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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 100)

Audrey Hepburn had a love affair with Marilyn Monroe’s photographer before Hollywood fame: report

Before Milton H. Greene passed away in 1984, the celebrated photographer revealed a shocking secret to his son, Joshua Greene — he once had a love affair with Audrey Hepburn.

Those photos captured during their romance long ago are seen for the first time in a new book published by ACC Art Books titled “Always Audrey,” which highlights the work of six iconic photographers who photographed the star over the years.

Hepburn passed away in 1993 at age 63 from cancer.

Joshua claimed a relationship between the two blossomed when both were starting out in their careers. However, it was the first time that Greene ever mentioned it before he succumbed to lymphoma at age 63.

AUDREY HEPBURN REPORTEDLY HELPED RESIST NAZIS IN HOLLAND DURING WWII

Westlake Legal Group MHG-PS-AH-153 Audrey Hepburn had a love affair with Marilyn Monroe’s photographer before Hollywood fame: report Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/marilyn-monroe fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 62d006dc-0683-591c-af00-75c015c67225

Audrey Hepburn is the subject of a new book titled “Always Audrey.” (Milton H. Greene © Joshua Greene)

AUDREY HEPBURN’S GRANDDAUGHTER EXPLAINS HOW LATE HOLLYWOOD STAR IS STILL INSPIRING HER

“It was the first time he was assigned to photograph her for Life Magazine,” the now-64-year-old Joshua Greene told People magazine for this week’s issue. “It’s a wonderful series and not a lot of it was published.”

“He always loved the way she looked,” Joshua continued. “Audrey is one of those women, when you capture them right, set at the right angle, with the right light, she can be absolutely beautiful but if she’s not captured correctly, she looks like a woman with a funny face.”

Joshua admitted that he doesn’t know too many details of his father’s alleged romance with the Hollywood star.

“My dad was one of those people who didn’t really kiss and tell,” he explained to the outlet. “He was old school in that regard.”

AUDREY HEPBURN NEARLY STARVED TO DEATH DURING WORLD WAR II: ‘SHE SURVIVED BY EATING TULIP BULBS’

Westlake Legal Group MHG-PS-AH-155 Audrey Hepburn had a love affair with Marilyn Monroe’s photographer before Hollywood fame: report Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/marilyn-monroe fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 62d006dc-0683-591c-af00-75c015c67225

Milton H. Greene photographed Audrey Hepburn before she became an international movie star. (Milton H. Greene © Joshua Greene)

LADY GAGA WEARS $30M DIAMOND TO OSCARS; LAST WORN BY AUDREY HEPBURN

The Hollywood Reporter shared Greene and Hepburn met while she was starring in Broadway’s “Gigi,” which opened in 1951. It was 1953’s “Roman Holiday” that made Hepburn an international movie star.

The outlet also shares the pair originally had a romantic relationship at one point before forming a close friendship. While the romance ended, Hepburn went on to meet her first husband Mel Ferrer. The marriage lasted from 1954 until 1968.

RUTA LEE RECALLS WORKING ALONGSIDE FRANK SINATRA, ALEX TREBEK: ‘I LOVED EVERY SINGLE SECOND OF IT’

Westlake Legal Group MHG-PS-AH-053 Audrey Hepburn had a love affair with Marilyn Monroe’s photographer before Hollywood fame: report Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/marilyn-monroe fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 62d006dc-0683-591c-af00-75c015c67225

Audrey Hepburn originally appeared in Broadway’s “Gigi.” (Milton H. Greene © Joshua Greene)

ROBERT WOLDERS, ‘LAREDO’ STAR AND LONGTIME AUDREY HEPBURN COMPANION, DEAD AT 81

Hepburn soon found love again and married Andrea Dotti in 1969. However, that marriage ended in 1982. She developed a companionship with Robert Wolders in 1980 and that union lasted until her death.

As for Milton, he married his second wife Amy Greene, Joshua’s mother, in 1953. That marriage also lasted until his death.

AUDREY HEPBURN STAMPS FETCH $606,000 FOR CHARITY

Westlake Legal Group MHG-PS-AH-163 Audrey Hepburn had a love affair with Marilyn Monroe’s photographer before Hollywood fame: report Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/marilyn-monroe fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 62d006dc-0683-591c-af00-75c015c67225

Many photographs of Audrey Hepburn taken by Milton H. Greene have never been seen — until now. (Milton H. Greene © Joshua Greene)

MARILYN MONROE GAVE TEEN ‘GROUPIES’ COMPLETE ACCESS TO HER LIFE, DOC REVEALS: ‘SHE ALWAYS MADE HERSELF AVAILABLE’

In the book, Joshua recounted a funny memory his mother had of dining with Hepburn.

“My mother tells the story about when they met her for the first time and she was seven months pregnant with me,” he recalled. “My mother looked at Audrey and said, ‘Oh my God, you’re so beautiful! Would you do me a favor? Could you keep your coat on?’ And Audrey did.”

Joshua also said the photo collaboration between Hepburn and his father speaks for itself.

“Because they were friends who were intimately close, there’s an added excitement when he’s photographing her,” he explained. “Part of him always felt that his role in photographing women was the make the woman look as beautiful as possible. The two stayed friends throughout their lives. He was a big-hearted person, as was Audrey.”

MARILYN MONROE’S ICONIC COSTUMES FROM ‘GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES,’ ‘RIVER OF NO RETURN’ UP FOR AUCTION

Westlake Legal Group MHG-PS-AH-151 Audrey Hepburn had a love affair with Marilyn Monroe’s photographer before Hollywood fame: report Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/marilyn-monroe fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 62d006dc-0683-591c-af00-75c015c67225

Joshua Greene admitted he doesn’t know too many details about Milton H. Greene’s alleged relationship with Audrey Hepburn because he “didn’t really kiss and tell.” (Milton H. Greene © Joshua Greene)

MARILYN MONROE AND PHOTOGRAPHER MILTON H. GREENE ‘KNOWINGLY JUMPED OFF THE CLIFF TOGETHER’ DURING TUMULTUOUS YEAR

Joshua also told The Hollywood Reporter that, according to his mother, “they would call each other all the time.”

In late 2017, Joshua spoke to Fox News about the relationship his father had with another beloved friend — Marilyn Monroe.

Greene shot nearly 4,000 photos of the late actress and former business partner between 1953 and 1957.

Monroe, who was tired of being typecast as a dumb blonde, became inspired by the different personas she took on for Greene’s camera. As the friendship grew, so did her determination to launch her own production company.

