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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 9)

Facebook Cryptocurrency Plans Have a Problem: Facebook’s Reputation

Westlake Legal Group 16libra-facebookJumbo Facebook Cryptocurrency Plans Have a Problem: Facebook’s Reputation Zuckerberg, Mark E Virtual Currency United States Politics and Government United States Trump, Donald J Stocks and Bonds Social Media Senate Committee on Banking Securities and Exchange Commission Regulation and Deregulation of Industry Powell, Jerome H PayPal Money Laundering Mnuchin, Steven T Marcus, David A Libra (Currency) House Financial Services Committee Federal Trade Commission Federal Reserve System Facebook Inc E-Commerce Consumer Protection Computers and the Internet Brown, Sherrod Bitcoin (Currency) Banking and Financial Institutions

Lawmakers made it clear at a Senate Banking Committee hearing on Tuesday that they believe the biggest roadblock to Facebook’s plan to enter the world of cryptocurrency and global finance is the company’s reputation.

Facebook’s cryptocurrency project, Libra, has been in the works for more than a year. It has an ambitious goal: to offer an alternative financial system that makes it possible to send money around the world with few fees.

But almost immediately, the company has run into resistance from Washington.

“Facebook is dangerous,” Senator Sherrod Brown, Democrat of Ohio, said at the hearing. “Facebook has said ‘just trust us.’ And every time Americans trust you, they seem to get burned.”

The initiative is far from the first effort of its kind. The best-known cryptocurrency, Bitcoin, is in wide circulation, and it introduced the idea of digital currencies that are free from government control.

But the Libra effort has put a spotlight on cryptocurrencies and amplified the voices of critics who say the technology has little value beyond speculative investing and illegal transactions, like online drug sales.

When Facebook announced Libra in June, it also faced immediate skepticism from people who are wary of the power the social media company has already accumulated. Within days, regulators in Washington were calling for hearings on Facebook’s plans.

That concern was obvious on Tuesday when members of the committee questioned David Marcus, who leads the company’s cryptocurrency initiative, for more than two hours. Mr. Marcus was asked about a range of Facebook controversies, from lax protection of the private information of its users to Russian disinformation on Facebook’s platforms to claims that is tries to muzzle conservative viewpoints.

“Why in the world should Facebook of all companies do this?” asked Senator Brian Schatz, a Democrat from Hawaii. “Maybe before you do a new thing you should make sure you have your own shop fixed.”

Mr. Marcus, adopting a conciliatory tone, said the company would do its best to fight fraud and to earn back the trust of the more than two billion people who use Facebook’s services regularly.

“We’ve made mistakes in the past,” Mr. Marcus said. “We have been working, and are working hard to get better.”

The Senate session was the first in a day of Capitol Hill hearings involving the technology industry. House lawmakers were set to question multiple tech executives at an afternoon hearing focused on competition issues as part of a broad antitrust inquiry. And Google executives were scheduled to face questions at another hearing on the subject of whether the company censors conservative voices.

Facebook officials will also have to answer more questions about the company’s cryptocurrency plans in a House Financial Services Committee hearing on Wednesday.

Some lawmakers and regulators — most notably at the Securities and Exchange Commission — have been raising concerns about the legality and usefulness of cryptocurrencies for some time.

The involvement of Facebook, which has faced an onslaught of controversy over the last two years and is expected to pay a $5 billion settlement with the Federal Trade Commission, has put a charge into those discussions.

Last week, the chair of the Federal Reserve, Jerome H. Powell, said Libra raised “serious concerns” around “money laundering, consumer protection and financial stability.”

“I just think it cannot go forward without there being broad satisfaction with the way the company has addressed money laundering” and other issues, Mr. Powell said as he testified before the House Financial Services Committee. Central bankers from Britain, China, France, Singapore and the European Central Bank have all voiced similar concerns.

President Trump also criticized Libra and Bitcoin, writing on Twitter last week that the digital tokens were “highly volatile and based on thin air.”

And at a news conference on Monday afternoon, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin also raised questions about Libra and other cryptocurrencies. Facebook has “a lot of work to do before we get to the point where we’re comfortable with it,” Mr. Mnuchin told reporters.

The issue provides a rare instance when the Trump administration is lining up with Democrats rather than other Republicans. While Democrats on the Senate Banking Committee lashed into Facebook, several Republicans on the committee voiced support for Facebook and its new initiative.

“I just think we should be exploring this and considering the benefits as well as the risks,” said Patrick Toomey, a Republican from Pennsylvania. “To announce in advance that we have to strangle this baby in the crib seems wildly premature.”

But not all Republicans on the committee were so positive.

Martha McSally, a Republican from Arizona, said “I don’t trust you guys.”

