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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 90)

Kim Komando with 5 mistakes that shorten the life of your gadgets

Spill one cup of coffee, and you fry your laptop. Drop your tablet while taking a photo, and it can plunge to its doom. Lose your grip on a smartphone, and your $1,000 device could slip through a drainage grate and disappear forever.

Most of us can’t afford to regularly replace our devices, which is why we have to take good care of them. I have tons of practical tips on my site to help. Some popular ones are how to clean your camera, improve your Windows performance, and remove viruses from your iPad or iPhone.

Based on calls to my show, email, and questions posted on my site’s tech support forums, here are five mistakes that people routinely make.

1. Going the cheap route

In theory, you can buy a Lightning cable at your local corner store. But many fail to acknowledge that the specific charger and cable included in the box with any new device is designed especially for that product.

If you lose your charger or the USB cable gets frayed, do not buy the cheapest charger and cable you can find. The few dollars you save on a low-cost substitute will very likely negatively affect your device’s performance.

The dirty secret these one-size-fits-all charger and cable makers don’t want you to know is that often their products do not have the proper voltage needed to work with your specific device. Why does that matter? Your battery may end up not getting the juice it needs to charge fully. Worse, it may erode the battery’s life.

These cheap chargers can even be a threat to your life. Many generic phone chargers are less likely to meet established safety and quality testing guidelines than their name-brand counterparts and could lead to severe shocks and burns.

Sound extreme? Tap or click here to read about how a generic charger caused a fire in a woman’s bed, burning both her sheets and arms.

The lesson: Spend a little more on getting a replacement charger and cable from the devices’ manufacturers or certified third-party makers.

2. Being an over-charger

The newest batteries for smartphones, tablets, and laptops are a vast improvement over past years, and most of them are made of high-quality lithium-ion or lithium-polymer. While it may seem counter-intuitive, over-charging your battery can damage it.

The rule of thumb is to keep your phone, tablet, and laptop charged somewhere between 40% and 80%. Batteries containing a higher charge are more stressed. Tap or click here for more battery tips for your gadgets.

As for your laptop, those batteries have a finite number of charge-discharge cycles. If you frequently let your battery completely run out of juice, it affects the charge-discharge cycle and diminishes its intended lifespan. That’s why you should try to keep your battery charged to at least 40% levels.

RELATED: 5 signs it’s time for a new laptop

3. Charging all the time

Do you plug your device into the wall socket and forget about it? Fortunately, when the new generation of batteries reaches maximum charge, they have mechanisms to prevent excess charging. That holds true for tablets, smartphones, and laptops.

While it’s not considered harmful to keep your smartphone or tablet plugged in all night, do try to turn them off when you can to give them a rest. A huge side benefit is that a device’s performance gets a huge boost from a power off, power on cycle.

Don’t keep your laptop plugged in all the time. Batteries can overheat and even cause fires, a remote but real possible danger.

4. Not paying attention

The latest phones are fairly rugged: tough, water-resistant, and less likely to shatter when dropped. But leaving your device in a hot car or out in the sun can cause serious damage. Not only can it cause the battery to leak or overheat, but it can also cause data to be lost or corrupted.

Like those knockoff chargers, a low-quality battery can also be dangerous. In Oklahoma City, a woman left a lithium-ion battery meant for her iPhone inside her hot car. The battery didn’t just overheat; it exploded and set the woman’s car on fire. The battery was purchased from an unauthorized third-party dealer.

Extreme cold temperatures also wreak havoc on your phone. Lithium-ion batteries can stop discharging electricity in extremely cold temperatures, leading to shortened battery life, display problems, and even cracking the display glass.

RELATED: How to fix the 7 most irritating Windows 10 features

5. Being a Pig Pen

Whether you’re cleaning your laptop, iPad, smartphone, or favorite mouse, here are a few useful cleaning items to have on hand. They’re flexible for tidying up just about anything.

  • Compressed air – This is especially useful when spraying into extremely tight quarters and crevices that are difficult to reach.
  • Isopropyl alcohol – Do not use household cleaning products like Windex, glass cleaner, or countertop cleanser on your electronic devices. A good rule of thumb is if you would use it to clean your kitchen, it’s not appropriate for your computer or electronics.
  • Distilled or purified bottled water – Don’t rely on tap water, which could potentially leave mineral spots and stains.
  • Soft cloths – Try to aim for lint-free if you can, and don’t simply opt for paper towels. If you have a 100% cotton cloth, this is also appropriate, but not things like tissues.
  • Toothbrush – A soft toothbrush can be used on harder-to-reach areas and with spots that need light scrubbing.

Tap or click here for the exact steps to clean vents, ports, keyboards, touchpads, and mouse.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch the Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2019, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group iphone-11-pro-getty-images Kim Komando with 5 mistakes that shorten the life of your gadgets The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 8f22f225-d70e-5d3f-89d8-63851efe1f36   Westlake Legal Group iphone-11-pro-getty-images Kim Komando with 5 mistakes that shorten the life of your gadgets The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 8f22f225-d70e-5d3f-89d8-63851efe1f36

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Trump, Ukraine And The Path To The Impeachment Inquiry: A Timeline

Westlake Legal Group 2019-ukraine-trump-timeline_wide-a8c7b9afc750ac948f172bc101bf362a28be0f04-s1100-c15 Trump, Ukraine And The Path To The Impeachment Inquiry: A Timeline

Clockwise from top left: Rudy Giuliani, Donald Trump, Joe Biden, Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelenskiy and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. AFP/Getty Images and Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images and Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Trump, Ukraine And The Path To The Impeachment Inquiry: A Timeline

Clockwise from top left: Rudy Giuliani, Donald Trump, Joe Biden, Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelenskiy and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

AFP/Getty Images and Getty Images

When President Trump spoke to Volodymyr Zelenskiy on July 25th, Trump held the keys to two things the new Ukranian president needed in order to demonstrate he had full U.S. backing to push back on Russian aggression: military assistance and an Oval Office meeting. Both would send a necessary signal that the U.S.-Ukraine alliance was strong.

But the alliance was on shaky ground. In the months leading up to the call, Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani pressed Ukrainian officials to launch investigations that stood to benefit the president politically. Trump was also withholding the White House meeting Zelenskiy coveted, in addition to military aid that was already approved by Congress.

What started as a mission to undermine former special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation had morphed into an effort to sully a potential political rival, former Vice President Joe Biden. Now, Trump faces the greatest threat to his presidency — the risk of impeachment.

Here’s how we got there.

