web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 10)

Bernie Sanders’s universal childcare plan would mean Millennials like me could start families

Westlake Legal Group 5C6ywT5kzM5koYyT86K_YqjaMBgGBiBUgHmqpzdssr8 Bernie Sanders’s universal childcare plan would mean Millennials like me could start families r/politics

As a reminder, this subreddit is for civil discussion.

In general, be courteous to others. Debate/discuss/argue the merits of ideas, don’t attack people. Personal insults, shill or troll accusations, hate speech, any advocating or wishing death/physical harm, and other rule violations can result in a permanent ban.

If you see comments in violation of our rules, please report them.

For those who have questions regarding any media outlets being posted on this subreddit, please click here to review our details as to whitelist and outlet criteria.


I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

What are the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act and Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act?

Two abortion-restricting bills, one aimed at restricting late-term abortions and and the other providing care for survivors of the procedure, failed to pass the Senate on Tuesday.

The first bill, the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, sponsored by Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., would prohibit doctors from performing an abortion after 20 weeks – the point at which, according to a review study published in a maternal medical journal, Seminars in Perinatology, fetuses can feel pain – unless it is necessary for the mother’s life or was the product of rape.

Westlake Legal Group AP20056753787130 What are the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act and Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act? fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/judiciary/abortion fox news fnc/politics fnc Bradford Betz article 6c371437-fb2b-5793-b9ec-66f25dc43557

Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer of N.Y., listens during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020.  (AP)

The United States is currently one of seven countries in the world that permit elective abortion after 20 weeks.

The second bill, the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act, sponsored by Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., mandates that care be provided for babies that survive an abortion attempt.

Sasse said the bill was intended to make sure every newborn baby “has a fighting chance — whether she’s born in a labor and delivery ward or whether she’s born in an abortion clinic.”

Forty-one Democratic senators voted to block the born-alive bill by filibustering the legislation and preventing it from advancing to a floor vote.  The pain-culpable bill also failed to advance, with 44 senators voting “nay.”

Westlake Legal Group AP20056739699940 What are the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act and Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act? fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/judiciary/abortion fox news fnc/politics fnc Bradford Betz article 6c371437-fb2b-5793-b9ec-66f25dc43557

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., joined by the GOP leadership, speaks to reporters just after meeting with Attorney General William Barr. (AP)

Democratic Sens. Bob Casey of Pennsylvania, Doug Jones of Alabama, and Joe Manchin from West Virginia were the only lawmakers to cross party lines on the born-alive bill. Jones and GOP Sens. Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska opposed the late-term abortion ban.

Given previous failed attempts to pass the bills, they stood little chance of advancing on Tuesday. A vote on each was primarily intended to put lawmakers’ abortion stance on record ahead of the general election in November.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., accused Democrats of bowing “to the radical demands of the far left” to “drown out common sense” and the views of millions of Americans.

APPEALS COURT UPHOLDS TRUMP ADMINISTRATION RULES AGAINST TITLE X FUNDING FOR ABORTION

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., accused Republicans of acting in bad faith and alleged that the bills would “criminalize” women’s reproductive care and intimidate health care providers.

“Every single Senate Republican knows that these bills cannot and will not pass,” he said. “But they’re putting them on the floor anyway to pander to the hard right. And to cover up the fact that they won’t provide good health care for women.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The two votes marked the latest efforts by Republicans to restrict abortion availability. President Trump evoked the issue during his State of the Union address earlier this month.

“To defend the dignity of every person, I am asking Congress to pass legislation to prohibit late-term abortion of children who can feel pain in the mother’s womb,” he said. “Let us work together to build a culture that cherishes innocent life.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP20056753787130 What are the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act and Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act? fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/judiciary/abortion fox news fnc/politics fnc Bradford Betz article 6c371437-fb2b-5793-b9ec-66f25dc43557   Westlake Legal Group AP20056753787130 What are the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act and Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act? fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/judiciary/abortion fox news fnc/politics fnc Bradford Betz article 6c371437-fb2b-5793-b9ec-66f25dc43557

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Jesse Watters tells Democrats the way to defeat Bernie is to ‘treat him like the fool he is’

Westlake Legal Group Video-81 Jesse Watters tells Democrats the way to defeat Bernie is to 'treat him like the fool he is' fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/politics/socialism fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz cd291974-e208-516a-8b0f-0a6d039e2db8 article

Jesse Watters said on “The Five” Tuesday that the key to defeating Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., in the 2020 presidential race is not to attack his throngs of supporters but instead to deconstruct his entire socialist platform and his personal background.

