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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 82)

Saudi Oil Attack Photos Implicate Iran, U.S. Says; Trump Hints at Military Action

The Trump administration intensified its focus on Iran Sunday as the likely culprit behind attacks on important Saudi Arabian oil facilities over the weekend, with officials citing intelligence assessments to support the accusation and President Trump warning that he was prepared to take military action.

The government released satellite photographs showing what officials said were at least 17 points of impact at several Saudi energy facilities from strikes they said came from the north or northwest. That would be consistent with an attack coming from the direction of the Persian Gulf, Iran or Iraq, rather than from Yemen, where the Iranian-backed Houthi militia that claimed responsibility for the strikes operates.

Administration officials, in a background briefing for reporters as well as in separate interviews on Sunday, also said a combination of drones and cruise missiles — “both and a lot of them,” as one senior United States official put it — might have been used. That would indicate a degree of scope, precision and sophistication beyond the ability of the Houthi rebels alone.

Mr. Trump, however, did not name Iran, saying he needed to consult with Saudi Arabia first.

“Saudi Arabia oil supply was attacked,” he said in a tweet on Sunday evening. “There is reason to believe that we know the culprit, are locked and loaded depending on verification, but are waiting to hear from the Kingdom as to who they believe was the cause of this attack, and under what terms we would proceed!”

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Saturday that Iran was behind what he called “an unprecedented attack on the world’s energy supply” and asserted that there was “no evidence the attacks came from Yemen.” He did not, however, say where they came from, and the Saudis refrained from directly blaming Iran.

Saudi Oil Facilities Attacked

By The New York Times

The administration’s determination that Iran played a direct role in the attack marked a significant escalation in months of back-and-forth tensions between the United States and Iran. It raised questions about how Washington might retaliate — and why Iran would have risked such a confrontation.

Mr. Trump’s threat echoed one he made in June after Iran shot down an American surveillance drone. He said then that the military had been “cocked and loaded” for a strike against Iran.

He said he called off the strike with 10 minutes to spare when a general told him that 150 people would probably die in the attack, which he said would have been disproportionate.

Administration officials said on Sunday they would seek to declassify more intelligence to buttress their case against Iran in the coming days. The satellite photographs released on Sunday did not appear as clear cut as officials suggested, with some appearing to show damage on the western side of the facilities, not from the direction of Iran or Iraq.

American officials said that more than 17 weapons were directed at the Saudi facilities, but not all reached their targets. Forensic analyses of the recovered weapons could answer questions about what they were, who manufactured them and who launched them.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160299636_49e4ca0e-6e40-40f5-962d-cb82ffa0e332-articleLarge Saudi Oil Attack Photos Implicate Iran, U.S. Says; Trump Hints at Military Action Zarif, Mohammad Javad Yemen United States International Relations United States Saudi Arabia Rouhani, Hassan Pompeo, Mike Iran Houthis Drones (Pilotless Planes)

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Saturday accused Iran of being behind “an unprecedented attack on the world’s energy supply”CreditChristopher Smith for The New York Times

Iran forcefully rejected Mr. Pompeo’s accusation on Sunday, with the foreign minister dismissing it as “max deceit.” The office of the Iraqi prime minister, Adel Abdul-Mahdi, also rejected any suggestion that Iranian operatives carried out the attack from Iraqi territory, saying Iraq would act firmly if its territory were used to attack other countries.

If Iran, or one of its proxies in Iraq or Yemen, carried out the attacks, it would fit into a strategy Iran has followed for months in its escalating confrontation with the Trump administration.

Squeezed by sweeping American sanctions on its oil sales, Iran has sought to inflict a similar pain on its adversaries — threatening the ability of Saudi Arabia and other American allies in the Persian Gulf to sell oil and holding out the possibility of driving up international oil prices in the months before President Trump seeks re-election.

“Iran wants to show that instead of a win-lose contest, Iran can turn this into a lose-lose dynamic for everyone,” said Ali Vaez, head of the Iran Project at the International Crisis Group.

Yet Iran has stopped short of carrying out the kind of direct, open attack on United States allies that might trigger a military response, preferring to let regional allies do the work or at least share the blame.

Westlake Legal Group 04mag-yemen-newpromo2-articleLarge-v3 Saudi Oil Attack Photos Implicate Iran, U.S. Says; Trump Hints at Military Action Zarif, Mohammad Javad Yemen United States International Relations United States Saudi Arabia Rouhani, Hassan Pompeo, Mike Iran Houthis Drones (Pilotless Planes)

How the War in Yemen Became a Bloody Stalemate — and the Worst Humanitarian Crisis in the World

Saudi Arabia thought a bombing campaign would quickly crush its enemies in Yemen. But three years later, the Houthis refuse to give up, even as 14 million people face starvation.

“Plausible deniability is a trademark of Iran’s pushback strategy,” Mr. Vaez said.

The combination of military pressure and deniability also fits with a strategy of increasing Iran’s bargaining power before possible talks at the United Nations this month.

President Emanuel Macron of France has said he hopes the meeting of the United Nations General Assembly, which opens Tuesday, will be an opportunity for de-escalation between the United States and Iran. The recent hostilities began when the Trump administration withdrew last year from an agreement to limit Iran’s nuclear program and then this year imposed sweeping sanctions to try to force Iran into a more restrictive covenant.

Several other world powers, including France, also signed the original agreement and still support it, and Mr. Macron has said he hopes to hold talks at the General Assembly about saving the agreement. Mr. Trump said this month that he was open to a possible meeting there with President Hassan Rouhani of Iran.

