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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 94)

Nissan Is in Trouble. Carlos Ghosn May Deserve the Blame.

Carlos Ghosn was long one of the most admired executives in the auto industry.

He was hailed as a corporate savior when the French automaker Renault bought a stake in Nissan and dispatched him to Japan on a rescue mission. He built a thriving global alliance between the two companies, and for 12 years he led both simultaneously.

“Carlos Ghosn did some great things,” said Scott Smith, the owner of four Nissan franchises in Georgia. “He gave us a lot of good product. He was the Lee Iacocca of Europe.”

Mr. Ghosn’s career was abruptly halted 14 months ago with his arrest in Japan on charges of financial wrongdoing. After an audacious escape from custody and a surreptitious trek to Lebanon, he declared that he was determined to restore his personal reputation. But however his legal troubles play out, there are growing questions about another aspect of his reputation: whether he left Nissan in good shape.

Less than three years after Mr. Ghosn gave up the top job at Nissan, it has slipped into a deep slump. Revenue and profits are falling in markets around the world. Sales in the United States — its most crucial market after China — fell 11 percent in 2019, a staggering decline at a time when auto sales are at near-record levels.

Analysts and industry executives lay much of the blame for Nissan’s woes on Mr. Ghosn. Over his last eight years at the helm, he led an unrelenting push for growth, often at the expense of the bottom line. To satisfy his demands for higher sales and more market share, Nissan executives turned to questionable practices that alienated a critical constituency: the dealers who sell its cars.

“Almost nobody calls now and says, ‘I want to buy a Nissan franchise,’” said Alan Haig, president of Haig Partners, which advises buyers and sellers of auto dealerships. “Carlos pushed too hard. He had very ambitious goals, and he pushed his managers to achieve them. He created a temporary situation that looked good for a while, but it was artificial.”

In an interview last week in Beirut, Mr. Ghosn said Nissan was doing fine when he stepped aside as chief executive three years ago, and he blamed his successor, Hiroto Saikawa, for the company’s problems.

“I think he’s unfit to be C.E.O., particularly when he spent this time not taking responsibility for the situation in which the company was,” Mr. Ghosn said.

Travis Parman, a spokesman for Nissan’s North American division, declined to comment on Mr. Ghosn’s remarks, but acknowledged that a strategy of “volume at any cost” had sometimes driven “bad behavior” by the company.

Asked Tuesday to address whether flaws in Nissan’s United States strategy under Mr. Ghosn laid the groundwork for its recent troubles and alienated dealers, someone in contact with him said the former chief executive “strongly rejects” the premise.

Nissan’s Shifting Fortunes

Sales for Nissan’s two brands in the United States rose with the economic recovery, but failed to sustain their gains.

Westlake Legal Group 0111-biz-web-NISSAN-Artboard_2 Nissan Is in Trouble. Carlos Ghosn May Deserve the Blame. United States Nissan Motor Co Motivation and Incentive Programs Ghosn, Carlos Discount Selling Automobiles

U.S. AUTO SALES

million vehicles

U.S. MARKET SHARE

Westlake Legal Group 0111-biz-web-NISSAN-Artboard_3 Nissan Is in Trouble. Carlos Ghosn May Deserve the Blame. United States Nissan Motor Co Motivation and Incentive Programs Ghosn, Carlos Discount Selling Automobiles

U.S. MARKET SHARE

U.S. AUTO SALES

million vehicles

Source: Autodata

By The New York Times

Mr. Ghosn, who was educated in France, started his career at the French tire maker Michelin, becoming head of its North America operations. He moved to Renault in 1996 as executive vice president and helped lead a turnaround. His skill at improving profitability earned him the nickname “Le Cost Killer.”

When Renault bought its stake in 1999, Nissan was near collapse. Mr. Ghosn slashed thousands of jobs, drawing criticism in a country not accustomed to mass layoffs, but Nissan quickly returned to profitability. In 2005 he was named C.E.O. of Renault as well, becoming the first person to head two Fortune Global 500 companies at once. By then, Nissan was often more profitable than Renault, although the French company remained the senior partner in the alliance.

In 2011, as the industry was recovering from the deep recession of 2008 and 2009, Mr. Ghosn stood before hundreds of reporters in Yokohama and announced an ambitious plan for Nissan. Over the next eight years, he said, Nissan would raise its share of the global market to 8 percent, from 5.8 percent. He planned to do this by investing heavily in the emerging markets of Brazil, Russia, India and China.

The United States market, where the economic recovery promised several years of rising auto sales, had a special role. There, he promised, Nissan’s market share, including the Infiniti luxury brand, would rise to 10 percent by 2017.

To drive growth, Nissan introduced new models and aggressive incentives that imposed ambitious sales quotas and tough terms on dealers. The incentive scheme Nissan favored, known as a stair step, awards cash bonuses to dealers as opposed to the more familiar rebates given to buyers. But it was essentially an all-or-nothing deal: Dealers got substantial bonuses only if they hit sales goals.

“We made tremendous profit at the beginning,” said Mr. Smith, the Georgia dealer. “But as your target went up and up year after year, you reached a point where you can’t hit the target.”

Dealers often sold cars at fire-sale prices in the last days of the month to make it over the line. That irritated customers when they learned that a neighbor paid thousands of dollars less for the same car, some dealers said. Other dealers simply bought cars themselves, held them for a few months and then offered them as used cars.

By the middle of the decade, many dealers were losing money, despite the robust economy, and looked to sell their franchises. The owner of a dealership in Framingham, Mass., simply turned out the lights and walked away, unable to find a buyer. AutoNation, the country’s largest dealership group, had 21 Nissan franchises in 2014, and sold 10 of them by 2018, according to its annual reports.

“Nissan was convinced that stair steps were the way to go, and we did not agree with this strategy for our business,” said Marc Cannon, an AutoNation spokesman.

