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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 91)

‘This Is Not a Find-a-Friend Contest’: Bernie Sanders’s Resolute Campaign Style

WASHINGTON — When Senator Bernie Sanders brought his presidential campaign to Pittsburgh earlier this year, he quietly added a poignant stop to his schedule: a visit to the Tree of Life synagogue, where 11 congregants were killed in an anti-Semitic shooting last fall.

But his appearance also came with explicit instructions to his campaign aides, according to two Democrats familiar with the conversation: They were not to tell the news media about his conversation with the rabbi there.

Some aides dissented, believing there was a graceful way to disclose the visit. But Mr. Sanders, the only Jewish candidate among the leading Democratic contenders, did not want the visit to be perceived as a publicity grab. His impulse illustrated a deeper challenge confronting his aides and supporters: After nearly four decades of running, and usually winning, iconoclastic campaigns on his own terms, he is deeply reluctant to change his approach.

Mr. Sanders has been unwilling to regularly talk about his personal history of growing up poor in a Brooklyn neighborhood full of Holocaust survivors, and until recently he resisted letting his campaign poll voters in Iowa, the first nominating state. He has largely defied his staff’s urging that he go on the offensive against Joseph R. Biden Jr., the Democratic front-runner.

But now, slipping in the polls and outraised by a handful of rivals, including a fellow progressive, Elizabeth Warren, Mr. Sanders is facing growing pressure from some of his allies, and within his own ranks, to adjust his strategy.

“I do think he’s going to have to draw a contrast with the vice president,” said Representative Ro Khanna of California, one of Mr. Sanders’s four campaign co-chairs, referring to Mr. Biden. He added that the 77-year-old Vermont senator should also “speak about his personal story.”

Voters, Mr. Khanna said, “have got to see that human side.”

In what is shaping up to be a volatile Democratic primary, Mr. Sanders retains significant strengths. He has more money on hand ($30 million) than any other candidate, and nearly all his donors can contribute again because they have yet to give the maximum amount. He enjoys the unwavering devotion of his core base of voters, support that will not flag with the ups and downs of the campaign.

In a contest that could remain splintered after Iowa and New Hampshire, and in which candidates only need to garner 15 percent of the vote to earn delegates, that loyalty may prove critical to keeping Mr. Sanders in contention up to the convention.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_155836173_a82c29f4-7554-47dd-b8ca-76389c0134e0-articleLarge ‘This Is Not a Find-a-Friend Contest’: Bernie Sanders’s Resolute Campaign Style Weaver, Jeffrey P (1966- ) Warren, Elizabeth United States Politics and Government Tree of Life (Pittsburgh, Pa, Synagogue) Sanders, Bernard Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Presidential Election of 2016 Pittsburgh (Pa) Democratic Party Biden, Joseph R Jr

Mr. Sanders’s consistency appeals to his most fervent supporters, but it may limit his ability to gain more.CreditSarahbeth Maney for The New York Times

Yet Mr. Sanders has struggled to expand his support in the early nominating states beyond those die-hard supporters. In Iowa, for example, he has fallen to fourth place in recent polling. A Wall Street Journal/NBC News national poll released Thursday showed him tied for third, well behind Mr. Biden and Ms. Warren. And his advisers acknowledge that just under half of his supporters that they’ve identified from the 2016 Iowa caucuses, where he came within a point of defeating Hillary Clinton, have defected to other candidates.

Jeff Weaver, Mr. Sanders’s closest adviser, suggested in an interview that the campaign may make some modifications to re-energize his bid. “A smart campaign is always tweaking,” he said.

But he emphasized that there would be no wholesale changes, and disparaged the ways that some presidential hopefuls attempt to forge a personal connection with voters.

“Let’s be clear about this point: If somebody wants a candidate who is going to make health care a right, raise wages, deal with climate change, deal with immigration reform and criminal justice reform, Bernie Sanders is your candidate,” said Mr. Weaver. “If you want somebody who’s going to talk about their cooking, their dog, their wardrobe, travel habits, or favorite books, Bernie Sanders is not your candidate.”

“This is not a popularity contest or a find-a-friend contest,” he said.

While Ms. Warren is making incursions with some of Mr. Sanders’s progressive backers, campaign aides insist that they view Mr. Biden as a far more significant threat because of his support from some of the working-class voters who voted for Mr. Sanders in 2016.

Yet Mr. Sanders’s campaign faces a conundrum in how to run against Ms. Warren. Though aides grumble that she has claimed some of Mr. Sanders’s long-held, anti-big business stances, they all but rule out the prospect of aggressively confronting someone their candidate considers a personal friend.

“I do not see a situation at all where Bernie Sanders allows the campaign to do that,” Ari Rabin-Havt, the campaign’s chief of staff, said about attacking Ms. Warren. “That’s not who he is and that’s not how he feels about Elizabeth Warren.”

It is a different story with Mr. Biden. Mr. Sanders’s advisers had hoped he would challenge the former vice president at last month’s debate, according to multiple Democrats familiar with their conversations. After choosing not to, Mr. Sanders found himself largely left out of the post-debate conversation, which was dominated by Senator Kamala Harris’s criticism of Mr. Biden’s past opposition to busing.