FRANK SINATRA’S ATTORNEY WARNED STAR NOT TO MARRY MARILYN MONROE OVER HER SUICIDAL THOUGHTS, PODCAST CLAIMS

Westlake Legal Group MHG-PS-AH-775 Audrey Hepburn had a love affair with Marilyn Monroe’s photographer before Hollywood fame: report Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/marilyn-monroe fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 62d006dc-0683-591c-af00-75c015c67225

Milton H. Greene photographed some of the most iconic actresses in Hollywood, including a young Audrey Hepburn. (Milton H. Greene © Joshua Greene)

MARILYN MONROE WAS ‘JUST IN AWE’ OF ARTHUR MILLER, DIDN’T SEDUCE ‘NERVOUS’ PHOTOGRAPHER

Monroe fled Hollywood to New York and would go on to live with Greene’s family in Connecticut as they hatched a plan to help her escape her film studio’s tight grasp. By 1955, Marilyn Monroe Productions was born.

“Milton said, ‘You can live with my family,’” said Joshua. “’I’ll pay for all your needs. And you can go to acting school, dancing school — whatever you want to do. I’ll make sure you’re covered.’… For about a year, she was in hiding. Nobody knew where she was.

“She wanted control of script approval, directing approval, take over her career and not be the dumb blond t–s and a– girl. Which is exactly what she hated and wanted to get away from. Milton wanted to be a producer and direct films. It’s not a secret for a photographer wanting to do that.”

Monroe, who lived in a series of foster homes while growing up, discovered a sense of family with Greene.

BLANCA BLANCO STRIPS DOWN LIKE MARILYN MONROE FOR 60-YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF ‘SOME LIKE IT HOT’

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-3200225 Audrey Hepburn had a love affair with Marilyn Monroe’s photographer before Hollywood fame: report Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/marilyn-monroe fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 62d006dc-0683-591c-af00-75c015c67225

Marilyn Monroe (1926 – 1962) and photographer Milton Greene sitting and talking after their arrival from New York at LA Airport, Los Angeles, California. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

CANDID MARILYN MONROE PHOTOS REVEALED IN NEW LONDON EXHIBITION

“She was an excellent houseguest according to my mom and dad,” said Joshua. “She was never needy. She would keep to herself. She knew she had the run of the house. The guest room had its own entrance and exit. They played charades and cards.

Gene Kelly, who was probably one of the greatest charade players of all time, was unstoppable. Marilyn was always like a little girl watching a master at work because when Gene Kelly did his charades, everyone would stop in awe… She loved to read and would sit quietly for hours and read books. And she loved music.”

In private, Monroe wasn’t the glamour goddess depicted on screen. She was a woman who preferred flats over heels and looked forward to dining on potato salad and fried chicken. She also frequently listened to jazz and relished driving her 1955 Thunderbird alongside Greene with the top down while wearing a scarf and sunglasses.

She also loved babysitting Joshua.

MARILYN MONROE FILMED LOST NUDE SCENE TO PLEASE AUDIENCES, WAS ‘FURIOUS’ ON HER LAST DAY ALIVE, BOOK CLAIMS

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1036202078 Audrey Hepburn had a love affair with Marilyn Monroe’s photographer before Hollywood fame: report Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/marilyn-monroe fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 62d006dc-0683-591c-af00-75c015c67225

American actress Marilyn Monroe (1926 – 1962) with photographer Milton Green, 1955. (Gene Lester/Getty Images)

MARILYN MONROE AVOIDED THE CASTING COUCH, FOUGHT TO SHED SEX SYMBOL STATUS, BOOK CLAIMS

“She was always there to take care of me,” he recalled. “I had all the attention I needed … I just thought she was a friend of my parents. I didn’t know who she was … She would grab me and tickle me until I screamed.”

Westlake Legal Group MHG-PS-AH-153 Audrey Hepburn had a love affair with Marilyn Monroe’s photographer before Hollywood fame: report Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/marilyn-monroe fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 62d006dc-0683-591c-af00-75c015c67225   Westlake Legal Group MHG-PS-AH-153 Audrey Hepburn had a love affair with Marilyn Monroe’s photographer before Hollywood fame: report Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/marilyn-monroe fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 62d006dc-0683-591c-af00-75c015c67225

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Symbol of ’80s Greed Stands to Profit From Trump Tax Break for Poor Areas

Westlake Legal Group 26milken-promo-facebookJumbo Symbol of ’80s Greed Stands to Profit From Trump Tax Break for Poor Areas United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Treasury Department Tax Credits, Deductions and Exemptions Mnuchin, Steven T Milken, Michael R Milken Institute Federal Taxes (US) Enterprise Zones Area Planning and Renewal

RENO, Nev. — In the 1980s, Michael Milken embodied Wall Street greed. A swashbuckling financier, he was charged with playing a central role in a vast insider-trading scheme and was sent to prison for violating federal securities and tax laws. He was an inspiration for the Gordon Gekko character in the film “Wall Street.”

Mr. Milken has spent the intervening decades trying to rehabilitate his reputation through an influential nonprofit think tank, the Milken Institute, devoted to initiatives “that advance prosperity.”

These days, the Milken Institute is a leading proponent of a new federal tax break that was intended to coax wealthy investors to plow money into distressed communities known as “opportunity zones.” The institute’s leaders have helped push senior officials in the Trump administration to make the tax incentive more generous, even though it is under fire for being slanted toward the wealthy.

Mr. Milken, it turns out, is in a position to personally gain from some of the changes that his institute has urged the Trump administration to enact. In one case, the Treasury secretary, Steven Mnuchin, directly intervened in a way that benefited Mr. Milken, his longtime friend.

It is a vivid illustration of the power that Mr. Milken, who was barred from the securities industry and fined $600 million as part of his 1990 felony conviction, has amassed in President Trump’s Washington. In addition to the favorable tax-policy changes, some of Mr. Trump’s closest advisers — including Mr. Mnuchin, Jared Kushner and Rudolph W. Giuliani — have lobbied the president to pardon Mr. Milken for his crimes, or supported that effort, according to people familiar with the effort.

While the Milken Institute’s advocacy of opportunity zones is public, Mr. Milken’s financial stake in the outcome is not.

The former “junk bond king” has investments in at least two major real estate projects inside federally designated opportunity zones in Nevada, near Mr. Milken’s Lake Tahoe vacation home, according to public records reviewed by The New York Times.

One of those developments, inside an industrial park, is a nearly 700-acre site in which Mr. Milken is a major investor. Last year, after pressure from Mr. Milken’s business partner and other landowners, the Treasury Department ignored its own guidelines on how to select opportunity zones and made the area eligible for the tax break, according to people involved in the discussions and records reviewed by The Times.

The unusual decision was made at the personal instruction of Mr. Mnuchin, according to internal Treasury Department emails. It came shortly after he had spent time with Mr. Milken at an event his institute hosted.