It didn’t help that Americans were gravitating strongly toward trucks and sport utility vehicles — which produce bigger profits — and away from sedans and compacts, which Nissan relies on for a large portion of sales.

With the deadline for Mr. Ghosn’s goal of 10 percent market share a few years away, Nissan’s United States executives increasingly took aim at smaller dealers, imposing ever more demanding terms to ramp up sales. Inside Nissan, the effort was known as “Grow or Go.”

The company also began favoring a few large dealers, quietly agreeing to provide funding to them that was not offered to others nearby. In Coral Gables, Fla., Bernie Moreno had a confidential agreement calling for Nissan to pay him $4.4 million over several years to fund an opulent Infiniti dealership, he said. Nissan also agreed to give him $6.5 million more for two new Nissan dealerships he opened near Cleveland.

Even with extra money from Nissan, Mr. Moreno eventually struggled. One month in 2018, Nissan raised the sales goal of his Infiniti store to 180 cars — about twice as many as it would naturally sell.

“It was an impossible number,” he said. The type of stair-step programs Nissan operated “were like heroin,” Mr. Moreno added. “They gave car companies an immediate boost in sales, but then they couldn’t get off it.”

In 2017, Mr. Ghosn’s final year as chief executive, Nissan sold 1.6 million cars and trucks in the United States, a 53 percent increase from 2011, and enough to give it 9.2 percent of the market, short of Mr. Ghosn’s target. But the incentives it was paying out were starting to eat into profits, and many of its remaining dealers were fed up with chasing higher sales year after year.

Nissan’s most recent earnings report revealed the depth of its troubles. While China has become Nissan’s biggest market, Mr. Ghosn’s push into emerging markets has become a costly flop amid economic turmoil in Brazil, India and Russia. In the United States, Nissan has been slow to introduce new models, leaving little to draw shoppers. When Mr. Ghosn’s successor, Mr. Saikawa, finally changed the company’s incentive strategy in 2018, sales slumped, and Nissan was left with a glut of unsold cars.

Without the old incentive scheme, Nissan dealers stopped offering bargain prices every month. “Customers had become trained to shop for the deal,” Mr. Smith said.

In the six-month period ending Sept. 30, Nissan’s operating income fell 85 percent from the same period a year before. In North America, profit declined 57 percent.

In September, Mr. Saikawa resigned after an internal investigation found that he had been paid hundreds of thousands of dollars more than he was owed. The head of Nissan’s China operations, Makoto Uchida, was named chief executive in October. He has vowed to focus on profits and installed a new management team in the United States.

For all Nissan’s troubles, Mr. Smith is determined to continue as a dealer. He said a turnaround would take time, but added, “I’m optimistic.”

Mr. Moreno, on the other hand, is giving up on selling cars, in large part because of his experience with Nissan. Over the past year, he has sold his two Nissan stores in Ohio and about a dozen dealerships of other brands. A deal to sell Infiniti of Coral Gables and a Buick GMC dealership in Ohio is expected to close in a few weeks, he said.

“Then I’ll be out of the auto business completely,” he said.

Ben Dooley contributed reporting.

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Warren-Sanders clash ‘very dispiriting,’ Dems’ debate like ‘cold oatmeal,’ CNN’s Van Jones says

Westlake Legal Group Jones_VanAP397 Warren-Sanders clash ‘very dispiriting,’ Dems' debate like 'cold oatmeal,' CNN’s Van Jones says fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Dom Calicchio b5072b93-ccbe-5dee-9e7b-b2c231163663 article

Tuesday’s Democratic debate clash between Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders may have stemmed from their respective election strategies as next month’s Iowa caucuses draw closer, but it left CNN’s progressive commentator Van Jones shaking his head.

To see those two have that level of vitriol was very dispiriting,” Jones said during a network panel discussion after the debate in Des Moines, Iowa, less than three weeks before the Iowa caucuses.

It also left him thinking Democrats were unlikely to defeat President Trump in November, he said.

Leading up to the debate were reports that Sanders had told Warren he didn’t think a woman could win the presidency. But on the debate stage, Sanders vehemently denied the story.

CNN BLASTED FOR ‘SIDING’ WITH WARREN AFTER SANDERS DENIED SEXISM CHARGE

Warren countered by pointing out that only she and Sen. Amy Klobuchar among the debate participants had never lost an election – and only Warren herself had defeated a Republican incumbent in the last 30 years.

Sanders answered by insisting he had defeated a GOP candidate – exactly 30 years ago.

After the debate, Warren even appeared unwilling to shake Sanders’ hand when he extended it.

Four other Democrats – Klobuchar, Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg and Tom Steyer – shared the stage with Warren and Sanders, but CNN’s Jones didn’t seem impressed with them either.

“The Democrats are going to have to do better than what we saw tonight,” he said. “There was [no one] I saw tonight that would be able to take Donald Trump out – and I want to see a Democrat in the White House as soon as possible.

“There was nothing tonight that, if you’re looking at this thing, you say, ‘Any of these people are prepared for what Donald Trump’s going to do to us,’” Jones continued, “and to see further division tonight is very dispiriting.”

Later, Jones tweeted he had “high expectations” for the debate but came away disappointed.

“There was a spark missing on stage,” he wrote. “It felt like cold oatmeal to me.”

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A Monmouth University poll released Monday showed Biden leading in Iowa with support from 24 percent of likely caucus participants, followed by Sanders (18 percent), Buttigieg (17 percent), Warren (15 percent), Klobuchar (8 percent) and Steyer (4 percent).

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is skipping the Iowa caucuses and focusing on other races later in the primary season.