Advisers had hoped Mr. Sanders would go after former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. during last month’s debate, but he chose not to.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Mr. Weaver expressed hope that his candidate would take on Mr. Biden over his support for free trade pacts that are highly unpopular among blue-collar voters in the Midwest.

“Joe Biden has some serious issues when it comes to the trade policies he has supported and reaffirmed his support for,” said Mr. Weaver.

However, even Mr. Sanders’s aides acknowledge that they would like to see him talk more about his post-World War II childhood in Brooklyn, where he was surrounded by Jewish immigrants who bore the tattoos Nazis had branded them with. In a campaign in which issues of race and discrimination have been central, and in which the inhumane treatment of migrants has become a partisan flash point, the senator’s advisers believe he has something to contribute to that discussion.

Mr. Sanders highlighted his biography at the outset of this campaign, but since has done so only sporadically, instead returning to what is essentially a compilation of his greatest hits: jeremiads against the greed of plutocrats and paeans for universal health care.

But unlike during the 2016 campaign, when Democratic voters had only to choose between him and the establishment-aligned Hillary Clinton, progressives now can select from a wealth of candidates singing from the same populist hymnal.

“In some ways, I think that he has been so extremely successful that his platform has become the norm,” said Brent Welder, a Sanders supporter who ran for Congress in Kansas last year.

Which is to say he is at risk of being a victim of his own success. And that, perhaps, highlights the fundamental tension of Mr. Sanders’s candidacy: It may prove difficult for him to expand his support without broadening his message, yet what draws many of his fervent supporters in the first place is the constancy of his appeals.

“Bernie Sanders always runs his own campaign — it may be unscripted, but it’s focused on his issues,” said Mark Longabaugh, who was one of Mr. Sanders’s top advisers in 2016. Mr. Longabaugh and his partners abruptly left the 2020 team shortly after its formation because they concluded the senator and his wife, Jane, were unwilling to cede any real control.

Mr. Sanders traced his agenda back to Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal during a speech in Washington last month.CreditGabriella Demczuk for The New York Times

Mr. Weaver said the senator was open to advice, but acknowledged that he at times goes his own way.

“He accepts some of it, he doesn’t accept others of it,” he said. “But he always wants ideas.”

Though he can be gruff on the campaign trail and prefers holding big rallies, Mr. Sanders has begun in recent weeks to hold smaller events like ice cream socials and has even acquiesced to taking photos with supporters who line up to see him.

Still, the angst among some of Mr. Sanders’s own supporters has been building.

While he has sought to elevate matters of racial justice more in this campaign than he did in 2016, his overriding focus remains class uplift. At times, that message can feel discordant from the energy of the Democratic Party at a moment when President Trump has helped elevate issues of race, gender and sexuality.

In May, during a sweep through the South just days after Alabama passed a law effectively banning abortion, Mr. Sanders responded to a national outcry on the left by devoting only a small portion of his speaking time to addressing the measure at a series of town halls and rallies. Some allies said they found that response puzzling.

Later that month, he returned to Vermont to deliver a speech at the state capitol in Montpelier. It was a homecoming event that his campaign billed as an opportunity to amplify his long political record in the state and accentuate a topic his aides have been eager to highlight: his history of winning difficult races and defeating Republicans.

But Mr. Sanders made scant mention of his accomplishments. The only real deviation from his usual stump speech was a fresh attack on the media that stemmed from a story in The New York Times about his left-wing foreign policy activism as mayor of Burlington, Vt., in the 1980s.

Then, last month, Mr. Sanders planned another speech aimed at reframing the race: an address in Washington meant to defuse attacks on the democratic socialism he espouses, by tracing his agenda back to Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal.

Some of his allies expressed skepticism about the wisdom of holding up a president who has been dead for nearly 75 years as a point of comparison — a move akin to George McGovern linking himself to the populism of William Jennings Bryan in 1972 — but Mr. Sanders would not be denied. He has since introduced a sticker inspired by Roosevelt, and his campaign quotes the former president on a new webpage that lists what Mr. Sanders is calling “anti-endorsements” from tycoons whose contempt he relishes in the same fashion of his political role model.

If it all rings familiar, well, that’s just fine by Mr. Sanders.

After the first debate, when a chorus of critics panned Mr. Sanders for reciting his most familiar themes and doing little to distinguish himself, he wryly acknowledged that “they’re probably right.”

“It’s never made sense to me that a few people have incredible wealth and power while most have none,” he wrote on Twitter. “Should we ever achieve justice, I promise I’ll write some new speeches.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘This Is Not a Find-a-Friend Contest’: Inside Bernie Sanders’s Resolute Campaign Style

WASHINGTON — When Senator Bernie Sanders brought his presidential campaign to Pittsburgh earlier this year, he quietly added a poignant stop to his schedule: a visit to the Tree of Life synagogue, where 11 congregants were killed in an anti-Semitic shooting last fall.

But his appearance also came with explicit instructions to his campaign aides, according to two Democrats familiar with the conversation: They were not to tell the news media about his conversation with the rabbi there.

Some aides dissented, believing there was a graceful way to disclose the visit. But Mr. Sanders, the only Jewish candidate among the leading Democratic contenders, did not want the visit to be perceived as a publicity grab. His impulse illustrated a deeper challenge confronting his aides and supporters: After nearly four decades of running, and usually winning, iconoclastic campaigns on his own terms, he is deeply reluctant to change his approach.