“People were troubled,” said Annie Donovan, who previously ran the Treasury office in charge of designating areas as opportunity zones. She and two of her former colleagues said they were upset that the Treasury secretary was intervening to bend rules, though they said they didn’t realize at the time that Mr. Mnuchin’s friend stood to profit. The agency’s employees, Ms. Donovan said, “were put in a position where they had to compromise the integrity of the process.”

The opportunity zone initiative, tucked into the tax cut bill that Mr. Trump signed into law in 2017, has become one of the White House’s signature initiatives. It allows investors to delay or avoid taxes on capital gains by putting money in projects or companies in more than 8,700 federally designated opportunity zones. Mr. Trump has boasted that it will revitalize downtrodden neighborhoods.

But the incentive, also championed by some prominent Democrats, has been dogged by criticism that it is a gift to wealthy investors and real estate developers. From the start, the tax break targeted people with capital gains, the vast majority of which are held by the very richest investors. The Treasury permitted opportunity zones to encompass not only poor communities but some adjacent affluent neighborhoods. Much of the money so far has flowed to those wealthier areas, including many projects that were planned long before the new law was enacted.

Investors and others — including Mr. Milken’s institute — have been pushing the Treasury Department to write the rules governing opportunity zones in ways that would make it easier to qualify for the tax break. That campaign worked, and Mr. Milken is among the potential beneficiaries.

Geoffrey Moore, a spokesman for Mr. Milken, confirmed that Mr. Milken had investments inside opportunity zones, though they are a sliver of his overall real estate holdings. He disputed that Mr. Milken had used his institute or Washington connections to benefit his investments and said no one at the institute “has any specific knowledge of Mike’s personal investments.”

Mr. Moore added that Mr. Milken’s support for opportunity zones was based on his longstanding belief “that jobs and the democratization of ownership are the keys to helping people in economically struggling areas.”

A spokesman for the Milken Institute, Geoffrey Baum, said that “to suggest that the work of the Milken Institute is motivated by or connected to Mr. Milken’s investments is flat-out wrong.” He said the institute advocated changes that were intended to spread the benefits to more low-income communities, not to help the wealthy.

The White House declined to comment on whether Mr. Trump is considering a presidential pardon for Mr. Milken.

Mr. Milken — operating from an X-shaped trading desk in Beverly Hills, Calif. — was a Wall Street legend. He pioneered the junk bond, which enabled financially risky companies to borrow billions of dollars and ignited a wave of often-hostile corporate takeovers that came to define a go-go era. His firm, Drexel Burnham Lambert, hosted an annual event, which came to be known as the Predators’ Ball, where the era’s greatest financiers mingled. Mr. Milken became a billionaire.

Then, in 1989, federal prosecutors charged him with violating securities and tax laws and with being part of a lucrative insider-trading ring. The next year, Drexel Burnham went bankrupt.

Mr. Milken pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 10 years in prison and paid $600 million in fines. After cooperating with the government, he ended up serving about two years behind bars.

Mr. Milken emerged with a considerable fortune intact. He invested in companies in for-profit education, health care and fast food, according to securities filings and company announcements. He also acquired lots of real estate, coming to own roughly 700 properties around the United States, Mr. Moore said.

He continued to attract scrutiny from regulators, including one case in which Mr. Milken paid $47 million to resolve the Securities and Exchange Commission’s allegations that he had violated his lifetime ban from the securities industry.

Mr. Milken, however, has largely managed to restore his reputation — and his clout. His family gave tens of millions of dollars to his Milken Institute, which he founded in 1991 and whose board of directors he leads. After battling prostate cancer, he helped raise hundreds of millions of dollars to fund cancer research.

In Washington, Mr. Milken, 73, and his institute have courted influence, wooing and sometimes adding former federal officials. His family recently spent more than $85 million to buy three buildings opposite the White House and the Treasury Department, which he is transforming into his institute’s new Washington offices.

The most public display of his renewed stature comes each spring in Los Angeles when Mr. Milken presides over a glitzy gathering at the Beverly Hilton — the same venue where his famed Predators’ Balls took place three decades ago.

The Milken Institute’s annual conference attracts thousands of the world’s most powerful people — from government, finance, medicine, Hollywood and the like — for a frenzy of high-powered networking and conspicuous consumption. Recent guests have included Leon Black, the chairman of Apollo Global Management; David M. Solomon, the chief executive of Goldman Sachs; Eric Schmidt, the former chief executive of Google; and the New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady.

Mr. Milken is the power broker at the center of the action. Onstage, he interviews famous guests. In private, he organizes exclusive dinners. Some have called the event the Davos of North America.

In the Trump era, cabinet secretaries and White House advisers have been among the event’s marquee guests, more so than in other recent administrations. Coveted speaking roles have gone to Ivanka Trump and her husband, Mr. Kushner, giving them access to an elite audience.

At last year’s event in Beverly Hills, attendees included Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Mr. Mnuchin. The Treasury secretary was accompanied by several senior aides, including Daniel Kowalski, who is overseeing the department’s drafting of the opportunity zone rules.

Mr. Kowalski, who has spent months drumming up support across the country for opportunity zones, is well acquainted with the Milken Institute.

After the tax incentive became law, it was up to the Treasury, and Mr. Kowalski in particular, to put it in effect through a series of rules. Officials at the Milken Institute met repeatedly with him to try to influence that rule-writing process. The institute submitted a series of letters and presentations to the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service, and at times directly to Mr. Mnuchin, pushing for rules that would make the tax break easier to qualify for.

“Helping to shape the rules of the road” is how the Milken Institute describes its work on opportunity zones.

The institute “is incredibly active,” Mr. Kowalski said in an interview. He said he thought he had discussed opportunity zones with Mr. Milken, although he said he could not specifically recall. He disputed that Mr. Milken or his institute exerted any special influence over the Treasury Department.

Among the Milken Institute’s proposals was for the Treasury to give investors a generous amount of time to build on opportunity zone land and to reduce the amount that investors had to spend upgrading properties to be eligible for the tax break. Those changes would make it easier for investors to reap the benefits.

The institute also asked the Treasury a question that would clarify if investors who owned land in opportunity zones before the tax law was passed were eligible to receive the benefits. The Treasury ruled that such investments were permissible, a controversial decision since the purpose of the opportunity zone initiative was to spur new investments, not reward existing projects.

Mr. Milken’s spokesman, Mr. Moore, said Mr. Milken “never attended any meeting focused on opportunity zone regulations with any federal agency, nor did he consult with any institute representatives who may have interacted with any agency.”

