Richmond seemed to be breaking two Virginia laws, by carrying weapons with large magazines and by wearing face masks, which was largely outlawed decades ago as an anti-Ku Klux Klan measure.

“So much for law abiding gun owners,” Mr. Carter wrote.

One gun-control advocate who did go to the scene and confront pro-gun demonstrators was Paul Karns, 49, a writer from Richmond. Mr. Karns said he has been dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder after he was shot 13 years ago while defending his neighbor during a robbery.

As the rally ended, he confronted a young man holding what appeared to be a bolt-action rifle. The man told him that he used the gun for hunting and precision shooting. “I learned a few things,” Mr. Karns said.

Mr. Karns got into a more heated debate with a pro-gun demonstrator who said schools were vulnerable to violence because of the lack of guns on campus. Mr. Karns yelled and stormed off. “One thing I don’t see from that side of the spectrum is empathy for the rest of us,” he said.

On a day when guns and Second Amendment grandeur took center stage, the atmosphere also took on an overtly political tone at times, as pro-gun groups criticized the state’s Democratic governor, Ralph Northam.

Demonstrators circulated a racist photograph from Mr. Northam’s medical school yearbook, which showed a man in blackface and another in a Ku Klux Klan robe, an image that nearly destroyed Mr. Northam’s political career. An investigation last year could not conclusively determine whether Mr. Northam appeared in the photo, and he now leads a state government that is fully controlled by Democrats and focused on enacting gun control.

“The man behind the sheet wants your guns,” read one poster, which had reprinted the photograph. In another case, a pamphlet using the photograph called on liberals and conservatives to “fight back” against “slave masters” in the state legislature.

Support for President Trump was apparent among many of the gun rights activists in attendance.

A large “Make America Great Again” flag whipped above the crowds that gathered outside the State Capitol perimeter. A bus adorned in pro-Trump posters, including a “Women for Trump” flag and a flag with the president’s head photoshopped on Rambo, occasionally drove passed the entrance of the capitol grounds and was greeted with cheers from the crowd.

“Trump 2020, baby!” one man shouted. “Amen,” a man wearing a camouflage hat replied.

Despite concerns about potential violence, which led the governor to declare a state of emergency ahead of the rally, the authorities said they were not aware of any major incidents or arrests by early afternoon. The Richmond police estimated the crowd at about 22,000, with 6,000 inside the perimeter and 16,000 outside. Organizers had said they expected 100,000 or more people to attend.

Inside the Capitol grounds, a peaceful crowd held banners and flags, and shouts of “U.S.A.” swelled in the background. The area took on a festive atmosphere, with tunes being played on instruments that sounded like flutes and piccolos.

At the same time, a swelling crowd jammed the surrounding streets, appearing to outnumber those inside the grounds for the rally.

Weapons were allowed outside the security perimeter, and demonstrators walked through the area carrying firearms and flags, as if on parade. There were military-style rifles, shotguns, 9-millimeter handguns, .45- and .22-caliber pistols, and even a man carrying .50-caliber sniper rifle.

Chris Dement, 22, said he was glad to see that the demonstration was peaceful so far. He said he brought a 9-millimeter carbine to stand in solidarity, but was prepared to use it for self-defense in case of violence.

“It’s never out of the realm of possibility,” he said.

Richmond was alive with activity as early as 6 a.m. as clusters of people made their way toward the Capitol. The traffic downtown included a Jeep flying an American flag, and numerous pickup trucks.

Logan Smith, 25, a transmission plant worker from Indianapolis, said he set out Saturday night and drove in his black Dodge Charger for 9 hours and 46 minutes to reach Richmond on Sunday. Standing in a teal sweatshirt in the early morning cold on Monday, his hands in his pockets, he watched the line for entrance to the Capitol grounds start to snake around the block.

“I see how it matters — it matters to me back home,” Mr. Smith said of gun rights. Referring to the gun regulations bills before the Virginia legislature, he said, “Seeing stuff like this being pushed, it doesn’t sit well.”

Around the corner, a whoop went up from a small crowd when several men unfurled a large cloth banner with a long gun emblazoned on the front.

Teri Horne, 51, stood on the sidewalk directly across from the entrance to the Capitol grounds, with a Smith & Wesson M&P15T rifle straddled around her shoulder and a Texas flag at her side. Ms. Horne, of Quitman, Texas, said she and about three dozen others from the women’s chapter of Open Carry Texas attended “to support the people in Virginia.”

