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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 99)

British seaside town cordoned off after people experience vomiting, sore eyes, officials say

A section of a British seaside town had to be cordoned off for several hours on Sunday after several people experienced vomiting and sore eyes from what officials described as a “hazardous material incident.”

The Sussex Police force said on Twitter that a “small number of people” reported the symptoms in Worthing, located 50 miles south of London on England’s south coast.

Fire officials said that a cordon was set up along a 1.6-mile stretch of roadway as authorities responded to the scene.

FUGITIVE’S RECEDING HAIR MOCKED ON FACEBOOK, SPURRING WARNING FROM POLICE

“People are being advised to shut all windows and doors, or stay away from the area,” Worthing Fire Station said, in part, on Twitter.

Sussex Police said that two people were taken to the hospital, but later discharged and “advised to go home, wash their clothes and have a shower.”

Anyone else who may have been affected by the incident has been advised to “use copious amounts of water to wash your eyes,” police said in a statement.

“We’d like to thank everyone for their patience and understanding during the incident,” police said, adding that they are following up “a number of lines” of inquiry as the investigation into the incident continues.

UK WOMAN, 71, UNMASKED AS CULPRIT BEHIND ANTI-BREXIT GRAFFITI

Kitesurfing instructor Christine Johnston told Sky News that she was at her surf ship when two beach patrol officers approached her with their faces covered and told her to leave immediately.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-Worthing British seaside town cordoned off after people experience vomiting, sore eyes, officials say Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox news fnc/world fnc d5f9bfe9-eeea-572b-9acd-3c378673b107 article

A section of the British seaside town of Worthing had to be cordoned off on Sunday after several people reported becoming sickened by what authorities described as a “hazardous material incident.” (iStock)

“I hadn’t had any symptoms up until that point, but now I feel as though my eyes are itching — though that might be psychosomatic,” she told Sky News. “It was quite bizarre and sounded really dramatic — we’ve canceled all our lessons for the rest of the day.”

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Authorities did not provide information on a suspected cause of the incident.

Local lawmaker Tim Loughton tweeted that it involved reports of “bathers affected by some sort of chemical-type irritants.”

“People are advised to stay away from the seafront area,” he said.

In 2017, a mysterious chemical haze left scores of people on the coast about 30 miles away with streaming eyes, sore throats and breathing problems.

An investigation found that the most likely cause of that incident was emissions from a passing ship, lost cargo or a wreck in the English Channel.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-Worthing British seaside town cordoned off after people experience vomiting, sore eyes, officials say Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox news fnc/world fnc d5f9bfe9-eeea-572b-9acd-3c378673b107 article   Westlake Legal Group iStock-Worthing British seaside town cordoned off after people experience vomiting, sore eyes, officials say Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox news fnc/world fnc d5f9bfe9-eeea-572b-9acd-3c378673b107 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

'Torture,' 'roach motel': Conditions at jail where Jeffrey Epstein died by suicide decried by inmates for years

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 'Torture,' 'roach motel': Conditions at jail where Jeffrey Epstein died by suicide decried by inmates for years
CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 'Torture,' 'roach motel': Conditions at jail where Jeffrey Epstein died by suicide decried by inmates for years

Jeffrey Epstein pleaded not guilty to charges of drug trafficking and allegedly sexually abusing dozens of underage girls in New York and Florida. USA TODAY

Over the years, critics have described New York’s Metropolitan Correctional Center – the site where disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein died of an apparent suicide – as having inhumane conditions. 

Mexican drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzmán called the place “torture.”

“Since the government will send me to a jail where my name will not ever be heard again, I take this opportunity to say there was no justice here,” Guzmán said at his sentencing July 17. “It has been psychological and mental torture 24 hours a day.”

Guzmán, who was held at the MCC until his transfer on July 19, said he was completely cut off from sunlight and forced to drink unsanitary water. His lawyers complained on his behalf months earlier, saying the lights at night and noisy air conditioning made sleep almost impossible. 

Your questions answered: What we know about Jeffrey Epstein’s apparent suicide

The MCC first opened in 1975, originally designed to hold 474 inmates, according to website Gothamist. That number is now 763, leading to complaints of overcrowding. 

The detention center has held a number of high-profile inmates, including Ponzi scheme mastermind Bernard Madoff and 1993 World Trade Center bomber Ramzi Ahmed Yousef.

Lawyers for Mob boss John Gotti said in 1991 that the jail deprived their client of “basic human rights,” according to UPI. UPI reported that inmates called the lockup “roach motel.”