Trump’s Early Focus On Ukraine

April 21, 2017: Three months after his inauguration, President Trump sits for an interview with the Associated Press and floats a debunked conspiracy theory about Ukrainian involvement in hacks of the Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee during the election.

“They get hacked, and the FBI goes to see them, and they won’t let the FBI see their server,” Trump says about the attack on the DNC, which U.S. intelligence has traced to Russian state actors. “… They brought in another company that I hear is Ukrainian-based.”

Trump is talking about CrowdStrike, the California cybersecurity firm that helped investigate the DNC attack — even providing federal investigators with evidence. In bringing up the company, the president appears to be alluding to a false narrative that has emerged suggesting that Ukraine, not Russia, was involved in the hacking, and that CrowdStrike helped cover it up.

“I heard it’s owned by a very rich Ukrainian, that’s what I heard,” he tells the AP.

It’s a theory the president returns to more than two years later on his July 25, 2019 call with Zelenskiy.

Giuliani Enters The Fray

Late 2018: Rudy Giuliani participates in a Skype call with the former top Ukrainian prosecutor, Viktor Shokin, who was ousted from office after multiple Western leaders, including former Vice President Joe Biden, pressed for his removal. Leaders complain Shokin was failing to tackle corruption. It’s around this time that Giuliani says he first learned of a possible Biden-Ukraine connection.

January 2019: Giuliani meets in New York with the top Ukrainian prosecutor at the time, Yuriy Lutsenko. This is when Giuliani says his investigation into the Bidens began.

A man named Lev Parnas says he attended the meeting with Lutsenko and arranged the call with Shokin. Parnas tells NPR he attended at least two meetings Giuliani had with Lutsenko. Parnas and an associate, who also worked with Giuliani, are later arrested and charged with violating campaign finance law in a separate matter.

March 31: The first round of presidential elections take place in Ukraine. Zelenskiy, a comedian who once played a president on television, comes out ahead of incumbent President Petro Poroshenko. The race goes to a runoff.

April 7: In an interview on Fox News, Giuliani, unprompted, brings up a Biden-Ukraine connection. He says that while investigating the origin of the Russia investigation, “some people” told him “the story about Burisma and Biden’s son.” Giuliani suggests that as vice president, Biden pressed to remove Shokin, the former prosecutor, because he was investigating Burisma, a Ukrainian gas company that had Biden’s son Hunter on its board for several years.There is no evidence to support this claim.

Zelenskiy Elected, Trump Talks “Corruption”

April 21: Zelenskiy is elected president of Ukraine and President Trump calls to congratulate him. A White House readout of the call says Trump “expressed his commitment to work together with President-elect Zelenskyy and the Ukrainian people to implement reforms that strengthen democracy, increase prosperity, and root out corruption.”

April 25: Trump, calls in to Sean Hannity’s TV show and says he has heard rumors about Ukrainian “collusion.” He tells the Fox News host he expects Attorney General Bill Barr to look into it. “I would imagine he would want to see this,” Trump says.

May 6: Marie Yovanovitch, the U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine and an Obama appointee, ends her assignment in Kyiv. According to the whistleblower complaint filed against Trump, she had been “suddenly recalled” to the U.S. by senior State Department officials a week earlier.

Giuliani later says in an interview that she was removed “because she was part of the efforts against the President.” Yovanovitch tells Congress that she learned from the deputy secretary of state “there had been a concerted campaign against me, and that the Department had been under pressure from the President to remove me since the Summer of 2018,” according to prepared remarks reported by multiple outlets.

May 9: Giuliani tells The New York Times he will travel to Ukraine “in the coming days” to push for investigations that could help President Trump. Giuliani says he hopes to meet with President-elect Zelenskiy to push for inquiries into the origins of the Russia investigation and the Bidens’ involvement with Burisma.

“We’re not meddling in an election, we’re meddling in an investigation, which we have a right to do,” Giuliani tells the Times.

“There’s nothing illegal about it,” he says. “Somebody could say it’s improper. And this isn’t foreign policy — I’m asking them to do an investigation that they’re doing already and that other people are telling them to stop. And I’m going to give them reasons why they shouldn’t stop it because that information will be very, very helpful to my client, and may turn out to be helpful to my government.”

May 10: Facing a backlash, Giuliani cancels his trip. “I’m not going to go because I think I’m walking into a group of people that are enemies of the president, in some cases, enemies of the United States,” he tells The Washington Post.

There are echoes of this language in Trump’s July 25 call with the Ukranian president. After mentioning that his assistant recently spoke with Giuliani, Zelenskiy tells the president, “I just wanted to assure you once again that you have nobody but friends around us.”

May 14: Trump allegedly instructs Vice President Mike Pence to cancel his planned travel to Ukraine to attend President Zelenskiy’s inauguration, according to the whistleblower complaint brought against the president. Energy Secretary Rick Perry will travel in his place.

May 19: In an interview with Steve Hilton on Fox News, President Trump puts the focus on Biden and Ukraine:

“Look at Joe Biden, he calls them and says ‘don’t you dare prosecute, if you don’t fire this prosecutor’ — The prosecutor was after his son. Then he said ‘If you fire the prosecutor, you’ll be OK. And if you don’t fire the prosecutor, we’re not giving you $2 billion in loan guarantees,’ or whatever he was supposed to give. Can you imagine if I did that?”

Biden did, in fact, press for the prosecutor, Shokin, to be sacked because of concerns that he was turning a blind eye to corruption. However, the effort was in keeping with U.S. policy at the time and consistent with the goals of European allies and the International Monetary Fund.

May 30: Zelenskiy receives a letter from Trump inviting him to Washington for an official visit, according to Ukranian media reports. The Ukrainian government says plans are being made for a visit, but no date is set for the visit.

June 12: Trump tells ABC’s George Stephanopoulos that he would consider taking damaging information on political rivals from a foreign government.

“I think you might want to listen, there isn’t anything wrong with listening,” Trump says. “If somebody called from a country, Norway, [and said] ‘we have information on your opponent’ — oh, I think I’d want to hear it.”

Funding For Ukraine

June 18: The Defense Department announces that it intends to provide $250 million to Ukraine in “security cooperation funds for additional training, equipment, and advisory efforts to build the capacity of Ukraine’s armed forces.” This follows a May 23 letter from a top Defense Department official certifying “that the Government of Ukraine has taken substantial actions to make defense institutional reforms for the purposes of decreasing corruption” and “increasing accountability.”

June 21: Giuliani tweets that Zelenskiy is “silent on investigation of Ukranian interference in 2016 election and alleged Biden bribery.”