“This is where freedom began, right here, and this is what they’re doing to the people of Virginia,” Ms. Horne said. “Thomas Jefferson, he was a very livid character, he would have some strong words to say.”

The rally has been a frequent topic of discussion on internet platforms that are popular among anti-government militia groups and white supremacists. Many users expressed interest in attending the rally. But over the weekend, white-supremacist chat rooms began to overflow with warnings against attending.

Many suggested that participants were being set up for a government trap where they would either be blamed for any violence that broke out, or would even be the targets of violence themselves.

Those warnings continued on Monday from members of anti-government militias, white supremacists and others who were in Richmond. The message “Don’t go in the cage” was posted repeatedly on Twitter, along with comments like “Flood the rest of Richmond instead.”

For years, Martin Luther King’s Birthday, which falls early in the legislative session, has been a day for ordinary Virginians and advocacy groups to talk with state legislators about issues that concern them, in a tradition known as “Lobby Day.”

This year, gun rights groups made especially big plans, after control of the legislature flipped in the November election.

After a generation of dominance by Republicans sympathetic to gun rights, the State Senate and House of Delegates are now run by Democrats who want to impose tighter regulations — measures that have become increasingly popular in the state, especially after a gunman fatally shot 12 people last May in Virginia Beach.

The State Senate approved three gun control bills last week that the House of Delegates could approve as early as this week.

The prospect of new laws restricting firearms has met with stiff opposition in the state’s rural areas. Since November, more than 100 municipalities have declared themselves “Second Amendment sanctuaries” — a purely symbolic step, but one that highlights the widening rift in Virginia between its cities and its rural areas, which have been losing population and political power for years.

Timothy Williams, Sabrina Tavernise and Zolan Kanno-Youngs reported from Richmond, Va., and Sarah Mervosh from New York. Neil MacFarquhar contributed reporting from New York.

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Hawaii man who allegedly shot, killed 2 officers had history of disputes with law

A Hawaii man who is suspected of stabbing a landlord before fatally shooting two police officers at a Honolulu home on Sunday had a history of run-ins with police and issues with his neighbor, according to his lawyer.

Jarovlav Hanel, a native of the Czech Republic, faced eviction because the landlord wanted to move into the home where he had stayed for free in return for maintenance work, said his lawyer, Jonathan Burge.

Westlake Legal Group AP20019784139886 Hawaii man who allegedly shot, killed 2 officers had history of disputes with law fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 6b4dea63-055c-5454-a7c4-a254c07ce347

Honolulu police prepare to take defensive positions with their weapons after a shooting and domestic incident at a residence in Honolulu.  (Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP)

Police said Hanel stabbed Lois Cain, the landlord who had filed court documents last week to evict him. After the stabbing, two Honolulu police officers were fatally shot, and the home and neighboring structures later burst into flames.

Local media have not confirmed, but Hanel and two other unidentified women are presumed dead inside the destroyed home.

Burge said he knew Hanel had some mental health issues but had never known him to be violent.

“He thought the government was watching him all the time and tapping his phone, stuff like that,” Burge said.

Several years ago, a neighbor accused Hanel of shoving him. Hanel was acquitted of assault after a trial.

Westlake Legal Group AP20020150889661-1 Hawaii man who allegedly shot, killed 2 officers had history of disputes with law fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 6b4dea63-055c-5454-a7c4-a254c07ce347

This undated photo provided by the Honolulu Police Department shows Officers Tiffany Enriquez, left, and Kaulike Kalama. Enriquez and Kalama were killed Sunday, Jan. 19, 2020, while responding to a call.  (Honolulu Police Department via AP)

Police responding Sunday morning to a call for help at the location found Cain stabbed in the leg. Hanel then opened fire, killing Officers Tiffany Enriquez and Kaulike Kalama, Honolulu Police Chief Susan Ballard said.

POLICE SAY 2 DEAD, POSSIBLY 15 INJURED IN KANSAS CITY BAR SHOOTING

The fire, just a few blocks from oceanfront high-rise buildings, spread quickly, destroying seven homes and leaving others with fire or smoke damage.

Burge has represented Hanel since 2015 in various disputes with neighbors, including temporary restraining orders that three obtained against him. Hanel was facing a hearing next week on a charge of misusing 911 services, Burge said.

Cain was supportive of him in his disputes with neighbors, but she wanted him to move out so she could move into the home, Burge said. Their relationship had also soured because Hanel’s dog had died and Cain wouldn’t let him get a new one.