Gothamist spoke with a dozen people who spent time at the MCC and heard reports of vermin infestations, violent guards and filthy conditions. 

“I thought there was nowhere worse than Rikers Island,” Melvin Rodriguez, who spent three weeks at MCC, told Gothamist. “The cells (are) very small and at nighttime you hear the mouses, see waterbugs in the shower.”

Uzair Paracha, a former inmate for two years, told The New York Post guards frequently strip searched him, isolated him and left lights on for 22 or 23 hours a day. 

‘We need answers’: Congress calls for investigations after Jeffrey Epstein’s death

Epstein, who was awaiting trial on sex-trafficking charges, was put on suicide watch after guards found him with bruises on his neck three weeks ago, though it was unclear whether the injuries were self-inflicted or from an assault. But at the end of July he was taken off the watch, a person familiar with the matter told The Associated Press. 

His removal from suicide watch would have been approved by both the warden of the jail and the facility’s chief psychologist, said Jack Donson, a former prison official who worked for the Bureau of Prisons for more than two decades.

Epstein led a life of luxury before being charged with drug trafficking and sexual abuse of minors. He experienced more favorable conditions while serving a 13-month sentence for prostitution charges in a Palm Beach County stockade. Through a work-release program, he was allowed to work at his office most days.

Contributing: John Bacon, The Associated Press 

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Report: Jail Broke Rules Ahead Of Epstein’s Death

Westlake Legal Group 5d503583240000ff34937eba Report: Jail Broke Rules Ahead Of Epstein’s Death

NEW YORK (AP) — Guards on Jeffrey Epstein’s unit were working extreme overtime shifts to make up for staffing shortages the morning of his apparent suicide, a person familiar with the jail’s operations told The Associated Press.

The person said that the Metropolitan Correctional Center’s Special Housing Unit was staffed with one guard working a fifth straight day of overtime and another who was working mandatory overtime. The person wasn’t authorized to discuss jail operations publicly and spoke Sunday on the condition of anonymity.

The jail staff failed to follow protocols leading up to Epstein’s death, according to a report from The New York Times, deepening the fallout from what led to the highly connected financier’s apparent suicide.

Epstein should have been checked on by guards in his cell every 30 minutes, but that didn’t happen the night before his apparent suicide, a law enforcement official told the Times.

The Times spoke to the official on the condition of anonymity. The Associated Press has not independently confirmed the information.

A law enforcement source also told the Times he was alone in his cell early Saturday after his cellmate was transferred. An official with knowledge of the investigation told the paper that the Justice Department was told Epstein would have a cellmate and be monitored by a guard every 30 minutes.

The mystery surrounding how he was able to kill himself in jail comes as investigators have been digging into allegations of sexual abuse and conspiracy against Epstein. An additional federal investigation was launched Saturday after the Federal Bureau of Prison said Epstein was found unresponsive in his cell at a high-security jail in Manhattan. He was later pronounced dead from an apparent suicide, the BOP said. His abrupt death cuts short a criminal prosecution that could have pulled back the curtain on the inner workings of the high-flying financier with connections to celebrities and presidents, though prosecutors have vowed to continue investigating.

Epstein had been placed on suicide watch after he was found a little over two weeks ago with bruising on his neck, according to a person familiar with the matter who wasn’t authorized to discuss it publicly. But he was taken off the watch at the end of July and therefore wasn’t on it at the time of his death, the person said.

Attorney General William Barr, calling for an investigation by the FBI and the Justice Department’s inspector general’s office, said he was “appalled” to learn of Epstein’s death while in federal custody.

“Mr. Epstein’s death raises serious questions that must be answered,” Barr said in a statement.

Epstein, 66, had been denied bail and faced up to 45 years behind bars on federal sex trafficking and conspiracy charges unsealed last month. He had pleaded not guilty and was awaiting trial.

The federal investigation into the allegations remains ongoing, U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman said. He noted in a statement Saturday that the indictment against Epstein includes a conspiracy charge, suggesting others could face charges in the case.

Epstein’s death raises questions about how the Bureau of Prisons ensures the welfare of such high-profile inmates. In October, Boston gangster James “Whitey” Bulger was killed in a federal prison in West Virginia where had just been transferred.

Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse, a Republican member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, wrote Saturday in a scathing letter to Barr that “heads must roll” after the incident.

“Every single person in the Justice Department — from your Main Justice headquarters staff all the way to the night-shift jailer — knew that this man was a suicide risk, and that his dark secrets couldn’t be allowed to die with him,” Sasse wrote.