Even as Iranian diplomats denied any role in the attack, others close to Iran’s elite Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corp. were reveling in the damage at the Saudi oil facilities, which process the vast majority of the country’s crude output.

The Trump administration, said Naser Imani, a former member of the guard’s political bureau, should take it as a warning to the United States and its Persian Gulf partners.

A satellite image released by the American government of an oil-processing facility in Abqaiq. Officials said it shows that the attack came from the north or northwest, consistent with an attack from Iran or Iraq, however this photo appears to show damage on the western side of the tanks.CreditU.S. Government/DigitalGlobe, via Associated Press

“If a few Houthis can cause this extensive damage, imagine what Iran could do if it was forced into a military conflict,” he said in a telephone interview on Sunday. “Iran has proved in the past few months that it has the will to pull the trigger as well as the military power to do so.”

A military strategist with the Revolutionary Guards, speaking on the condition of anonymity for fear of retaliation, also questioned whether the Houthis alone could have carried out such a complex and effective attack without Iranian help.

But whoever carried out the attack, the Iranian strategist said, the message to the West and its regional allies was the same. If the United States strikes Iran, “the flames of war in the Persian Gulf will burn you all,” he said.

A senior commander for the Revolutionary Guards insisted that the country was ready for “full-fledged” war, the semiofficial Tasnim news agency reported, according to Reuters.

“Everybody should know that all American bases and their aircraft carriers in a distance of up to 2,000 kilometers around Iran are within the range of our missiles,” said Gen. Amir Ali Hajizadeh, the head of the Revolutionary Guards’ air force.

How the Trump administration responds remains to be seen. Breaking with a pattern under both Democratic and Republican presidents, the Trump administration has said that it intends to hold Iran fully responsible for any attacks carried out by the Houthis or other regional allies that the administration deems Iranian proxies.

Previous administrations have said that Iran was arming and training allied groups such as the Lebanese militia Hezbollah and Shiite militias in Syria or Iraq to extend its regional influence. Yet in the past, the United States has generally declined to retaliate against Iran militarily even when those groups have attacked the American military, as Iranian-backed Shiite militias did during American occupation of Iraq.

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California Lyft driver opens fire in shootout after 2 men tried robbing him, police say

Westlake Legal Group lyft-sign California Lyft driver opens fire in shootout after 2 men tried robbing him, police say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox news fnc/us fnc article 7aea9674-b4da-5051-b74b-4a1600afb6ec

Police in California are looking for two suspects who allegedly shot a Lyft driver early Sunday morning after the driver shot at the men who held him up, according to a local report.

The Lyft driver had just dropped off a passenger in west-central Fresno at around 3 a.m. Sunday and pulled over as he waited for another pick up when two men walked up to him and demanded money, KFSN-TV reported, citing police.

The driver reportedly told police he agreed to give the men cash, but instead of reaching for it, he pulled out a gun of his own and shot at the suspects. The suspects allegedly fired back, hitting the driver in the side.

HIT-AND-RUN CRASH INVOLVING BOATS IN CALIFORNIA LEAVES 1 DEAD, 5 HURT, OFFICIALS SAY

Paramedics reportedly rushed him to a nearby hospital where he was listed in critical condition.

“I mean, how sad,” Lt. Tim Tietjen with the Fresno Police Department said. “The guy’s just trying to work. He’s trying to do his job and he’s confronted by two individuals who are trying to take his hard-earned money from him. To me, that’s extremely sad and our prayers are with the victim.”

The suspects took off before officers had arrived and investigators reportedly were looking for surveillance video from the neighborhood.

A Lyft spokeswoman told Fox News the driver had logged off of the Lyft platform before the incident was reported to have taken place.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In a statement the spokeswoman, Lauren Alexander, wrote, “What’s being reported is terrifying. While this incident did not occur on platform we have reached out to the driver to extend our support, and stand ready to assist law enforcement with their investigation.”

Lyft has a strict no-weapons policy for both riders and drivers.

Westlake Legal Group lyft-sign California Lyft driver opens fire in shootout after 2 men tried robbing him, police say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox news fnc/us fnc article 7aea9674-b4da-5051-b74b-4a1600afb6ec   Westlake Legal Group lyft-sign California Lyft driver opens fire in shootout after 2 men tried robbing him, police say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox news fnc/us fnc article 7aea9674-b4da-5051-b74b-4a1600afb6ec

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California Lyft driver opens fire in shootout after 2 men tried robbing him, police say

Westlake Legal Group lyft-sign California Lyft driver opens fire in shootout after 2 men tried robbing him, police say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox news fnc/us fnc article 7aea9674-b4da-5051-b74b-4a1600afb6ec

Police in California are looking for two suspects who allegedly shot a Lyft driver early Sunday morning after the driver shot at the men who held him up, according to a local report.

The Lyft driver had just dropped off a passenger in west-central Fresno at around 3 a.m. Sunday and pulled over as he waited for another pick up when two men walked up to him and demanded money, KFSN-TV reported, citing police.

The driver reportedly told police he agreed to give the men cash, but instead of reaching for it, he pulled out a gun of his own and shot at the suspects. The suspects allegedly fired back, hitting the driver in the side.

HIT-AND-RUN CRASH INVOLVING BOATS IN CALIFORNIA LEAVES 1 DEAD, 5 HURT, OFFICIALS SAY

Paramedics reportedly rushed him to a nearby hospital where he was listed in critical condition.