And Tom Cotton, a Republican from Arkansas, worried that conservatives would not be treated fairly in the Libra system, echoing a frequent Republican talking point about the liberal bias of tech companies.

Mr. Marcus, a former PayPal executive, was handpicked by Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, to lead the Libra effort.

Facebook’s role in the project will be run through a subsidiary company called Calibra, led by Mr. Marcus and other top Facebook employees. If the Libra digital token become popular, Calibra could build a business around offering customer financial services, including loans and other actions traditionally offered by the banking industry.

A separate entity called the Libra Association, whose proposed board would include more than a dozen partners in the tech and financial industries, would manage the cryptocurrency system once it is up and running, which Facebook is hoping to do next year.

Mr. Brown asked if there was any amount of opposition that would convince Facebook to scrap Libra.

“Is there anything that elected leaders can say that will convince you and Facebook that it should not launch this currency?” he said.

Mr. Marcus said that the company would not move ahead with the project until the concerns of regulators are answered.

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Natural gas explosion at California home kills worker, injures 15 others

A gas company worker was killed and more than a dozen people were hurt when a natural gas explosion leveled a home in Southern California on Monday, according to officials.

The blast took place shortly after noon in Murrieta, located about 80 miles southeast of Los Angeles. Firefighters and Southern California Gas Co. workers had gone to the home after a report that a contractor had damaged a gas line.

SoCalGas officials told FOX11 the contractor did not call 811, a phone number to notify utility companies about projects that involve digging so that the utility companies can safely mark all buried lines, before him and his team began digging.

FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR DEAD, STUDENT PILOT INJURED AFTER HELICOPTER LANDS UPSIDE DOWN AT EAST BAY AIRPORT: REPORTS

Shortly after crews arrived, an explosion killed one SoCalGas employee and injured another. Murrieta Deputy Fire Chief David Lantzer said 15 people were injured in total, including three firefighters.

Westlake Legal Group houseexplosion2 Natural gas explosion at California home kills worker, injures 15 others Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/disasters fox news fnc/us fnc article 03e1d9fc-b93e-55c4-a53a-8d9ac0d46cc8

A firefighter and civilians train fire hoses on a burning home after an explosion and fire destroyed the home in Murrieta, Calif., sending up thick flames and closing several streets. One Southern California Gas Company employee was killed. (Andrew Foulk via AP)

The explosion sent up a wall of fire and smoke and rocked nearby homes before the gas was shut off and the fire doused more than an hour later.

Westlake Legal Group housexplosion1 Natural gas explosion at California home kills worker, injures 15 others Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/disasters fox news fnc/us fnc article 03e1d9fc-b93e-55c4-a53a-8d9ac0d46cc8

A house in Murrieta, Calif. caught fire and exploded on Monday as a result of a gas line rupture, killing a gas company worker and injuring 15 others. (KTTV)

Photos from the scene showed the home virtually torn apart, with flames burning about 20 feet high.

HURRICANE BARRY RATTLES GULF COAST FISHERMEN ALREADY REELING FROM ROUGH SEASON

Neighbors said the explosion shattered windows throughout the neighborhood. Jessica Molstad who lives nearby told FOX11 that, at first, she thought the blast was an earthquake after other recent temblors.

Kevin McKinney, 63, lives in a home next door that was damaged by the blast. There was “just a huge, huge explosion and then I heard screams and went outside,” he told the Riverside Press-Enterprise.

In a statement posted to Twitter, SoCalGas said its “deepest sympathies are with all those impacted by the Murrieta incident.”

“Sadly, we lost one of our technicians today. He will be greatly missed,” the company said. “We urge all contractors & homeowners to call 811 to have utility lines marked prior to digging of any sort.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

The identification of the worker that was killed has not yet been released. The investigation into the deadly blast is ongoing.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6059824141001_6059729136001-vs Natural gas explosion at California home kills worker, injures 15 others Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/disasters fox news fnc/us fnc article 03e1d9fc-b93e-55c4-a53a-8d9ac0d46cc8   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6059824141001_6059729136001-vs Natural gas explosion at California home kills worker, injures 15 others Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/disasters fox news fnc/us fnc article 03e1d9fc-b93e-55c4-a53a-8d9ac0d46cc8

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DoorDash fires delivery driver who allegedly ate customer’s barbecue ribs, dropped off food with bite marks

A man in Pennsylvania is accusing his delivery driver of speeding off with a bellyful of barbecue.

Chris Payton, of York County, claims he ordered six ribs from a local barbecue restaurant via DoorDash, only to discover that the driver had helped herself to two of the ribs, and some waffle fries, before dropping them off.