Watters claimed that Sanders “cannot take a punch” and said that former New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg had proven as much in last week’s Nevada debate when the Vermont lawmaker appeared flustered when Bloomberg remarked that America’s “best known socialist happens to be a millionaire with three houses.”

“The way to take out Bernie is to treat him like the fool he is,” Watters remarked. “Say, ‘Bernie you can’t even do math, here’s a calculator.’ Say ‘Bernie, you’ve been in D.C. your whole life and you’ve never gotten anything done. Why would we think you get something done as president?”

SHARK TANK HOST KEVIN O’LEARY TELLS ‘THE VIEW’ TRUMP WILL WIN RE-ELECTION DUE TO LOW UNEMPLOYMENT

Watters said Sanders’ Democratic rivals should find it easy to cast the 78-year-old as “anti-Hillary” and “anti-Obama” and a candidate who is running on a platform that takes away every American’s preferred health care coverage.

“That’s dumb politics and dumb policy,” he said, adding that Sanders has a history of being a “weirdo” who created “erotic writings” decades ago and was once reportedly kicked out of a “hippie commune.”

Watters suggested that record be contrasted with the other candidates who have either built businesses, served in the military, taught school or worked a gainful job.

“The guy’s wife was a scam artist and got caught with her college deal,” Watters added, pointing to Jane O’Meara Sanders’s involvement with the now-defunct Burlington College — which financially collapsed a few years after she departed as president, according to the Burlington Free Press.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In 2018, a family spokesman told the Associated Press that O’Meara Sanders was told by the Vermont office of the United States Attorney that she would not face charges for her role in a land deal involving the college.

Federal investigators were probing allegations by a Republican activist that Sanders committed bank fraud when she arranged for the college to buy the property on the shores of Lake Champlain.

Fox News’ Adam Shaw and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Video-81 Jesse Watters tells Democrats the way to defeat Bernie is to 'treat him like the fool he is' fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/politics/socialism fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz cd291974-e208-516a-8b0f-0a6d039e2db8 article   Westlake Legal Group Video-81 Jesse Watters tells Democrats the way to defeat Bernie is to 'treat him like the fool he is' fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/politics/socialism fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz cd291974-e208-516a-8b0f-0a6d039e2db8 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Elizabeth Warren’s Fans Want to Know: Can She Do It Again?

Thrilling. Invigorating. Cathartic.

These were the adjectives that some Democratic women used last week to describe watching Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts on the debate stage, where she confronted former Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg of New York over his past embrace of stop-and-frisk policing tactics, his history of sexist comments and the nondisclosure agreements binding some of his former employees.

To many of these women, it felt like a potential turning point for Ms. Warren’s stagnant campaign, though it remains to be seen whether that is true. For those angry or discouraged by what they saw as a premature declaration of political death — and especially for women who work in politics and are all too familiar with the headwinds facing female candidates — it also felt profound: a woman standing up and declaring that she would not be dismissed.

“It was cathartic as hell,” said Amanda Litman, executive director of Run for Something, which supports young Democrats running for office. “This felt like if you’re going to count her out, she’s not going down without a fight.”

Now, with another debate happening Tuesday night and the South Carolina primary just four days away, Ms. Warren’s supporters are waiting to see if she can do it again.

If last week’s debate did move the needle, it wasn’t clear in her fourth-place finish in Nevada. The state held its early caucus voting, in which about 75,000 of the 105,000 total votes were cast, before the debate, meaning any potential bounce for Ms. Warren was not fully reflected.

And Ms. Warren has had strong debate performances before, of course — especially last summer and early in the fall, when she was surging in the polls and her path to the nomination was easier to imagine.

But this one was different, precisely because that path has become so much less clear.

“It was the woman of a year ago,” Kelsey Duckett, 35, said at a Warren rally in Denver on Sunday. “She’s showing us why we supported her in the beginning.”

Ms. Duckett added of the fusillade against Mr. Bloomberg, “Who doesn’t want to see her do that to Donald Trump?”