Epstein’s removal from suicide watch would have been approved by both the warden of the jail and the facility’s chief psychologist, said Jack Donson, a former prison official who worked for the Bureau of Prisons for more than two decades.

On Friday, more than 2,000 pages of documents were released related to a since-settled lawsuit against Epstein’s ex-girlfriend by Virginia Giuffre, one of Epstein’s accusers. The records contain graphic allegations against Epstein, as well as the transcript of a 2016 deposition of Epstein in which he repeatedly refused to answer questions to avoid incriminating himself.

Giuffre, in an interview with The New York Times, said she’s grateful Epstein will never harm anyone again, but is angry that there would be no chance to see him answer for his conduct.

“We’ve worked so hard to get here, and he stole that from us, too,” she told the newspaper.

Sigrid McCawley, Giuffre’s attorney, said Epstein’s suicide less than 24 hours after the documents were unsealed “is no coincidence.” McCawley urged authorities to continue their investigation, focusing on Epstein associates who she said “participated and facilitated Epstein’s horrifying sex trafficking scheme.”

Epstein’s arrest drew national attention, particularly focusing on a deal that allowed Epstein to plead guilty in 2008 to soliciting a minor for prostitution in Florida and avoid more serious federal charges.

Federal prosecutors in New York reopened the probe after investigative reporting by The Miami Herald stirred outrage over that plea bargain.

His lawyers maintained that the new charges in New York were covered by the 2008 plea deal and that Epstein hadn’t had any illicit contact with underage girls since serving his 13-month sentence in Florida.

Before his legal troubles, Epstein led a life of extraordinary luxury that drew powerful people into his orbit. He socialized with princes and presidents and lived on a 100-acre private Caribbean island and one of the biggest mansions in New York.

Sisak reported from Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, and Balsamo from Savannah, Georgia. Associated Press writers Curt Anderson, Jennifer Peltz, David Klepper and Larry Neumeister contributed to this report.

This story has been corrected to show Epstein was found unresponsive Saturday morning, not Saturday night.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

More Details Emerge Surrounding Circumstances Of Epstein’s Death

Westlake Legal Group 5d503583240000ff34937eba More Details Emerge Surrounding Circumstances Of Epstein’s Death

NEW YORK (AP) — Guards on Jeffrey Epstein’s unit were working extreme overtime shifts to make up for staffing shortages the morning of his apparent suicide, a person familiar with the jail’s operations told The Associated Press.

The person said that the Metropolitan Correctional Center’s Special Housing Unit was staffed with one guard working a fifth straight day of overtime and another who was working mandatory overtime. The person wasn’t authorized to discuss jail operations publicly and spoke Sunday on the condition of anonymity.

The jail staff failed to follow protocols leading up to Epstein’s death, according to a report from The New York Times, deepening the fallout from what led to the highly connected financier’s apparent suicide.

Epstein should have been checked on by guards in his cell every 30 minutes, but that didn’t happen the night before his apparent suicide, a law enforcement official told the Times.

The Times spoke to the official on the condition of anonymity. The Associated Press has not independently confirmed the information.

A law enforcement source also told the Times he was alone in his cell early Saturday after his cellmate was transferred. An official with knowledge of the investigation told the paper that the Justice Department was told Epstein would have a cellmate and be monitored by a guard every 30 minutes.

The mystery surrounding how he was able to kill himself in jail comes as investigators have been digging into allegations of sexual abuse and conspiracy against Epstein. An additional federal investigation was launched Saturday after the Federal Bureau of Prison said Epstein was found unresponsive in his cell at a high-security jail in Manhattan. He was later pronounced dead from an apparent suicide, the BOP said. His abrupt death cuts short a criminal prosecution that could have pulled back the curtain on the inner workings of the high-flying financier with connections to celebrities and presidents, though prosecutors have vowed to continue investigating.

Epstein had been placed on suicide watch after he was found a little over two weeks ago with bruising on his neck, according to a person familiar with the matter who wasn’t authorized to discuss it publicly. But he was taken off the watch at the end of July and therefore wasn’t on it at the time of his death, the person said.

Attorney General William Barr, calling for an investigation by the FBI and the Justice Department’s inspector general’s office, said he was “appalled” to learn of Epstein’s death while in federal custody.

“Mr. Epstein’s death raises serious questions that must be answered,” Barr said in a statement.

Epstein, 66, had been denied bail and faced up to 45 years behind bars on federal sex trafficking and conspiracy charges unsealed last month. He had pleaded not guilty and was awaiting trial.