Westlake Legal Group DoorDashRibsfox43Chrispayton2 DoorDash fires delivery driver who allegedly ate customer's barbecue ribs, dropped off food with bite marks Michael Bartiromo fox-news/food-drink/food fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 03d5cc7c-96b8-51ce-8870-9ea392eef08e

Chris Payton claims his order of ribs arrived half-eaten. (Chris Payton)

NYC BURGER KING DELIVERED BEEF BURGERS TO CUSTOMERS WANTING VEGGIE PATTIES

“I guess she just pulls over to the side of the road and just decides to have herself a little snack before she delivers,” Payton told Fox 43.

Payton had also taken photos of his incomplete order, noting that the two ribs appeared to be “torn off” from the rest of the meat. Fox 43 reported that bite marks appeared to be left behind, too.

Westlake Legal Group DoorDashRibFox43ChrisPayton1 DoorDash fires delivery driver who allegedly ate customer's barbecue ribs, dropped off food with bite marks Michael Bartiromo fox-news/food-drink/food fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 03d5cc7c-96b8-51ce-8870-9ea392eef08e

“I guess she just pulls over to the side of the road and just decides to have herself a little snack before she delivers,” Payton told Fox 43. (Chris Payton)

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Surprisingly, the eatery that provided the ribs — Dickey’s Barbecue, located in West Manchester Township — told Fox 43 that this wasn’t the first time they fielded complaints about that very DoorDash employee, or “Dasher.”

DoorDash has since confirmed to Fox News that the offending “Dasher” is no longer working with DoorDash.

“We sincerely regret that this incident fell short of the experience we strive to give our customers every day,” a DoorDash spokesperson confirmed. “We reached out to this customer immediately after being notified of this event. We have since taken appropriate actions, including deactivating the Dasher from our platform for failing to follow and maintain our standards of food safety.”

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The company reportedly issued Payton a refund, but he’s also hoping the employee learned a lesson in treating customers with respect.

Westlake Legal Group DoorDashChrisPayronFox43 DoorDash fires delivery driver who allegedly ate customer's barbecue ribs, dropped off food with bite marks Michael Bartiromo fox-news/food-drink/food fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 03d5cc7c-96b8-51ce-8870-9ea392eef08e

Payton was issued a refund, and DoorDash confirmed to Fox News the employee no longer works with the company. (Fox 43)

News of the alleged barbecue bandit follows a similar complaint lodged against a DoorDash delivery driver earlier this year. In March, a customer in Stockton, Calif., claimed his “Dasher” took a sip of his milkshake before dropping it off, although he didn’t discover the driver’s dirty deed until later, when he watched his family’s front-door surveillance footage.

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DoorDash, which was founded in 2013, pays the Dashers that act as independent delivery drivers for restaurants in their area. Restaurants can apply to appear on the DoorDash app and website to be included among a specific area’s delivery offerings.

Westlake Legal Group DoorDashRibsfox43Chrispayton2 DoorDash fires delivery driver who allegedly ate customer's barbecue ribs, dropped off food with bite marks Michael Bartiromo fox-news/food-drink/food fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 03d5cc7c-96b8-51ce-8870-9ea392eef08e   Westlake Legal Group DoorDashRibsfox43Chrispayton2 DoorDash fires delivery driver who allegedly ate customer's barbecue ribs, dropped off food with bite marks Michael Bartiromo fox-news/food-drink/food fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 03d5cc7c-96b8-51ce-8870-9ea392eef08e

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Rooted In History, ‘The Nickel Boys’ Is A Great American Novel

It’s pretty rare for a writer to produce a novel that wins the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award and, then, a scant three years later, bring out another novel that’s even more extraordinary. But, that’s what Colson Whitehead has done in following up his 2016 novel, The Underground Railroad, with The Nickel Boys. It’s a masterpiece squared, rooted in history and American mythology and, yet, painfully topical in its visions of justice and mercy erratically denied.

By Whitehead’s own admission, the disturbing true story that informs The Nickel Boys derailed him from the crime novel he’d been planning to write. A few years ago, Whitehead read news reports about The Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys, a segregated reform school in Florida that opened in 1900 and was finally shut down in 2011. Unmarked graves of boys brutalized and even possibly murdered at the school were discovered — and are still being discovered — by forensic archaeologists. In Whitehead’s novel, The Dozier School is renamed “The Nickel Academy” and it’s at this house of horrors that his main character, an African American teenager named Elwood Curtis, winds up.

It’s the early 1960s and Elwood has been listening to a record album of Martin Luther King Jr.’s speeches that his grandmother gave him for Christmas. Elwood has absorbed Dr. King’s message that he “must walk the streets of life every day with [a] sense of dignity and … somebody-ness.”