But Aron Betru, who led the Milken Institute’s opportunity zone efforts, told The Times in an interview that he did discuss opportunity zones with Mr. Milken, though he said he was not aware of Mr. Milken’s specific investments. And in 2018 Mr. Mnuchin and Mr. Milken attended a small, private event, sponsored by the institute, to discuss opportunity zones.

High above Reno, on a vast hillside where wild horses roam, is the site of one of Nevada’s biggest opportunity zones.

The center of this area is known as Comstock Meadows, a reference to the 1859 discovery of the so-called Comstock Lode, one of the largest deposits of silver ever found in the United States. The find generated hundreds of millions of dollars in wealth, creating a boomtown in nearby Virginia City.

Today it is home to the Tahoe-Reno Industrial Center. Lured by cheap land, Google is building a huge new complex inside the industrial park. Tesla and Switch, the data-center company, recently opened their own operations. And down the street, Mr. Milken co-owns a company that holds nearly 700 acres of empty land.

He and his partner — Chip Bowlby, president of a development company called Reno Land — planned to use that space to open a so-called tech incubator, where smaller companies could set up operations, among other possible uses.

Being inside an opportunity zone would potentially be a huge boon for the venture. It would mean that start-ups at the tech incubator could attract tax-advantaged money from outside investors.

Nevada officials wanted to nominate the census tract that included the industrial park as an opportunity zone. But in early 2018, Treasury officials had ruled that the area was ineligible because its residents were too affluent.

Major landowners at the site, including Mr. Bowlby, urged state and local officials to try to get the Treasury to reverse that ruling, said Kris Thompson, the project manager at the industrial center.

Storey County, where the industrial park is situated, deployed Jon Porter, a former House Republican from Nevada who is now a lobbyist, to push the matter. Dean Heller, at the time a Republican senator, and Brian Sandoval, then the governor, also were enlisted and had phone calls with Mr. Mnuchin around that time, according to Treasury records. Mr. Heller, Mr. Porter and Mr. Sandoval did not respond to requests for comment.

Just as that lobbying intensified in the spring of 2018, Mr. Milken opened his institute’s annual conference in Beverly Hills.

Mr. Mnuchin was a featured guest. “It’s great to be here with you and all my L.A. friends,” the Treasury secretary said in an onstage interview on April 30.

That afternoon, the institute organized an invitation-only meeting with Mr. Mnuchin and his staff to discuss opportunity zones. Other listed attendees included Sean Parker, the former Facebook president and an early advocate of opportunity zones, and Raymond J. McGuire, a top Citigroup executive. Mr. Betru was the moderator.

Within days, the Treasury Department had shifted its position and was now willing to let the state nominate the area around the Nevada industrial park as an opportunity zone.

Mr. Mnuchin told Mr. Kowalski to inform other Treasury officials that they should accept Storey County’s nomination, according to email records reviewed by The Times.

Mr. Mnuchin spoke on the phone on May 8 with Mr. Sandoval. Forty-five minutes later, Mr. Sandoval formally nominated the site to be part of an opportunity zone, email records show. And the decision was soon officially blessed by the Treasury Department. (While the Treasury’s reversal has been reported, Mr. Milken’s connection has not been previously disclosed.)

Treasury officials said the change was part of an effort to iron out inconsistencies in different Treasury rules. But the switch provoked intense protests from Treasury and I.R.S. employees.

“Failure to apply the designation standards equally across the board will call into question the legitimacy of the process by which the designations were made,” an unnamed I.R.S. employee wrote in an internal memo in May 2018. It added that the appearance of “arbitrary” Treasury standards risked “opening the door for accusations that the determination process was influenced by political considerations or bias.”

“Any such controversy would in turn taint the opportunity zones and potentially chill or cloud the incentive for investors to invest in the opportunity zones,” the memo said.

In an interview this month at an event co-sponsored by the Milken Institute in Jackson, Miss., Mr. Kowalski would not comment on whether Mr. Mnuchin had been the driving force behind the Treasury’s reversal. “I can certainly say he was apprised of the situation,” Mr. Kowalski said.

Brett Theodos, a senior fellow at the Urban Institute, which has advised state governments including Nevada on their nominations of opportunity zones, said the Treasury’s decision-making appeared problematic. “Making exceptions for the politically connected is deeply troubling,” he said.

Spokesmen for Mr. Milken and Mr. Mnuchin said the two men had never discussed the Storey County issue. Mr. Mnuchin’s spokesman, Devin O’Malley, said Mr. Mnuchin “had no knowledge of Milken’s investments in Nevada.”

In August 2018, Mr. Mnuchin and Mr. Milken met again. This time, the occasion was a small conference hosted by the Milken Institute to discuss opportunity zones. The event took place at the Hamptons home of the real estate developer Richard LeFrak, a business associate of Mr. Trump, according to the event’s agenda.

A handout from the event, which was later posted online, showed a map of all 8,764 opportunity zones in the United States, but focused on the virtues of just one specific area: Reno. The handout promoted the city as a “hub to the western United States.”

The handout did not mention that Mr. Milken was a major investor in two projects in opportunity zones in that area: the tech incubator in the industrial park and a housing, hotel and retail development on the site of an old shopping mall in Reno.

As his institute was continuing to push the Treasury to tinker with its opportunity zone rules, Mr. Milken gave Mr. Mnuchin a flight in January on his private jet to Los Angeles, where both men have homes.

Three months later, the Treasury Department heeded the institute’s request and clarified that investors could receive the opportunity zone tax benefits by simply leasing properties to themselves. As a result, investors who had long owned land inside opportunity zones were now eligible for the tax break.

In a separate round of rule changes, Treasury agreed to loosen rules governing how quickly developers had to start work on opportunity zone projects and how much money they had to spend — both revisions that the Milken Institute, among many others, had sought.

This was a potential win for Mr. Milken. His partner, Mr. Bowlby, had bought the Nevada real estate — for both the tech incubator and the residential and retail complex — before the areas were designated as opportunity zones.

Mr. Bowlby, who didn’t respond to requests for comment, said at a public event this year that he was using a lease on his Reno project with Mr. Milken “so we can still be qualified for the opportunity zone.”

The Treasury’s leasing decision has faced criticism.

“Anybody who owned property in the zone prior to 2018 would have been out of luck until these rules,” said Michelle Layser, a tax law professor at the University of Illinois College of Law. “This really opens the door.”

Mr. Moore, the spokesman for Mr. Milken, denied that he received special treatment.

“Your insinuation that Mike has reaped personal financial benefits from Milken Institute programs is outrageous,” he said. “It’s clear that you are less interested in the objective truth than in assigning to Mike Milken sinister motives that simply do not exist.”

Mr. Moore said that Mr. Milken hadn’t hidden the fact that he had investments in the Nevada opportunity zones. He said Mr. Milken had described them at the Hamptons event that Mr. Mnuchin attended. “There was nothing secretive about it,” he said.