Westlake Legal Group promo-video_debate-1-articleLarge Elizabeth Warren’s Fans Want to Know: Can She Do It Again? Women and Girls Warren, Elizabeth Presidential Election of 2020 Debates (Political)

Tonight’s Democratic Debate: Everyone vs. Bernie Sanders

The South Carolina debate is all about who can slow Mr. Sanders’s momentum there and beyond. Take a look at the key dynamics to watch for tonight.

That element of Ms. Warren’s performance also spoke directly to the quality that some voters on the fence were most concerned with: electability. It is a squishy, eye-of-the-beholder judgment often used against women, but it has been a real barrier for Ms. Warren with voters who like her and her policies but are worried that she would lose to Mr. Trump.

“People are really scared about electability,” Lauren Hess, a resident of Georgetown, Colo., who called voters in Iowa and New Hampshire for Ms. Warren, said outside the Denver rally.

“I wish she had been doing better,” Ms. Hess added. “But it’s not over.”

Ms. Warren made no secret of the fact that she saw Mr. Bloomberg as a stand-in for Mr. Trump: After he qualified for last week’s debate, she tweeted that the candidates would have an opportunity to show voters how they would “take on an egomaniac billionaire.” And many viewers certainly saw her performance that way.

“I thought, ‘That is a general election candidate,’” Rachel Dane, 33, founder of a nonprofit that provides legal services to survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault, said at the rally.

Ms. Warren’s performance was reminiscent of the ones that made her a national name to begin with. Long before she was a senator and presidential candidate, Elizabeth Warren the Harvard Law School professor and Elizabeth Warren the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau creator went toe-to-toe with powerful men.

In 2005, she clashed with Joseph R. Biden Jr., then a senator from Delaware, over bankruptcy reform in an exchange that ended with Mr. Biden saying, to some laughter: “OK, I get it. You’re very good, professor.”

In 2009, Ms. Warren, as chairwoman of the Congressional Oversight Panel, grilled Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner on the execution of one of the bailout programs created to address the financial crisis. In 2016, as a senator, she sharply questioned the chief executive of Wells Fargo. In 2017, she did the same for the chief executive of Equifax over the data breach that exposed millions of Americans’ personal information.

“That was the senator that we watched make bank executives cry,” Jess McIntosh, a SiriusXM host who worked for Hillary Clinton, said on CNN after the debate.

Commentators and political scientists, especially those who study women in politics, noted how unapologetically Ms. Warren had expressed anger on the stage — despite the risk she faced, given sexist double standards.

“I don’t know how to put it other than she was a badass,” said Jennifer Lawless, a professor of politics at the University of Virginia and former director of the Women & Politics Institute at American University.

“She went out there and said what every other candidate on that stage was thinking, and she did it in a way that demonstrated she was really willing to play hardball.”

Ms. Warren’s debate performance led to a flood of donations: $9 million in just three days. She has raised a total of $21 million so far this month, according to her campaign, and spent $1.5 million of it on new ads in the states voting on Super Tuesday, March 3, and in Washington, which votes a week later.

Her challenge now is to parlay her performance and her money into tangible results.

By the time South Carolina goes to the polls, though, this week’s debate may be fresher in voters’ minds than anything Ms. Warren did last week.

Her supporters understand how crucial it is for her to replicate her performance, but it won’t necessarily be easy.

A great deal of attention at the debate is likely to shift to Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who is the favorite to win the nomination after a blowout victory in Nevada. Having been thoroughly pummeled last week, Mr. Bloomberg might be better prepared this time to parry the blows and throw some of his own. And Ms. Warren faltered somewhat late last year when she started to get more incoming attacks.

That means, Dr. Lawless said, she has to “demonstrate that she can not only dish it, she can take it.”

Ms. Warren has one thing going for her, though: Her disappointing finish in Nevada did not erase last week’s debate, at least not among her audience in Denver, where questions were peppered with references to her “wrecking” Mr. Bloomberg. One woman praised her for the “trash-can beating.”

“Women can be tough,” Ms. Warren replied. “I’ll poke him again.”