July 18: President Trump blocks nearly $400 million in aid to Ukraine. According to the whistleblower complaint, officials in the Office of Management and Budget “stated explicitly that the instruction to suspend this assistance had come directly from the President, but they still were unaware of the policy rationale.”

It is not clear that the Ukrainians knew the funding was being held.

July 19: According to text messages released by Giuliani and House investigators, Kurt Volker, the U.S. special representative for Ukraine negotiations, has breakfast with Giuliani to discuss Ukraine. Volker later connects Giuliani via text with Andrey Yermak, a top aide to Zelenskiy, and suggests scheduling a call together.

That same day, Volker texts Gordon Sondland, U.S. ambassador to the European Union, and Ambassador Bill Taylor, the chief of mission in Ukraine, about the upcoming call between Trump and Zelenskiy. “Most impt is for Zelensky to say that he will help investigation,” Volker writes.

July 24: Mueller testifies before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees about his report on Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Trump takes to Twitter suggesting the hearing went well for him.

July 25, 8:36 a.m.: In a text message sent shortly before the call between Trump and Zelenskiy, Volker tells Yermak: “Heard from White House – assuming President Z convinces trump he will investigate / ‘get to the bottom of what happened’ in 2016, we will nail down a date for visit to Washington.”

9:03 a.m. to 9:33 a.m.: Trump and Zelenskiy speak. According to the Ukrainian readout of the call, the two leaders discussed “investigation of corruption cases.” It also mentions a planned visit by Zelenskiy to the U.S. The U.S. readout of the call also mentions a meeting.

While on the call, Zelenskiy mentions wanting to purchase anti-tank missiles from the U.S., according to a rough transcript of the call released by the White House. Trump responds, “I would like you to do us a favor though.” Trump brings up investigating both the CrowdStrike conspiracy theory and the Bidens. He repeatedly tells Zelenskiy he should talk to Giuliani and Attorney General Barr.

Zelenskiy mentions an Oval Office meeting. “Whenever you would like to come to the White House, feel free to call. Give us a date and we’ll work that out,” Trump says, according to the rough transcript, which according to the whistleblower complaint, was later put on “lock down” by “senior White House officials.”

10:15 a.m.: Yermak texts Volker. “Phone call went well. President Trump proposed to choose any convenient dates. President Zelenskiy chose 20, 21, 22 September for the White House Visit. Thank you again for your help!”

He also mentions an upcoming meeting with Giuliani.

The Aftermath

August 9 to 17: In a series of text threads released by House investigators, State Department officials, Giuliani and Yermak discuss a statement that would commit Ukraine to investigate both the 2016 election and Burisma.

In one exchange, Sondland tells Volker that Trump “really wants the deliverable,” but the Ukrainains make clear they don’t want to release such a statement until a White House meeting is set. “Once we have a date, will call for a press briefing, announcing upcoming visit and outlining vision for the reboot of US-UKRAINE relationship, including among other things Burisma and election meddling investigations,” Yermak writes.

August 12: The Inspector General for the Intelligence Community, Michael Atkinson, receives the anonymous whistleblower complaint now at the center of the impeachment inquiry. It alleges “the President of the United States is using the power of his office to solicit interference from a foreign country in the 2020 U.S. election.”

August 28: Politico reports that U.S. military aid to Ukraine is being held up. Yermak sends a text to Volker the next day linking to the article and says,”Need to talk with you.”

August 29: Trump cancels a trip to Poland to commemorate World War II. He is scheduled to meet with Zelenskiy while on the trip, but plans change so that he can stay in Washington to monitor an approaching hurricane. Meanwhile, congressional pressure to release aid to Ukraine heats up.

September 1: Ambassador Taylor, a career foreign service officer, texts Sondland asking a pointed question. “Are we now saying that security assistance and WH meeting are conditioned on investigations?” Sondland replies, “Call me.”

Separately, Vice President Pence, who is traveling in Poland in place of Trump, meets with Zelenskiy.

September 2: Pence tells reporters he didn’t discuss Biden with Zelenskiy. But he says they did discuss “corruption” and “the upcoming decision the President will make on the latest tranche of financial support.”

“But as President Trump had me make clear, we have great concerns about issues of corruption.”

September 9: On the day that the congressional intelligence committees are formally notified of the existence of the whistleblower complaint, Ambassador Taylor in a text with Sondland says, “As I said on the phone, I think it is crazy to withhold security assistance for help with a political campaign.”

Sondland responds five hours later by saying, “The President has been crystal clear no quid pro quo’s of any kind” adding “I suggest we stop the back and forth by text.” The Wall Street Journal reports that Sondland spoke with Trump before sending this response.

September 11: Under pressure from lawmakers, the White House releases the funding for Ukraine without any explanation of what changed.

September 13: The chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., subpoenas the Acting Director of National Intelligence, Joseph Maguire, to provide the whistleblower complaint to Congress. Maguire, had refused to do so, citing guidance from the Justice Department.

September 18: The Washington Post reports on the standoff over the whistleblower complaint, thrusting its substance into public view. Media reports later indicate the complaint was prompted by a call involving the Ukrainian president.

September 22: Departing the White House, President Trump tells reporters the call with Zelenskiy was “absolutely perfect” and “a beautiful, warm, nice conversation.” He also admits that he brought up corruption accusations against Biden.

“We had a great conversation. The conversation I had was largely congratulatory. It was largely corruption — all of the corruption taking place. It was largely the fact that we don’t want our people, like Vice President Biden and his son, creating to the corruption already in the Ukraine. And Ukraine — Ukraine has got a lot of problems,” Trump says.

Over the course of the next several days, he shifts his description of why he held up funding to Ukraine. First he says it’s because not enough was being done to fight corruption. He then suggests it’s because European nations should contribute more.

September 24: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announces a formal impeachment inquiry. “The president must be held accountable,” Pelosi says. “No one is above the law.”

September 25: The White House releases the rough transcript of Trump’s July 25 call with Zelenskiy.

Zelenskiy reminds Trump of an earlier invitation to visit Washington. Trump again suggests he talk to Barr and Giuliani before mentioning a visit. “Whenever you would like to come to the White House, feel free to call. Give us a date and we’ll work that out,” Trump says, according to the rough transcript.

That same day, President Trump and President Zelenskiy finally meet on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly in New York. Zelenskiy says he didn’t feel pressured by Trump, and adds, “I want to thank you for the invitation to Washington. You invited me. But I think — I’m sorry, but I think you forgot to tell me the date.”

The visit has still not been scheduled.

September 26: The House Intelligence Committee releases the whistleblower complaint. It reads, in part, “In the course of my official duties, I have received information from multiple U.S. Government officials that the President of the United States is using the power of his office to solicit interference from a foreign country in the 2020 U.S. election.”