Mr. Kowalski said he hadn’t been aware that Mr. Milken was an investor in the Nevada projects at the same time that his institute was seeking to change the rules governing opportunity zones.

Was he surprised? Mr. Kowalski paused. “Nothing surprises me anymore,” he said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

8 movies to stream this Halloween

Westlake Legal Group Halloween-movies 8 movies to stream this Halloween Nate Day fox-news/organization/netflix fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc e7776561-5f03-5bdc-a548-d923360045a2 article

One of the best parts of Halloween is the movies.

Whether you’re looking for something goofy and family-friendly or something to spook your socks off, there are plenty of options for you to choose from.

Here are eight movies to stream this Halloween, and where to find them:

‘HOCUS POCUS’ SEQUEL COMING TO DISNEY+: REPORT 

1. “A Quiet Place”

One of 2018’s biggest hits, “A Quiet Place,” centers on a family living in a post-apocalyptic world forced to live in silence to avoid being ravaged by monsters.

Interestingly, the film was written and directed by John Krasinski — Jim on “The Office” — but that doesn’t make it any less scary.

Where to find it: Amazon Prime, Hulu, Google Play, Vudu, YouTube, iTunes

 

2. “Psycho”

A Halloween classic: “Psycho” centers on a young woman who visits a motel dominated by an angry, controlling, well… psycho.

A Hitchcock flick, you can get your jump-scare fix while watching this Oscar-nominated movie.

Where to find it: Amazon Prime, iTunes, Google Play, Vudu, YouTube

 

3. “Hocus Pocus”

This 1993 comedy features Bette Midler and Sarah Jessica Parker as cooky 17th Century witches who are brought back to life by a boy from modern Salem.

HEIDI KLUM HINTS AT HALLOWEEN COSTUME, ‘VERY SPECIAL’ UPCOMING PARTY 

No need to fear, the kids will love this one.

Where to find it: Amazon Prime, iTunes, Vudu, Google Play, YouTube. It also airs on Freeform.

 

4. “Goosebumps”

Another one for the family, this movie is an adaptation of R.L. Steine’s children’s books.

This one focuses on all sorts of creatures escaping from a storybook, with Jack Black and his crew working to save the day.

Where to find it: Amazon Prime, Netflix, iTunes, Google Play, YouTube, Vudu

 

5. “Bird Box”

Based in another post-apocalyptic world, Sandra Bullock has to safely transport other people’s kids to an oasis, evading monsters that they have to avoid seeing at all costs.

Where to find it: Netflix

 

6. “Casper”

Everybody loves a friendly ghost, or at least Kat and Dr. Harvey do once they meet him in their new digs: a haunted, crumbling mansion.

Where to find it: Amazon Prime, iTunes, Google Play, YouTube, Vudu

 

7. “Ghostbusters”

What’s Halloween without Bill Murphy and his proton pack?

HOLLYWOOD STARS DRESS UP AS THEIR FAVORITE CELEBS FOR HALLOWEEN

Follow him and his crew as they try to rid New York City of all kinds of spooky spirits.

Where to find it: Amazon Prime, iTunes, Google Play, YouTube, Vudu

 

8. “Beetlejuice”

The whole family will love watching the eccentric Beetlejuice help a recently deceased duo of the living inhabitants of their home.

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Where to find it: Amazon Prime, iTunes, Google Play, YouTube, Vudu

Westlake Legal Group Halloween-movies 8 movies to stream this Halloween Nate Day fox-news/organization/netflix fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc e7776561-5f03-5bdc-a548-d923360045a2 article   Westlake Legal Group Halloween-movies 8 movies to stream this Halloween Nate Day fox-news/organization/netflix fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc e7776561-5f03-5bdc-a548-d923360045a2 article

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Carol Roth: Canceling Halloween is not a solution – It only makes kids equally miserable

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5617621261001_5617590095001-vs Carol Roth: Canceling Halloween is not a solution – It only makes kids equally miserable fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/education fox-news/opinion fox-news/lifestyle/parenting/family fox news fnc/opinion fnc d93bad7d-3b70-5419-aba3-35d9096c2eee Carol Roth article

As if the “woke” ultra-left couldn’t get any more insufferable, they are now going after a primary source of joy for every school-aged kid by canceling Halloween celebrations at school.

In the suburbs of Chicago, not far from where I grew up or where I currently live, one school district is getting rid of Halloween in the name of “inclusivity and equity.” Here’s the reality—these ungrateful, victim-creating, pessimistic, no-fun adults only want equality of misery. They aren’t happy, despite having every reason to be so, and therefore nobody else can be happy, either.

Their arguments for the cancelations run counter to embracing freedom. One argument is that some families don’t celebrate Halloween or want to participate.

HALLOWEEN-LIKE HOLIDAY, ‘NATIONAL TRICK OR TREAT DAY,’ SPARKS DEBATE ABOUT PROPOSED NEW DATE

Well, if there’s a family that doesn’t want to participate in the Halloween celebration for religious or other reasons, then tell them, “that’s fine.” Give them the day off or look for some other solution. You don’t need to ruin something for everyone else because one person or a handful of people may not want to participate.

I don’t drink alcohol, but I certainly don’t expect everyone in a restaurant to stop imbibing because I have shown up.

As for the argument that some kids may not be able to afford costumes, well, you are school and supposed to be teaching creativity and problem-solving, so isn’t there some other solution you can come up with other than canceling an entire holiday?

Where does it end? Equality is about being equal under the eyes of the law, not everyone having exact equal circumstances.

Why not allow kids in the school to make costumes during an art class or special assembly. Do a community drive for extra costumes. There are so many ways to allow more people to participate in something and enjoy a celebration, so why is the default option cancelation?

And, where does it end? Equality is about being equal under the eyes of the law, not everyone having exact equal circumstances.

Will they stop athletic competitions next because not every kid is athletic? Will they go after other holidays and celebrations?

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Why, in a country that is built on freedom, choice and individuality are schools trying to strip out anything that makes people individuals or interesting? This is something you might expect in a communist country, not in America.

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Parents and community members need to push back against this nonsense. We can’t expect everyone to stop what they are doing or give up long-standing traditions every time one or a handful of people are uncomfortable or don’t want to participate. –It is sucking the joy out of life for kids and communities.

You can be respectful of someone’s dissent without having it disrupt everyone else’s lives.

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Freedom is meant for people to have different choices, not for conformity.