Mr. Sanders has been unwilling to regularly talk about his personal history of growing up poor in a Brooklyn neighborhood full of Holocaust survivors, and until recently he resisted letting his campaign poll voters in Iowa, the first nominating state. He has largely defied his staff’s urging that he go on the offensive against Joseph R. Biden Jr., the Democratic front-runner.

But now, slipping in the polls and outraised by a handful of rivals, including a fellow progressive, Elizabeth Warren, Mr. Sanders is facing growing pressure from some of his allies, and within his own ranks, to adjust his strategy.

“I do think he’s going to have to draw a contrast with the vice president,” said Representative Ro Khanna of California, one of Mr. Sanders’s four campaign co-chairs, referring to Mr. Biden. He added that the 77-year-old Vermont senator should also “speak about his personal story.”

Voters, Mr. Khanna said, “have got to see that human side.”

In what is shaping up to be a volatile Democratic primary, Mr. Sanders retains significant strengths. He has more money on hand ($30 million) than any other candidate, and nearly all his donors can contribute again because they have yet to give the maximum amount. He enjoys the unwavering devotion of his core base of voters, support that will not flag with the ups and downs of the campaign.

In a contest that could remain splintered after Iowa and New Hampshire, and in which candidates only need to garner 15 percent of the vote to earn delegates, that loyalty may prove critical to keeping Mr. Sanders in contention up to the convention.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_155836173_a82c29f4-7554-47dd-b8ca-76389c0134e0-articleLarge ‘This Is Not a Find-a-Friend Contest’: Inside Bernie Sanders’s Resolute Campaign Style Weaver, Jeffrey P (1966- ) Warren, Elizabeth United States Politics and Government Tree of Life (Pittsburgh, Pa, Synagogue) Sanders, Bernard Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Presidential Election of 2016 Pittsburgh (Pa) Democratic Party Biden, Joseph R Jr

Mr. Sanders’s consistency appeals to his most fervent supporters, but it may limit his ability to gain more.CreditSarahbeth Maney for The New York Times

Yet Mr. Sanders has struggled to expand his support in the early nominating states beyond those die-hard supporters. In Iowa, for example, he has fallen to fourth place in recent polling. A Wall Street Journal/NBC News national poll released Thursday showed him tied for third, well behind Mr. Biden and Ms. Warren. And his advisers acknowledge that just under half of his supporters that they’ve identified from the 2016 Iowa caucuses, where he came within a point of defeating Hillary Clinton, have defected to other candidates.

Jeff Weaver, Mr. Sanders’s closest adviser, suggested in an interview that the campaign may make some modifications to re-energize his bid. “A smart campaign is always tweaking,” he said.

But he emphasized that there would be no wholesale changes, and disparaged the ways that some presidential hopefuls attempt to forge a personal connection with voters.

“Let’s be clear about this point: If somebody wants a candidate who is going to make health care a right, raise wages, deal with climate change, deal with immigration reform and criminal justice reform, Bernie Sanders is your candidate,” said Mr. Weaver. “If you want somebody who’s going to talk about their cooking, their dog, their wardrobe, travel habits, or favorite books, Bernie Sanders is not your candidate.”

“This is not a popularity contest or a find-a-friend contest,” he said.

While Ms. Warren is making incursions with some of Mr. Sanders’s progressive backers, campaign aides insist that they view Mr. Biden as a far more significant threat because of his support from some of the working-class voters who voted for Mr. Sanders in 2016.

Yet Mr. Sanders’s campaign faces a conundrum in how to run against Ms. Warren. Though aides grumble that she has claimed some of Mr. Sanders’s long-held, anti-big business stances, they all but rule out the prospect of aggressively confronting someone their candidate considers a personal friend.

“I do not see a situation at all where Bernie Sanders allows the campaign to do that,” Ari Rabin-Havt, the campaign’s chief of staff, said about attacking Ms. Warren. “That’s not who he is and that’s not how he feels about Elizabeth Warren.”

It is a different story with Mr. Biden. Mr. Sanders’s advisers had hoped he would challenge the former vice president at last month’s debate, according to multiple Democrats familiar with their conversations. After choosing not to, Mr. Sanders found himself largely left out of the post-debate conversation, which was dominated by Senator Kamala Harris’s criticism of Mr. Biden’s past opposition to busing.

Advisers had hoped Mr. Sanders would go after former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. during last month’s debate, but he chose not to.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Mr. Weaver expressed hope that his candidate would take on Mr. Biden over his support for free trade pacts that are highly unpopular among blue-collar voters in the Midwest.

“Joe Biden has some serious issues when it comes to the trade policies he has supported and reaffirmed his support for,” said Mr. Weaver.

However, even Mr. Sanders’s aides acknowledge that they would like to see him talk more about his post-World War II childhood in Brooklyn, where he was surrounded by Jewish immigrants who bore the tattoos Nazis had branded them with. In a campaign in which issues of race and discrimination have been central, and in which the inhumane treatment of migrants has become a partisan flash point, the senator’s advisers believe he has something to contribute to that discussion.