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Warren Takes Facebook’s Ad Policy, Fires It Right Back At Zuckerberg And Trump

Westlake Legal Group 5da1a73e200000690550012a Warren Takes Facebook’s Ad Policy, Fires It Right Back At Zuckerberg And Trump

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) is playing Facebook at its own game over its refusal to ban the posting of false ads and statements from politicians.

The Democratic presidential candidate is running a “Breaking news”-teased ad on the platform which begins with the false claim that the company and its CEO Mark Zuckerberg “just endorsed Donald Trump for re-election” in 2020.

Check it out here:

“You’re probably shocked, and you might be thinking, ‘how could this possibly be true?’” Warren’s ad continues. “Well, it’s not. (Sorry.) But what Zuckerberg *has* done is given Donald Trump free rein to lie on his platform ― and then to pay Facebook gobs of money to push out their lies to American voters.”

“If Trump tries to lie in a TV ad, most networks will refuse to air it. But Facebook just cashes Trump’s checks,” it adds. “Facebook already helped elect Donald Trump once. Now, they’re deliberately allowing a candidate to intentionally lie to the American people. It’s time to hold Mark Zuckerberg accountable.”

Facebook drew ire this week for refusing to pull an ad that makes false accusations about former Vice President Joe Biden, who is Warren’s 2020 rival in the Democratic race. The platform has also faced heavy scrutiny over the role it played in the widespread dissemination of misinformation about candidates including Hillary Clinton during the 2016 election.

In audio that leaked last week, Zuckerberg said he was prepared to “go to the mat and … fight” lawmakers such as Warren who are keen to break up big technology companies.

Warren, meanwhile, this week called out Facebook’s “incredible power to affect elections and out national debate” in a lengthy Twitter thread, below:

Nick Clegg, the former deputy UK prime minister who is now Facebook’s vice president of global affairs and communications, said last month that the company didn’t believe “it’s an appropriate role for us to referee political debates and prevent a politician’s speech from reaching its audience and being subject to public debate and scrutiny.

“That’s why Facebook exempts politicians from our third-party fact-checking program. We have had this policy on the books for over a year now, posted publicly on our site under our eligibility guidelines,” he added. “This means that we will not send organic content or ads from politicians to our third-party fact-checking partners for review. However, when a politician shares previously debunked content including links, videos and photos, we plan to demote that content, display related information from fact-checkers, and reject its inclusion in advertisements.”

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Deroy Murdock: AOC, Warren attack Trump for increased income inequality – But Obama did nothing to reduce it

Westlake Legal Group money Deroy Murdock: AOC, Warren attack Trump for increased income inequality – But Obama did nothing to reduce it National Review fox-news/us/economy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/barack-obama fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Deroy Murdock article 5e32cc15-a6f4-5901-b597-ef958c9fa091

President Trump’s fiercest critics claim that the gap between the haves and have-nots is expanding on his watch.

“Is it getting hot in here, or just the elevating public consciousness around rampant wealth inequality?” Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., asked via Twitter earlier this year. According to AOC’s House website, she contends that income inequality is “being used by those in power to amplify fear and anger in our communities and further divide us.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren concurs.

WEALTH INEQUALITY IN US REACHED HIGHEST LEVEL IN OVER 50 YEARS, CENSUS SAYS

“When you’ve got a government, when you’ve got an economy that does great for those with money and isn’t doing great for everyone else, that is corruption, pure and simple,” the Massachusetts Democrat says. She argues that “Inequality is rapidly growing, transforming rule by-the-people into rule by-wealthy-elites” and “many American politicians seem to accept — even embrace — the politics of division and resentment.”

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AOC and Warren are right, to a point: Income inequality, indeed, has grown on President Trump’s watch. And the numbers back them up.

The key metric here is called the Gini coefficient. A 0.00 score represents perfect income equality; neither rich nor poor exist, since everyone has identical incomes. A 1.00 Gini coefficient represents perfect income inequality: The rich earn all the money, and nobody else makes a penny.

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Under President Trump, America’s Gini coefficient ticked up, according to the latest data, from 0.48 in 2017 to 0.49 in 2018.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THIS OP-ED IN THE NATIONAL REVIEW

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Westlake Legal Group money Deroy Murdock: AOC, Warren attack Trump for increased income inequality – But Obama did nothing to reduce it National Review fox-news/us/economy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/barack-obama fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Deroy Murdock article 5e32cc15-a6f4-5901-b597-ef958c9fa091   Westlake Legal Group money Deroy Murdock: AOC, Warren attack Trump for increased income inequality – But Obama did nothing to reduce it National Review fox-news/us/economy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/barack-obama fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Deroy Murdock article 5e32cc15-a6f4-5901-b597-ef958c9fa091

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Report: Giuliani under investigation for lobbying violations

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6094280038001_6094279557001-vs Report: Giuliani under investigation for lobbying violations fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fnc/politics fnc ba147eb4-3fc9-5c31-bfe4-8e350cd026f5 Associated Press article

WASHINGTON — Rudy Giuliani, President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer, is being investigated by federal prosecutors in New York for possible lobbying violations.

That’s according to a report Friday in The New York Times, citing two anonymous people familiar with the inquiry.

EX-GOP CONGRESSMAN SAYS HE’LL DONATE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM ARRESTED GIULIANI ASSOCIATES

One of the Times’ sources says the investigation is related to Giuliani’s efforts to undermine former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch.

Two Florida businessmen tied to Giuliani were charged Thursday with federal campaign finance violations. The men had key roles in Giuliani’s efforts to launch a Ukrainian corruption investigation against Democratic presidential contender Joe Biden and his son Hunter. A whistleblower complaint about Trump’s involvement with Ukraine has led to an impeachment investigation.

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The U.S. attorney’s office in Manhattan declined to comment Friday night on the Times report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6094280038001_6094279557001-vs Report: Giuliani under investigation for lobbying violations fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fnc/politics fnc ba147eb4-3fc9-5c31-bfe4-8e350cd026f5 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6094280038001_6094279557001-vs Report: Giuliani under investigation for lobbying violations fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fnc/politics fnc ba147eb4-3fc9-5c31-bfe4-8e350cd026f5 Associated Press article

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James Comey Would Like to Help

Westlake Legal Group 00comey1-facebookJumbo James Comey Would Like to Help Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Presidential Election of 2020 Presidential Election of 2016

James Comey slumps strategically in restaurants — all 6-foot-8 of him, drooping faux-furtively with his back to the room — and daydreams about deleting the civic-minded Twitter feed where a bipartisan coalition pronounces him a national disgrace.