“I mean, how sad,” Lt. Tim Tietjen with the Fresno Police Department said. “The guy’s just trying to work. He’s trying to do his job and he’s confronted by two individuals who are trying to take his hard-earned money from him. To me, that’s extremely sad and our prayers are with the victim.”

The suspects took off before officers had arrived and investigators reportedly were looking for surveillance video from the neighborhood.

A Lyft spokeswoman told Fox News the driver had logged off of the Lyft platform before the incident was reported to have taken place.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In a statement the spokeswoman, Lauren Alexander, wrote, “What’s being reported is terrifying. While this incident did not occur on platform we have reached out to the driver to extend our support, and stand ready to assist law enforcement with their investigation.”

Lyft has a strict no-weapons policy for both riders and drivers.

Westlake Legal Group lyft-sign California Lyft driver opens fire in shootout after 2 men tried robbing him, police say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox news fnc/us fnc article 7aea9674-b4da-5051-b74b-4a1600afb6ec   Westlake Legal Group lyft-sign California Lyft driver opens fire in shootout after 2 men tried robbing him, police say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox news fnc/us fnc article 7aea9674-b4da-5051-b74b-4a1600afb6ec

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Texas girl contracts brain-eating amoeba during swim in river

Westlake Legal Group brain-eating-amoeba-infection Texas girl contracts brain-eating amoeba during swim in river New York Post fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fnc/health fnc article 31d34d1a-1191-5a0a-abd5-25603ca2dd2a

A young Texas girl is fighting for her life after she was infected with a deadly brain-eating amoeba following a day spent swimming in a river, according to reports.

Lily Mae Avant, 10, went swimming over Labor Day weekend in the Brazos River near Waco — where doctors believe she contracted the often-fatal Naegleria fowleri amoeba, news station KWTX-TV reported.

Days after her swim, the Valley Mills Elementary School student started experiencing a fever and a headache, according to the station.

GIRL INFECTED WITH RARE MOSQUITO-BORNE EEE VIRUS GETS MASSIVE SUPPORT ONLINE

Though she appeared to be suffering from symptoms of a common virus, her family said they still believed that “something was not quite right,” according to a Facebook page launched to support Lily.

Then one night, Lily’s mother heard concerning noises coming from her daughter’s room.

“She was incoherent, unresponsive and was quickly swept up and taken to the ER,” the page said.

Lily was then flown to Cook Children’s Heath Care System in Forth Worth, where a spinal tap revealed she had contracted Naegleriasis, a rare infection caused by the amoeba.

Read more from the New York Post.

Westlake Legal Group brain-eating-amoeba-infection Texas girl contracts brain-eating amoeba during swim in river New York Post fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fnc/health fnc article 31d34d1a-1191-5a0a-abd5-25603ca2dd2a   Westlake Legal Group brain-eating-amoeba-infection Texas girl contracts brain-eating amoeba during swim in river New York Post fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fnc/health fnc article 31d34d1a-1191-5a0a-abd5-25603ca2dd2a

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Will the drone strikes in Saudi Arabia impact gas prices? Experts say yes.

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Will the drone strikes in Saudi Arabia impact gas prices? Experts say yes.

Drones claimed by Yemen’s Houthi rebels attacked the world’s largest oil processing facility in Saudi Arabia and a major oilfield operated by Saudi Aramco early Saturday, sparking a huge fire at a processor crucial to global energy supplies. (Sept. 14) AP, AP

Drone strikes on two major oil facilities in Saudi Arabia Saturday could impact the price of gas in the coming weeks, experts say.

Gradual increases may be seen at U.S. gas stations before next weekend depending on how fast the kingdom’s state-owned oil behemoth Saudi Aramco can revive lost output, said Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy.

“Right now, I would classify that impact as being minor because Saudi has signaled that most of this oil production could return quickly,” said DeHaan, whose company monitors real-time fuel prices. “If it doesn’t return relatively quickly then we could be looking at minor to major impact to gasoline prices” as early as midweek. 

By some estimates, the price per barrel could rise $5 to $10, which translates into 10- to 24-cent increases for gas, diesel and jet fuel, according to Tom Kloza, an analyst at the Oil Price Information Service. 

More: Iran denies attacking Saudi oil sites, derides US ‘maximum deceit’

MoviePass is shutting down. Discount service to bring the curtain down this week

“The question is, does the increase continue to grow and gain steam through the next few months or does Aramco make crude available through some other extraordinary means,” Kloza said. 

Prices at the pump in the U.S. were on a downward trajectory following Labor Day due to a decrease in demand and a shift to cheaper-to-produce winter-blend gasoline. Since gas prices are low, Kloza said the average motorist could tolerate a short-term increase caused by the disruption in the Middle East. 

“If the boiling point for a lot of consumers is $3 a gallon, we are at about $2.50 or $2.55, so we can tolerate a 20-cent increase,” Kloza said. 

The U.S. imports about 9.93 million barrels a day of petroleum, including crude oil, from which gasoline is derived. About 9% of that comes from Saudi Arabia, according to 2018 government estimates. Reuters reports that the targeted facilities in Abqaiq and Khurais produce 5% of the overall world supply of crude oil.

Although the U.S. is a major oil producer, crude is a global commodity and the impact of catastrophic events ripple across the globe. 

“Every country buys and sells oil on the global market, so conceivably even if the U.S. is no longer a main beneficiary to Saudi oil, someone else is,” DeHaan said. 