Westlake Legal Group Jones_VanAP397 Warren-Sanders clash ‘very dispiriting,’ Dems' debate like 'cold oatmeal,' CNN’s Van Jones says fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Dom Calicchio b5072b93-ccbe-5dee-9e7b-b2c231163663 article   Westlake Legal Group Jones_VanAP397 Warren-Sanders clash ‘very dispiriting,’ Dems' debate like 'cold oatmeal,' CNN’s Van Jones says fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Dom Calicchio b5072b93-ccbe-5dee-9e7b-b2c231163663 article

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Tom Steyer’s red plaid tie trends during Democratic debate

Westlake Legal Group AP20015122682583 Tom Steyer's red plaid tie trends during Democratic debate fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson article 8a1c3ead-127c-5438-8cee-a0da0b754468

As Democrats debated health care and foreign policy at the last Democratic presidential debate Tuesday before voting starts in Iowa next month, Tom Steyer’s red plaid tie was trending on social media.

“Here is the most important question the moderators are ignoring,” senior writer at The Root Michael Harriot joked, “Why does Tom Steyer have only one tie?”

The issue seemed to unite the left and the right.

“Why does Tom Steyer wear a Christmas tie every debate?” conservative radio host Howie Carr tweeted.

Actor Nick Westrate, a Sen. Elizabeth Warren supporter, joked, “Steyer wears the same tie to lower his carbon footprint in order to offset his decades making billions from the sale of oil!”

“How is Tom Steyer so rich but only owns one tie?” another asked.

An Illinois reporter had an interesting take on the tie’s entanglement in another big moment at the debate between Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders.

Tuesday wasn’t the first time social media has poked fun at Steyer’s tie choice. In fact, the tie has multiple fan accounts on Twitter.

Steyer has been wearing tartan ties for years, according to The New York Times, telling The Washington Post in 2013 he wears Scottish ties every day because “You gotta dress up for a fight.”

Steyer also has a beaded belt he bought in Kenya that he likes to wear to remember to not be so formal.

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Fellow Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang got similar notice in past debates for choosing to forego a tie all together in favor of a more casual look.

Westlake Legal Group AP20015122682583 Tom Steyer's red plaid tie trends during Democratic debate fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson article 8a1c3ead-127c-5438-8cee-a0da0b754468   Westlake Legal Group AP20015122682583 Tom Steyer's red plaid tie trends during Democratic debate fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson article 8a1c3ead-127c-5438-8cee-a0da0b754468

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Meghan Markle, Prince Harry: Who will pay for security?

Westlake Legal Group Security Meghan Markle, Prince Harry: Who will pay for security? Nate Day fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/personalities/queen fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/topic/royals fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc d2bcf6a2-6750-5583-8295-25b1c1b5fb6d article

In stepping down as “senior members” of the royal family, the question of who will pay for security for Meghan Markle and Prince Harry is one of many that are up in the air — at least to public knowledge.

Senior royals are provided with a taxpayer-funded security force by the Metropolitan Police, which Meghan and Harry’s website says is “mandated” by the Queen.

“The provision of armed security by The Metropolitan Police is mandated by the Home Office, a ministerial department of Her Majesty’s Government, responsible for security and law & order,” the website reads. “The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are classified as internationally protected people which mandates this level of security.”

QUEEN ISSUES STATEMENT ON MEGHAN MARKLE, PRINCE HARRY AFTER FAMILY TALKS, AGREES TO PART-TIME MOVE TO CANADA

This would appear to imply that the U.K. would continue to provide security for the royal couple, but Prince Harry’s desire to become “financially independent” brings the use of the publically-funded security forces into question.

Additionally, it stands to reason that security costs — which the Police and Palace do not share with the public — would rise significantly in order to accommodate deploying a detail to North America for extended periods of time.

On Monday, the Evening Standard reported that Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada, said that “taxpayers in his country should pick up the huge bill for the couple’s round-the-clock protection while they are in the country.”

The report also stated that Trudeau “privately assured” Queen Elizabeth II that the safety of Harry, 35, Meghan, 38, and 8-month-old Archie would not be “jeopardized” while in Canada.

DID QUEEN ELIZABETH DROP A HINT THAT MEGHAN MARKLE, PRINCE HARRY MIGHT BE LOSING THEIR ROYAL TITLES

Canadian finance minister Bill Morneau, however, told CBC that there have been no discussions on the matter.

“No, we haven’t spent any time thinking about this issue,” Morneau said. “We obviously are always looking to make sure, as a member of the Commonwealth, we play a role. We have not had any discussions on that subject at this time.”

Regardless of who picks up the tab, security is a very important matter to the royal duo, as Harry’s old military comrade told BBC’s “The One Show” that protecting Archie was a big reason behind Harry’s decision to “step back” from his royal duties.

“Any husband wants to protect their wife and any father wants to protect their children,” said JJ Chalmers. “Particularly, he’s a very principal individual so when he looks at the way that the media, for example, reacts or how social media talks about someone, he has to answer to his son one day when he begins to understand this and be able to look him in the face and say ‘I made the right decision and I did right by you.'”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Chalmers added: “Ultimately, he grew up in the limelight and he knows how this can end if it’s not handled correctly.”

Westlake Legal Group Security Meghan Markle, Prince Harry: Who will pay for security? Nate Day fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/personalities/queen fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/topic/royals fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc d2bcf6a2-6750-5583-8295-25b1c1b5fb6d article   Westlake Legal Group Security Meghan Markle, Prince Harry: Who will pay for security? Nate Day fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/personalities/queen fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/topic/royals fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc d2bcf6a2-6750-5583-8295-25b1c1b5fb6d article

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Steyer knocks ‘Washington establishment’ foreign policy in post-debate interview

Westlake Legal Group 1st-a-tomsteyer-spinroom Steyer knocks ‘Washington establishment’ foreign policy in post-debate interview Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox news fnc/politics fnc article 8ecd2095-b217-5e2d-9b79-a6c3701c240d

DES MOINES, IA – In what appeared to be a jab at former Vice President Joe Biden, Democratic presidential candidate Tom Steyer took aim at foreign policy decisions by “the Washington establishment” in an interview with Fox News following Tuesday night’s presidential primary debate in Iowa – a showdown where the current crisis Iran and other Mideast flashpoints took center stage.