He sleeps soundly — nine hours a night, he ballparks — and organizes the self-described “unemployed celebrity” chapter of his life around a series of workaday goals. “One of my goals has been to get to 10 consecutive pull-ups,” Mr. Comey said in an interview, legs crossed on the back porch of his stately Virginia home. “I’m at nine now. So, I’ve been doing a lot of pull-ups.”

He writes and thinks and reads and worries from a tidy downstairs office surrounded by the trinkets of his past: the White House place card from the night President Trump asked for his “loyalty” as F.B.I. director; a book by Nate Silver, the political data whiz who believes Mr. Comey’s explosively ambiguous letter in October 2016 about the Hillary Clinton email investigation probably handed Mr. Trump the election; a page from a quote-of-the-day calendar, saved for its resonance: “Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.”

“It reminds me so much of the F.B.I.,” Mr. Comey said.

But then, a lot of things have lately. Another Trump-branded election interference scandal is upon us. Institutions are wobbling. And Mr. Comey, as ever, cannot fight a nagging conviction about it all: James Comey can help. He must help.

“I feel stuck,” he said. “Like I can’t do something else. And I couldn’t look myself in the mirror if I went and did something easy.”

What he is doing, exactly, is not entirely clear even to him. Rather than proceed with the standard arc of an erstwhile intelligence leader — think tanks, corporate boards, studied political silence — Mr. Comey has pledged to spend the next 13 months working to drive Mr. Trump from power.

The former F.B.I. director, a lover of order, sees little of it in a norm-smashing president spiraling toward impeachment, riffing on “sick and deranged” Democrats at a recent rally and playacting the dialogue of F.B.I. officials like an insult comic. In this concern, Mr. Comey has ample company. In this company, he carries a kind of customized psychic baggage.

Who can know how it feels to wonder, to have everyone you meet wonder, if the president is standing behind that seal because of you?

“Thanks for giving us Donald Trump,” an older woman heckled recently, adding an expletive as Mr. Comey strolled through a Yale Law School building, where he had come for a talk that focused largely on his fateful 2016 decisions and attendant personal anguish.

“Thank you for the feedback,” he told her.

Divorced from its singular context, Mr. Comey’s condition is somewhat typical of the wandering urgency with which many presidential critics are approaching the 2020 election. Last year’s season of midterm activism has given way to a long electoral winter of Democratic primary skirmishes and an emphasis on just a few early-voting states, leaving Trump opponents to wrestle with how to contribute amid a gush of executive outrages they feel powerless to counteract.

Lawmakers can impeach. Whistle-blowers whistle-blow. What of the private citizen, determined to live publicly?

“It’s hard for people who’ve had a lot of power to come to terms with the fact that there’s actually very little you can do when you’re not a candidate,” said Jennifer Palmieri, a former top aide to Mrs. Clinton. “Or the F.B.I. director.”

While short on formal authority, Mr. Comey has suffered no deficiency of platforms. He says he has signed a contract to write opinion pieces for The Washington Post. He is the subject of an upcoming mini-series, starring Jeff Daniels as Mr. Comey, based on his best-selling memoir. He travels the country giving speeches on ethical leadership, mixing pro bono appearances on college campuses with paid bookings that command a six-figure fee. (“It’s a lot!” Mr. Comey enthused, while declining to name his precise rate. “Seriously, it’s crazy.”)

Over nearly two hours last month at his Northern Virginia home, whose coordinates he prefers not to publicize given the president’s affection for lathering up supporters with tales of “Leakin’ Lyin’ James Comey,” the former F.B.I. director could register as a spindly contradiction. He is at once a just-the-facts lawman and a prodigious feeler of feelings, introspective about the size of his ego and incapable of suppressing it entirely.

He says he is “not that important in the great sweep of American history” but believes his firsthand view into the president’s psyche can offer uncommon value to the anti-Trump movement. He can hold forth in one breath on the humbling task of bird-feeder maintenance and in another invoke the teachings of the theologian Reinhold Niebuhr. He says “dude” a lot.

At times, Mr. Comey can sound as if he is suggesting that the Twitter account from which he slings grave warnings and measured hope (“This country is so much better than this president”) is yoked to the health of the nation.

“I have a fantasy about on January 21, 2021, deleting my Twitter and moving on to something else,” he said. “But until then, I can’t.”

Closure has eluded some of his audiences, too. They lard Mr. Comey’s public events with skeptical questions about his choices in 2016. The Justice Department’s inspector general has lashed Mr. Comey for “insubordinate” conduct during that period, accusing him of breaking with longstanding policy by publicly discussing an investigation into Mrs. Clinton’s use of a private email server, including in a letter to Congress less than two weeks before the election.

Mr. Comey has conceded that he may have allowed himself to be influenced subconsciously by the political consensus that Mrs. Clinton would win. But he has betrayed no major regrets, defending his chosen course as the best among bad options. “I wish like hell we hadn’t been involved,” he said. He predicted that history would judge him kindly for prizing disclosure over concealment (not, as some Clinton allies see it, opting for spectacle over discretion).

Asked if he cared about how he would be remembered for the ages, Mr. Comey, 58, said, “I was going to say I don’t care. I’m sure I care a little,” adding, “It frustrates me in general that millions of people have a false impression of me. I wish they knew I was funnier.”

Asked if helping to defeat Mr. Trump would provide a measure of catharsis given his role in 2016, Mr. Comey paused. “Hmm,” he said. “I don’t think so. At least in my own conscious mind, I don’t connect those things.”

There is little template for a modern F.B.I. chief pursuing a prominent perch in political advocacy. Mr. Comey has performatively bristled at the observation that he is the bureau’s most consequential leader since its first, affecting a grimace recently when a forum moderator introduced him as “the first F.B.I. director since J. Edgar Hoover to be a household name.”

“There’s no precedent,” Tim Weiner, author of “Enemies: A History of the F.B.I.,” said of Mr. Comey’s present ambitions. “But then, there’s never been a president who’s been perceived as a threat to American national security.”

A former registered Republican who planned to complete his 10-year F.B.I. term in 2023, Mr. Comey has urged Democrats against charging to “the socialist left.” He is open to appearing with presidential candidates at campaign functions or even at a nominating convention, if they will have him, though he vowed never to seek office himself.

Mr. Comey donated money earlier this year to Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, a former law school classmate, but in the interview volunteered few opinions on the rest of the 2020 Democratic field, save for a compliment about the thoughtfulness of the South Bend, Ind., mayor whose name he seemed unsure of (“Is it Pete Boot-ed-edge?”).