Countries that receive a bulk of their supply from Saudi Arabia could seek to purchase oil from the U.S. if the Saudi’s facilities are offline for an extended period. The company said in a statement that the attacks cut its output by 5.7 million barrels per day and the loss would be offset by stockpiles. 

Some experts say that political destabilization in the region could rattle oil markets.

“There’s this broader recognition of the politics in the Middle East and there’s a whispering that comes with that, which could mean structurally higher (prices) which lead to structurally higher gasoline prices,” said Ian Nieboer, managing director of RS Energy Group, a data analytics firm that services the oil industry.

Analysts anticipate a knee jerk spike in crude oil prices when the market opens Monday. 

Brent crude reopened for trading on Sunday at $70.98 per barrel, almost 20% higher than Friday close on oil futures markets. West Texas Intermediate closed at $54.85 on Friday and jumped to $61.23 per barrel on Sunday.

“The one certainty is that you see (prices) rise tomorrow, which will ultimately mean higher gas prices,” Nieboer said. “They say they’re going to have the lines back running in a day or two but it could take some time longer before their running up to full capacity.”

Follow Dalvin Brown on Twitter @Dalvin_Brown.

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2019/09/15/attacks-saudi-oil-facilities-could-mean-higher-gas-prices-us/2334921001/

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Antonio Brown scores as New England Patriots defeat Miami Dolphins 43-0

Westlake Legal Group brownmiami Antonio Brown scores as New England Patriots defeat Miami Dolphins 43-0 fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl/miami-dolphins fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/antonio-brown fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 20684456-3979-5af4-994d-df64440e1126

When Antonio Brown celebrated his first touchdown with the New England Patriots by vaulting into a first-row luxury box, he didn’t linger.

The Patriots had a job to finish.

Determined to play to the final gun after allowing a miracle comeback at Miami last year, the Patriots beat the Dolphins 43-0 Sunday.

Coach Bill Belichick had Tom Brady still throwing at the end.

“We’re playing 60 minutes,” Belichick said.

The Pats did that. They scored twice on interception returns in a two-minute fourth-quarter span, and registered their first shutout since Week 3 of 2016.

Brown helped get them going. The Patriots were 18½-point favorites but led only 7-0 late in the first half before Brady hit his newest target for a 20-yard score.

TOM BRADY’S UNUSUAL METHOD OF KEEPING HIS CENTER’S BUTTS DRY REVEALED

They connected four times in all.

“It was a good start,” Brady said. “I was just trying to find an open guy. He was snapping off some routes and did a great job.”

Brown, who signed Monday, made an 18-yard catch on his first play and finished with 56 yards receiving, all in the first half. He won raves from teammates for his debut.

“It was awesome,” receiver Julian Edelman said. “A lot of energy. He’s a playmaker.”

One thing Brown didn’t do was talk to reporters after the game. The NFL allowed the four-time All-Pro receiver to play despite a civil lawsuit filed Tuesday by his former trainer accusing him of sexually assaulting her on three occasions. Brown has denied the allegations.

New England’s defense outscored Miami with interception returns for touchdowns of 54 yards by Stephon Gilmore and 69 yards by Jamie Collins Sr. The Patriots totaled seven sacks and four interceptions and earned their most lopsided win in the 108-game history of the series.

“The defense was spectacular,” Brady said.

He threw for 264 yards and two scores for the Pats, who are 2-0 for the first time since 2016, winning by a combined score of 76-3.

The Dolphins are 0-2 for only the second time since 2012, with their losses by a combined score of 102-10.

“It’s never fun to be embarrassed,” Miami quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick said, “especially two weeks in a row at home.”

Fitzpatrick threw for 89 yards and was intercepted three times. Josh Rosen replaced him and went seven for 18 for 97 yards and one interception.

Coach Brian Flores hedged when asked if Fitzpatrick remains the starter.

“We’ll evaluate things over the course of the week,” Flores said, “and as of right now, Ryan is still the starter.”

NO MERCY

Belichick didn’t let up against Flores, his former assistant. Brady’s passing sparked a 59-yard drive for the final touchdown with 2:10 left.

“Last year it came down to 60 minutes of football,” Brady said. “We were talking about 60 minutes of football, and that’s what it took.”

The defending Super Bowl champions won for only the second time in their past seven trips to Miami, and avenged a loss in 2018 on a last-second pass and double lateral.

TIMELINE OF ANTONIO BROWN’S DRAMA

Brady tied George Blanda for the second-most regular-season wins in the NFL with 209. Adam Vinatieri began the weekend first with 215 wins.

HOW DO YOU DO?

Brown celebrated his touchdown by leaping into the seats, where he landed on an 18-year-old college student wearing a Brady jersey.

“I was really excited,” said the spectator, Jenna Saadah, attending her first football game. “The fact that it was the Patriots team that scored a touchdown, it was mind-blowing.”

INJURIES

The Patriots’ battered offensive line was dealt another blow when left tackle Isaiah Wynn left in the first half with a foot injury. Marshall Newhouse replaced him.

DISGRUNTLED DEFENDER

Minkah Fitzpatrick started at safety for the Dolphins even though he has requested and received permission to seek a trade. He made six tackles.

“There’s a saying: ‘I never lose, I just learn.'” Fitzpatrick said. “That’s just what we’ve got to do right now.”

BAD DAY

Patriots kicker Stephen Gostkowski missed two extra points and a 48-yard field-goal try. He has missed three extra points in the past two seasons, all in Miami.

UP NEXT

The Patriots play host to the Jets next Sunday. New England has won the past six meetings.