Mr. Sanders highlighted his biography at the outset of this campaign, but since has done so only sporadically, instead returning to what is essentially a compilation of his greatest hits: jeremiads against the greed of plutocrats and paeans for universal health care.

But unlike during the 2016 campaign, when Democratic voters had only to choose between him and the establishment-aligned Hillary Clinton, progressives now can select from a wealth of candidates singing from the same populist hymnal.

“In some ways, I think that he has been so extremely successful that his platform has become the norm,” said Brent Welder, a Sanders supporter who ran for Congress in Kansas last year.

Which is to say he is at risk of being a victim of his own success. And that, perhaps, highlights the fundamental tension of Mr. Sanders’s candidacy: It may prove difficult for him to expand his support without broadening his message, yet what draws many of his fervent supporters in the first place is the constancy of his appeals.

“Bernie Sanders always runs his own campaign — it may be unscripted, but it’s focused on his issues,” said Mark Longabaugh, who was one of Mr. Sanders’s top advisers in 2016. Mr. Longabaugh and his partners abruptly left the 2020 team shortly after its formation because they concluded the senator and his wife, Jane, were unwilling to cede any real control.

Mr. Sanders traced his agenda back to Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal during a speech in Washington last month.CreditGabriella Demczuk for The New York Times

Mr. Weaver said the senator was open to advice, but acknowledged that he at times goes his own way.

“He accepts some of it, he doesn’t accept others of it,” he said. “But he always wants ideas.”

Though he can be gruff on the campaign trail and prefers holding big rallies, Mr. Sanders has begun in recent weeks to hold smaller events like ice cream socials and has even acquiesced to taking photos with supporters who line up to see him.

Still, the angst among some of Mr. Sanders’s own supporters has been building.

While he has sought to elevate matters of racial justice more in this campaign than he did in 2016, his overriding focus remains class uplift. At times, that message can feel discordant from the energy of the Democratic Party at a moment when President Trump has helped elevate issues of race, gender and sexuality.

In May, during a sweep through the South just days after Alabama passed a law effectively banning abortion, Mr. Sanders responded to a national outcry on the left by devoting only a small portion of his speaking time to addressing the measure at a series of town halls and rallies. Some allies said they found that response puzzling.

Later that month, he returned to Vermont to deliver a speech at the state capitol in Montpelier. It was a homecoming event that his campaign billed as an opportunity to amplify his long political record in the state and accentuate a topic his aides have been eager to highlight: his history of winning difficult races and defeating Republicans.

But Mr. Sanders made scant mention of his accomplishments. The only real deviation from his usual stump speech was a fresh attack on the media that stemmed from a story in The New York Times about his left-wing foreign policy activism as mayor of Burlington, Vt., in the 1980s.

Then, last month, Mr. Sanders planned another speech aimed at reframing the race: an address in Washington meant to defuse attacks on the democratic socialism he espouses, by tracing his agenda back to Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal.

Some of his allies expressed skepticism about the wisdom of holding up a president who has been dead for nearly 75 years as a point of comparison — a move akin to George McGovern linking himself to the populism of William Jennings Bryan in 1972 — but Mr. Sanders would not be denied. He has since introduced a sticker inspired by Roosevelt, and his campaign quotes the former president on a new webpage that lists what Mr. Sanders is calling “anti-endorsements” from tycoons whose contempt he relishes in the same fashion of his political role model.

If it all rings familiar, well, that’s just fine by Mr. Sanders.

After the first debate, when a chorus of critics panned Mr. Sanders for reciting his most familiar themes and doing little to distinguish himself, he wryly acknowledged that “they’re probably right.”

“It’s never made sense to me that a few people have incredible wealth and power while most have none,” he wrote on Twitter. “Should we ever achieve justice, I promise I’ll write some new speeches.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Coming up on Fox News, July 12, 2019 and this weekend

STAY TUNED

On Fox News: 

Fox & Friends, 6 a.m. ET: Rush Limbaugh sounds off on the top headlines of the day in an exclusive interview. Country music group Runaway June performs in the latest installment of Fox & Friends’ All-American Summer Concert Series.

The Story with Martha MacCallum, 7 p.m. ET: It’s a “Ladies Night” edition of “The Story” as a panel featuring Fox News “24/7 Headlines” reporter Carley Shimkus and Fox News contributors Lisa Boothe and Jessica Tarlov address leading topics of the past week.

On Fox Business:

Mornings with Maria, 6 a.m. ET: Kellyanne Conway, counselor to President Trump.

Varney & Co., 9 a.m. ET: Ajit Pai, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission.

On Fox News Radio:

The Fox News Rundown podcast: “President Trump Sidesteps Census Fight”– Fox News Radio’s Jon Decker discusses President Trump’s shift in strategy on adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census and how his base may react. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi pushed back Thursday on the apparent ongoing feud between her and four progressive members of her party. Fox News contributors Doug Schoen and Jehmu Greene weigh in on the battle between Pelosi and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and her allies. PLUS: Don’t miss the good news with Fox News’ Tonya J. Powers and commentary by Karol Markowicz, columnist for FOXNews.com and the New York Post.

Want the Fox News Rundown sent straight to your mobile device? Subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher.