The other kids in high school think he’s a goody goody, but industrious Elwood believes in the meritocracy and, in fact, he’s already been offered an opportunity to take classes at a “colored college” miles away from his home in Tallahassee. To get there he has to hitchhike. That’s when Fate steps in in the form of a black man driving a bright green Plymouth Fury, which turns out to be stolen. Even though Elwood is but a clueless passenger, he’s sent to the Nickel Academy for car theft.

Whitehead’s novel is short and intense; its chapters as compact as the isolation cells that Nickel boys are thrown into and sometimes never leave. One way that Whitehead uses the narrative spareness of The Nickel Boys to devastating effect is by tightly juxtaposing scenes and images and letting the contrasts silently sink in.

For instance, Elwood’s arrival (in handcuffs) at The Nickel Academy is made all the more wretched by the fact that the school — all green lawns and red brick — looks like his intended college, at least on the outside. And a shattering chapter about a rigged and vicious boxing match that nods to Ralph Ellison‘s Invisible Man is followed by a description of the annual Christmas Fair at The Nickel Academy. The child-friendly displays of Santa and gingerbread houses are constructed by the forced labor of the Nickel boys — boys, who, we’re told, years later:

“could have been many things had they not been ruined by that place. Doctors who cure diseases or perform brain surgery, … [S]ure not all of them were geniuses … but they had been denied even the simple pleasure of being ordinary. Hobbled and handicapped before the race even began, never figuring out how to be normal.”

At Nickel, Elwood makes a friend whose name is Turner; Turner is an expert whistler, often breaking into the theme music from The Andy Griffith Show. (Another disorienting juxtaposition.) He’s also more skeptical, especially about the civil rights movement and the chances of justice within the walls of Nickel or beyond. Turner goes along to get along and, as Elwood begins to do the same, he feels his spirit dying. We’re told that Elwood wakes up at night and realizes that:

“In keeping his head down, … he fooled himself that he had prevailed. … In fact he had been ruined. He was like one of those Negroes Dr. King spoke of in his letter from [Birmingham] jail, so complacent and sleepy after years of oppression that they had adjusted to it and learned to sleep in it as their only bed.”

Before he gives up, Elwood resolves he’ll make one last gesture of faith in the possibility that someone in power cares about correcting injustice. You may think you can guess how that effort ends, but you’d only be partially right. The Nickel Boys issues a complex and deeply affecting verdict on whether or not the arc of the moral universe does indeed bend toward justice. But my “verdict,” so to speak, on The Nickel Boys is much more straightforward: It’s a great American novel.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘The D.O.J. Has Failed Us’: Eric Garner’s Family Assails Prosecutors

Elected officials, civil rights activists and family members expressed dismay on Tuesday that the Justice Department had declined to pursue charges against a New York City police officer in the death of Eric Garner on a Staten Island sidewalk five years ago.

In an emotional news conference, family members called on Mayor Bill de Blasio and police officials to immediately fire the officer, Daniel Pantaleo, who remains on the force, suspended with pay.

“The D.O.J. has failed us,” Mr. Garner’s mother, Gwen Carr, said. “Five years ago, my son said ‘I can’t breathe’ 11 times. Today we can’t breathe. Because they have let us down.”

She also posted on Twitter the phrase “This is not the end,” repeated 11 times.

The decision by the Justice Department ended a yearslong inquiry into a case that prompted national protests over excessive force by the police, and helped spark the Black Lives Matter movement.

Caught on video, Mr. Garner’s death shocked the nation. It showed Officer Pantaleo and a team of other officers taking down and arresting Mr. Garner, accusing him of selling cigarettes illegally, on July 17, 2014.

Federal prosecutors faced a Wednesday deadline to file charges against Officer Pantaleo, who put his arm around Mr. Garner’s neck while arresting him. Mr. Garner did not appear to be resisting, and the officers continued to hold him even after he said repeatedly that he could not breathe.

The New York City medical examiner determined that Mr. Garner died of a fatal asthma attack sparked by the police takedown and compression to his neck and chest.

Eric Garner’s Death Will Not Lead to Federal Charges for N.Y.P.D. Officer

July 16, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 16garner01-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v2 ‘The D.O.J. Has Failed Us’: Eric Garner’s Family Assails Prosecutors Staten Island (NYC) Police Department (NYC) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Pantaleo, Daniel New York City Justice Department Garner, Eric Decisions and Verdicts Civil Rights and Liberties Carr, Gwen (1949- ) Blacks
Beyond the Chokehold: The Path to Eric Garner’s Death

June 13, 2015

Westlake Legal Group 14GARNER1web-videoLarge ‘The D.O.J. Has Failed Us’: Eric Garner’s Family Assails Prosecutors Staten Island (NYC) Police Department (NYC) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Pantaleo, Daniel New York City Justice Department Garner, Eric Decisions and Verdicts Civil Rights and Liberties Carr, Gwen (1949- ) Blacks

Mayor Bill de Blasio said in a statement that the Justice Department had failed the city.