Life is short — stop with the tricks and get back to the treats.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM CAROL ROTH

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5617621261001_5617590095001-vs Carol Roth: Canceling Halloween is not a solution – It only makes kids equally miserable fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/education fox-news/opinion fox-news/lifestyle/parenting/family fox news fnc/opinion fnc d93bad7d-3b70-5419-aba3-35d9096c2eee Carol Roth article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5617621261001_5617590095001-vs Carol Roth: Canceling Halloween is not a solution – It only makes kids equally miserable fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/education fox-news/opinion fox-news/lifestyle/parenting/family fox news fnc/opinion fnc d93bad7d-3b70-5419-aba3-35d9096c2eee Carol Roth article

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The Impeachment Inquiry This Week in 6 Developments

More damning testimony. A Republican resistance emerges and so does the “Deep State.” Steve Bannon is back and so is Anonymous. So many developments … so little time. It’s O.K., we’ll recap the week for you.

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Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

The top American diplomat in Ukraine gave a vivid and impassioned account on Tuesday of how multiple senior administration officials told him that President Trump blocked security aid to Ukraine and refused to meet the country’s leader until he agreed to publicly pledge to investigate Mr. Trump’s political rivals.

In testimony to impeachment investigators delivered in defiance of State Department orders, the diplomat, William B. Taylor Jr., sketched out in remarkable detail a quid pro quo pressure campaign on Ukraine that Mr. Trump and his allies have long denied. He said the president sought to condition the entire United States relationship with Ukraine — including a $391 million aid package — on a promise that the country would publicly investigate Mr. Trump’s political rivals, including former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and his family. His account implicated Mr. Trump, citing multiple sources inside the government.

____

On Friday, a federal judge ruled that the House is legally engaged in an impeachment inquiry, delivering a major victory to House Democrats and undercutting arguments by President Trump and Republicans that the investigation is a sham. (Representative Adam Schiff, above, is among those leading the inquiry.)

The House Judiciary Committee is entitled to view secret grand jury evidence gathered by the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, Judge Beryl A. Howell of the Federal District Court for the District of Columbia, ruled in a 75-page opinion. Attorney General William P. Barr had withheld the material from lawmakers.

____

Nameless, faceless and voiceless, the C.I.A. officer who first set off the impeachment inquiry seemed to be practically the embodiment of the “deep state” that the president has long accused of trying to take him down.

But over the last three weeks, the so-called deep state has emerged from the shadows in the form of real live government officials, who have defied a White House attempt to block cooperation with House impeachment investigators and provided evidence that largely backs up the whistle-blower. Here’s the warning letter received by one of the witnesses, Laura Cooper, the military’s Russia-Ukraine expert, before she testified.

Also worth noting: An anonymous Trump administration official who published a September 2018 essay in The New York Times, about the active resistance to the president’s agenda and behavior from within his own administration, will publish a book next month.

We traveled to the front lines of the war in Ukraine, a bare-bones fight against Russian-backed separatists. The war there has killed 13,000 people, put a large part of Ukraine under Russia’s control and dragged on for five years. It was almost forgotten by the outside world until it became a backdrop to the impeachment inquiry. Ukrainian soldiers on the front line were jolted when American military aid was suspended in July. While the aid was restored in time to prevent any military setbacks, it took a heavy psychological toll, they said, striking at their confidence that their backers in Washington stood solidly behind them.

The president and his allies have said that there was no quid pro quo with Ukraine because Ukrainian officials did not know military aid had been blocked, but word of the aid freeze had reached high-level officials there, according to interviews and documents.

____

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From Simple Exchange To Shakedown: The Evolution Of ‘Quid Pro Quo’

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1177754811_custom-7ae65204fc2f085069d177f29bcc8e7ff77a1e0c-s1100-c15 From Simple Exchange To Shakedown: The Evolution Of 'Quid Pro Quo'

President Trump insists there was no quid pro quo with Ukraine — but the phrase was not always synonymous with a shakedown. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  From Simple Exchange To Shakedown: The Evolution Of 'Quid Pro Quo'

President Trump insists there was no quid pro quo with Ukraine — but the phrase was not always synonymous with a shakedown.

Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

A bit of Latin has been on the lips of many lately: quid pro quo.

The phrase has been broadly invoked in the House impeachment inquiry into President Trump and his interactions with the leader of Ukraine.

Trump and many of his allies deny there was a quid pro quo — they say that Trump did not withhold military aid to Ukraine as part of an exchange for investigations that could help Trump politically in the 2020 campaign. (Acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney admitted that link in a press briefing last week but then later walked back his comments.)

U.S. diplomat William Taylor’s recent testimony to congressional investigators supports allegations that Trump withheld military assistance as part of a parallel — and informal — Ukraine policy.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has said that proving quid pro quo is not a requirement for impeachment, but the phrase has stuck.

“In Latin it just simply means something for something,” says Ben Zimmer, language columnist for The Wall Street Journal. But, he notes, “I think that the political situation can’t help but inform the way that we’re going to understand this particular phrase, even though it’s been in the language for oh, about 500 years.”

An exchange — not necessarily an equal one

Zimmer says the first recorded use of the phrase quid pro quo in English meant something totally different.

“In the 16th century, very often if you’ve got a drug from an apothecary, what you would be getting might not be exactly what you asked for,” he says.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-709101359_custom-fc919eb54b1814f6f373e814c7a0a82b793471db-s1100-c15 From Simple Exchange To Shakedown: The Evolution Of 'Quid Pro Quo'

L’Etude du Procureur, The Lawyers Office, Plate III from the series The Trades, ca 1632-1633, etching by Abraham Bosse, France, 17th century. De Agostini Picture Library/De Agostini Picture Library/Getty Images hide caption

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De Agostini Picture Library/De Agostini Picture Library/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  From Simple Exchange To Shakedown: The Evolution Of 'Quid Pro Quo'

L’Etude du Procureur, The Lawyers Office, Plate III from the series The Trades, ca 1632-1633, etching by Abraham Bosse, France, 17th century.

De Agostini Picture Library/De Agostini Picture Library/Getty Images

Instead of the quid you asked for, you got the quo. It sounds harmless enough, but Zimmer says it could lead to problems.

“Very often the drugs that were swapped out would lead to someone getting something that didn’t work as well or could even be harmful. And so, this was a practice that people were scared of,” he says.

That’s where the idea of an exchange started. Fast-forward another century, and lawyers start using quid pro quo a lot.

“Lawyers love using Latin, and that was true way back in the 16th and 17th century, when quid pro quo started getting picked up to refer to an exchange of one thing for another — and again, that in a legalistic context could be very neutral. It’s simply one thing for another,” he says.

“But this more negative connotation has always carried through — that there is perhaps some sort of corrupt intents on at least one side of this mutual relationship, perhaps the motives are not so pure.”

What about a favor?

If a quid pro quo by definition is something for something else, then what about the word “favor”? In his July phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy, President Trump asked him for a “favor.” Trump insists there was no pressure.