The federal investigation into the allegations remains ongoing, U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman said. He noted in a statement Saturday that the indictment against Epstein includes a conspiracy charge, suggesting others could face charges in the case.

Epstein’s death raises questions about how the Bureau of Prisons ensures the welfare of such high-profile inmates. In October, Boston gangster James “Whitey” Bulger was killed in a federal prison in West Virginia where had just been transferred.

Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse, a Republican member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, wrote Saturday in a scathing letter to Barr that “heads must roll” after the incident.

“Every single person in the Justice Department — from your Main Justice headquarters staff all the way to the night-shift jailer — knew that this man was a suicide risk, and that his dark secrets couldn’t be allowed to die with him,” Sasse wrote.

Epstein’s removal from suicide watch would have been approved by both the warden of the jail and the facility’s chief psychologist, said Jack Donson, a former prison official who worked for the Bureau of Prisons for more than two decades.

On Friday, more than 2,000 pages of documents were released related to a since-settled lawsuit against Epstein’s ex-girlfriend by Virginia Giuffre, one of Epstein’s accusers. The records contain graphic allegations against Epstein, as well as the transcript of a 2016 deposition of Epstein in which he repeatedly refused to answer questions to avoid incriminating himself.

Giuffre, in an interview with The New York Times, said she’s grateful Epstein will never harm anyone again, but is angry that there would be no chance to see him answer for his conduct.

“We’ve worked so hard to get here, and he stole that from us, too,” she told the newspaper.

Sigrid McCawley, Giuffre’s attorney, said Epstein’s suicide less than 24 hours after the documents were unsealed “is no coincidence.” McCawley urged authorities to continue their investigation, focusing on Epstein associates who she said “participated and facilitated Epstein’s horrifying sex trafficking scheme.”

Epstein’s arrest drew national attention, particularly focusing on a deal that allowed Epstein to plead guilty in 2008 to soliciting a minor for prostitution in Florida and avoid more serious federal charges.

Federal prosecutors in New York reopened the probe after investigative reporting by The Miami Herald stirred outrage over that plea bargain.

His lawyers maintained that the new charges in New York were covered by the 2008 plea deal and that Epstein hadn’t had any illicit contact with underage girls since serving his 13-month sentence in Florida.

Before his legal troubles, Epstein led a life of extraordinary luxury that drew powerful people into his orbit. He socialized with princes and presidents and lived on a 100-acre private Caribbean island and one of the biggest mansions in New York.

Sisak reported from Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, and Balsamo from Savannah, Georgia. Associated Press writers Curt Anderson, Jennifer Peltz, David Klepper and Larry Neumeister contributed to this report.

This story has been corrected to show Epstein was found unresponsive Saturday morning, not Saturday night.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Hungry Pennsylvania snake rescued after swallowing ‘almost half’ of own body, video shows

Westlake Legal Group iStock-kingsnake Hungry Pennsylvania snake rescued after swallowing ‘almost half’ of own body, video shows Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/science/wild-nature/reptiles fox news fnc/science fnc article 5740ef8e-bfd1-5ab7-9810-539204ecdfb7

A snake in Pennsylvania was caught performing the circle of life — on itself.

Jesse Rothacker, of Forgotten Friend Reptile Sanctuary in Elm, said he walked in on a kingsnake at the facility after it had “swallowed almost half of his body” on Friday.

VENOMOUS ARKANSAS SNAKE DEVOURS BUG IN JAW-DROPPING PHOTOS

Rothacker posted a video to the sanctuary’s Facebook page, saying that kingsnakes often prey on other snakes, including venomous copperheads and rattlesnakes. He explained that the reptile ended up in such dire straits after mistaking its bottom half for another snake.

“They will sometimes see their own tail, they’ll think it’s a snake, they’ll take a bite out of it, and they’ll realize they’ve bit themselves,” Rothacker said. “They don’t usually swallow themselves. But today, we’re going to see a kingsnake that, I don’t know, might not have done very well on the SATs.”

Rothacker first tried to get the snake to release itself by tapping it on its nose, which can make the serpents nervous and unhinge their jaws.

COLORADO DOG SAVED FROM 123-DEGREE CAR SUFFERING NEUROLOGICAL ISSUES, POLICE SAY; OWNER ARRESTED

When the kingsnake refused to let go, Rothacker was forced to use his fingernail to pry the fangs loose and pull the snake from its own mouth.