Shay Castle and Shane Goldmacher contributed reporting from Denver.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Spread of Virus Could Hasten the Great Coming Apart of Globalization

Westlake Legal Group 25virus-q01-facebookJumbo Spread of Virus Could Hasten the Great Coming Apart of Globalization Travel and Vacations Politics and Government International Trade and World Market globalization Global Warming Europe Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Airlines and Airplanes

BRUSSELS — Globalization, that awkward catchall for our interconnectedness, was already under assault from populists, terrorists, trade warriors and climate activists, having become an easy target for much that ails us.

Now comes the coronavirus. Its spread, analysts and experts say, may be a decisive moment in the fervid debates over how much the world integrates or separates.

Even before the virus arrived in Europe, climate change, security concerns and complaints about unfair trade had intensified anxieties about global air travel and globalized industrial supply chains, as well as reinforcing doubts about the reliability of China as a partner.

The virus already has dealt another blow to slowing economies, and emboldened populists to revive calls, tinged with racism and xenophobia, for tougher controls over migrants, tourists and even multinational corporations.

Among all the challenges to globalization, many of them political or ideological, this virus may be different.

“We always forget that we’re at the mercy of nature, and when episodes pass we forget and carry on,” said Ivan Vejvoda, a fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna. “But this virus has put forward all these questions about the interconnectedness of the world as we’ve built it. Air travel, global supply chains — it’s all linked.”

As the virus spreads to Europe and beyond, Mr. Vejvoda said, “it makes China seem a bit more fragile and dependence on China as ‘the factory of the world’ more iffy.”

The rapid spread of the virus from Asia is “another straw on the camel’s back of globalization,” said Robin Niblett, director of Chatham House, the London research institution.

The political tensions between the United States and China over trade, as well as concerns about climate change, already had raised questions about the sense and cost of shipping parts country to country and the potential for carbon taxes at borders, he noted.

Coupled with the risk of a supply chain that is vulnerable to the breakout of the next coronavirus, or the vulnerabilities of an increasingly authoritarian China, Mr. Niblett said, “If you’re a business you have to think twice about exposing yourself.”

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 25, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is probably transmitted through sneezes, coughs and contaminated surfaces. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • Where has the virus spread?
      The virus, which originated in Wuhan, China, has sickened more than 80,000 people in at least 33 countries, including Italy, Iran and South Korea.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      The World Health Organization officials have been working with officials in China, where growth has slowed. But this week, as confirmed cases spiked on two continents, experts warned that the world is not ready for a major outbreak.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The C.D.C. has warned older and at-risk travelers to avoid Japan, Italy and Iran. The agency also has advised against all non-essential travel to South Korea and China.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

Particularly now, with more countries using sanctions and economic interdependence “as a new form of coercive diplomacy, and it adds up to becoming more risk-averse toward globalization,” he said.

Globalization of disease is hardly new, noted Guntram Wolff, director of Bruegel, an economic research institution in Brussels, citing the massive deaths that followed the European arrival in the Americas, or the plague, which the now-canceled Venice Carnival in part commemorates.

“What’s different is that with the airplane things can spread very fast,” he said. The immediate impulse is to recoil and erect barriers. “We already see flight numbers down dramatically.”

Climate-conscious citizens were already discouraging discretionary air travel, as were digital technologies that allow remote participation and transmission of information.

“You wonder if perhaps the peak of the global aircraft boom has passed,” Mr. Wolff said. “Many people are asking if we really need to have that kind of regular daily travel by air to all parts of the world.”

In a way, this virus underscores the imbalance in globalization. Private-sector supply chains have become very effective. Air travel is comprehensive and never ending. So the private sector is constantly moving around the world.

But any sort of coordinated governmental response is often weak and disorganized — whether on climate change, health or trade. And efforts to strengthen globalized public efforts are attacked by nationalists and populists as infringements on sovereignty.

Nor can governments do much to unfreeze supply chains, and few governments in Europe have the financial flexibility to inject much extra money into the economy.

Theresa Fallon, the director of the Center for Russia Europe Asia Studies, agreed that much of the pushback may now be directed at China.

She recently returned from Milan, where officials are checking temperatures of travelers, doctors are careful about office visits and locals were visibly keeping their distance from Chinese tourists, she said.

“China’s growth has been a long, positive story but now gravity has hit,” she said, with the virus arising as “a kind of black swan that underlines how different China is.”

Many companies “are rethinking about putting too many eggs in the Chinese basket,” she said, especially as hopes of China becoming more like the West are fading.