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Burge said Hanel planned to go trial for the misusing 911 charge.

“He thought he saw someone selling drugs nearby [and] called the police. They determined it wasn’t happening,” Burge said. “He didn’t like their determination. He kept calling them until they told him stop” and cited him.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP20019784139886 Hawaii man who allegedly shot, killed 2 officers had history of disputes with law fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 6b4dea63-055c-5454-a7c4-a254c07ce347   Westlake Legal Group AP20019784139886 Hawaii man who allegedly shot, killed 2 officers had history of disputes with law fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 6b4dea63-055c-5454-a7c4-a254c07ce347

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Brad Parscale: ‘Right now, the American people have tuned out’ 2020 Democrats

Westlake Legal Group HemmerParscale Brad Parscale: 'Right now, the American people have tuned out' 2020 Democrats Samuel Chamberlain fox-news/shows/fox-news-reporting fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning/trump-2020-campaign fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc bf17bcac-5156-57b2-8a51-dde377f54ed8 article

President Trump’s reelection campaign manager Brad Parscale told Fox News’ “Bill Hemmer Reports” Monday that the forthcoming Senate impeachment trial was unlikely to have any impact at the polls this November, and may even help the president’s chances.

“From the campaign side, our numbers have gone up [since impeachment],” Parscale told host Bill Hemmer. “I told the president this right out of the gate. I said, ‘If they try to impeach you and they try to do this [to you] for doing nothing wrong at all, you’re the one that’s going to come victorious out of this.’ It’s going to create lots of fundraising — we have over $200 million in the bank between our committees — our numbers have gone up, and independents see this farce, and this hoax.”

Parscale also dismissed the field of potential challengers to the president, saying most Americans had “tuned out” their arguments.

“As soon as the president runs on any of the ballots, against any of their policies, he performs greatly against them, better than [even against Hillary] Clinton [in 2016],” Parscale said. ” … He is so far ahead of where he was in 2016 against Clinton, he is so far ahead of these other candidates in fundraising and in numbers … and their policies are so far-left, the American people are not going to want them.”

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“Right now,” Parscale added, “the American people have tuned out. Because, honestly, what’s happened with impeachment and everything else, they’ve shut down. They’re enjoying the Super Bowl or they’re watching football games, enjoying this country’s great economy, they’re not sitting around watching this stuff.”

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3 Organizers for 3 Candidates, Under One Roof: This Is Campaigning in Iowa

Westlake Legal Group 00howardcounty1-facebookJumbo 3 Organizers for 3 Candidates, Under One Roof: This Is Campaigning in Iowa Warren, Elizabeth Voting and Voters Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Iowa Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Biden, Joseph R Jr

RICEVILLE, Iowa — Charles Uffelman, a bearded and burly Tennessean who is working in Iowa for Elizabeth Warren, stirred gravy on a stovetop while biscuits rose in the oven.

Jared Sherman, a Pete Buttigieg organizer in a checked lumberjack shirt, scrambled eggs.

Bryan McNamara, a staff member for Joseph R. Biden Jr. who is fond of a light leather jacket in the Midwest winter, poured strong coffee.

“I love these guys, I love organizing alongside them,” Mr. Uffelman said as he and the others prepared a country breakfast on a recent weekday morning.

The Democratic presidential candidates may have thrown some sharp elbows on a debate stage in Des Moines last week. But two and a half hours away, in a farmhouse beneath a wind turbine, with the odor of a hog farm wafting across a rural road, field organizers for three of the combatants have found a way to coexist in harmony as housemates.

“It helps we all have thick skin,” said Mr. McNamara, who has added 8,000 miles and a coat of dust to a sedan with New York plates. “Being able to come home and, you know, if I had a rough day, being able to talk to people and see that we’re all having similar challenges out here — it’s not just our candidate or our campaign — there are issues with rural organizing that we all encounter.”

The monthslong buildup to Iowa’s first-in-the-nation nominating contest, and the challenges of turning out voters to more than 1,000 caucus sites on Feb. 3, have led to a culture of grass-roots organizing in the state unlike anywhere else. All four leading Democratic campaigns, including Bernie Sanders’s team, have dispatched small armies of field organizers, mostly idealistic young people from out of state, to embed themselves in communities.