Rothacker said the snake was normally a very good eater, assuring viewers he regularly fed the reptile.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

The sanctuary later shared on Facebook that the kingsnake was chowing down on a real meal: “miceicles,” posting of photo of what appeared to be a frozen mouse clasped in the hungry serpent’s jaws.

Rothacker said the snake was being adopted Sunday.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-kingsnake Hungry Pennsylvania snake rescued after swallowing ‘almost half’ of own body, video shows Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/science/wild-nature/reptiles fox news fnc/science fnc article 5740ef8e-bfd1-5ab7-9810-539204ecdfb7   Westlake Legal Group iStock-kingsnake Hungry Pennsylvania snake rescued after swallowing ‘almost half’ of own body, video shows Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/science/wild-nature/reptiles fox news fnc/science fnc article 5740ef8e-bfd1-5ab7-9810-539204ecdfb7

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US fencer takes knee at Pan Am Games in protest

A member of the U.S. men’s fencing team staged a national anthem protest at the Pan American Games, saying, “We must call for change.”

Race Imboden and two teammates were winners of gold in a team foil competition at the games in Lima, Peru, Friday and he took a knee on the podium at the medal ceremony.

He won the gold with teammates Gerek Meinhardt and Nick Itkin, both of whom stood for the anthem.

COLIN KAEPERNICK SHOWS SUPPORT FOR FORMER TEAMMATE ERIC REID OVER VOW TO KEEP KNEELING DURING ANTHEM

“We must call for change,” Imboden said afterward on Twitter. “This week I am honored to represent Team USA at the Pan Am Games, taking home Gold and Bronze.”

Westlake Legal Group Race-Imboden-GettyImages-1167100212 US fencer takes knee at Pan Am Games in protest Robert Gearty fox-news/sports fox news fnc/sports fnc f4a9b966-1ed2-5d50-90cb-5e6111d76379 article

Gold medalist Race Imboden of United States takes a knee during the National Anthem Ceremony in the podium of Fencing Men’s Foil Team Gold Medal Match Match on Day 14 of Lima 2019 Pan American Games at Fencing Pavilion of Lima Convention Center on August 09, 2019 in Lima, Peru. (Photo by Leonardo Fernandez/Getty Images)

“My pride however has been cut short by the multiple shortcomings of the country I hold so dear to my heart,” he said. “Racism, Gun Control, mistreatment of immigrants.”

The political protest could lead to disciplinary action by the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee.

“Every athlete competing at the 2019 Pan American Games commits to terms of eligibility, including to refrain from demonstrations that are political in nature. In this case, Race didn’t adhere to the commitment he made to the organizing committee and the USOPC,” Mark Jones, Vice President of Communications, USOPC said in a statement on Saturday.

SEVERAL OLE MISS ATHLETES KNEEL DURING ANTHEM IN RESPONSE TO PRO-CONFEDERACY RALLY: REPORT

“We respect his rights to express his viewpoints, but we are disappointed that he chose not to honor his commitment. Our leadership are reviewing what consequences may result.”

Colin Kaepernkick sparked controversy—and the wrath of President Trump—after kneeling during the national anthem in a protest against racial injustice.

His protest led to similar protests by athletes in other sports.

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Imoden, 26, won an Olympic bronze medal in Rio De Janeiro three years ago.

Westlake Legal Group Race-Imboden-GettyImages-1167100212 US fencer takes knee at Pan Am Games in protest Robert Gearty fox-news/sports fox news fnc/sports fnc f4a9b966-1ed2-5d50-90cb-5e6111d76379 article   Westlake Legal Group Race-Imboden-GettyImages-1167100212 US fencer takes knee at Pan Am Games in protest Robert Gearty fox-news/sports fox news fnc/sports fnc f4a9b966-1ed2-5d50-90cb-5e6111d76379 article

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Jail Broke Rules Night Of Jeffrey Epstein’s Death: Report

Westlake Legal Group 5d503583240000ff34937eba Jail Broke Rules Night Of Jeffrey Epstein’s Death: Report

NEW YORK (AP) —A law enforcement source tells The New York Times financier Jeffrey Epstein was alone in his jail cell the night of his apparent suicide.

The Times spoke to the official on the condition of anonymity. The Associated Press has not independently confirmed the information.

An official with knowledge of the investigation told the Times that Epstein’s cellmate was transferred. The official says the Justice Department was told Epstein would have a cellmate and be monitored by a guard every 30 minutes.

He was found unresponsive in his jail cell Saturday and the Bureau of Prisons says he was later pronounced dead of an apparent suicide.