“We see more centralization and lack of trust in China,” in its statistics and its ability to manage the crisis, she said. That was so even as Chinese leaders try to influence what they call “discourse management” with international institutions like the World Health Organization, in attempts to downplay the epidemic.

That crisis of confidence in China extends beyond China’s ability to handle the virus, said Simon Tilford, director of the Forum New Economy, a research institution in Berlin.

The lack of trust “will only reinforce an existing trend among businesses to reduce their dependency and risk,” he said.

But the spread of the virus to Europe will also have a significant impact on politics, likely boosting the anti-immigrant, anti-globalization far right, Mr. Tilford said.

“We already see a lot of populist concern about the merits of globalization as benefiting multinationals, the elite and foreigners, not local people and local companies,” he said.

Politicians who insist on control over borders and immigration will be helped, even as the virus transcends borders easily.

“Their argument will be that the current system poses not only economic but also health and security threats, which are existential, and that we can’t afford to be so open just to please big business,” Mr. Tilford said.

That argument may attract voters “who hate overt racism but fear loss of control and a system vulnerable to a distant part of the world,” he added.

The racial impact of the spreading virus is delicate, all agreed, but there.

“It’s always different when it happens in your own neighborhood, among people like yourself,” said Stefano Stefanini, a former Italian diplomat. “When it happens in Denmark or Spain or Italy you have more of a feeling that it happens among people who share the same lifestyle — so you can see it happening to you.”

But the virus also allows people to express hostility to the Chinese that they may have felt but had been reluctant to articulate, said Mr. Tilford. “There is already an undercurrent of fear of the Chinese in Europe and the United States because they represent a challenge to Western hegemony,” he said.

That fear is being stoked by the Trump administration’s campaign against Huawei, China’s telecommunications company, but also by reports of Chinese repression and censorship through the use of advanced technology.

Many Chinese living or traveling in the West have reported a quick spike in abuse and avoidance in public places and transport. “It’s a sign of how close to the surface these sentiments are,” Mr. Tilford said.

The media, too, shares this sense of cultural distance and difference, Mr. Stefanini and Mr. Tilford said.

Mr. Stefanini recalled debates in the Italian Foreign Ministry about whether to send condolence messages, depending on the numbers of deaths and how far away they occurred.

“Events in Australia get massive coverage, but mass floods and deaths in Bangladesh barely register,” Mr. Tilford said. The outbreak in China “feels distant geographically and culturally, with a touch of racism, as if we measure lives lost in a different way,” he said.

The Italian sociologist Ilvo Diamanti had a more philosophical concern. The spread of the virus to Italy “has called into question our certainties,” because “it makes defense systems in the face of threats to our security more complicated, if not unnecessary,” he wrote in Monday’s La Repubblica. “The world no longer has borders that cannot be penetrated.”

To defend against the virus, Mr. Diamanti wrote, “one would have to defend oneself from the world,” hiding at home and turning off the television, the radio and the internet. “In order not to die contaminated by others and become spreaders of the virus ourselves, we would have to die alone.”

This, he suggested, is “a greater risk than the coronavirus.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Barr pitches GOP lawmakers on FISA reforms to clean up Russia probe ‘mess’

Westlake Legal Group AP20041565825895 Barr pitches GOP lawmakers on FISA reforms to clean up Russia probe 'mess' Marisa Schultz fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/person/william-barr fox-news/person/lindsey-graham fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 2006f848-03b2-5362-91cf-58cfe1a0addc

Attorney General William Barr met with lawmakers on Capitol Hill Tuesday pledging internal reforms to the FISA warrant process, while some GOP senators will seek to cement additional changes into law to prevent further mishaps exposed in the Russia probe.

Barr told Republican senators he’ll be making executive changes to clean up the significant errors and omissions outlined by Inspector General (IG) Michael Horowitz in applications to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) to eavesdrop on former Trump campaign aide Carter Page as part of the FBI’s Russia investigation.

“I think he’s going to take a lot of what Horowitz did and add his own stamp on it,” Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said Tuesday after the lunch meeting with Barr.

AG BARR NAMES NEW HEAD OF FEDERAL PRISON SYSTEM AFTER LEADERSHIP SHAKEUP FOLLOWING EPSTEIN’S DEATH

Graham, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee who has been concerned with FISA warrant abuse, said Barr’s executive changes were “pretty comprehensive [and] very impressive.”