“Years ago, we put our faith in the federal government to act,” he said. “We won’t make that mistake again.”

“New York is not the same city it was five years ago,” the mayor added. “We are a different city, and we must act like a different city. Moving forward, we will not wait for the federal government to commence our own disciplinary proceedings.”

The decision extinguishes the hopes of the family and their supporters that Officer Pantaleo might face prosecution in a case that ignited demonstrations and debates and led to changes in policing practices across the United States.

Tina Luongo, the attorney-in-charge of the criminal defense practice at The Legal Aid Society, said the long wait for the Justice Department’s decision had unnecessarily prolonged the Garner family’s anguish.

“All eyes now fall to City Hall,” she said, “where Mayor Bill de Blasio can finally deliver some measure of justice to the Garner family.”

In June, the New York Police Department finished a disciplinary trial to determine if Officer Pantaleo should be fired or punished in some other way for using what appeared to be a chokehold, which the department had banned more than two decades ago.

Though Mr. de Blasio can weigh in, it is ultimately up to Commissioner James P. O’Neill, as the final arbiter of police discipline, to decide whether to fire Officer Pantaleo.

Police officials said he had been waiting for the report of the administrative judge before making his decision.

The Rev. Al Sharpton stood with Mr. Garner’s family on the steps outside the United States Attorney’s office in Brooklyn, as they shared their anger over the Justice Department’s decision.

“It’s not over. This is one chapter, but don’t close the book,” Mr. Sharpton said. “Daniel Pantaleo must be fired. And must be fired immediately.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Rallies G.O.P. to Oppose Resolution Against Racist Language

WASHINGTON — President Trump on Tuesday denied that his tweets suggesting that four minority congresswomen leave the country were racist, imploring House Republicans to reject a resolution set for a vote Tuesday that condemns his statements as “racist comments that have legitimized increased fear and hatred of new Americans and people of color.”

On Monday, Mr. Trump told reporters he was not concerned that his comments about the so-called Squad were being heard as racist and embraced by white nationalists. A day later, the president raged on Twitter against the resolution, calling it a “con game.” He renewed his harsh criticism of Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Ayanna S. Pressley of Massachusetts and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan.

“Those Tweets were NOT Racist,” Mr. Trump wrote. “I don’t have a Racist bone in my body! The so-called vote to be taken is a Democrat con game. Republicans should not show ‘weakness’ and fall into their trap.”

The vote on the resolution, scheduled for Tuesday evening, is developing into a show of unity for Democrats who had been squabbling for weeks — and a test of Republican principles.

In a closed-door meeting of House Democrats on Tuesday morning, Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California called the four freshman congresswomen “our sisters,” and said the insults to which Mr. Trump subjected them echo hurtful and offensive remarks he makes every day.

“So this is a resolution based in who we are as a people, as well as a recognition of the unacceptability of what his goals were,” Ms. Pelosi told Democrats, according to an aide present for the private meeting who described her remarks on condition of anonymity. “This is, I hope, one where we will get Republican support. If they can’t support condemning the words of the president, well, that’s a message in and of itself.”

A smattering of Republicans have denounced the president’s performance, including Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker. Mr. Trump’s comments “were shameful, they were racist,” he told WBUR in Boston, “and they bring a tremendous amount of, sort of, disgrace to public policy and public life and I condemn them all.”

But Representative Kevin McCarthy of California, the House Republican leader and a close ally of the president’s, said he would oppose the resolution, and when asked whether Mr. Trump’s tweets were racist, replied flatly, “No.”

That drew an appreciative response from a president who appeared to be searching for validation for his statements.

Earlier, Mr. Trump attempted to shift the focus to what he called “HORRIBLE” things said by the four liberal freshmen congresswomen, who have been among the most outspoken in their party in their criticisms of him, including at a news conference on Monday where they described Mr. Trump as racist, xenophobic, misogynistic and criminal.

“This should be a vote on the filthy language, statements and lies told by the Democrat Congresswomen, who I truly believe, based on their actions, hate our Country,” Mr. Trump wrote.

His latest broadside against the women comes hours before the House is poised to vote on a resolution that responds directly to his nativist tweets on Sunday telling the lawmakers — all but one of whom was born in the United States — to “go back” to their countries. The measure is a chance for Democrats to go on offense, and put Republicans on the record either rejecting or endorsing what the president said.