The Brian Kilmeade Show, 9 a.m. ET: Retired Navy Adm. James Stavridis, operating executive with the Carlyle Group; Geraldo Rivera, Fox News roaming correspondent-at-large; Matt Schlapp, chairman of the American Conservative Union; Shannon Bream, host of “Fox News @ Night”; James Carroll, director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy.

The Todd Starnes Show, Noon ET: Todd will have the latest on Tropical Storm Barry heading toward Louisiana and will discuss the 2020 census immigration question controversy with Hogan Gidley, White House principal deputy press secretary.

On Fox News Weekend:

Sunday:

Fox News Sunday, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. ET: U.S. Rep. Ben Ray Luján, D-N.M., assistant House speaker.

Westlake Legal Group Limbaugh-Trump-Latino Coming up on Fox News, July 12, 2019 and this weekend fox-news/entertainment/media fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9935f884-c05d-5c5b-9f89-78c73fcbf9d6   Westlake Legal Group Limbaugh-Trump-Latino Coming up on Fox News, July 12, 2019 and this weekend fox-news/entertainment/media fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9935f884-c05d-5c5b-9f89-78c73fcbf9d6

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Frank Miniter: To reduce gun violence, we need to do these things

Westlake Legal Group guns Frank Miniter: To reduce gun violence, we need to do these things Frank Miniter fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/crime fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 24276df1-8561-5756-b770-2e8136b35c3c

When he called the Republican-controlled Virginia Legislature to the state Capitol for a special session this week, Virginia’s Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam wasn’t really attempting to make changes to the state’s gun laws that would have stopped the murderer who killed a dozen people in Virginia Beach in May.

In fact, despite his claims to the contrary, Northam was simply playing gun control politics. He was crassly using the deaths of victims to push the current national agenda of those who want to blame guns and law-abiding gun owners for the actions of criminals and the mentally ill.

The Republicans called Northam on this obviously political ploy. With their one-vote majorities in the state House of Delegates and Senate, they cut the special session short. It lasted only 90 minutes.

GOP-LED VIRGINIA LEGISLATURE ABRUPTLY ADJOURNS GUN SESSION

Republican lawmakers wisely referred all of the gun control bills submitted to the special session of the Legislature to the bipartisan state Crime Commission. This will enable the proposals to be studied, so lawmakers can actually craft legislation that would help save lives.

By declining to vote on a long list of gun control proposals, Virginia legislators reminded us of what is really preventing America from coming together in a bipartisan way on this issue: Americans are divided between three wildly different gun cultures.

First, there is the freedom-loving, law-abiding, gun rights culture that upholds the responsible use of guns for hunting, sport and self-defense. This includes nearly all of the more than 100 million gun owners in America today. Over 5 million people who are part of this culture are members of the National Rifle Association, where I serve as editor in chief of the NRA’s magazine America’s 1st Freedom.

Will we continue to waste resources, media time and more as we allow the mainstream media to unfairly blame America’s law-abiding gun owners for the actions of criminals and the dangerously mentally ill?

Second, there is the criminal culture that thrives in spite of, or even because of, government attempts at restricting our constitutional right to bear arms.

And third, there is the part of the culture – including many members of the mainstream media – that is made up of people who have no experience with firearms, but who fear guns out of ignorance. This group often exhibits a complete unwillingness to even try to understand American freedom.

Worse still, this last group is actively blaming the gun rights segment of the American citizenry for the unlawful actions of the second part – the criminals and the mentally ill.

This sets the stage for the culture war now underway.

The most disturbing part of this issue is there are good solutions available, but the mainstream media have no interest in them, as they require us to focus on the actual problem – the criminal element in our society and the mentally ill.

The mainstream media, instead, are waging a political war. They want to win power for their preferred political party. They have little interest in doing honest reporting on gang violence and how we can make inner city communities safer.

They have little interest in devoting more resources to helping us find and treat the small percentage of mentally ill people who might do violent things. To the mainstream media, doing any of that would require us to focus on what they view as marginalized communities, many of which have high minority populations.

It is more politically expedient for them to instead blame people who largely don’t vote for Democrats and who mostly live outside of inner city communities where gang-related homicides are a serious problem.

The same can be said for focusing on the relatively few members of American society who are violent due to serious mental health issues. Those people can be hard to find and diagnose. It is much easier and more politically advantageous for the mainstream media to simply blame gun ownership.

Meanwhile, things that might have actually stopped the Virginia Beach murderer – at least before he killed a dozen people – require us to allow average citizens to utilize their constitutional right to bear arms.

To stop something as random as a person who doesn’t have a criminal record – yet suddenly and for unfathomable reasons decides to perform an evil act – people need their right to self-preservation, as granted to us by the Second Amendment of our Bill of Rights.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Virginia’s political disagreement on this issue demonstrates what is happening nationally. Will we continue to waste resources, media time and more as we allow the mainstream media to unfairly blame America’s law-abiding gun owners for the actions of criminals and the dangerously mentally ill?