The former hedge fund manager turned billionaire environmental and progressive advocate once again spotlighted his outsider status as he runs against a field full of former and current politicians.

FEISTY DEBATE AT LAST PRIME-TIME SHOWDOWN BEFORE IOWA CAUCUSES

Steyer – who was the only candidate on the stage without any government or military experience in dealing with foreign policy – dispelled any notion that he couldn’t hold his own on foreign policy with his 2020 rivals.

He appeared to take an indirect jab at Biden, who touted his foreign policy experience during the debate. Biden also called in 2002 Senate vote to greenlight the Iraq War a mistake.

Steyer told Fox News that “when you say to me we really need to go back to the experience that Washington has brought us, I would say actually we need something new here.”

Touting his private sector global business experience, Steyer emphasized that “I’ve traveled around this world working for three decades. I’ve dealt with people all over this world. If you want to know someone who actually understands how America engages internationally, actually I’m that person.”

And Steyer emphasized that “we tend to want to look at foreign policy as this question about America being the policeman of the world and it’s all about military policy, but if you actually look at what America has to do in terms of coordinating with our traditional allies, being value-driven, and understanding what goes on in the real world, in a different way of looking at it, I’m the person who has that experience.”

Westlake Legal Group 1st-a-tomsteyer-spinroom Steyer knocks ‘Washington establishment’ foreign policy in post-debate interview Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox news fnc/politics fnc article 8ecd2095-b217-5e2d-9b79-a6c3701c240d   Westlake Legal Group 1st-a-tomsteyer-spinroom Steyer knocks ‘Washington establishment’ foreign policy in post-debate interview Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox news fnc/politics fnc article 8ecd2095-b217-5e2d-9b79-a6c3701c240d

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Jeanne Zaino: Iowa Democratic debate – Winners and losers

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122757444001_6122758623001-vs Jeanne Zaino: Iowa Democratic debate – Winners and losers Jeanne Zaino fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 44105657-1512-5abe-be36-a9c62401abeb

The six Democratic presidential candidates who met for a televised debate in Iowa Tuesday night – the last before the state’s all-important caucuses Feb. 3 – focused most of their attacks on President Trump, with only a few fiery exchanges with each other.

With no clear front-runner, rising tensions and high stakes, the debate led many to expect it would be a truly memorable clash – one when the gloves would finally come off.

Instead, we saw a gathering of ladies and gentlemen who politely disagreed on a number of issues but who did not turn the debate into an angry brawl.

FEISTY SANDERS CLASHES WITH BIDEN, WARREN – AND THE MODERATORS – AT LAST-CHANCE IOWA DEBATE

The debate at Drake University in Des Moines was far more tame and congenial than heated. Anyone expecting that the back-and-forth between Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Bernie Sanders of Vermont over the last few days would boil over was sorely disappointed.

More from Opinion

And anyone who thought that given recent tension with Iran and the focus on foreign policy that perhaps former Vice President Biden was going to have to spend much of the night defending his support for the Iraq War against the doves on the stage was left wanting.

Biden acknowledged he was wrong to support the start of the war under Republican President George W. Bush when Biden was a senator, but the discussion quickly moved on.

No one came out swinging, not even former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg or Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, who polls suggest really needed to make their case.

The subdued debate so close to the caucuses can mean only one thing – the impact of the debate on the polls will be negligible at best.

This isn’t to suggest the debate lacked substance. In the first hour candidates were asked everything from their views on Iran and troop withdrawals from the Middle East, to trade, nuclear weapons, and whether a woman can be elected president.

In the second hour, the candidates were given the opportunity to address issues of the environment and climate change, health care, child care, the cost of a college education, and the impeachment of President Trump before making their closing arguments.

And when it was all over, the winners and losers of the night were:

WINNERS

BIGGEST WINNER – Bernie Sanders

When you’re ahead in the polls the only rule going into a debate is to not make any unforced errors. Bernie Sanders has stunned many just months after a major heart attack by breaking fundraising records. Tuesday night was no exception, with the Sanders team reported they raised more money in the first hour of the debate than ever before.

And Sanders currently leads in some of the latest Iowa and New Hampshire polls, although many voters say they could change their minds in the final days leading up to voting in the two early states.

Tuesday was the first night when Sanders went into debate as the front-runner. Normally this means he should have been the one not just taking center stage but more of the criticism, but he managed to avoid that with one exception.

The exception was the claim by Warren that Sanders had told her in a private meeting in 2018 that he didn’t believe a woman could be elected president. It was, quite literally, a he-said-she-said situation, with Warren standing by the claim and Sanders denying he ever made the comment.

Sanders, who lost the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016 to Hillary Clinton, said that since Clinton won more than 3 million popular votes than Donald Trump in the general election – although losing in the Electoral College – it would be absurd for him to claim a woman could be elected president.

The attack on a woman’s electability seems to fizzle, and in any case, it seems hard to believe that this will be a major issue determining who voters support in the Democratic nominating contests.

Given that no one laid a glove on him, Sanders remains the leader of the progressive wing of the Democratic Party – a formidable fundraiser with a huge following that looks likely to serve him well in Iowa and beyond

WINNER – Joe Biden

Biden just seems to get better with every debate – not great mind you, but better. He proved that again Tuesday night. He’s not leading in the state polls in Iowa or New Hampshire, but he is still leading in South Carolina and nationally.