Video

Westlake Legal Group 15dc-trump-sub-videoSixteenByNine3000 Trump Rallies G.O.P. to Oppose Resolution Against Racist Language Trump, Donald J tlaib, rashida Race and Ethnicity Omar, Ilhan Ocasio-Cortez, Alexandria Malinowski, Tom Immigration and Emigration discrimination

On Monday, hours after President Trump defended his Twitter attacks on Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib and Ayanna S. Pressley, the four Democratic congresswomen of color held a news conference to respond to his remarks.CreditCreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

While some Democrats are pressing for a stronger resolution of censure, House leaders have opted instead for a narrower measure based on Mr. Trump’s latest remarks, in an effort to generate a unanimous vote in their party.

“Let’s focus on these comments that the vast majority of Americans recognize to be divisive and racist, that the vast majority of my Republican colleagues, in their hearts, recognize to be divisive and racist,” said Representative Tom Malinowski, Democrat of New Jersey, the sponsor of the resolution.

“We need to move forward with something that can be unifying, and right now, what we can unite around is that what the president said was wrong, un-American, and dangerous.”

During the meeting on Tuesday, Representative Jim McGovern, Democrat of Massachusetts and the chairman of the Rules Committee, warned members to take care with their language during the debate, including checking with the official in charge of enforcing floor procedures to make sure their speeches would not violate House rules against making personal references to the president on the floor.

Ms. Pelosi advised Democrats to focus on how Mr. Trump’s “words were racist,” which would keep them in compliance with the rules.

While the vote is symbolic and nonbinding, the debate is certain dramatize the conflict between Democrats and a president who has organized his agenda and his re-election campaign around stoking racial controversy, and casting the group of progressive stars as dangerous extremists to be feared.

Among other things, the resolution declares that the House “believes that immigrants and their descendants have made America stronger,” that “those who take the oath of citizenship are every bit as American as those whose families have lived in the United States for many generations,” and that the House “is committed to keeping America open to those lawfully seeking refuge and asylum from violence and oppression, and those who are willing to work hard to live the American Dream, no matter their race, ethnicity, faith, or country of origin.”

Republican leaders signaled on Tuesday that they would seek to shift the debate from the president’s incendiary remarks to the policies espoused by Ms. Ocasio-Cortez and her colleagues.

“I want to make absolutely clear that our opposition to our socialist colleagues has absolutely nothing to do with their gender, with their religion or with their race,” said Representative Liz Cheney of Wyoming, the No. 3 Republican.

While Mr. Trump’s comments have helped to paper over divisions among Democrats over how aggressively to confront him, the resolution itself prompted more rifts. Representative Steve Cohen, Democrat of Tennessee, introduced a resolution of censure, endorsed by the squad among others, and said it would be “more appropriate” for the House to pass that than the measure scheduled for a vote on Tuesday.

“Censure would put him in the class with Andrew Jackson, which is where he wants to be and we should put him where he wants to be, with a president who was racist, who had slaves and led the Trail of Tears,” Mr. Cohen said.

“We have a different way of doing things,” Mr. Cohen added. “I’m not worried about getting Republicans. I think we ought to do what’s right.”

Democratic leaders deflected questions on Tuesday about the strength of the resolution and sought to shift pressure onto Republicans to reject Mr. Trump’s statements.

“We are hopeful that our colleagues on the other side of the aisle would put country ahead of party, would put decency ahead of Donald Trump,” Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York, the No. 5 House Democrat, told reporters.

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How the Eric Garner Decision Compares With Other Cases

After the fatal chokehold of Eric Garner by a New York City police officer, a familiar pattern unfolded: Expressions of outrage, promises to investigate, a long wait for a resolution.

On Tuesday, just before the fifth anniversary of Mr. Garner’s death, word came that federal prosecutors would not seek civil rights charges against Daniel Pantaleo, the officer who put Mr. Garner in a chokehold.

Mr. Garner’s death was among several involving the police in recent years that have led to protests and calls for the officer to face criminal charges. Here is what has happened to the officers in some of the other cases.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 15officers-tensing-alt-articleLarge How the Eric Garner Decision Compares With Other Cases Wilson, Darren (1986- ) Shelby, Betty J (1974- ) Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Murders, Attempted Murders and Homicides Garner, Eric Clark, Jamar (d 2015) Blacks

Ray Tensing, a University of Cincinnati police officer, after the shooting of Samuel DuBose in 2015.CreditHamilton County Prosecutor’S Off/Reuters

In 2014, Timothy Loehmann, a rookie patrolman in Cleveland, shot and killed Tamir Rice, a black 12-year-old, within seconds of arriving outside a recreation center where Tamir was carrying a replica gun. Mr. Loehmann, who is white, was not criminally charged, but was fired from the Cleveland police for lying about a past job on his employment application. Years later, Mr. Loehmann accepted another policing job in rural Ohio, but resigned under pressure from activists. He has appealed his firing from the Cleveland police force.