Some veterans of law enforcement have questioned the value, and the propriety, of Mr. Comey’s new phase, mocking the emotive turn that has found him posting images of nature and open road on social media.

Rod J. Rosenstein, the former deputy attorney general whose 2017 memo about Mr. Comey was cited to rationalize the firing of the F.B.I. director that May, has been particularly cutting. At a speech last spring, Mr. Rosenstein taunted the former director for “selling books and earning speaking fees while speculating about the strength of my character and the fate of my immortal soul.”

“I kid you not,” Mr. Rosenstein said. “And that is disappointing. Speculating about souls is not a job for police and prosecutors.”

Those who know Mr. Comey concede that he is often the hero of his own anecdotes, and it is in these moments that he can most resemble a politician.

“I’ve probably now had dozens — and maybe dozens isn’t enough — of encounters with uniformed military, intelligence community people and F.B.I. people in grocery stores, in airports, in hardware stores,” Mr. Comey said. “They’ll just come up and touch my arm and say, ‘Please keep speaking. Please keep speaking.’”

While his crowds are self-selecting, Mr. Comey has plainly retained a constituency, dispensing hugs and autographs and frozen selfie smiles wherever he goes.

Charles Grady, a community outreach specialist at the F.B.I.’s New Haven office who came to see Mr. Comey speak at Yale, wrapped him in a bearhug afterward, saying Mr. Comey was the man who first recruited him. “I joined the F.B.I. because of him,” Mr. Grady said. “And I stay because of the work he started.”

The next evening, hours after encountering the heckler at the law school, Mr. Comey was briefly exultant when a young woman on the street praised his subsequent conversation with student Democrats.

“At least three of those for every ‘douchebag,’” he estimated as he walked away.

In the interview at his home, Mr. Comey imagined it was “darkly funny” to Mrs. Clinton that he had been recast as “the leader of a cabal” to destroy the president after testifying in Congress against Mr. Trump’s conduct and character — and less funny to Mr. Comey’s wife, Patrice, who had been a devoted Clinton supporter herself.

“We’re very protective of him,” Ms. Comey said. “It’s not O.K. the way the Republicans and the president and politicians in Congress — I mean, it’s just not O.K.”

Mr. Comey has found comfort in a longer view. In speeches and writings, he can appear almost preternaturally convinced of his capacity to sort right from wrong, and to be recognized for having done so eventually.

His public career — in self-idealization and, often enough, in reality — has been an exercise in telling powerful people what they did not wish to hear, in accordance with Mr. Comey’s own professional compass. As deputy attorney general under George W. Bush, he famously confronted presidential aides over a surveillance program he found legally dubious.

On the road, Mr. Comey speaks often of being left to “take the hit” in service of the institutions he reveres, saying he knew full well that his actions in 2016 would be “disastrous for me as a human being.”

There is a story he likes to tell audiences about his grandfather, William Comey, a former leader of the Yonkers Police Department whose picture hangs in Mr. Comey’s private work space. During Prohibition, the elder Mr. Comey caught wind of a bootlegging scheme to funnel beer through fire hoses between Yonkers and the Bronx.

He loved beer. He knew that didn’t matter. His order came swiftly: Ax the hoses, and let the alcohol fill the sewers.

“It made a lot of people angry,” Mr. Comey told students recently. But did that make it wrong?

“Pop did the right thing,” Mr. Comey instructed them.

And then once more, a little firmer: “He did the right thing.”

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Nationals beat Cards 2-0 in NLCS opener as Sanchez carries no-hitter into 8th inning

Westlake Legal Group AP19285026502583 Nationals beat Cards 2-0 in NLCS opener as Sanchez carries no-hitter into 8th inning Jay Cohen fox-news/sports/mlb/washington-nationals fox-news/sports/mlb/st-louis-cardinals fox-news/sports/mlb-postseason fox-news/sports/mlb fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 44689984-097b-522b-8cf5-b57e8ab14982

ST. LOUIS — It turns out Washington’s Big Three is a Big Four.

Don’t forget about Aníbal Sánchez.

The right-hander carried a no-hit bid into the eighth inning, Howie Kendrick had two more big swings and the Nationals beat the St. Louis Cardinals 2-0 on Friday night in the NL Championship Series opener.

“Tonight was obviously vintage Aníbal,” first baseman Ryan Zimmerman said.

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Sánchez had allowed just three runners when he took the mound for the eighth. Zimmerman robbed Tommy Edman with an outstanding diving grab at full stretch for the first out, but pinch-hitter José Martínez cleanly singled to center with two down for the Cardinals’ first hit.

“I just tried to keep focused on every pitch that I’m going to throw,” Sánchez said. “I don’t want to miss any kind of pitch in the middle in the zone against those guys.”

Sánchez thought he was going to finish the no-hitter after the big grab.

“When Zimmerman caught the ball I said, ‘OK, I’ve got it,'” the pitcher recalled.

Sean Doolittle relieved and got four straight outs to finish the one-hitter for his first postseason save in two years.

Sánchez and Doolittle made life easy on manager Dave Martinez after the Nationals placed closer Daniel Hudson on the paternity list before the franchise’s first appearance in the NLCS since the Montreal Expos moved to Washington ahead of the 2005 season.

“I think the mood of the guys in the bullpen, we really wanted to find a way to pick him up and allow him to enjoy a really special moment with his wife and his family,” Doolittle said.

Game 2 is back at Busch Stadium on Saturday. Washington ace Max Scherzer starts in his hometown, and Adam Wainwright gets the ball for St. Louis. Stephen Strasburg and Patrick Corbin will follow when the series moves to Nationals Park.

“People were talking about the Big Three,” Cardinals manager Mike Shildt said, “but we got a guy tonight that we got to contend with and not overlook him.”

St. Louis wasted a solid performance by Miles Mikolas, who pitched six innings of one-run ball in his second career playoff start.

Washington scored each of its runs with two outs. Kendrick doubled and came home on Yan Gomes’ double in the second. Kendrick then singled in Adam Eaton in the seventh after Eaton reached on a one-out triple against Giovanny Gallegos.

Kendrick also had the big blow in Washington’s Game 5 victory at Los Angeles on Wednesday night, a 10th-inning grand slam.

“It’s going to be a fun series,” Kendrick said. “Hopefully we can continue to play really good baseball and put up runs and get some wins.”

Gomes finished with two hits while subbing for catcher Kurt Suzuki, who left the Nationals’ clinching victory against the Dodgers with a head injury.