More importantly, Biden seems to have a Teflon character in this race – surviving some really poor early debate performances and improving as he goes. Whether he wins Iowa or not – and the likelihood is he won’t — he is in the for the long haul and his performance Tuesday night proved that he has the moderate wing of the party locked up at this point.

 WINNER – Amy Klobuchar

The senator from Minnesota is an authentic Midwesterner and she put that on full display during the debate. She was tough on Trump, which is what most Democrats want and she proved tonight that when it comes to the moderate lane, she is a strong competitor for Buttigieg.

Klobuchar doesn’t have the poll numbers or fundraising prowess of the top tier, but she has two things in her favor. She gave a good enough performance that – as something of a regional favorite –may enable her to do better than expected in the caucuses.

Under Iowa’s complicated caucus system, second choices matter because candidates with little support must drop out before a second round of voting.  Klobuchar could be the second choice of enough voters to enable her to make a respectable showing in the caucuses.

WINNER – President Trump

While the Democrats were battling it out in Iowa, Trump was campaigning where they should have been – in the swing state of Wisconsin.

None of the Democratic candidates can be held responsible for this, but it shows the Democratic primary process is broken.

As billionaire presidential candidate and former New York City Mike Bloomberg has pointed out, the candidates he is running against are spending huge chunks of their time and money in the early voting states of Iowa and New Hampshire that likely will vote for Trump in November, rather than focusing on swing states that will matter in the general election.

Bloomberg – who didn’t appear in the debate because he is self-funding his campaign and so can’t meet the target for fundraising from other contributors – is skipping the four early nominating contests and concentrating and vote-rich states that cast ballots afterward.

Democrats will have to figure out after the election if they want to continue devoting so much attention to the early states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina.

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LOSERS

BIGGEST LOSER – Pete Buttigieg

There was a lot at stake for Buttigieg, who ended his term as mayor of South Bend, Ind., on Jan. 1 and is now a full-time campaigner.

The former mayor is struggling in the polls and he has staked his campaign on a strong showing in Iowa. It wasn’t that he had a bad night Tuesday. It was – as is the case with Klobuchar – that he didn’t do enough to change the dynamics of the race.

As the only military veteran on stage, Buttigieg had ample opportunity when it came to foreign policy, which dominated much of the first hour. Yet he was unable to make much headway either there or on the issue of health care, where he tried to stake out a pragmatic path.

LOSER – Elizabeth Warren

Warren is always a strong debater, and she proved that again Tuesday night. What she didn’t do was to capitalize on the back-and-forth which her campaign started with Sanders regarding statements she claims he made about the electability of a female presidential candidate.

Tuesday night was an opportunity for Warren to show progressives that she – not Sanders – is the real deal. She was unable to do that.

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LOSER – Tom Steyer

Billionaire Steyer gets credit for qualifying for the debate and for avoiding any questions regarding the fact that he bought his way on to the debate stage. He also performed better than he did in the last debate.

Despite that, Steyer did little to change the dynamic in the race. He certainly has the money to continue – but at some point Democrats are right to ask if his money would be better spent supporting other candidates or causes.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY JEANNE ZAINO

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY JEANNE ZAINO

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122757444001_6122758623001-vs Jeanne Zaino: Iowa Democratic debate – Winners and losers Jeanne Zaino fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 44105657-1512-5abe-be36-a9c62401abeb   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122757444001_6122758623001-vs Jeanne Zaino: Iowa Democratic debate – Winners and losers Jeanne Zaino fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 44105657-1512-5abe-be36-a9c62401abeb

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Steyer knocks ‘Washington establishment’ foreign policy in post-debate interview

Westlake Legal Group 1st-a-tomsteyer-spinroom Steyer knocks ‘Washington establishment’ foreign policy in post-debate interview Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox news fnc/politics fnc article 8ecd2095-b217-5e2d-9b79-a6c3701c240d

DES MOINES, IA – In what appeared to be a jab at former Vice President Joe Biden, Democratic presidential candidate Tom Steyer took aim at foreign policy decisions by “the Washington establishment” in an interview with Fox News following Tuesday night’s presidential primary debate in Iowa – a showdown where the current crisis Iran and other Mideast flashpoints took center stage.

The former hedge fund manager turned billionaire environmental and progressive advocate once again spotlighted his outsider status as he runs against a field full of former and current politicians.

FEISTY DEBATE AT LAST PRIME-TIME SHOWDOWN BEFORE IOWA CAUCUSES

Steyer – who was the only candidate on the stage without any government or military experience in dealing with foreign policy – dispelled any notion that he couldn’t hold his own on foreign policy with his 2020 rivals.

He appeared to take an indirect jab at Biden, who touted his foreign policy experience during the debate. Biden also called in 2002 Senate vote to greenlight the Iraq War a mistake.

Steyer told Fox News that “when you say to me we really need to go back to the experience that Washington has brought us, I would say actually we need something new here.”

Touting his private sector global business experience, Steyer emphasized that “I’ve traveled around this world working for three decades. I’ve dealt with people all over this world. If you want to know someone who actually understands how America engages internationally, actually I’m that person.”

And Steyer emphasized that “we tend to want to look at foreign policy as this question about America being the policeman of the world and it’s all about military policy, but if you actually look at what America has to do in terms of coordinating with our traditional allies, being value-driven, and understanding what goes on in the real world, in a different way of looking at it, I’m the person who has that experience.”

Westlake Legal Group 1st-a-tomsteyer-spinroom Steyer knocks ‘Washington establishment’ foreign policy in post-debate interview Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox news fnc/politics fnc article 8ecd2095-b217-5e2d-9b79-a6c3701c240d   Westlake Legal Group 1st-a-tomsteyer-spinroom Steyer knocks ‘Washington establishment’ foreign policy in post-debate interview Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox news fnc/politics fnc article 8ecd2095-b217-5e2d-9b79-a6c3701c240d

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Early Top 25 for 2020

The 2019 season is in the books. It’s time to start thinking about how the Bowl Subdivision will look in 2020. (Kickoff is only eight or so months away, after all.)