“And he made a commitment to make sure that what happened in 2016 that internally he’s going to clean up that mess, and whether or not we need statutory changes I think is a subject of debate,” Graham added.

A spokesperson for Barr did not immediately respond to a request for comment on details of the reforms the attorney general plans to implement.

The timing for the FISA debate is crucial. Congress is seeking to renew the USA Freedom Act that’s set to expire next month, including one authority that enables the FBI to collect from a third party a wide range of documents and records on subjects in terrorism and national security investigations. The deadline is March 15, leaving Congress with little time to act.

Some senators want broader reforms to the government’s secret surveillance program for those posing a national security risk. Barr made the case that the tools in the statute are important to national security and he wanted Congress to pass a straight reauthorization of the provisions while revisiting other reforms after the deadline, senators said.

DOJ WATCHDOG FINDS NO BIAS IN LAUNCH OF TRUMP-RUSSIA PROBE, BUT UNCOVERS ‘SIGNIFICANT’ FBI ERRORS

“He basically talked about a clean reauthorization of the Freedom Act and tinkering with it from there,” Sen. Kevin Cramer, R-N.D., said.

Barr’s meeting with Republican senators was scheduled weeks ago, long before Barr raised the prospect of a possible resignation, though tensions between the attorney general and the Republican president seem to have cooled in recent days.

Barr told people close to him early last week that he has considered leaving his post after President Trump wouldn’t respect his request to stop tweeting about the Justice Department’s cases. The week before, Barr took a public swipe at Trump, saying in a television interview that the president’s tweets about department cases and staffers make it “impossible” for him to do his job.

Barr’s suggestion that he might quit over the president’s tweets left many close to Trump questioning whether the attorney general really was considering stepping aside, instead believing he was trying to quell an internal uproar at the Department of Justice and bolster his own reputation and his ability to act on Trump’s behalf. In the days that followed, some of the president’s closest GOP allies scrambled to let Trump know they think Barr is the right person to lead his Justice Department.

Lawmakers interviewed by Fox News said Barr didn’t address his job status or Trump’s tweets but received a warm welcome and encouragement to stay on the job.

“He received a lot of encouragement in hopes that he would [stay on],” Cramer said, adding that several senators thanked Barr for his service and urged him to stick it out. “He didn’t commit to anything like that.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The FBI believes the surveillance powers are vital in thwarting acts of terrorism, with Director Christopher Wray urging Congress this month to permanently authorize them.

Wray told the House Judiciary Committee that none of the provisions at issue for renewal have anything to do with the mistakes made in the Page case and urged lawmakers to keep the issues separate.

“They are vital to our relentless efforts to keep something like 325 million American people safe,” Wray said of the surveillance powers.

The Fox News’ Jason Donner and The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group AP20041565825895 Barr pitches GOP lawmakers on FISA reforms to clean up Russia probe 'mess' Marisa Schultz fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/person/william-barr fox-news/person/lindsey-graham fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 2006f848-03b2-5362-91cf-58cfe1a0addc   Westlake Legal Group AP20041565825895 Barr pitches GOP lawmakers on FISA reforms to clean up Russia probe 'mess' Marisa Schultz fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/person/william-barr fox-news/person/lindsey-graham fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 2006f848-03b2-5362-91cf-58cfe1a0addc

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Hot Pockets heiress sentenced to 5 months in prison in college admissions scandal

The heiress to the Hot Pockets microwavable snack fortune was sentenced Tuesday to five months in prison for her part in the college admissions scandal.

Prosecutors had been seeking nearly two years in prison for Michelle Janavs for her role in helping buy her children’s way into elite universities across the country. The government called her one of the “most culpable parents” they had charged in the case and said she only accepted responsibility when backed into a corner.

Janavs, whose family developed Hot Pockets, admitted to paying Rick Singer — the consultant at the center of the scandal — $100,000 to have a proctor correct her daughters’ ACT exam answers. She also paid $200,000 to have one of her daughters labeled as a fake beach volleyball recruit at the University of Southern California.

LORI LOUGHLIN’S DAUGHTER OLIVIA JADE HAS HER ALLEGEDLY FORGED CREW RESUME RELEASED BY PROSECUTORS 

Unlike some of the parents who had come before her and were sentenced, Janavs was also hit with a money laundering conspiracy charge — something prosecutors tacked on for parents who did not quickly plead guilty to their crimes.