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Prince Andrew makes first public appearance a day after friend Jeffrey Epstein found dead

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Prince Andrew makes first public appearance a day after friend Jeffrey Epstein found dead
CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Prince Andrew makes first public appearance a day after friend Jeffrey Epstein found dead

Britain’s Prince Andrew on Thursday publicly denied allegations he had sex with an underage teenager. (Jan. 22) AP

Prince Andrew, the Duke of York and second son of Queen Elizabeth, was spotted making a public appearance at church Sunday with his mother a day after news broke that his friend, Jeffrey Epstein, died in jail. 

Epstein was arrested in July and pleaded not guilty to charges of drug trafficking and sexually abusing dozens of underage girls in New York and Florida. He died early Saturday in a Manhattan jail in an apparent suicide while waiting trial on sex-trafficking charges. 

Paparazzi photos obtained by British tabloids show Prince Andrew’s oldest daughter, Princess Beatrice, accompanying her father and grandmother in a car after service at Crathie Kirk Church, where the royal family worships while in residence at Balmoral Castle in Scotland. 

The charges against Epstein do not involve Andrew, although Virginia Roberts Giuffre, 35, has previously accused the wealthy financier and his employees of paying her, when she was 17, to sexually service him along with Prince Andrew, Harvard lawyer Alan Dershowitz and other friends of Epstein. Andrew forcefully denied her allegation.

According to British media reports, Epstein and Prince Andrew have been friends for more than two decades. Their relationship is often cited as evidence of Andrew’s alleged poor judgment, and likely contributed in 2011 to the end of Andrew’s role as a British trade envoy, a job he had held for about 10 years. 

The Guardian reports that Andrew met Epstein in the 1990s after being introduced by Ghislaine Maxwell, daughter of the late British media mogul Robert Maxwell. She was Epstein’s girlfriend and employee at the time and has been implicated in Epstein’s alleged trafficking activities as one of his supposed “recruiters.”

What’s their link? Jeffrey Epstein’s friendship with Prince Andrew is raising eyebrows

In 2011, Andrew’s ex-wife, Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York, to whom he is still close, acknowledged that Epstein had loaned her money to pay off her debts during one of her past financial crises. 

According to The Telegraph, she apologized for a “gigantic error of judgment.”

“I personally, on behalf of myself, deeply regret that Jeffrey Epstein became involved in any way with me. I abhor pedophilia and any sexual abuse of children and know that this was a gigantic error of judgment on my behalf,” she said in a statement at the time.

Contributing: Maria Puente and Olivia Sanchez, USA TODAY 

More on Epstein: Jeffrey Epstein was awaiting trial on sex-trafficking charges

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Before Jail Suicide, Jeffrey Epstein Was Left Alone and Not Closely Monitored

Jeffrey Epstein, the financier who hanged himself in a federal jail in Manhattan, was supposed to have been checked by guards every 30 minutes, but that procedure was not being followed the night before he was found, a law-enforcement official with knowledge of his detention said.

In addition, the jail had transferred his cellmate and allowed Mr. Epstein to be housed alone in a cell just two weeks after he had been taken off suicide watch, a decision that also violated the jail’s normal procedure, two officials said.

The disclosures about apparent failures in Mr. Epstein’s detention at the Metropolitan Correctional Center deepened questions about his suicide and are very likely to be the focus of inquiries by the Justice Department and the F.B.I.

Officials cautioned that their initial findings about his detention were preliminary and could change.

The federal Bureau of Prisons has already come under intense criticism for not keeping Mr. Epstein under a suicide watch after he had been found in his cell on July 23 with injuries that suggested that he had tried to kill himself.

The law-enforcement official said that when the decision was made to remove Mr. Epstein from suicide watch, the jail informed the Justice Department that Mr. Epstein would have a cellmate and that a guard “would look into his cell” every 30 minutes.

But that was apparently not done, the official said, speaking on the condition of anonymity because the death was still under investigation.

Senior law-enforcement officials, members of Congress and Mr. Epstein’s accusers have all demanded answers about why Mr. Epstein was not being more closely monitored.

Mr. Epstein’s suicide has also unleashed a torrent of unfounded conspiracy theories online, with people suggesting, without evidence, that Mr. Epstein was killed to keep him from incriminating others.

Over the years, Mr. Epstein’s social circle had included dozens of well-known politicians, business executives, scientists, academics and other notables, including President Trump, former President Bill Clinton, Prince Andrew of Britain and Leslie H. Wexner, the retail billionaire behind Victoria’s Secret and Bath & Body Works.