The Dolphins continue their race to the bottom Sunday at the Dallas Cowboys, who have won their past three meetings.

“There’s not going to be anybody in this league that’s going to feel sorry for us,” Fitzpatrick said. “So we have to continue to try to get better every day.”

Westlake Legal Group brownmiami Antonio Brown scores as New England Patriots defeat Miami Dolphins 43-0 fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl/miami-dolphins fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/antonio-brown fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 20684456-3979-5af4-994d-df64440e1126   Westlake Legal Group brownmiami Antonio Brown scores as New England Patriots defeat Miami Dolphins 43-0 fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl/miami-dolphins fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/antonio-brown fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 20684456-3979-5af4-994d-df64440e1126

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Trump Approves Oil Release From Reserve After Attack On Saudi Sites

Westlake Legal Group 5d7ebc58240000c92b7b4d12 Trump Approves Oil Release From Reserve After Attack On Saudi Sites

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The Latest on the tensions in the Persian Gulf a day after Iran-backed Yemeni rebels attacked major oil sites in Saudi Arabia (all times local):

President Donald Trump says he has approved the release of U.S. strategic petroleum reserves “if needed” to stabilize energy markets after a Saturday attack on Saudi Arabian energy facilities.

Trump tweets that the attacks could have an impact on oil prices and says the final amount of the release, if any, would be “sufficient to keep the markets well-supplied.”

The authorization alone could help prevent a spike in oil prices after the attack led to suspension of more than 5% of the world’s daily crude oil production. The Trump administration has blamed the attack on Iran.

The federally owned petroleum reserve of hundreds of millions of barrels of crude oil has only been tapped three times, most recently in 2011 amid unrest in Libya.

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that the recent attacks on Saudi Arabia oil facilities mean that a return to full production may take weeks. That could mean a spike in oil prices as traders worry about supply, with potential negative consequences for the global economy.

The Journal reports that Saudi officials say a third of crude output will be restored Monday. Officials said they would use other facilities and existing stocks to supplant the gap in production.

The weekend drone attacks hit Saudi Arabia’s biggest oil processing facility and a major oil field, halting production of 5.7 million barrels of crude a day, about half of the country’s global daily output and more than 5% of the world’s daily production.

Yemen’s Iran-backed Houthi rebels claimed responsibility for the attack, but U.S. officials say Iran is responsible. Iran denies it.

11:15 p.m.

Senior U.S. officials are citing intelligence assessments, including satellite imagery, to support their case that Iran was responsible for Saturday’s attacks on key Saudi Arabian oil infrastructure.

The officials say the intelligence shows that the strikes are inconsistent with the kind of attack that would have been launched from Yemen.

The U.S. government is releasing satellite imagery showing what officials say are at least 19 points of impact at two Saudi energy facilities. The officials say the photos show impacts consistent with attack coming from the direction of Iran, rather than from Yemen.

The officials say additional devices, which apparently didn’t reach their targets, have been recovered and are being analyzed by Saudi and American intelligence agencies.

The officials are speaking on the condition of anonymity to discuss intelligence matters.

—Associated Press writer Zeke Miller

Satellite images examined by The Associated Press appear to show damage at the heart of a Saudi oil processing facility targeted in a claimed drone attack by Yemen’s Houthi rebels.

The images Sunday come from the European Commission’s Sentinel-2 satellite.

The images appear to show black char marks in the heart of Saudi Aramco’s Abqaiq oil processing facility in Buqyaq.

Those marks were not visible in a month’s worth of earlier satellite images of the facility.

The Washington-based Center for Strategic and International Studies in August identified the area with the char marks as the plant’s stabilization area.

The center said the area’s functions mean “the likelihood of a strike successfully disrupting or destroying its operations.”

Neither Saudi Arabia nor the state-run oil giant Saudi Aramco have said how much damage was done to the facility.

Kuwait says it is increasing security across the oil-rich small nation after an attack on oil sites in Saudi Arabia.

That’s according to a report Sunday night by the state-run KUNA news agency.

KUNA said the order came from Prime Minister Jaber Al Mubarak Al Sabah, who asked officials to “tighten security measures around vital sites inside of the country.”

Separately, KUNA said authorities would investigate reports of drones flying over Kuwait. It did not elaborate.

Local Kuwaiti media has reported that witnesses say they saw a drone near a presidential palace on Saturday morning, around the same time of the attacks in Saudi Arabia.

Germany is condemning the attacks on oil facilities in Saudi Arabia and calling for de-escalation in the region.

The Foreign Ministry in Berlin said in a statement Sunday that “there can be no justification for such an attack on Saudi Arabia’s civilian and critical infrastructure.”

It noted that Yemen’s Houthi rebels have claimed responsibility for the attack and said it “heightens tensions” in the region when de-escalation is “urgently” needed.

The statement didn’t mention Iran, which the U.S. alleges was behind Saturday’s attacks.

A leader of Yemen’s Houthi rebels says they were able to “exploit vulnerabilities” in Saudi Arabia’s air defense system to stage the attack previous day on the kingdom’s vital oil installations.

Muhammad al-Bukhaiti told The Associated Press on Sunday that the U.S. allegations that Iran was behind the attack reflected “political bankruptcy” of the administration in Washington.

The drone attack claimed by the Houthis hit the world’s largest oil processing facility and a major oil field on Saturday, sparking huge fires at a vulnerable chokepoint for global energy supplies.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has blamed Iran for the attacks and said that here’s “no evidence the attacks came from Yemen.”