“I’m so very sorry I tried to create an unfair advantage for my children,” she told the court Tuesday.

Janavs is scheduled to report to prison on April 7. She is the 17th defendant sentenced in the scam.

Westlake Legal Group Hot-Pockets-iStock Hot Pockets heiress sentenced to 5 months in prison in college admissions scandal fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/massachusetts fox-news/topic/college-admissions-scandal fox-news/politics/regulation/business fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/us fnc Barnini Chakraborty article 15562852-0dc4-5095-b706-c3dbb14b8e14

Winneconni, WI, USA – 13 June 2015: Box of Hot Pockets in Meatballs & Mozzarella flavor.

FORMER FINANCIER GETS 9 MONTHS IN COLLEGE ADMISSIONS SCANDAL, STIFFEST PENALTY YET

Janavs’ lawyers painted her as a concerned mother who was simply looking out for her children, and that she fell for Singer’s “manipulative sales tactics” caused in part by the competitive college admissions process. Her lawyers argued that she should not be forced to spend any time behind bars and that she had already been punished enough.

“The fallout from Michelle’s actions stand as a beacon to others that illegal shortcuts are a recipe for disaster, regardless of the punishment the court imposes on Michelle,” her lawyers wrote in court documents.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Janavs is one of nearly two dozen prominent parents who have pleaded guilty in the case. Others include actress Felicity Huffman, who was sentenced to two weeks in prison for paying $15,000 to have a proctor correct her daughter’s SAT answers.

Two parents who are fighting the charges against them are “Full House” actress Lori Loughlin and her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group image Hot Pockets heiress sentenced to 5 months in prison in college admissions scandal fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/massachusetts fox-news/topic/college-admissions-scandal fox-news/politics/regulation/business fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/us fnc Barnini Chakraborty article 15562852-0dc4-5095-b706-c3dbb14b8e14   Westlake Legal Group image Hot Pockets heiress sentenced to 5 months in prison in college admissions scandal fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/massachusetts fox-news/topic/college-admissions-scandal fox-news/politics/regulation/business fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/us fnc Barnini Chakraborty article 15562852-0dc4-5095-b706-c3dbb14b8e14

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Twitter freaks out over ‘demonic kitchen’ photo featuring floating chairs

Westlake Legal Group Kitchen-iStock Twitter freaks out over 'demonic kitchen' photo featuring floating chairs Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/real-estate fnc db99df92-d4aa-5a7a-8203-5e5af0c6e83a article

A photo of a swanky kitchen inside a Texas home is raising eyebrows online, with Twitter users calling out a certain interior design as bizarre and “demonic.”

The images of the undisclosed home were posted to Twitter last week by writer Kate Wagner, whose blog, McMansion Hell, pokes fun at architecture “we love to hate the most.”

KIM KARDASHIAN, KANYE WEST SHARE GLIMPSE OF MINIMALIST LA MANSION, INSTAGRAM REACTS: ‘HORROR MOVIE MATERIAL’

“Ok y’all you have to see this image from a Texas house that was submitted on the mcmansion hell live stream. you are simply unprepared for this,” Wagner wrote along with a photo of a pristine white and gray kitchen with tons of natural sunlight.

9 HOME IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS THAT ARE EASIER — AND OFTEN CHEAPER — IN THE WINTER

While at first glance the kitchen appeared to be every homeowner’s dream, upon further inspection many Twitter users noticed a unique design choice: dozens of floating chairs.

“The part of my brain that knew how to do long division has been replaced wholesale by ‘floating chair,’” Wagner later tweeted.

Twitter had plenty to say (and plenty of questions) about the home’s “demonic” kitchen.

“Do the chairs swivel out or are they for people without legs?” said one curious Twitter user, pointing out the lack of legroom between the chair and the kitchen counter.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS

“They’re ghost chairs!” another person tweeted.

Others zeroed in on what they felt were an unnecessary amount of chairs.

“Spending tens of thousands so I can make my home look like an airport waiting area,” one person joked.

Another Twitter user wrote: “When you rich so you want your house to look like a fancy McDonald’s.”