Mr. Epstein, 66, was awaiting trial on federal charges he sexually abused dozens of teenage girls when he was found dead in his cell at the Metropolitan Correctional Center at 6:30 a.m. on Saturday.

Jeffrey Epstein Dead in Suicide at Jail, Spurring Inquiries

Aug 10, 2019

Westlake Legal Group merlin_159066939_bca8398d-60f0-4007-a646-00ac94bbec75-threeByTwoSmallAt2X Before Jail Suicide, Jeffrey Epstein Was Left Alone and Not Closely Monitored Wexner, Leslie H Trump, Donald J Suicides and Suicide Attempts Sex Crimes Prisons and Prisoners Palm Beach (Fla) Metropolitan Correctional Center (Manhattan, NY) Manhattan (NYC) Justice Department Federal Bureau of Prisons Epstein, Jeffrey E (1953- ) Clinton, Bill Child Abuse and Neglect

That was a day after thousands of documents were released in a civil case that provided disturbing details about how he had lured scores of adolescent girls into prostitution, paying them to give him erotic massages at his mansions in Manhattan and Palm Beach, Fla.

The former money manager was found semiconscious three weeks ago in a shared cell with bruises on his neck after a judge denied him bail. He was placed on a 24-hour suicide watch and received daily psychiatric evaluations, the official said.

But six days later, prison officials determined he was no longer a threat to his own life and put him in a cell in a special housing unit with another inmate, one prison official familiar with the incident said, speaking on the condition of anonymity for fear of losing employment.

It is standard practice at the Metropolitan Correctional Center to place people who have been on suicide watch with a cellmate, two people with knowledge of Mr. Epstein’s case said.

But Mr. Epstein’s cellmate was later moved out of the special housing unit, leaving him alone, the prison official said.

Bureau of Prison officials said it is standard procedure for guards in special housing units to check on inmates every half-hour.

It remained unclear why that procedure was not followed in Mr. Epstein’s case. Like many federal prisons and detention centers, the jail has been short staffed for some time, union leaders have said.

The two guards on duty in the special housing unit where Mr. Epstein was housed were both working overtime, the prison official with knowledge of the incident said. One of the corrections officers was working his fifth straight day of overtime, while the other officer had been forced to work overtime, the official said.

An investigation by The New York Times that published last year revealed that federal prisons across the country, including the Metropolitan Correctional Center, have been dealing with rising violence as staffing at the facilities has dwindled.

Questions about the safety of such prisons arose late last year when James (Whitey) Bulger, the notorious Boston gangster, was brutally murdered in a West Virginia prison shortly after being moved there.

[Read how staffing shortages have made federal prisons more dangerous.]

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Why the Jeffrey Epstein Investigation Is Not Over

Westlake Legal Group merlin_157655712_51152e48-f850-44bc-9554-8c05e3f6bcf6-facebookJumbo Why the Jeffrey Epstein Investigation Is Not Over Women and Girls Suicides and Suicide Attempts Sex Crimes prostitution Manhattan (NYC) human trafficking Florida Federal Bureau of Prisons Epstein, Jeffrey E (1953- ) Child Abuse and Neglect Berman, Geoffrey S

Jeffrey Epstein is dead. But the criminal investigation that led to the sex-trafficking charges against him is not.

Federal prosecutors and F.B.I. agents who built the case against Mr. Epstein will turn their attention to people whom his accusers have said participated in a scheme that dates back more than a decade and involved the sexual exploitation of dozens of underage girls.

That could include a circle of close associates whom accusers said helped recruit, train and coerce them into catering to Mr. Epstein, a wealthy financier.

Soon after Mr. Epstein was found dead of an apparent suicide in a federal jail on Saturday, Geoffrey S. Berman, the chief federal prosecutor in Manhattan, said his office’s investigation would continue, and pointedly mentioned that the government’s indictment against Mr. Epstein included a conspiracy charge.

Daniel C. Richman, a former federal prosecutor in Manhattan who now teaches criminal law at Columbia University, said that meant the government already had identified additional targets despite the death of Mr. Epstein.

“Its use of conspiracy charges suggests it already has some living people in its sights,” Mr. Richman said.

Manhattan federal prosecutors have not charged or named anyone as a co-conspirator. But in 2007, a non-prosecution agreement between Mr. Epstein and federal officials in Florida said that prosecutors would not charge four women it identified as “potential co-conspirators.”

Mr. Berman’s office has maintained that it is not bound by the Florida agreement.