Here’s USA TODAY Sports’ first crack at next season with the very early Top 25, which is topped by the four familiar faces to the College Football Playoff: Clemson, Alabama, Ohio State and LSU.

Clemson will bring back quarterback Trevor Lawrence and its entire defensive line while adding into the mix the best recruiting class in the country. Alabama and LSU will battle for SEC supremacy, followed by Florida and Georgia. Ohio State will reload on both sides of the ball and make another run at an unbeaten regular season.

Oregon is the favorite to win the Pac-12, though Southern California, California and Washington will play a factor in determining the conference championship. The Golden Bears return most of this year’s starting lineup and are an under-the-radar team to watch in the Rose Bowl chase.

The best of the best includes the usual suspects: Oklahoma, Penn State and Notre Dame, among others. (2019 record is in parentheses.)

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NOT JUST OFFENSE:LSU defense steps up to shut down Clemson in second half

Westlake Legal Group  Early Top 25 for 2020

1. Clemson (14-1)

The team of the second half of the last decade is poised to dominate the start of the 2020s. While it’ll be difficult to replace running back Travis Etienne, linebacker Isaiah Simmons and receiver Tee Higgins, Clemson has proven itself to be more than just the sum of its parts in making the case to rank among the great dynasties in the history of the sport. Remember: Lawrence is back for his junior year.

DYNASTY DELAYED:Clemson lost to LSU, but knows it’ll be back

2. Alabama (11-2)

The Crimson Tide are loaded and ready for life after Tua Tagovailoa, though that battle to replace the NFL-bound star will dominate headlines this offseason. (Keep an eye on incoming freshman Bryce Young.) As we’ve seen throughout Nick Saban’s tenure, Alabama always bounces back from disappointment — and in Tuscaloosa, going 11-2 and winning the Citrus Bowl qualifies as a letdown.

3. Ohio State (13-1)

There are going to be several key holes to fill, notably with the departures of stars Chase Young, J.K. Dobbins and Jeff Okudah. But the Buckeyes are in steady hands in second-year coach Ryan Day and quarterback Justin Fields, and very likely motivated to leave no doubt after feeling robbed by officiating during the Fiesta Bowl loss to Clemson.

4. LSU (15-0)

Keeping assistant Joe Brady in Baton Rouge is the Tigers’ top priority, followed closely by identifying a replacement for Heisman-winning quarterback Joe Burrow. LSU could also be slammed by early departures for the NFL, though some draft-eligible starters could opt to come return in 2020. Overall, the Tigers will be firmly in the mix to take home the SEC and return to the playoff.

ED ORGERON:The imperfect son who delivered perfection for a state

5. Oklahoma (12-2)

There are questions to answer on defense, as always seems to be the case, though there is some young talent on board. But the offense looks to be in strong hands with young quarterback Spencer Rattler, whose arm strength and ability as a passer should lead the offense to more closely resemble the teams lead by Baker Mayfield and Kyler Murray. Keeping defensive coordinator Alex Grinch is almost mandatory for the Sooners’ postseason hopes.

Westlake Legal Group  Early Top 25 for 2020

6. Oregon (12-2)

The Ducks are a program ready to take the next step after barely missing out on the playoff and winning the Rose Bowl earlier this month. While quarterback Justin Herbert leaves big shoes to fill, rising sophomore Tyler Shough seems up for the challenge. The offensive line rebuilds around perhaps the nation’s best overall player in tackle Penei Sewell while the defense is the most talented in the Pac-12.

7. Penn State (11-2)

It would’ve been great to keep wide receiver KJ Hamler, who brought some danger to the Penn State offense. Even still, the Nittany Lions stand as the greatest threat to Ohio State in the Big Ten and a solid pick to land in a New Year’s Six bowl or take home the conference championship outright and book a trip to the national semifinals.

8. Florida (11-2)

Given Georgia’s offseason losses — though it’s not all bad for the Bulldogs, as we’ll discuss in a moment — Florida represents the surest bet in the SEC East after back-to-back successful seasons under coach Dan Mullen. The biggest key will be manufacturing a running game to take pressure off quarterback Kyle Trask.

9. Notre Dame (11-2)

The Irish will have one of the best senior quarterbacks in the country in Ian Book. Former QB Tommy Rees, 27, will lead the offense. This is an interesting team: Notre Dame looks to have good depth and solid experience but doesn’t have any returning starters who are no-doubt contenders for preseason All-America honors, which means this could be a team that gets to double-digit wins without being a huge factor in the Playoff chase. Games against Wisconsin and Clemson will tell the story. 

10. Iowa (10-3)

Here’s your sleeper pick coming out of the Big Ten West. Yeah, there’s going to be a new face at quarterback in place of longtime starter Nathan Stanley, but impressive skill talent returns and the foundation of a good offensive front. Two big contributors might be gone on defense in end A.J. Epenesa and safety Geno Stone, but there’s a significant collection of talent along the back seven. Iowa doesn’t always match expectations, but hopes should be high heading into September.

11. Georgia (12-2)

Georgia has found its new quarterback in Wake Forest transfer Jamie Newman, though it remains to be seen whether Newman can thrive in an offense that scuffled in the second half of the season. There are also losses on the offensive line and the typical rash of exits for the NFL. As of today, there are enough unknowns to put the Bulldogs a peg behind Florida in the race for the SEC.

Westlake Legal Group  Early Top 25 for 2020

12. Michigan (9-4)

It’s not quite make-or-break time for Jim Harbaugh, but we’re getting close. Let’s ignore the matchup against Ohio State, which again seems destined to go in the Buckeyes’ favor. Overall, Michigan matches up well with the second tier of elite teams in the FBS and should be considered a strong contender for the Rose Bowl. Here’s the question: When, if ever, will the offense find the balance it needs to take the next step?