Mr. McNamara is an organizer for former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.Credit…Jordan Gale for The New York Times Mr. Sherman is an organizer for Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind.Credit…Jordan Gale for The New York Times

They knock on doors, hold meet-ups of potential supporters and otherwise build out networks of volunteers who play a large part in determining the results of the caucuses. Lack of an Iowa ground game in 2016 was a big part of why Donald J. Trump finished second in the state despite leading in pre-caucus polls. Barack Obama’s enormous organizing footprint in 2008 was largely why his margin of victory exceeded expectations.

“You have to build community around the campaign — it has to feel like a family,” said Mr. Uffelman, 26, the Warren organizer, who has joined a local Methodist church in an effort to meet people and become known.

Mr. McNamara, 22, the Biden representative, held a potluck dinner for volunteers he recruited and people just considering the former vice president. “I love community events that pull our supporters together but also don’t put pressure on them to just make it about the candidate,” he said.

Laura Hubka, who has opened her large home to the organizers rent-free since October, in a windswept region on the Minnesota border, is chairwoman of the Howard County Democratic Party. An area of declining population with many older rural voters, Howard County is famous in political circles for having swung more jarringly than any county in America from Mr. Obama to Mr. Trump. It voted for Mr. Obama by a 21 percentage point margin in 2012 and for Mr. Trump by 20 — a 41-point gyration.

“I’ve been asked 300 times what happened,” Ms. Hubka said. The closest she’s come to an answer is that the Obama-Trump vote was a fed-up rejection of both parties by people who had lost faith in government. The county seat, Cresco, is a town of fewer than 4,000 rarely visited by presidential candidates. A wall mural of standout local wrestlers represents community pride, but downtown storefronts are increasingly going dark.

Also, there was a lot of “Hillary hate” in 2016, Ms. Hubka acknowledged. “We were chased out of yards with rakes while door knocking.”

Some of that sentiment still lingers. Mr. McNamara told of knocking at the door of an older woman who had caucused for Mr. Biden in 2008, only to be turned away by a family member, who shouted: “She doesn’t want to talk to you. Trump 2020!”

“That’s one of those experiences where I said, O.K., this is real,” said Mr. McNamara, who grew up in New York’s Hudson Valley.

Ms. Hubka, 55, an ultrasound technician married to a long-haul truck driver, was a Sanders supporter four years ago, when Howard County Democrats gave the Vermont senator 54 percent of their caucus vote. After the general election, she quit the state party central committee in frustration over the factionalism between supporters of Mr. Sanders and Hillary Clinton.

But she did not stay away long from activism. Ms. Hubka endorsed Mr. Buttigieg, the first county chair in Iowa to do so. She believes Mr. Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., can bridge the divisiveness in her party, in Howard County and in the country.

She does not demonize Trump voters, who include friends and family members. She ticks off some who regret their choice: the husband of a dietitian at the medical center where she works. A conservative official at the Chamber of Commerce angry at the lack of fiscal restraint under Republicans. A “shirttail uncle” of her husband’s, a small farmer hurt by tariffs, who she said “came up to me and put his fist down on the table” and declared he would not vote for Mr. Trump again.

Such voters are not hard to find in Howard County, even if far from the majority. They include Sara Burke, who plans to participate in her first Democratic caucus next month, an abrupt reversal in her short voting history. Ms. Burke, 38, cast her first ballot ever for president in 2016 for Mr. Trump.

At the time, she said, she was “terrified” that Muslim extremists would harm her family in rural Iowa, a fear driven by Mr. Trump that even her 11-year-old son echoed. “He legitimately felt fear; it’s horrible as a parent,” she said.

Her disappointment set in early. She described the president’s bullying speech and braggadocio as “disgusting.”

Mr. Uffelman prepared to canvass for Senator Elizabeth Warren.Credit…Jordan Gale for The New York Times The three talked over breakfast before starting work.Credit…Jordan Gale for The New York Times

“Democrat or Republican, I can’t support anybody like that,” she said.

The auto parts factory where Ms. Burke works is near full employment, running three shifts, but she said her income from a $21.50 an hour job is barely above the line that would entitle her children to subsidized school lunches. “If I’m at one of the best paying places around here, I should be able to be grateful and do my job and pay for the lunches and not have to need help,” she said. “It’s crazy to me.”

Last year Ms. Burke became active in the political wing of the United Automobile Workers union. She concluded the president was anti-worker. “What I really realize now, and didn’t before, is if he had his way, my God, our children would be working right alongside of us and none of us would be making any money, there would be no union,” she said.

“From what I was paying attention to and where I was getting my information,” Ms. Burke recalled of 2016, “I was not informing myself well at all.”