Sánchez became the first pitcher to start two postseason games with six hitless innings. Facing Boston for Detroit in the 2013 AL Championship Series opener, he was replaced by Al Alburquerque at the start of the seventh. The Tigers won 1-0, allowing their only hit when Daniel Nava singled off Joaquin Benoit with one out in the ninth.

Sánchez got his first playoff win since he struck out 12 in that game. He threw a no-hitter for the Florida Marlins in his 13th big league start as a rookie in 2006 and also has pitched four one-hitters.

He started this year 0-6 in his first nine starts but went 11-2 in his final 19.

For a while, it looked as if he might be headed to the third no-hitter in postseason history.

“He was good,” Edman said. “He was just hitting his spots and keeping us off balance all night, and we just didn’t execute our plan very well.”

Sánchez retired his first 10 batters before Kolten Wong walked in the fourth on a chilly, breezy evening.

Wong stole second and took third on Gomes’ throwing error, but Marcell Ozuna hit an inning-ending foulout.

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Pinch-hitter Randy Arozarena was hit by a pitch with one out in the sixth, but the 35-year-old Sánchez retired Dexter Fowler and Wong. He plunked Yadier Molina in the seventh before Matt Carpenter bounced out.

“He was spot on with everything he threw today,” Gomes said.

Sánchez struck out five in his ninth career postseason start. He threw 67 of 103 pitches for strikes.

Westlake Legal Group AP19285026502583 Nationals beat Cards 2-0 in NLCS opener as Sanchez carries no-hitter into 8th inning Jay Cohen fox-news/sports/mlb/washington-nationals fox-news/sports/mlb/st-louis-cardinals fox-news/sports/mlb-postseason fox-news/sports/mlb fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 44689984-097b-522b-8cf5-b57e8ab14982   Westlake Legal Group AP19285026502583 Nationals beat Cards 2-0 in NLCS opener as Sanchez carries no-hitter into 8th inning Jay Cohen fox-news/sports/mlb/washington-nationals fox-news/sports/mlb/st-louis-cardinals fox-news/sports/mlb-postseason fox-news/sports/mlb fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 44689984-097b-522b-8cf5-b57e8ab14982

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Girl facing fatal brain disease gets tailor-made drug

When Mila Makovec was diagnosed with a rare neurological condition at age 6, her prognosis was grim. The condition, known as Batten disease, is fatal, with death usually occurring in late childhood or the early teen years. There is no cure, and at the time of Mila’s diagnosis, in 2016, there was no specific treatment for her condition.

But that soon changed. In a striking example of personalized medicine, doctors were able to develop a tailor-made genetic treatment for Mila and to initiate the therapy, all within a year of first seeing the patient, according to a new report of her case, published today (Oct. 9) in The New England Journal of Medicine. That’s much shorter than the years or even decades it typically takes to develop new drugs.

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What’s more, the therapy appears safe, and Mila is showing signs of improvement; in particular, she is having shorter and fewer seizures than before, the report said. However, it’s unclear exactly how much the treatment will help Mila in the long run or whether it will prolong her life.

Still, the report’s authors, from Boston Children’s Hospital, said that her case can serve as a “template” for the rapid development of tailored genetic treatments. “This report shows a path to personalized treatments for patients with orphan diseases,” the authors said, using a term for diseases that affect fewer than 200,000 people in the nation.

The study was funded in part by Mila’s Miracle Foundation, a charity started by Mila’s family to find a cure for Batten disease and other devastating neurological diseases.

Devastating diagnosis 

As an infant and young toddler, Mila appeared healthy, learning to walk at age 1 and “talking up a storm” by 18 months, her mother, Julia Vitarello, wrote on the Mila’s Miracle Foundation website. But as she grew older, her parents noticed some concerning signs. At age 3, her right foot started to turn inward and she would get stuck on words when talking. At age 4, she started pulling books closer to her face when looking at them, and at age 5, she began stumbling and falling backward.

Shortly before she turned 6, she was hospitalized for a rapid progression of symptoms, including vision loss, frequent falls, slurred speech and difficulting swallowing. Tests showed that her brain volume was shrinking, and she was having seizures, the report said.

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Further lab and genetic testing finally led to her diagnosis: She had Batten disease, a rare and fatal genetic disorder of the nervous system that can take several forms depending on the specific genetic mutation involved. But all forms of the disease appear to affect structures inside cells known as lysosomes, which function as the cell’s “trash can” or “recycle bin,” breaking down waste products to be discarded or recycled, according to the National Institutes of Health. Without  properly working lysosomes, junk material builds up, leading to cell death, including the death of brain and eye cells.

A detailed analysis of Mila’s genome revealed that she had a unique mutation in a gene called CLN7, which is known to be associated with Batten disease. The authors found that a chunk of extra DNA had inserted itself into the CLN7 gene. This meant that when the cell tried to read the gene’s instructions to make a protein for the lysosome, the instructions were getting prematurely cut off, preventing the cell from making the full protein.

Doctors realized that a type of genetic treatment that uses molecules called antisense oligonucleotides might work for Mila’s case. These are short, synthetic molecules of genetic material (known as nucleic acids) that bind to the patient’s faulty genetic instructions, essentially masking the error so the full protein can be produced, according to Boston Children’s Hospital.

Doctors named the drug they created “milasen” after Mila. It resembles a recently approved drug for spinal muscular atrophy called nusinersen (brand name Spinraza).

Studies of samples of Mila’s cells suggested that milasen could help rescue the lysosome function, and studies in animals suggested there would be no harmful side effects, the report said.

After the doctors received approval from the Food and Drug Administration for a one-person trial of milasen, Mila started treatment in January 2017. The drug was given as an injection into her spinal cord.

Results from the first year of her treatment suggested an improvement in seizures. Before the study, Mila experienced about 15 to 30 seizures per day, each lasting up to 2 minutes, as measured by reports from her parents. But over the course of her treatment, that frequency dropped to between zero and 20 seizures per day, and the duration decreased to less than 1 minute, the authors said.

Measures of Mila’s brain waves also showed a decline of greater than 50 percent in the frequency and duration of the seizures. The treatment didn’t cause any harmful side effects.

Personalized medicine

Mila’s treatment “offers great hope,” Vitarello wrote on the foundation website. “While we remain cautiously optimistic, we feel so fortunate that Mila was given a second chance.”

Still, before Mila began the therapy, she lost the ability to see, speak and walk without assistance, and the treatment has not reversed these effects, Science Magazine reported.

Although friends have asked if Mila is now cured and will be able to have a normal life, “it’s not that simple,” Vitarello said. “Batten disease affects every part of the brain and body. It’s unbelievably complicated and still very un-understood.”