Pompeo said on Saturday that “Iran has now launched an unprecedented attack on the world’s energy supply.”

Lebanon’s Prime Minister Saad Hariri has condemned the drone attack on Saudi oil installations, describing it as an escalation that could widen conflicts in the region.

Hariri said in a statement on Sunday that the attack the day before in Saudi Arabia should push the international community to rein in “all the arms of aggression and terrorism that are striking Arab countries.”

Hariri said Lebanon stands by Saudi Arabia, adding that the latest “aggression” against the kingdom is part of attacks targeting Gulf Arab states and also undermines regional and international security.

Iran’s foreign minister says that blaming Iran for Yemeni rebel attacks on major Saudi oil sites will not end the war in the Arab world’s most impoverished country — but that talks might.

Mohammad Javad Zarif also said in a tweet on Sunday that “Having failed at ‘max pressure’, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo turning to ‘max deceit’.”

He also says: “US & its clients are stuck in Yemen because of illusion that weapon superiority will lead to military victory.”

Zarif also tweeted: “Blaming Iran won’t end disaster. Accepting our April ’15 proposal to end war & begin talks may.”

Late Saturday, Pompeo directly blamed Iran for the attack on major Saudi oil sites, without offering evidence to support his claim.

Iraq is denying that its country was the site from where Yemeni-rebel drones were launched to attack Saudi oil installations.

The statement came from Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul-Mahdi’s office on Sunday.

It says Iraq would act “decisively” if anyone tried to use its territory to attack other countries.

U.S. officials previously alleged at least one recent drone attack on Saudi Arabia came from Iraq, where Iran backs Shiite militias, something denied by Baghdad. Those militias in recent weeks have been targeted themselves by mysterious airstrikes, with at least one believed to have been carried out by Israel.

12:10 p.m.

Iran’s Foreign Ministry has dismissed the U.S. accusation that it was behind an attack on Saudi Arabia’s oil infrastructure the day before, calling it part of Washington’s policy of “maximum lies.”

Abbas Mousavi made the statement on Sunday.

He says Washington adopted a ‘maximum pressure’ policy against Iran but because of “its failure, (the U.S.) is leaning toward ‘maximum lies’” now.

Saturday’s drone attacks by Iranian-backed Yemeni rebels have halted about half of Saudi oil supplies after hitting the kingdom’s biggest oil processing facility and a major oil field.

They set off huge fires and led to a suspension of “production operations” at the Abqaiq facility and the Khurais field.

President Donald Trump called the Saudi crown prince after the attack, expressing U.S. support for the kingdom’s security and stability.

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Trump: US ‘locked and loaded’ against attackers of Saudi oil facility ‘depending on verification’

President Trump on Sunday suggested U.S. investigators had “reason to believe” they knew who launched crippling attacks against a key Saudi oil facility, and vowed that America was “locked and loaded depending on verification.”

While he did not specify who he believed was responsible for Saturday’s drone attacks, U.S. investigators previously have pointed the finger at Iran.

“Saudi Arabia oil supply was attacked. There is reason to believe that we know the culprit, are locked and loaded depending on verification, but are waiting to hear from the Kingdom as to who they believe was the cause of this attack, and under what terms we would proceed!” the president tweeted.

Earlier Sunday, Trump authorized the use of emergency oil reserves in Texas and other states after Saudi oil processing facilities were attacked, sparking fears of a spike in oil prices when markets reopen Monday.

The president wrote that he had authorized the release of oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, “in a to-be-determined amount sufficient to keep the markets well-supplied.”

He continued, “I have also informed all appropriate agencies to expedite approvals of the oil pipelines currently in the permitting process in Texas and various other States.”

The Saudi oil sites attacked on Saturday, in a drone assault linked to Iran, interrupted about 5.7 million barrels of crude oil production, over 5 percent of the world’s daily supply.

Yemen’s Iran-backed Houthi rebels have claimed responsibility, but the U.S. has accused Iran of launching the assault. Tehran has denied any involvement, calling the accusations “maximum lies.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19258155738443 Trump: US 'locked and loaded' against attackers of Saudi oil facility 'depending on verification' fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc Bradford Betz article 121c2084-0c20-5890-9976-90412dea68bc

This Saturday satellite image showed thick black smoke rising from Saudi Aramco’s Abqaiq oil processing facility in Buqyaq, Saudi Arabia.  (Planet Labs Inc via AP)

The Strategic Petroleum Reserve, located in Texas and Louisiana, is the largest government-owned stockpile of emergency crude oil in the world, according to the Department of Energy, which manages the supply.

The emergency reserve was created in the mid-1970s amid rising gasoline prices sparked by the Arab oil embargo. Per U.S. law, presidents may authorize the use of the reserves if a major disruption threatens the economy.

DEFIANT IRAN BLASTS POMPEO’S SAUDI-ATTACK ACCUSATIONS AS ‘BLIND AND FUTILE COMMENTS’

The federally owned petroleum reserve of hundreds of millions of barrels of crude oil has been tapped only three times, most recently in 2011 amid unrest in Libya.

“This president and his national security team, Secretary (of State Mike) Pompeo – our nation’s chief diplomat – keep many options on the table, particularly when it comes to retaliating against malign behavior, and protecting American interests and Americans and our American economy,” said Kellyanne Conway, counselor to President Trump, on “Fox News Sunday.”

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Saturday’s attack made no immediate impact on global oil prices since as markets were closed for the weekend, yet some analysts have cautioned that oil prices could spike when markets reopen on Monday.