Neil Shaffer, the chairman of the Republican Party in Howard County, said he saw no signs of a “Trump revolt.” He predicted the general election would turn on the tone of the two major candidates, in a county where many voters have weak partisan identity and dislike divisiveness. “I think honestly this election will have more to do with personalities than with issues,” he said.

Ms. Hubka is not optimistic the county will swing back to the Democrats in November. If she can shave 10 points off Mr. Trump’s 2016 margin, that would be a victory, she said. “I think it’s going to be a horrible, nasty election,” she said.

Even though she favors Mr. Buttigieg, she welcomes all of the organizers staying under her roof. “One of these three people’s candidates is going to be the nominee,” she said.

Usually after dinner, her three lodgers head upstairs to separate rooms to log data from their day or work the phones. “They call until 9, which I’ve advised against because Iowans don’t like to be called after 8,” Ms. Hubka said.

Late at night, the organizers drift down to a bar in the basement. They walk a fine line in talking shop — swapping general stories without sharing details about the caucusgoers they’ve recruited or the canvassing scripts used by their campaigns. “We talk about what we’re doing without actually talking about what we’re doing,” Mr. Uffelman, the Warren organizer, said.

All three find that some of the best parts of the job are the lengthy conversations that rural residents are willing to engage in. Mr. Uffelman, in his Southern lilt, recalled speaking for 30 minutes to a farmer fixing a tractor, who had concerns about his health care and corruption in the farm economy. Mr. Uffelman persuaded him to support Ms. Warren, the Massachusetts senator.

“I’m a farm boy, I grew up on a farm, and you know, being able to talk about what his job is like,” he said, “that’s my favorite part of organizing — you get to hear the story.”

The three men said they have never debated among themselves the No. 1 issue for many Democrats: Who is most electable in November?

“We’ll say, well, I know my candidate’s most electable,” Mr. McNamara said to laughter.

“I think that’s why this dynamic works,” Mr. Sherman, 28, the Buttigieg organizer, who is an Ohio native, said. “Yes, we’re on different teams now, and yes, we think our candidate is the best person to move forward. But once our party has a nominee, we have to work with each other.”

Mr. Sherman’s laptop is a collage of stickers for candidates he has worked for. He said the housemates hope to stay together after Iowa and through Election Day.

“I’m trying to get these guys to come to Ohio,” Mr. Sherman said.

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Michael Goodwin: Trump impeachment trial is clearest evidence yet of a looming national crackup

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124671306001_6124682599001-vs Michael Goodwin: Trump impeachment trial is clearest evidence yet of a looming national crackup New York Post Michael Goodwin fox-news/us/congress fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc c8a990f6-fa83-596d-b684-8cb627224f85 article

For much of the last three years, the impeachment of President Trump seemed inevitable. The left refused to accept his 2016 victory and ­remained determined to end his tenure.

When he made mistakes or said dumb things, the frenzy boiled over. When his tax and regulation cuts unleashed the great American jobs machine, the resistance grew more determined.

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After Democrats seized the House in 2018, Speaker Nancy ­Pelosi became the firewall against impeachment. By the time she surrendered last fall, Pelosi had adopted the fiery zeal of a convert.

NEWT GINGRICH: TRUMP IMPEACHMENT WILL BRING PELOSI AND HOUSE DEMOCRATS CONDEMNATION BY HISTORY

She now displays her hatred of Trump without reservation and accuses him of being a Russian agent, notwithstanding that Special Counsel Robert Mueller concluded otherwise. Anyone who disagrees with her is accused of being part of a criminal coverup, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Attorney General William Barr.

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Given Pelosi’s position, these extraordinary accusations are unprecedented in modern times. Yet such vile extremism is the new normal on the left, which uses Trump as an excuse for its own abnormal conduct.

A top Pelosi henchman, Rep. Jerry Nadler, argued last week that, despite the coming election, impeachment must go forward now. Waiting wasn’t an option, he claimed, because the Ukraine case proves beyond a doubt that Trump is “trying to cheat in that election.”

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124671306001_6124682599001-vs Michael Goodwin: Trump impeachment trial is clearest evidence yet of a looming national crackup New York Post Michael Goodwin fox-news/us/congress fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc c8a990f6-fa83-596d-b684-8cb627224f85 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124671306001_6124682599001-vs Michael Goodwin: Trump impeachment trial is clearest evidence yet of a looming national crackup New York Post Michael Goodwin fox-news/us/congress fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc c8a990f6-fa83-596d-b684-8cb627224f85 article

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