“I want to add seat belts?” someone else tweeted.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

As it turns out, Wagner pointed out that the floating-seat concept wasn’t confined to just the kitchen.

“The previous image in the listing is also great bc it is simply the preview for the main event,” she tweeted along with another photo of a dining area with more floating chairs — including one by a desk area.

For some, that apparently went too far.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

“This honestly feels like someone who was pushed to the edge of sanity because the Roomba kept bumping chair legs. Now I want to see the rest of their house,” someone tweeted.

“PLEASE REMOVE THIS IMAGE FROM MY RETINAS,” another said.

At least one person, however, saw a potential benefit to having floating chairs in your home, noting it’s “easy to sweep when the chairs have no legs.”

Westlake Legal Group Kitchen-iStock Twitter freaks out over 'demonic kitchen' photo featuring floating chairs Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/real-estate fnc db99df92-d4aa-5a7a-8203-5e5af0c6e83a article   Westlake Legal Group Kitchen-iStock Twitter freaks out over 'demonic kitchen' photo featuring floating chairs Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/real-estate fnc db99df92-d4aa-5a7a-8203-5e5af0c6e83a article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Mouse House Shakeup! Disney CEO Bob Iger Steps Down

Westlake Legal Group 5e5590f02300002d0b39c3fa Mouse House Shakeup! Disney CEO Bob Iger Steps Down

NEW YORK (AP) — The Walt Disney Co. has named Bob Chapek CEO, replacing Bob Iger, effective immediately.

The surprise announcement Tuesday makes Iger executive chairman. Chapek was most recently chairman of Disney Parks, Experiences and Products.

Iger will remain chairman through the end of his contract Dec. 31, 2021.

Iger said it was an “optimal time” for him to step down following Disney’s acquisition of Fox’s entertainment assets and the launch of Disney Plus streaming service in November.

“Did not see this coming ― Wowza,” tweeted LightShed media analyst Rich Greenfield.

Chapek is only the seventh CEO in Disney history.

Susan Arnold, the independent lead director of the Disney board said succession planning had been ongoing for several years.

Chapek was head of the parks, experiences and products division since it was created in 2018. Before that he was chairman of Walt Disney Parks and Resorts since 2015. Before that, he was president of the Disney Consumer Products segment from 2011 to 2015.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘The Wire’ Honored With ‘Classic TV’ Award By American Black Film Festival

Westlake Legal Group 5e555110260000630cb5fb52 ‘The Wire’ Honored With ‘Classic TV’ Award By American Black Film Festival

The American Black Film Festival awarded the acclaimed 2000s series “The Wire” with the Classic Television award at its honors gala over the weekend. 

The ABFF celebrated the HBO Baltimore crime drama, created by David Simon, for being widely regarded as “one of the greatest television shows of all time,” a press release stated. 

Cast members from “The Wire,” which aired from 2002 to 2008, accepted the award on stage at the ceremony on Sunday in Beverly Hills, California. 

Wendell Pierce, who portrayed detective William “Bunk” Moreland in the series, delivered an acceptance speech, alongside other cast members, including Lance Reddick, Andre Royo, Jamie Hector, Sonja Sohn and Michael K. Williams. 

“This is a great honor for us… the many years we did ‘The Wire’ we never got awards,” Pierce said with a laugh. “We’re breaking records tonight, getting our first one.”

Critics widely accused the Emmys of snubbing “The Wire” by not granting the show a single award and only giving it two noms for writing.

“Twenty years ago we gathered in Baltimore to start filming this television series that we were hoping would be our best work… but what we couldn’t [have] seen, was the fact that it captured the zeitgeist of the time and changed American television history,” Pierce later continued on stage. 

He also noted that what makes the series a classic is that “it speaks to our humanity then when it was filmed [and] now it’s still relevant and years after we are gone, it will still speak to our humanity because it was authentic and truthful.” 

The ABFF honors ceremony aims to celebrate “Black culture by recognizing artists who have made distinguished contributions to American entertainment through their work, as well as those who champion diversity and inclusion,” its website states. 

Actor Jamie Foxx was also a recipient of an award at the ceremony on Sunday. He received the Excellence in the Arts Award, which honors someone who has received critical acclaim for their work. 

“Martin,” a 1990s series starring Martin Lawrence, Tisha Campbell and Tichina Arnold received ABFF’s Classic TV award in 2018.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com