The stunning news of Mr. Epstein’s death prompted a swirl of new questions about its circumstances, including why jail officials removed Mr. Epstein, 66, from a suicide watch program that included daily psychiatric evaluations just days after he was found injured in his cell in what appeared to have been an earlier suicide attempt.

[Read more: Before his suicide, Mr. Epstein was left alone and not closely monitored.]

The United States attorney general, William P. Barr, whose Justice Department oversees the federal Bureau of Prisons, ordered the F.B.I. and department’s inspector general to investigate the circumstances around Mr. Epstein’s death.

But those circumstances also prompted outrage from his many accusers, who saw him as again eluding justice, years after escaping federal prosecution on similar charges of sexually abusing girls. He was allowed to plead guilty in 2008 to state prostitution charges in Florida, and served a 13-month sentence, spending most of his days on work-release.

“I never wanted him to die. I just wanted him to be held accountable for his actions,” said Michelle S. Licata, 31, who was among the dozens of girls who Palm Beach police and the F.B.I. found were recruited to give Mr. Epstein erotic massages, which included his touching her breasts while he masturbated.

Still, many of his accusers can pursue civil claims against his vast estate, which is said to be worth more than $500 million, lawyers for some of his accusers have said.

Mr. Berman, the United States attorney for the Southern District of New York, appeared to have the frustration of Mr. Epstein’s accusers in mind when he spoke on Saturday.

“To those brave young women who have already come forward and to the many others who have yet to do so,” Mr. Berman said in a statement, “let me reiterate that we remain committed to standing for you, and our investigation of the conduct charged in the indictment — which included a conspiracy count — remains ongoing.”

It is unclear whether others will be charged; but even before Mr. Epstein’s death, it was apparent that the investigation was expanding into his finances, with F.BI. agents and prosecutors gathering evidence from banks and others.

In addition to possible sex-trafficking conspiracy charges against others, prosecutors could also seek charges of aiding and abetting Mr. Epstein or money laundering, which could lead to trials and criminal forfeiture actions. The government could try to seize assets that could be sold and used to compensate his accusers.

Sharon Cohen Levin, a former federal prosecutor who led the Southern District’s money laundering and asset forfeiture unit, said another likely option would be for prosecutors to file a lawsuit known as a civil forfeiture action against Mr. Epstein’s properties, such as his $56 million mansion on the Upper East Side, claiming they were used to facilitate crimes.

The procedure has been used to recover artwork stolen by the Nazis in World II and to return it to victims’ families, she noted.

If prosecutors were to file such an action against Mr. Epstein’s property, Ms. Levin said they would likely offer a detailed narrative of how the mansion, for example, was used to further his alleged trafficking of underage victims.

“The victims will lose the opportunity to face him in court, see him eye to eye and tell their story,” Ms. Levin said, “but they can still work with the government to get their story out.”

Lawyers for Mr. Epstein’s accusers said the news of his death was traumatic, but did not leave them without options.

David Boies, a New York lawyer who represents several of Mr. Epstein’s accusers, said his clients were surprised by the suicide and unhappy that they would never be able to confront Mr. Epstein.

“On the other hand, they have been through a lot and they are not going to give up, and to the extent that they can hold his estate liable and to the extent that they can hold the other people who worked with him responsible, they’re committed to trying to do that,” Mr. Boies said.

Lisa Bloom, a California-based lawyer, said she intended to file a lawsuit in the coming days on behalf of two accusers, naming Mr. Epstein’s estate as the defendant.

“The victims are entitled for compensation for the anguish he put them through over so many years,” Ms. Bloom said. She said her clients were above the age of 18 when Mr. Epstein victimized them in the early 2000s in New York and that they have been in touch with federal investigators.

Roberta Kaplan, who represents a woman who was a minor at the time she said she was abused by Mr. Epstein and was one of the victims cited in the federal indictment, said Mr. Epstein’s death was for her client “not only emotionally devastating but a real emotional roller coaster.”

But Ms. Kaplan was confident her client could still achieve justice through the courts. “It may not be justice through the criminal system,” Ms. Kaplan said, “but there should be some measure of justice as a result of civil lawsuits and civil claims.”

A Florida lawyer, Jack Scarola, said his clients were disappointed. But he suggested that the troubling and strange turn to the case could perhaps bring an unforeseen benefit. “They are hopeful,” he said, “that other victims may be relieved of some of the fear that has prevented them from coming forward while Epstein was still alive.”

Mike Baker and Frances Robles contributed reporting.

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