Criminals almost always use illegal guns to commit their crimes. This is hardly the fault of average gun owners in America or their guns. Criminals and a small percentage of the mentally ill are the cause. We need to focus our resources on the actual problem.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY FRANK MINITER

Westlake Legal Group guns Frank Miniter: To reduce gun violence, we need to do these things Frank Miniter fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/crime fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 24276df1-8561-5756-b770-2e8136b35c3c   Westlake Legal Group guns Frank Miniter: To reduce gun violence, we need to do these things Frank Miniter fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/crime fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 24276df1-8561-5756-b770-2e8136b35c3c

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Top Trump Economic Adviser Heaps Praise On Ocasio-Cortez: ‘Hats Off To Ms. AOC’

Westlake Legal Group 5d281af23b00004d00dac293 Top Trump Economic Adviser Heaps Praise On Ocasio-Cortez: ‘Hats Off To Ms. AOC’

It’s not often that Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) receives praise from inside the White House of President Donald Trump. But it happened on Thursday.

Larry Kudlow, director of the National Economic Council, said the freshman lawmaker had “nailed” her line of questioning to Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell during a House hearing earlier this week.

Ocasio-Cortez asked Powell about the Phillips curve, an economic model that says inflation is supposed to rise as unemployment drops. CNBC reported that the concept was used by the Fed to guide policy. 

However, in recent years, low unemployment hasn’t led to rising inflation. Ocasio-Cortez put Powell on the spot about the issue, and he admitted that the link “was broken at least 20 years ago” and the relationship between the two had “become weaker and weaker and weaker.”

Kudlow applauded Ocasio-Cortez for her queries.  

“I got to give her high marks for that,” Kudlow told Fox News. “She got that out of the chairman.” 

He added that the White House agreed: 

“By the way, that’s been my position. That’s been the president’s position: Strong growth doesn’t cause higher inflation and interest rates. It looks like the Fed is going to cut their rates.”

The agreement likely ends there; the point of Ocasio-Cortez’s questions was to say that if the Phillips curve was wrong about unemployment driving inflation, other assumptions about inflation might also be wrong. 

Do you think that could have implications in terms of policymaking?” she asked Powell. “That there is perhaps room for increased tolerance of policies that have historically been thought to drive inflation?”

Her specific example was increasing the minimum wage, something Kudlow has called “a terrible idea.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

As Nations Look to Tax Tech Firms, U.S. Scrambles to Broker a Deal

Westlake Legal Group merlin_148265940_3d34f4ca-6938-496a-86fd-8da1c7681316-facebookJumbo As Nations Look to Tax Tech Firms, U.S. Scrambles to Broker a Deal United States Politics and Government United States International Relations United States Economy Trump, Donald J Treaties tax evasion Mnuchin, Steven T International Trade and World Market Income Tax Great Britain Google Inc France Federal Taxes (US) Facebook Inc Customs (Tariff) Corporations Corporate Taxes Amazon.com Inc

WASHINGTON — For most of the 21st century, wealthy nations have engaged in a race to the bottom on corporate taxes, cutting rates in an effort to poach business activity across borders. Very quickly, that script has flipped.

Developed countries are now moving to impose new taxes on technology companies, like Facebook and Google, that have large presences in their citizens’ daily lives but pay those countries little tax on the profits they earn there.

France moved on Thursday to become the first country to impose a so-called digital tax of 3 percent on the revenue companies earn from providing digital services to French users. It would apply to large companies, numbering more than two dozen, with robust annual sales in France, including United States-based Facebook, Google and Amazon. British leaders also detailed plans on Thursday to impose a similar tax, of 2 percent, on tech giants. And the European Union has also been mulling a digital tax.

The digital revenue grab is pitting traditional allies against one another, threatening to set off a cascade of tax increases and tariffs unless political and economic leaders work out a multinational agreement to avert them. Late Wednesday, the Trump administration said it would pursue an investigation into whether France’s tech tax amounted to an unfair trade practice that could be punishable with retaliatory tariffs. Administration officials, including Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, have also raised concerns about Britain’s move.

The French tax, which would exact a bigger toll on foreign companies than French ones, has been denounced by the American tech industry, along with Democratic and Republican leaders, who are looking for ways to avoid such one-off decisions by more closely coordinating international digital tax arrangements.

Administration officials have tried to shape an effort being led by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development to broker an international system for taxing digital profits. A lobbying flurry has broken out in Washington to influence the negotiations.

And in its attempts to show international leadership — and not go it alone, as Mr. Trump has in his trade wars with China and other partners — the administration is pushing the Senate to vote next week on a package of long-foundering updates to international tax treaties, which could demonstrate to allies that it is serious about leading the effort to broker a digital armistice.

Countries have competed to reduce corporate tax rates, and attract business activity both physically and on paper, for two decades. The average rate tracked by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has fallen seven percentage points since 2000, to just over 21 percent today. France and the United States both cut rates substantially for 2018, with Mr. Trump’s signature tax cuts bringing the American rate of 21 percent right to the international average.

Technology companies’ revenue has surged worldwide, but not their tax payments, prompting many wealthy governments to complain that digital businesses are not paying their fair share. The European Union calculates that digital company revenue is growing more than four times as fast as revenue for other multinational companies, partly from ad sales to European consumers.

Because the firms have relatively light physical presences in Europe, they benefit from the current system, which taxes companies based on where their operations and assets are — and not where their sales are generated. The European Union has said this has allowed tech companies to pay less than half the effective tax rate of other multinationals, and European leaders want to tax them in a way that takes into account where their users are.

Mr. Mnuchin has spent much of his time discussing the issue at international forums with finance ministers from around the world.