Webster’s defines “favor” as a “gracious kindness.” There’s no mention of expecting something in return. But that is not always how it plays out in real life.

“There’s a quid pro quo built into every relationship — every conversation. We talk in a certain way because we expect some response,” says Deborah Tannen, a linguistics professor at Georgetown University. “I want you to like me, and so then you might be friends. Or we are friends, I want to stay friends.”

People don’t usually attach strings to the favors they do for family, Tannen says. But the further people get outside that circle, the more complicated the favor becomes, even between peers. At times, people may not even realize their own expectations for reciprocity.

It gets infinitely messier when there’s a power dynamic at play. It’s natural, Zimmer says, “when we are in this type of transactional relationship to think, ‘Am I really getting the something of equal value here or am I being taken advantage of?’ “

Tannen adds that how the trade-off is articulated — or how it is not — is key. “That’s what I think we’re dealing with often in public situations where people are caught on tape, say, making what we all know is a demand but not in so many words, so they can say, ‘Oh no, that’s not what I meant.’ “

There is inherent drama in the quid pro quo. It’s about relationships, it’s about trust and power, spoken and unspoken expectations. The idea is everywhere in popular culture, and now, because of the Ukraine scandal, quid pro quo is everywhere in our politics.

Zimmer says gone are the days when it could be descriptive, or morally neutral.

“Now it’s more like a shakedown. It’s more like: You have to do this for me or else.”

Marc Rivers and Steve Tripoli produced and edited this story for broadcast. Heidi Glenn adapted it for the Web.

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Casino near Las Vegas gets entrance smashed by RV driver who was kicked out, police say

A custodial worker was critically injured Friday when a driver crashed a motorhome into the entrance of a Las Vegas-area casino after having been kicked out.

Police said Jennifer Stitt, 50, was booked into the Las Vegas city jail on an attempted murder charge in connection with the incident at the Cannery Casino & Hotel in North Las Vegas early Friday morning, FOX 5 of Las Vegas reported.

GEORGIA DRIVER ESCAPES WITH ‘MINOR’ INJURIES AFTER LOGS IMPALE CAR

Westlake Legal Group 97dda3fb-rv-crash-thumb Casino near Las Vegas gets entrance smashed by RV driver who was kicked out, police say fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/general/hotels fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 1cff2be2-fc7b-5751-894c-8855ac5444f1

The scene of a crash at the Cannery hotel-casino in North Las Vegas, Friday, Oct. 25, 2019. (Associated Press)

Authorities said Stitt became angry after being accused of trespassing on the property, but further details were not available.

Photos of the aftermath showed the Winnebago wedged in the front entrance, with broken glass and twisted metal from the door frame all around it.

Westlake Legal Group casino99 Casino near Las Vegas gets entrance smashed by RV driver who was kicked out, police say fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/general/hotels fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 1cff2be2-fc7b-5751-894c-8855ac5444f1

Jennifer Stitt, 50, was booked into jail on an attempted murder charge, authorities say. (North Las Vegas Police Department)

“You’re hitting me!,” the 66-year-old casino worker shouted, North Las Vegas Police spokesman Eric Leavitt told USA Today.

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“And she continued to accelerate at him, actually running him over,” Leavitt said. “She knew fully well what she was doing.”

The injured employee was expected to survive, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported.

Westlake Legal Group rv-crash-thumb Casino near Las Vegas gets entrance smashed by RV driver who was kicked out, police say fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/general/hotels fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 1cff2be2-fc7b-5751-894c-8855ac5444f1   Westlake Legal Group rv-crash-thumb Casino near Las Vegas gets entrance smashed by RV driver who was kicked out, police say fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/general/hotels fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 1cff2be2-fc7b-5751-894c-8855ac5444f1

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Adriana Cohen: Trump-hater Adam Schiff unfit to lead impeachment inquiry – He must be replaced

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6097462351001_6097460929001-vs Adriana Cohen: Trump-hater Adam Schiff unfit to lead impeachment inquiry – He must be replaced fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Creators Syndicate article Adriana Cohen 4794036c-be73-5579-a3e6-bc7dce32b5d6

Republican leaders on Capitol Hill must demand that Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., immediately recuse himself from leading the Trump impeachment inquiry. There simply cannot be fair, impartial and legitimate impeachment proceedings with a known partisan and conspiracy theorist like Schiff at the helm of such a serious undertaking.

And serious it is. In a democracy, we have free elections. Voters select their leaders – including the president of the United States. No self-respecting Americans should allow their constitutionally enshrined votes for Donald Trump in the 2016 election to be overturned by corrupt Deep State operatives and corrupt politicians – especially those with a documented history of lying.

After all, it was Schiff who went on TV hundreds of times in the past few years spreading damaging propaganda and conspiracy theories about the president and his administration, accusing them of colluding with Russians to steal the 2016 election.

NEWT GINGRICH: PATHETIC TRUMP IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY IS FALLING APART – WHAT ARE PELOSI AND DEMS AFRAID OF?

Schiff insisted repeatedly there was ample evidence of such collusion, yet after a thorough 22-month special counsel investigation, no evidence was found – or charges brought – against the president or his associates for conspiracy.   

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That alone is enough to disqualify Schiff – an extreme partisan and Trump-hater – from the impeachment proceedings.     

Strike 1.

Add to it that Schiff recently lied about having any contact with the whistleblower, whose complaint filed with the intelligence community inspector general in August was the catalyst for the impeachment mess that’s tearing our country apart.

Turns out Schiff’s office did consult – if not coach – the whistleblower on how to file his or her complaint with authorities, unbeknownst to Congress. Schiff then hid this information from the media when asked, earning him four Pinocchios by The Washington Post.   

Strike 2.

Then there’s Schiff’s televised late-September spectacle before Congress with millions of Americans watching. He manufactured what was said during President Trump’s July phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. Instead of reading directly from the official transcript the president swiftly released, Schiff literally made stuff up and acted out a parody.     

Someone please inform the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee that attempting to nullify the votes of the 63 million Americans who elected the president isn’t a comedy skit on “Saturday Night Live.”     

If the president said anything that rose to “high crimes and misdemeanors” during the controversial phone call, why didn’t the liberal lawmaker just read verbatim from the transcript?     

It’s because there was no there. So Schiff lied and inserted his own opinions and embellishments, further eroding his credibility – something he vanquished during the #RussiaHoax.     

Strike 3.

And then there’s the California congressman’s glaring hypocrisy. In 2017, he tweeted: “Have concluded Sessions must step down. His testimony was misleading, his explanation not credible and an independent prosecutor is needed,” referring to Trump’s former attorney general, Jeff Sessions, whom Schiff and other Democrats demanded recuse himself from the Russia investigation.     