Protesters in Minneapolis occupied the area outside a police precinct for days in 2015 after Jamar Clark, a black man, was shot during a struggle with Officers Mark Ringgenberg and Dustin Schwarze. Both officers, who are white, returned to work after the county prosecutor and the police chief cleared them of wrongdoing. In 2017, Officer Ringgenberg was among the first officers on the scene after another Minneapolis officer shot and killed an unarmed woman.

In Tulsa, Okla., prosecutors swiftly charged Officer Betty Jo Shelby with manslaughter after she shot and killed Terence Crutcher, an unarmed black man, in 2016. But jurors acquitted her, and Officer Shelby, who is white, returned to work. She later resigned from the Tulsa police after being assigned a desk job, and joined a sheriff’s department in a nearby county.

Roy D. Oliver II, who was charged in the death of Jordan Edwards, during a hearing in Dallas last year. CreditPool photo by

Twice, prosecutors tried to convince jurors that Ray Tensing, a white University of Cincinnati police officer, was guilty of murder in the death of Samuel DuBose, an unarmed black driver. Twice, jurors deadlocked and failed to reach a verdict. Prosecutors declined to seek a third trial. Mr. Tensing, who had been fired shortly after the shooting, was later reported to have reached a settlement with the university that included legal fees and nearly $250,000 in back pay.

Baltimore erupted in large, sometimes violent, protests in 2015 when Freddie Gray, a black man, died after suffering a spinal cord injury while in police custody. The local prosecutor charged six officers in connection with his death, but none were convicted. Federal prosecutors declined to file charges.

Roy D. Oliver II, a white police officer in Balch Springs, Tex., shot and killed Jordan Edwards with a high-powered rifle as Jordan, who was black and 15, and other teenagers drove away from a house party in 2017. Mr. Oliver was convicted of murder last summer and sentenced to 15 years in prison, a sentence Jordan’s family called too lenient.

Mohamed Noor, a Minneapolis police officer, said he feared for his life when Justine Ruszczyk, a white woman wearing pajamas and holding a glittery cellphone, approached his squad car on a summer night in 2017. Mr. Noor, who is black, shot and killed her. Jurors did not accept his account, and convicted him of murder this year. He was sentenced to 12.5 years in prison.

A 2014 video showing Jason Van Dyke, a white Chicago police officer, firing 16 shots into Laquan McDonald, a black teenager who had been holding a knife, touched off political upheaval and led to an agreement to overhaul the city’s Police Department. Jurors found Mr. Van Dyke guilty of murder last year — the first such conviction for an on-duty Chicago officer in decades — and he was sentenced in January to nearly seven years in prison. Laquan’s family and the Illinois attorney general called the sentence inadequate.

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House GOP leaders refuse to condemn Donald Trump's racist tweets, say the uproar is 'all about politics'

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close House GOP leaders refuse to condemn Donald Trump's racist tweets, say the uproar is 'all about politics'

While commenting on tweets he made about the “Radical Left Congresswomen,” President Donald Trump said they’re free to leave if they want to. USA TODAY

WASHINGTON – House Republican leaders declined Tuesday to condemn President Donald Trump’s racist tweets suggesting four minority Democratic congresswomen should “go back” to where they came from.

GOP minority leader Kevin McCarthy of California told reporters he doesn’t consider Trump’s comments racist and slammed Democrats for planning to bring a resolution to the floor later Tuesday condemning the president’s remarks.

 “Let’s not be false about what is happening here today,” McCarthy said. “This is all about politics and beliefs of ideologies.”

Trump’s remarks – which initially came in a series of tweets on Sunday – have created a political firestorm and have been widely condemned by congressional Democrats and others as racist language that should not be tolerated, especially by the president of the United States.

Although Trump did not specify who he was specifically referring to, many believe he was talking about Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., and Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich.

Three of those lawmakers were born in the U.S. Omar came to the United States as a refugee from Somalia more than 20 years ago and is a naturalized U.S. citizen.

Omar and Tlaib are the only two Muslim women in the House.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., called Trump’s remarks “xenophobic” and said they were meant to divide the nation. The House has scheduled a vote for later Tuesday on a resolution condemning his comments

More: Trump triples down on his controversial tweets about ‘The Squad.’ Here’s what we know

Trump took to Twitter again Tuesday to defend himself and slam the upcoming vote.