During meetings of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank in April, Mr. Mnuchin said it was a “priority” to find an international solution, and he pressed France and Britain to abandon their own tax plans once a compromise is reached.

At the Group of 20 finance ministers meeting in Japan in June, Mr. Mnuchin underscored his concerns, and the finance ministers agreed in their communiqué to work toward finding a common set of rules to close loopholes that global technology companies have been using to reduce their tax bills.

“I’m not in favor of the current digital tax that has been proposed by France and the U.K.,” Mr. Mnuchin said, warning a system of unilateral digital taxes would not work. “We have significant concerns with both of those.”

The United States has called for a tax that is based on companies’ income, not sales, and said specific industries should not be singled out with a different standard. The Treasury secretary has dispatched his deputy, Justin Muzinich, to help broker an agreement. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development released a “road map” in May, agreed to by nearly 130 countries, toward finding agreement on a global digital tax plan.

France has said that it will repeal its tax once a group agreement is reached. The subject will come up again when finance minsters gather in Chantilly, France, for the summit of the Group of 7 industrialized nations next week. Bruno Le Maire, the French finance minister, has suggested that France’s tax will help accelerate an international pact.

“We are willing, especially with Steven Mnuchin, to give new impetus during the G7 in Chantilly on the very specific topic of minimum taxation,” Mr. Le Maire said in an interview last month.

The Treasury Department said in a letter to the Senate Finance Committee on Thursday that it is considering a range of responses to the French tax.

“We have and will continue to urge France to forbear from such unilateral actions and join with us in an intensive effort to reach a comprehensive, multilateral solution,” wrote Kimberly J. Pinter, deputy assistant secretary in Treasury’s office of legislative affairs.

As negotiations persist, administration officials and Republican Senate leaders have worked together to break a decade-long logjam on updating international tax treaties, some of which were negotiated in the early years of the Obama administration.

Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader, moved on Thursday to set up a vote on the quartet of treaties next week, in what would be a bipartisan victory for multinational companies. The package is expected to succeed in garnering the support of two-thirds of senators voting on the issue.

The so-called tax protocols would update existing tax treaties with Spain, Japan, Luxembourg and Switzerland. They would allow companies with operations in those countries to avoid some previous tax penalties for transferring money to their operations abroad, in a provision proponents say would encourage multinationals to invest more in the United States. They would also update the existing treaties to allow for more detailed sharing of information among countries on individual and corporate taxpayers.

The treaties were held up for years by Senator Rand Paul, Republican of Kentucky, who objected to that information sharing. But the Senate Foreign Relations Committee overrode his complaints and voted to advance the treaties last month.

A host of large and powerful trade groups, including the Semiconductor Industry Association and the Business Roundtable, has been urging Senate leaders to approve the measures. “Tax treaties help the U.S. economy by allowing U.S. companies to more efficiently conduct their businesses abroad and by making the U.S. more hospitable to foreign investment,” the groups wrote this spring in a letter to Senator Jim Risch, the Idaho Republican who leads the Foreign Relations Committee.

One of the companies that stands to benefit is a Spanish-owned steel maker with a large plant in Kentucky, North American Stainless, which has been pushing Mr. McConnell and other senators to schedule a vote.

North American Stainless is the subsidiary of Acerinox, and employs more than 1,300 workers in Kentucky. A company executive told a Senate panel in 2014 that ratifying the tax protocol with Spain could boost Acerinox’s investments in Kentucky, by ending a 10 percent tax on dividend payments from the American subsidiary to the parent company.

In pushing for the tax treaties, Treasury officials have argued that they would promote fair and efficient taxation by the United States and treaty partners, reduce the risk of double taxation and help combat tax evasion by improving the flow of information among tax authorities.

A Treasury spokeswoman said the tax treaties were a priority for Mr. Mnuchin and Mr. McConnell and that the Senate’s bipartisan work on the issue would fuel economic growth.

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NASA’s Hubble telescope detects supermassive black hole that defies theoretical models

NASA’s Hubble telescope has recently discovered a supermassive black hole that defies existing theories about the universe, a report said.

The black hole, which is about 250 million times heavier than the sun, lies at the heart of the spiral galaxy NGC 3147 and is 140 million light-years from Earth.

Westlake Legal Group 080ee8ad-Capture NASA’s Hubble telescope detects supermassive black hole that defies theoretical models fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/astronomy fox news fnc/science fnc Bradford Betz article 3200f311-02f9-5bcd-9917-952f27c0e7f2

The Hubble telescope has detected a supermassive black hole that technically shouldn’t exist, according to new findings.  (nasa.gov)

Spotted around the black hole was a thin “accretion disk” containing debris and gas rapidly pacing around the edge, according to findings published Thursday in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

The black hole was unusual in that its gravitational pull was not capturing the disk of material, which was moving at 10% the speed of light, according to the journal.

3RD MYSTERIOUS DEEP-SPACE FLASH TRACED TO HOST GALAXY

Lead author Stefano Bianchi said it’s “the same type of disk we see in objects that are 1,000 or even 100,000 times more luminous.”

“The predictions of current models for gas dynamics in very faint active galaxies clearly failed,” Bianchi added.