13. Auburn (9-4)

Good news, bad news. On the good side, look for Auburn’s offense to improve under sophomore Bo Nix after his up-and-down rookie season. On the other hand, the defense should undergo a decline in production as the Tigers overhaul up front; it’s impossible to see how Auburn replicates the impact Derrick Brown from the middle of the defensive line.

14. Texas (8-5)

Yeah, Texas. Why not? Well, because the Longhorns have become impossible to predict under Tom Herman, with this year’s team pegged for greatness in August before an underwhelming season after the 2018 squad seemingly broke through by beating Georgia in the Sugar Bowl. But Texas does bring back a strong senior starter in quarterback Sam Ehlinger, continues to add depth and experience, and could carry over a strong bowl win against Utah to start the offseason on a high note.

15. Memphis (12-2)

This is the best team in the Group of Five. That Memphis brings back quarterback Brady White for another year bodes well for the offense, which has another star in running back Kenneth Gainwell. There’s also the benefit of continuity gained by promoting former offensive line coach Ryan Silverfield as Mike Norvell’s successor. (Let’s worry about the long-term future in the future.) Even with all that and most of the defense back in the fold, it’ll be hard to match this year’s success.

16. Cincinnati (11-3)

And if the best Group of Five team isn’t Memphis, it’s almost certainly Cincinnati. A huge amount of talent returns, as does head coach Luke Fickell, for a program with 11 wins across the past two seasons. The Bearcats have an opportunity to make a statement against Nebraska in late September and draw Memphis at home in conference play, though Temple and Central Florida come on the road.

17. Southern California (8-5)

Clay Helton gets another shot at cementing his job security and will have depth at quarterback along with greater familiarity with the Trojans’ pass-happy offensive scheme. As always, there’s plenty of talent but a lack of proven depth and questions about the team’s general experience. But there’s reason to think USC can make a run at nine or more wins during the regular season.

18. Wisconsin (10-4)

Wisconsin will be Wisconsin, meaning a team that will land somewhere in the Top 25 and potentially be in the thick of the playoff race in October and November. There are some big losses, however, including several seniors from the front seven on defense and, of course, All-America running back Jonathan Taylor and star center Tyler Biadasz. The Big Ten West will have few easy outs, which could keep Wisconsin in the eight-win range during the regular season.

19. Texas A&M (8-5)

The schedule is a breeze until the last two, against Alabama and LSU, so barring a complete collapse — still possible, to be honest — A&M will enter that final pair sitting between 8-2 and a perfect 10-0. But this doesn’t look like a team capable of riding to the top of the SEC West and knocking off that two national powers. It would help to have more confidence in an offense that has a senior quarterback in Kellen Mond but seems tired and stale compared to the high-flying acts in the SEC.

Westlake Legal Group  Early Top 25 for 2020

20. Boise State (12-2)

The Broncos might’ve exceeded even the strongest preseason expectations heading into this past season in winning 12 games and the Mountain West, though the year ended poorly with a bowl loss to Washington. Getting back there is possible given the youth of this year’s offense, including freshman quarterback Hank Bachmeier, though the Broncos do need to develop a new top target at receiver. The defense will be heavy on seniors but will miss the production of star pass rusher Curtis Weaver.

21. Iowa State (7-6)

Losing six games in 2019 was a disappointment, even if most were of the single-possession variety, which speaks to the program’s growth and high expectations under coach Matt Campbell. The Cyclones will have a great backfield pairing in quarterback Brock Purdy and running back Breece Hall and is set to bring back key contributors at each level of the defense.

22. Baylor (11-3)

Baylor must find a replacement for Matt Rhule, which should be complete with enough time to add more pieces to the roster during the second national signing day. But there’s no sugarcoating how much losing Rhule impacts the Bears’ bottom line heading into 2020, even if the foundation and structure he leaves in place will ensure the team stays in the mix for the Big 12 title.

23. California (8-5)

There’s a tremendous amount of experience coming back for coach Justin Wilcox, who did an admirable job slowly building the Golden Bears into a Top 25 contender. With few questions at all surrounding the defense, the biggest key may be keeping quarterback Chase Garbers healthy; he went unbeaten as a sophomore in games he started and finished.

24. Washington (8-5)

We’ll have to wait and see what new coach Jimmy Lake does to the Huskies’ offense, let alone where he goes in choosing the successor to Jacob Eason at quarterback. But after a slight dip in 2019, Washington should be sparked by Lake’s promotion from defensive coordinator and rediscover the form that had the program in annual playoff contention for the middle portion of Chris Petersen’s tenure.

25. North Carolina (7-6)

UNC is a breakout candidate coming out of the ACC in Mack Brown’s second season. A deeper and stronger roster is headlined by rising sophomore quarterback Sam Howell, who had one of the best rookie seasons by a quarterback in FBS history. While there’s no catching Clemson at the top of the conference, UNC should be seen as the preseason favorite in what is always a hard-to-predict Coastal Division.

Just missed the cut: Minnesota, Oklahoma State, Utah, Arizona State, Tennessee, Nebraska, Kansas State, Louisville, Central Florida.

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Laura Ingraham on impeachment Senate trial: ‘If anyone should be charged with abuse of power, it’s Pelosi and Schiff’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122742334001_6122742822001-vs Laura Ingraham on impeachment Senate trial: 'If anyone should be charged with abuse of power, it's Pelosi and Schiff' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 50978808-c1e7-50bd-9e9d-3de89b603a87

Laura Ingraham blasted Democratic leadership Tuesday and urged Republicans to stand united during next week’s likely Senate impeachment trial.