“I don’t have a Racist bone in my body!” Trump tweeted. “The so-called vote to be taken is a Democrat con game. Republicans should not show ‘weakness’ and fall into their trap.”

In a news conference at the Capitol, GOP leaders also defended Trump and portrayed the upcoming vote as another political attack by Democrats.

Asked if he considered Trump’s remarks racist, McCarthy said “No.”

“I believe this is about ideology,” he said.

House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., said the upcoming vote condemning Trump’s remarks is “one more attempt to personally attack President Trump.”

Scalise accused Omar of making inflammatory false statements about the conditions in detention facilities where migrants who enter the country illegally are held. He also slammed Pressley for refusing to refer to Trump as president.

Republicans “disagreed with Barack Obama on a lot of things he did on policies … but we never disrespected the office,” Scalise said.

House Republican Conference Chairwoman Liz Cheney of Wyoming insisted GOP opposition to Democrats “has absolutely nothing to do with their gender, with their religion or with their race.”

“It has to do with the content of their policies,” she said.

More: George Conway, husband of Kellyanne Conway, calls Trump a racist in op-ed

More: Trump tells congresswomen to ‘go back’ to the ‘crime infested places from which they came’

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/07/16/trump-racist-tweets-mccarthy-house-gop-brass-dont-condemn-president/1742755001/

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Former South African soccer star Marc Batchelor fatally shot near his home, police say

Westlake Legal Group Marc-Batchelor-Getty Former South African soccer star Marc Batchelor fatally shot near his home, police say Ryan Gaydos fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/world fox-news/sports/soccer fox news fnc/sports fnc article 4114928f-6fe4-58eb-8954-dc75dab8539b

Former South African soccer star Marc Batchelor was fatally shot near his home in Johannesburg, police said Tuesday.

Batchelor, a striker who played for the Kaizer Chiefs, Orlando Pirates and Mamelodi Sundowns in South Africa’s Premier Soccer League, was shot several times, South Africa police spokesman Col. Lungelo Dlamini told South African Broadcasting Corporation.

USWNT’S ASHLYN HARRIS CALLS FORMER TEAMMATE JAELENE HINKLE ‘HOMOPHOBIC’ AFTER OLD INTERVIEW RESURFACES

“He was about to drive into his premises. The suspects shot several times at him,” he said. “He died inside the car and they drove away without taking anything.”

Police said they were still identifying a motive behind the shooting and no suspects have been identified.

BRANDI CHASTAIN’S ICONIC WOMEN’S WORLD CUP MOMENT IMMORTALIZED WITH STATUE OUTSIDE ROSE BOWL

Kaizer Chiefs chairman Kaizer Motaung released a statement on Batchelor’s death.

“I am shocked to learn about the passing of former Kaizer Chiefs player Marc Batchelor,” Motaung said. “On behalf of Kaizer Chiefs, I wish to express my deepest heartfelt condolences to the bereaved family, friends and the football fraternity. May his soul rest in eternal peace.”

Orlando Pirates chairman Irvin Khoza recalled Batchelor as a “hero” for his role in the CAF Champions League final in 1995 when the club defeated Asec Mimosas.

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After he retired, Batchelor notably testified about Oscar Pistorius during the Paralympian’s murder trial in 2014. He told the court at the time Pistorius threatened to break his legs because he believed Batchelor slept with his then-girlfriend Samantha Taylor, according to Metro.

Westlake Legal Group Marc-Batchelor-Getty Former South African soccer star Marc Batchelor fatally shot near his home, police say Ryan Gaydos fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/world fox-news/sports/soccer fox news fnc/sports fnc article 4114928f-6fe4-58eb-8954-dc75dab8539b   Westlake Legal Group Marc-Batchelor-Getty Former South African soccer star Marc Batchelor fatally shot near his home, police say Ryan Gaydos fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/world fox-news/sports/soccer fox news fnc/sports fnc article 4114928f-6fe4-58eb-8954-dc75dab8539b

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As backlash against Trump’s ‘go back’ comments builds, here’s Ronald Reagan’s ‘love letter to immigrants’: ‘You can go to live in Germany, Turkey or Japan, but you cannot become German, Turk or Japanese. But anyone, from any corner of the Earth, can come to live in America and become an American.’

Westlake Legal Group 2N7PS9tmN7KTibpp49-9mUM0PM5i5jRk6iUl8xVsJhg As backlash against Trump’s ‘go back’ comments builds, here’s Ronald Reagan’s ‘love letter to immigrants’: ‘You can go to live in Germany, Turkey or Japan, but you cannot become German, Turk or Japanese. But anyone, from any corner of the Earth, can come to live in America and become an American.’ r/politics

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