Fox News’ Bill Hemmer, Stephen Sorace and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19258155738443 Trump: US 'locked and loaded' against attackers of Saudi oil facility 'depending on verification' fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc Bradford Betz article 121c2084-0c20-5890-9976-90412dea68bc   Westlake Legal Group AP19258155738443 Trump: US 'locked and loaded' against attackers of Saudi oil facility 'depending on verification' fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc Bradford Betz article 121c2084-0c20-5890-9976-90412dea68bc

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Trump Approves Oil Release From Reserve After Attack On Saudi Sites

Westlake Legal Group 5d7ebc58240000c92b7b4d12 Trump Approves Oil Release From Reserve After Attack On Saudi Sites

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The Latest on the tensions in the Persian Gulf a day after Iran-backed Yemeni rebels attacked major oil sites in Saudi Arabia (all times local):

President Donald Trump says he has approved the release of U.S. strategic petroleum reserves “if needed” to stabilize energy markets after a Saturday attack on Saudi Arabian energy facilities.

Trump tweets that the attacks could have an impact on oil prices and says the final amount of the release, if any, would be “sufficient to keep the markets well-supplied.”

The authorization alone could help prevent a spike in oil prices after the attack led to suspension of more than 5% of the world’s daily crude oil production. The Trump administration has blamed the attack on Iran.

The federally owned petroleum reserve of hundreds of millions of barrels of crude oil has only been tapped three times, most recently in 2011 amid unrest in Libya.

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that the recent attacks on Saudi Arabia oil facilities mean that a return to full production may take weeks. That could mean a spike in oil prices as traders worry about supply, with potential negative consequences for the global economy.

The Journal reports that Saudi officials say a third of crude output will be restored Monday. Officials said they would use other facilities and existing stocks to supplant the gap in production.

The weekend drone attacks hit Saudi Arabia’s biggest oil processing facility and a major oil field, halting production of 5.7 million barrels of crude a day, about half of the country’s global daily output and more than 5% of the world’s daily production.

Yemen’s Iran-backed Houthi rebels claimed responsibility for the attack, but U.S. officials say Iran is responsible. Iran denies it.

11:15 p.m.

Senior U.S. officials are citing intelligence assessments, including satellite imagery, to support their case that Iran was responsible for Saturday’s attacks on key Saudi Arabian oil infrastructure.

The officials say the intelligence shows that the strikes are inconsistent with the kind of attack that would have been launched from Yemen.

The U.S. government is releasing satellite imagery showing what officials say are at least 19 points of impact at two Saudi energy facilities. The officials say the photos show impacts consistent with attack coming from the direction of Iran, rather than from Yemen.

The officials say additional devices, which apparently didn’t reach their targets, have been recovered and are being analyzed by Saudi and American intelligence agencies.

The officials are speaking on the condition of anonymity to discuss intelligence matters.

—Associated Press writer Zeke Miller

Satellite images examined by The Associated Press appear to show damage at the heart of a Saudi oil processing facility targeted in a claimed drone attack by Yemen’s Houthi rebels.

The images Sunday come from the European Commission’s Sentinel-2 satellite.

The images appear to show black char marks in the heart of Saudi Aramco’s Abqaiq oil processing facility in Buqyaq.

Those marks were not visible in a month’s worth of earlier satellite images of the facility.

The Washington-based Center for Strategic and International Studies in August identified the area with the char marks as the plant’s stabilization area.

The center said the area’s functions mean “the likelihood of a strike successfully disrupting or destroying its operations.”

Neither Saudi Arabia nor the state-run oil giant Saudi Aramco have said how much damage was done to the facility.

Kuwait says it is increasing security across the oil-rich small nation after an attack on oil sites in Saudi Arabia.

That’s according to a report Sunday night by the state-run KUNA news agency.

KUNA said the order came from Prime Minister Jaber Al Mubarak Al Sabah, who asked officials to “tighten security measures around vital sites inside of the country.”

Separately, KUNA said authorities would investigate reports of drones flying over Kuwait. It did not elaborate.

Local Kuwaiti media has reported that witnesses say they saw a drone near a presidential palace on Saturday morning, around the same time of the attacks in Saudi Arabia.

Germany is condemning the attacks on oil facilities in Saudi Arabia and calling for de-escalation in the region.

The Foreign Ministry in Berlin said in a statement Sunday that “there can be no justification for such an attack on Saudi Arabia’s civilian and critical infrastructure.”

It noted that Yemen’s Houthi rebels have claimed responsibility for the attack and said it “heightens tensions” in the region when de-escalation is “urgently” needed.

The statement didn’t mention Iran, which the U.S. alleges was behind Saturday’s attacks.

A leader of Yemen’s Houthi rebels says they were able to “exploit vulnerabilities” in Saudi Arabia’s air defense system to stage the attack previous day on the kingdom’s vital oil installations.

Muhammad al-Bukhaiti told The Associated Press on Sunday that the U.S. allegations that Iran was behind the attack reflected “political bankruptcy” of the administration in Washington.

The drone attack claimed by the Houthis hit the world’s largest oil processing facility and a major oil field on Saturday, sparking huge fires at a vulnerable chokepoint for global energy supplies.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has blamed Iran for the attacks and said that here’s “no evidence the attacks came from Yemen.”

Pompeo said on Saturday that “Iran has now launched an unprecedented attack on the world’s energy supply.”

Lebanon’s Prime Minister Saad Hariri has condemned the drone attack on Saudi oil installations, describing it as an escalation that could widen conflicts in the region.