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In the spirit of fairness, if an attorney general must recuse himself from an important investigation for allegedly misleading the public, why not Schiff for doing the same? Shouldn’t he be living by the same standards he imposes on others?     

But wait! There’s more.     

Also during the Russia probe into the 2016 election, Schiff, now-House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.; Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.; and other Democrats demanded that former House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, R-Calif., recuse himself for allegedly withholding information from committee members, conducting secret meetings with the White House and other actions.

In 2017, Pelosi issued a statement saying: “Speaker Ryan must insist that Chairman Nunes at least recuse himself from the Trump-Russia investigation immediately. That leadership is long overdue.”     

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Again, Democratic and Republican members of Congress should hold Schiff to the same standard as Nunes. A failure to do so will further convince voters the entire impeachment inquiry is exactly what Trump says it is: a partisan witch hunt, warranting its termination.

From what we’ve seen so far, there needs to be an intervention. Schiff must go. 

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6097462351001_6097460929001-vs Adriana Cohen: Trump-hater Adam Schiff unfit to lead impeachment inquiry – He must be replaced fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Creators Syndicate article Adriana Cohen 4794036c-be73-5579-a3e6-bc7dce32b5d6   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6097462351001_6097460929001-vs Adriana Cohen: Trump-hater Adam Schiff unfit to lead impeachment inquiry – He must be replaced fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Creators Syndicate article Adriana Cohen 4794036c-be73-5579-a3e6-bc7dce32b5d6

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Ex-Ethics Chief Issues Ominous Warning About ‘Anti-Patriots’ Backing Trump

Westlake Legal Group 5db3f235200000cc27506d60 Ex-Ethics Chief Issues Ominous Warning About ‘Anti-Patriots’ Backing Trump

The former head of the U.S. Office of Government Ethics on Friday used a lengthy Twitter thread to warn about the people in positions of power who continue to defend President Donald Trump’s “indefensible” actions.

“Rather than risking a short-term political defeat, these anti-patriots wage war on democracy itself,” wrote Walter Shaub in the first of 11 tweets. “We are in dangerous territory.”

Shaub, who served under former President Barack Obama and the first six months of the Trump administration before he quit, listed a slew of examples of Trump’s alleged ethics violations to back up his claim.

“The list is longer than could fit in a Twitter thread. But this is enough to make one thing clear: Democracy cannot withstand this punishing assault much longer,” he concluded. “Shame on those who defend Trump’s misdeeds to protect their political careers. At stake is the republic itself.”

Check out the full thread below:

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‘Tomorrow, he’s going off’: Astros confident in Alex Bregman despite World Series struggles

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 'Tomorrow, he's going off': Astros confident in Alex Bregman despite World Series struggles

What I’m Hearing: The Astros remained confident heading into Game 3, and they finally came through to beat the Nationals and cut their World Series deficit to 2-1. USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — In the moments after the Houston Astros salvaged their season, Carlos Correa sought his running mate on the left side of the infield for a chat.

Certainly, the Astros’ 4-1 victory over the Washington Nationals in Game 3 of the World Series kept their championship hopes in the realm of the realistic. It showed they could hit – at least a little bit – with runners in scoring position and lean on their bullpen for nearly five innings of shutout work.

Yet since the start of the American League Championship Series, there’s been a gnawing sense that the Astros have been playing a man down, that their heartbeat has been off a tick, and that a 107-win team has been out of rhythm and lacking the panache that put them within reach of a second championship in three years.

So Correa summoned Alex Bregman and played hype man.

The Astros won the ALCS largely without meaningful offensive contributions from Bregman, and despite a Game 2 homer, he’s been nearly AWOL in this Series, too: One hit in 13 at-bats, and 4-for-31 (a .129 average) since the start of the ALCS.

That probably must change if the Astros are to erase this 2-1 deficit and vanquish the nettlesome Nationals. They are convinced that it will.

“I talked to him,” said Correa after Bregman went 0-for-5 and stranded six baserunners, “and I told him, ‘Today is a positive day for you. A, because we won, and B, because tomorrow, you’re going to crush.

“They can’t contain that guy for long. He’s one of the best players in the game, one of the best hitters in the game.

“Mark my words — tomorrow, he’s going to go off.”

Game 4 couldn’t be a better time for a Bregman revival. They will start rookie Jose Urquidy in a bullpen game, taking as many innings as they can from the right-hander before turning it over to a relief corps that retired 13 of 17 batters faced in Game 3.

It’s a tough way to live, especially when your cleanup hitter is doing anything but.

And while their third baseman was far from his standard Brash Bregman after his latest oh-fer, there was a glimmer of hope.

After a first-inning strikeout that stranded George Springer at second, Bregman got the ball in play his next four trips up — hard.

“I hit four balls over 95 mph or something,” Bregman said, and if a player is aware his exact exit velocities just minutes after the game, perhaps that’s a sign he’s a bit concerned, no?

And he was pretty much right on: A drive to center in the third inning at 93.9 mph, a smash to left field at 97.4 mph in the fifth, a 102-mph forceout in the sixth and a 99-mph lineout to short in the ninth, to be exact.

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GAME 5: Trump plans late arrival for Sunday game

The sixth-inning at-bat marked something of an indignity — after Michael Brantley burned them for a pair of RBI singles earlier in the game, the Nationals opted to walk Dr. Smooth intentionally to load the bases for Bregman.

Bregman grounded to short, and thus wasn’t in much position to chirp about it postgame.

But the Nationals’ maneuver did not go unnoticed by the Astros, who know they play better when their MVP — perhaps the AL’s MVP, too — is cooking.

And maybe a bit angry.

“We’ll go home tonight wanting somebody to intentionally walk in front of him again,” manager A.J. Hinch said. “He’ll carry that with him.”

 Friday was more about baby steps. Bregman said the Astros “stopped the bleeding” with the Game 3 triumph and sounded a tone more Belichick than Bregs in calling it “a good team win. And on to tomorrow.”

A tomorrow that looks a lot better now.

“If we get that game tomorrow,” says Correa, “it’s going to get interesting.  We needed to get our swagger back, and I feel like we got it today. We’re too talented, we’ve come too far, too deep into the season to give up now.”

The task is far simpler if the sinkhole in the middle of the order gets patched. Bregman said he felt “not great, but good,” and at the least, a Game 3 win bought he and the Astros a Game 5, two shots to take this back to Texas.

By then, they fully expect their MVP to look the part.

“I’m not worried about Alex. You saw what he did. He’s a great player,” Brantley said. “He’ll find his breaks. I can’t wait to see him come out tomorrow. I’m ready.

“You be ready, too.”

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