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The authors noted that milasen is still an experimental drug, adding that it is not suited to treat other people with Batten disease, because it is specifically tailored to Mila’s unique mutation.

Still, Mila’s case suggests that antisense oligonucleotides “may deserve consideration as a platform for the rapid delivery of individualized treatments,” the authors said. They noted that antisense oligonucleotides are customizable and have a relatively simple manufacturing process. However, the rapid approach used in Mila’s case should be considered only in the context of very serious or life-threatening circumstances, the authors said.

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Originally published on Live Science

Westlake Legal Group Mila-Makovec Girl facing fatal brain disease gets tailor-made drug Rachael Rettner LiveScience fox-news/health/nervous-system-health fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/medical-research fox-news/health/healthy-living/medications fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fnc/health fnc article a550ee2c-818c-5506-81e5-11b47f818389   Westlake Legal Group Mila-Makovec Girl facing fatal brain disease gets tailor-made drug Rachael Rettner LiveScience fox-news/health/nervous-system-health fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/medical-research fox-news/health/healthy-living/medications fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fnc/health fnc article a550ee2c-818c-5506-81e5-11b47f818389

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California man says mother, 89, missing after fire destroys homes

Westlake Legal Group AP19284165955684 California man says mother, 89, missing after fire destroys homes STEFANIE DAZIO fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/disasters fnc/us fnc f0641669-730e-55fb-aa3d-8a92260482ad CHRISTOPHER WEBER Associated Press article

Don Turner’s 89-year-old mother was missing Thursday night after a wind-driven wildfire sparked by burning trash swept through a Southern California mobile home park, destroying dozens of residences.

Lois Arvickson called her son from her cellphone to say she was evacuating shortly after the blaze was reported in the Calimesa area, Turner said while with family members at an evacuation center.

“She said she’s getting her purse and she’s getting out, and the line went dead,” he said.

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Arvickson’s neighbors saw in her garage as flames approached, according to Turner. A short time later the neighbors saw the garage on fire, but they don’t know if she’d managed to escape, he said.

Riverside County fire officials said they’re still trying to determine if anybody is unaccounted for after 74 structures were decimated.

Previously authorities said they responded to “numerous” medical emergencies at the park. Several residents were transported to hospitals but there were no details on their conditions, county fire Capt. Fernando Herrera said.

Turner said he’s been checking hospitals.

Fire danger is high throughout California after the typically dry summer and early fall. The high temperatures and winds predicted for inland areas of Southern California materialized mid-afternoon Thursday, when the driver of a commercial trash truck dumped a smoldering load to prevent the vehicle from catching fire.

Dry grass quickly ignited and winds gusting to 50 mph (80 kph) blew the fire into the Villa Calimesa Mobile Home Park, where Arvickson lived alone about 75 miles (120 kilometers) east of downtown Los Angeles. The park has 110 home sites and was built in 1958, according to its website. TV helicopter video showed vehicles and structures that were total losses.

About 160 students sheltered in place as smoke enveloped nearby Mesa View Middle School before buses arrived and evacuated them to another school outside the fire zone.

Crews were also battling a brush fire that prompted evacuations and closed Interstate 210 in the Sylmar neighborhood of the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles. Several vehicles burned in a nearby industrial complex. Another blaze threatened a neighborhood in the Newbury Park area of Ventura County, west of Los Angeles.

Fire officials were investigating what caused the trash in the truck to catch fire in Calimesa.

Linda Klosek, 70, and her daughter Stacey Holloway, 43, had gone grocery shopping and were on their way back home to Villa Calimesa when they saw their neighbors evacuating.

“You couldn’t even see anything, the smoke was so thick,” said Linda.

From the evacuation center they watched on TV as flames destroyed their home.

“When you’re watching it, it’s like someone else’s home,” Stacey said. They returned $60 worth of groceries to the store because now “there’s no place to put it.”

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The blaze, dubbed the Sandalwood Fire, was 10% percent contained Thursday night. It was one of several that broke out amid high winds and dry conditions that prompted California utilities to preemptively cut power to more than 2 million people in high-danger areas to guard against power lines sparking fires. The area that includes the mobile home park still had its power when the fire occurred.

To the west of Calimesa, firefighters contained a blaze that damaged two homes near Fontana. It was not immediately clear whether the power outage included the location where the fire broke out.

In Northern California, a brush fire sparked Thursday morning in the San Bruno Mountains south of San Francisco, prompting voluntary evacuations. No homes burned and firefighters made quick progress.

Westlake Legal Group AP19284165955684 California man says mother, 89, missing after fire destroys homes STEFANIE DAZIO fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/disasters fnc/us fnc f0641669-730e-55fb-aa3d-8a92260482ad CHRISTOPHER WEBER Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group AP19284165955684 California man says mother, 89, missing after fire destroys homes STEFANIE DAZIO fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/disasters fnc/us fnc f0641669-730e-55fb-aa3d-8a92260482ad CHRISTOPHER WEBER Associated Press article

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Ex-U.S. Attorney Reveals Sign Trump Is About To Throw Giuliani ‘Under The Bus’

Westlake Legal Group 5da193d5210000420734449a Ex-U.S. Attorney Reveals Sign Trump Is About To Throw Giuliani ‘Under The Bus’

President Donald Trump on Friday said he didn’t know if Rudy Giuliani was still his personal attorney.

And former U.S. Attorney Joyce Vance explained on MSNBC’s “The Beat with Ari Melber” why it could be a sign the president is about to throw the former mayor of New York City “under the bus.”

Melber noted how Trump’s apparent bid to distance himself from Giuliani echoed comments he made about his previous former attorney Michael Cohen in 2018, who is currently serving three years in federal prison for crimes involving campaign finance and lying to Congress.

The New York Times, meanwhile, reported Friday that Giuliani was now under investigation by federal prosecutors over alleged violations of lobbying laws in his dealings with Ukraine. Giuliani later confirmed to The Washington Post that he was still representing Trump.

“Is it a bad sign when President Trump starts to say you have to ask the attorney and maybe that’s not his attorney any more, for that attorney?” Melber asked Vance.

“Trump always has tells, right?” Vance replied. “We know that when he says a man came up to me and said, ‘sir,’ that we’re about to hear something that’s not true. Here we see the classic Trump throwing someone close to him under the bus.”

Vance later expressed hope Giuliani would now “take advantage, if it is true he is under investigation, of the opportunity maybe to achieve some sort of renewed good faith with the American people by coming forward and telling the truth.”

Check out the full interview above.

CNN’s Anderson Cooper also made a similar point about Trump distancing himself in the segment, below:

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