Hariri said in a statement on Sunday that the attack the day before in Saudi Arabia should push the international community to rein in “all the arms of aggression and terrorism that are striking Arab countries.”

Hariri said Lebanon stands by Saudi Arabia, adding that the latest “aggression” against the kingdom is part of attacks targeting Gulf Arab states and also undermines regional and international security.

Iran’s foreign minister says that blaming Iran for Yemeni rebel attacks on major Saudi oil sites will not end the war in the Arab world’s most impoverished country — but that talks might.

Mohammad Javad Zarif also said in a tweet on Sunday that “Having failed at ‘max pressure’, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo turning to ‘max deceit’.”

He also says: “US & its clients are stuck in Yemen because of illusion that weapon superiority will lead to military victory.”

Zarif also tweeted: “Blaming Iran won’t end disaster. Accepting our April ’15 proposal to end war & begin talks may.”

Late Saturday, Pompeo directly blamed Iran for the attack on major Saudi oil sites, without offering evidence to support his claim.

Iraq is denying that its country was the site from where Yemeni-rebel drones were launched to attack Saudi oil installations.

The statement came from Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul-Mahdi’s office on Sunday.

It says Iraq would act “decisively” if anyone tried to use its territory to attack other countries.

U.S. officials previously alleged at least one recent drone attack on Saudi Arabia came from Iraq, where Iran backs Shiite militias, something denied by Baghdad. Those militias in recent weeks have been targeted themselves by mysterious airstrikes, with at least one believed to have been carried out by Israel.

12:10 p.m.

Iran’s Foreign Ministry has dismissed the U.S. accusation that it was behind an attack on Saudi Arabia’s oil infrastructure the day before, calling it part of Washington’s policy of “maximum lies.”

Abbas Mousavi made the statement on Sunday.

He says Washington adopted a ‘maximum pressure’ policy against Iran but because of “its failure, (the U.S.) is leaning toward ‘maximum lies’” now.

Saturday’s drone attacks by Iranian-backed Yemeni rebels have halted about half of Saudi oil supplies after hitting the kingdom’s biggest oil processing facility and a major oil field.

They set off huge fires and led to a suspension of “production operations” at the Abqaiq facility and the Khurais field.

President Donald Trump called the Saudi crown prince after the attack, expressing U.S. support for the kingdom’s security and stability.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘Deplorable’ graffiti found at European Union’s Israel mission sparks condemnation

Westlake Legal Group EU-Building-Israel 'Deplorable' graffiti found at European Union's Israel mission sparks condemnation Talia Kaplan fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/world/disasters/refugees fox-news/us/crime fox-news/topic/the-european-union fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox news fnc/world fnc article 304ef750-6411-540a-89b3-4cd7a24c656f

The European Union’s diplomatic mission in Israel reportedly was vandalized Sunday with the words, “German money kills Jews,” and “EU get out,” sparking condemnation from officials there.

The graffiti was spray-painted on the door and walls at the entrance to the EU offices in Ramat Gan, The Times of Israel reported, adding that Israeli police were investigating.

An Israeli activist and a mother who lost her child while serving in the Israeli military allegedly were behind the vandalism, according to the newspaper which cited Israeli television station Channel 12.

TRUMP SAYS HE AND NETANYAHU DISCUSSED POSSIBLE US-ISRAELI DEFENSE TREATY

Video broadcast by the station showed right-wing activist Sheffi Paz, who has railed against a wave of migration to Israel, in front of the graffiti, saying, “We are here because enough is enough. Stop intervening in Israel’s domestic policies, stop subsidizing terrorists, stop financing illegal immigration or get out of Israel.”

The video also showed a man, apparently a security guard, approaching the pair who continued to vandalize the entrance as he confronted them. They were not immediately arrested, The Times of Israel reported.

BRITISH FOREIGN SECRETARY: UK WILL LEAVE EU WITHOUT A DEAL IF NECESSARY, BY END OF OCTOBER

The European Union’s ambassador to Israel, Emanuele Giaufret, tweeted that the office was closed on Sunday and no one was inside when the incident took place.

“Today the lobby of the EU Delegation was vandalized with threatening slogans on the walls,” Giaufret tweeted.

He added, “This incident is deplorable and has to be condemned. We will continue to do our job.”

The EU mission reportedly wrote in a statement that it contacted law enforcement and the foreign ministry to “ensure that adequate security measures are taken.”

Minister of Foreign Affairs Israel Katz tweeted that he condemned and was “appalled by” the act of vandalism, calling it “disgraceful.”

“Israel is committed to maintaining the security of all diplomatic missions,” Katz tweeted on Sunday. “The Israeli police are investigating the case, and I expect the culprits will be swiftly brought to justice.”

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Paz did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment. However, she tweeted on Sunday, “The EU is funding our child killers and infiltrators’ associations. It’s time for them to stop.”

Westlake Legal Group EU-Building-Israel 'Deplorable' graffiti found at European Union's Israel mission sparks condemnation Talia Kaplan fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/world/disasters/refugees fox-news/us/crime fox-news/topic/the-european-union fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox news fnc/world fnc article 304ef750-6411-540a-89b3-4cd7a24c656f   Westlake Legal Group EU-Building-Israel 'Deplorable' graffiti found at European Union's Israel mission sparks condemnation Talia Kaplan fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/world/disasters/refugees fox-news/us/crime fox-news/topic/the-european-union fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox news fnc/world fnc article 304ef750-6411-540a-89b3-4cd7a24c656f

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