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By observing the disk through blocking out starlight, researchers were able to better study processes happening close to the black hole’s edge. The team said they plan to study more galaxies with the Hubble Space Telescope in the future to find similar disks of material.

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Ingraham: ‘Left’ trying to destroy what it means to be American

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6058160238001_6058162891001-vs Ingraham: 'Left' trying to destroy what it means to be American Victor Garcia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc d86e5bd6-034e-521f-a904-5490f095a7d4 article

Fox News’ Laura Ingraham addressed Thursday the agenda to “destroy” what it means to be American blasting the left for trying to take away the county’s identity.

“The historical purge that we are witnessing all over the country is part of a larger agenda. To destroy what it means to be American. And it’s getting more audacious by the day,” Ingraham said on “The Ingraham Angle” Thursday.

LAWRENCE JONES TALKS TO MINNESOTA RESIDENTS ABOUT COUNCIL NIXING PLEDGE

The Fox News host addressed a controversy in a Minnesota city involving the Pledge of Allegiance.

“In St. Louis Park, Minnesota, the geniuses on the city council there recently decided to ban the Pledge of Allegiance from town meetings. Their reason? To create a more welcoming environment to a diverse community. Oh, welcoming to everybody but Americans who actually love the pledge,” Ingraham said.

Ingraham took on members of the “left” who view America as “illegitimate.”

“The easiest path to social media start today is one where you take cheap swipes and America symbols and traditions,” she said.

Ingraham called these attacks on what it means to be American part of a “power grab” by those on the “left.”

“Our progress on racial issues is conveniently ignored by cynical actors who are, frankly, using these past horrors for a power grab and, they hope, a total reorganization of our society here and a massive wealth confiscation,” Ingraham said.

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Ingraham warned that country would pay a price for not defending history.

“There is a price for surrendering your sovereignty and your identity and we are going to pay it if we don’t defend our history and our traditions,” Ingraham said.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6058160238001_6058162891001-vs Ingraham: 'Left' trying to destroy what it means to be American Victor Garcia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc d86e5bd6-034e-521f-a904-5490f095a7d4 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6058160238001_6058162891001-vs Ingraham: 'Left' trying to destroy what it means to be American Victor Garcia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc d86e5bd6-034e-521f-a904-5490f095a7d4 article

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Georgia homeowner shoots, kills machete-wielding intruder: cops

Westlake Legal Group Doraville-IJ2_7233-1024x683 Georgia homeowner shoots, kills machete-wielding intruder: cops fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox news fnc/us fnc f0b90080-5af3-5420-9167-06aeed7376cf Brie Stimson article

A Georgia homeowner fatally shot a machete-wielding intruder early Thursday morning, according to a report.

Investigators believe the unidentified suspect lived next door in Doraville, a small town northeast of Atlanta., WSB-AM reported.

ARIZONA HOMEOWNER SHOOTS, KILLS SUSPECTED INTRUDER, INJURES ANOTHER: ‘BETTER COME IN READY’

The homeowner shot the suspect around 5:30 a.m. when he allegedly caught the man breaking one of his windows.

The suspect was taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead.

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Dekalb County police said they were also called to the neighborhood a few hours before the incident because of an unconfirmed report that a man was screaming “at the top of his lungs.” They weren’t sure if the incidents were related, according to WSB.

Westlake Legal Group Doraville-IJ2_7233-1024x683 Georgia homeowner shoots, kills machete-wielding intruder: cops fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox news fnc/us fnc f0b90080-5af3-5420-9167-06aeed7376cf Brie Stimson article   Westlake Legal Group Doraville-IJ2_7233-1024x683 Georgia homeowner shoots, kills machete-wielding intruder: cops fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox news fnc/us fnc f0b90080-5af3-5420-9167-06aeed7376cf Brie Stimson article

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Dog the Bounty Hunter says he’s lost 17 pounds since wife Beth’s death

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Dog the Bounty Hunter said he lost 17 pounds during a two week period since his wife Beth lost her nearly two-year battle with throat cancer last month at the age of 51.

“I can’t eat. Two bites, I’m full. I got to force feed myself like I force fed her,” Duane “Dog” Chapman said during a sit down interview with Entertainment Tonight in his Colorado home. He said his late wife used to help him read the menu at restaurants since his eyesight is failing. Now he avoids eating out because he “can’t see the freakin’ menu.”

DOG THE BOUNTY HUNTER ON WIFE’S PASSING: ‘BETH ISN’T DEAD, SHE’S SLEEPING’

“I’m having a hard time ordering food. I’ve lost 17 pounds. Chewing ice helps, and I’ve lost 17 pounds in about two weeks,” he said. He also said he no longer sleeps soundly. The 66-year-old reality star said he used to wake up in the middle of the night when Beth was still alive to make sure she was still breathing. Now when he wakes up, he said he doesn’t understand right away why she’s not beside him.

Dog said he is ready to join his wife in heaven but does not contemplate suicide. For now, he said he uses his time on earth to help others experiencing the loss of a loved one. He described how one man came up to him recently who said he lost his wife six months ago.

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“I hugged him and I felt a connection like, boom, instantly brotherhood, right,” he shared. “So when you go through something and somebody else [goes through the same thing], there’s something there. That’s why I’m going through it, but I use that thing that’s bad to help me help others.”

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