“From Day 1, Schiff and company made it clear that they wouldn’t go to court to enforce subpoenas. What does that tell you that told you? They had no confidence in their case. They claim there was no time. They pointed to the urgency of the matter. ‘We had to stop Trump.’ He was going to do it again,” Ingraham said on “The Ingraham Angle.” “Remember all that. But it was, like, hurry up and wait for an entire month.”

DEMS DROP IMPEACHMENT FILE TROVE ON EVE OF KEY VOTE: HANDWRITTEN NOTES, MESSAGES TO UKRAINE AND MORE

“If anyone should be charged with abuse of power, it’s Pelosi and Schiff,” Ingraham added.

Ingraham argued that Democrats have failed to make the process bipartisan as the framers intended.

“The politics of this impeachment stinks to high heaven. Always have. Democrats didn’t get a single Republican to vote for it. Not one,” Ingraham said. “The framers made it very clear that impeachment had to be bipartisan, to be legitimate, and the underlying conduct had to be egregious.

The host also called on Congress to pay attention to more pressing issues facing Americans.

“We face a wide array of challenges that need the president’s undivided attention,” Ingraham said. “Iran, infrastructure, the skyrocketing costs of health care still. This is all a dangerous distraction and McConnell should continue to call it out as such.”

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Ingraham called on Republicans to stand united and against new witnesses.

“Allowing new witnesses into the process at this point, it only empowers the partisans that began this madness from the beginning. “It’s imperative that they stop the Democratic senators itching for a show trial. Allowing this impeachment to go forward only serves to set a poisonous precedent for future commanders in chief. Long after Trump has gone.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122742334001_6122742822001-vs Laura Ingraham on impeachment Senate trial: 'If anyone should be charged with abuse of power, it's Pelosi and Schiff' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 50978808-c1e7-50bd-9e9d-3de89b603a87   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122742334001_6122742822001-vs Laura Ingraham on impeachment Senate trial: 'If anyone should be charged with abuse of power, it's Pelosi and Schiff' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 50978808-c1e7-50bd-9e9d-3de89b603a87

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Sen. Ted Cruz floats idea of ‘witness reciprocity’ for Senate impeachment trial

Westlake Legal Group ted-cruz-GettyImages-1140594820 Sen. Ted Cruz floats idea of 'witness reciprocity' for Senate impeachment trial fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/person/ted-cruz fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 72e53244-1ed6-5362-8a41-76328b344b65

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, pitched the idea of “witness reciprocity” on Tuesday during a meeting with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and other GOP leaders who convened to discuss strategy for the upcoming impeachment trial that will decide if President Trump is removed from office, Fox News has confirmed.

The idea would mean if Democrats call a witness, such as Trump’s former National Security Adviser John Bolton, Republicans would in turn be allowed to call a witness.

Likely candidates to be subpoenaed by the GOP include former Vice President Joe Biden, his son Hunter Biden, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff and the unidentified whistleblower who reported a July phone call between President Trump and the leader of Ukraine.

MCCONNELL SETS STAGE FOR IMPEACHMENT TRIAL LAUNCH, WARNS ‘BOTH SIDES’ COULD CALL WITNESSES

McConnell appeared receptive to Cruz’s idea in remarks to reporters after the meeting.

“We’ll be dealing with the witness issue at the appropriate time into the trial. And I think it’s certainly appropriate to point out that both sides would want to call witnesses if they wanted to hear from them,” McConnell said. “So if you get to that issue, I can’t imagine that only the witnesses our Democratic colleagues want to call will be called.”

The president’s eldest son, Donald Trump Jr., also tweeted support for Cruz’s suggestion.

“I love @tedcruz’s plan of witness reciprocity. The American people want to hear from #wheresHunter Biden, #sleepyJoe Biden, #fullofschiff, the phony “whistleblower” etc. much more than they do anyone on our side especially since the house had free reign of witnesses for months,” Trump wrote.

McConnell, R-Ky., has distanced himself from an earlier notion that the GOP-controlled Senate would simply dismiss the articles of impeachment once House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., hands them over from the House. He called on Cruz, as well as Republican Sens. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, John Cornyn of Texas and Mike Lee of Utah to talk strategy as the party plays a careful numbers game to prevent Democrats from commandeering the trial.

A simple majority is required to win a motion in the Senate. Though Republicans control 53 seats, three GOP senators have indicated they’re open to hearing testimony from Bolton, who was ousted from the Trump administration in September after clashing with the president on a number of foreign policy issues regarding Iran, North Korea and Afghanistan.

Bolton has indicated that he would appear before the Senate if subpoenaed  — but President Trump told Fox News last week that he might use executive privilege to block Bolton from testifying.

Three moderate Republicans — Sens. Mitt Romney of Utah, Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska — have either said explicitly or suggested they’re deciding whether they want to hear from Bolton later in the trial after House Democrats have presented their case.

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Democrats in the Senate would need only a fourth Republican vote to effectively move to call a witness. The “witness reciprocity” rule, which Fox has learned Cruz and Sen. Rand Paul also pitched as a suggestion to the broader Senate Republican Conference at their weekly luncheon Tuesday, would ensure the party doesn’t completely forfeit control of trial proceedings over to Democrats should enough votes move for Bolton to testify.

Fox News’ Kevin Kirby contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group ted-cruz-GettyImages-1140594820 Sen. Ted Cruz floats idea of 'witness reciprocity' for Senate impeachment trial fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/person/ted-cruz fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 72e53244-1ed6-5362-8a41-76328b344b65   Westlake Legal Group ted-cruz-GettyImages-1140594820 Sen. Ted Cruz floats idea of 'witness reciprocity' for Senate impeachment trial fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/person/ted-cruz fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 72e53244-1ed6-5362-8a41-76328b344b65

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