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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 107)

‘Hocus Pocus’ Creator Shreds Trump’s Poster Parody: ‘Leave Our Witches Alone’

President Donald Trump’s campaign team is hawking what appears to be a ripoff version of the iconic “Hocus Pocus” poster.

And one of the movie’s creators is not happy, reported ET Canada.

“I am disgusted by this putrid act of evasion,” tweeted Mick Garris, a screenwriter on the 1993 fantasy comedy starring Bette Midler, Sarah Jessica Parker and Kathy Najimy.

“This is the worst president in our history, and I object in every way his attempt to co-opt, no matter how poorly, our creation,” continued Garris. “Leave our witches alone, oh Evil One.”

Trump’s campaign promoted the $24 fine art print on Twitter Monday.

Westlake Legal Group 5db813c22100001c3bad4382 ‘Hocus Pocus’ Creator Shreds Trump’s Poster Parody: ‘Leave Our Witches Alone’

DonaldJTrump.com

It appears to show House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) and Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) as the witches attempting to attack Trump, who is seen flying over Washington with an American flag.

“HOAXUS POCUS!” reads the description of the poster on Trump’s website.

“The Greatest Witch Hunt in the history of the USA continues,” it adds. “The only people scared this Halloween are Shifty Schiff, Nervous Nancy and Democrat Hack Jerry Nadler about their chances in 2020!” The design is also available on a t-shirt.

However, despite the spooky theme, “the item is not guaranteed for delivery by Halloween,” it states.

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Georgia manhunt on for convicted child rapist mistakenly released from prison

Westlake Legal Group tony-maycon-munoz-mendez-exlarge-169 Georgia manhunt on for convicted child rapist mistakenly released from prison fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article a115cf82-8d0a-53de-8964-b830b595acea

A manhunt in Georgia continued Monday after a convicted child rapist who was sentenced to life behind bars was mistakenly released from prison last week, the Georgia Department of Corrections said in a statement.

MOTHER ADMITS HITTING CHILD OVER DIRTY DIAPER, REPORTS SAY; INFANT LATER DIED

Tony Maycon Munoz-Mendez, 31, was released “in error” from the Rogers State Prison in rural Tattnall County at about 11:30 a.m. Friday, the department said in a statement.

“All resources are being utilized to ensure the rapid apprehension of Munoz-Mendez, including the Georgia Department of Corrections Fugitive Unit and US Marshals,” the statement said. It was unclear what circumstances lead to his release.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

Munoz-Mendez went to prison in April 2015 after receiving three life sentences for the rape and aggravated child molestation of a girl under the age of 10 in Gwinnett County, Atlanta’s WSB-TV reported, citing court records.

Westlake Legal Group tony-maycon-munoz-mendez-exlarge-169 Georgia manhunt on for convicted child rapist mistakenly released from prison fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article a115cf82-8d0a-53de-8964-b830b595acea   Westlake Legal Group tony-maycon-munoz-mendez-exlarge-169 Georgia manhunt on for convicted child rapist mistakenly released from prison fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article a115cf82-8d0a-53de-8964-b830b595acea

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‘Hocus Pocus’ Creator Shreds Trump’s Poster Parody: ‘Leave Our Witches Alone’

President Donald Trump’s campaign team is hawking what appears to be a ripoff version of the iconic “Hocus Pocus” poster.

And one of the movie’s creators is not happy, reported ET Canada.

“I am disgusted by this putrid act of evasion,” tweeted Mick Garris, a screenwriter on the 1993 fantasy comedy starring Bette Midler, Sarah Jessica Parker and Kathy Najimy.

“This is the worst president in our history, and I object in every way his attempt to co-opt, no matter how poorly, our creation,” continued Garris. “Leave our witches alone, oh Evil One.”

Trump’s campaign promoted the $24 fine art print on Twitter Monday.

Westlake Legal Group 5db813c22100001c3bad4382 ‘Hocus Pocus’ Creator Shreds Trump’s Poster Parody: ‘Leave Our Witches Alone’

DonaldJTrump.com

It appears to show House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) and Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) as the witches attempting to attack Trump, who is seen flying over Washington with an American flag.

“HOAXUS POCUS!” reads the description of the poster on Trump’s website.

“The Greatest Witch Hunt in the history of the USA continues,” it adds. “The only people scared this Halloween are Shifty Schiff, Nervous Nancy and Democrat Hack Jerry Nadler about their chances in 2020!” The design is also available on a t-shirt.

However, despite the spooky theme, “the item is not guaranteed for delivery by Halloween,” it states.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

High heels, high tech, high stakes: What happened when Reno tried to kick out its strip clubs

It’s a hot Friday night when three guys walk into the Spice House, a small strip club on the edge of the glittering downtown of Reno, Nevada.

In the dimly lit room, flashing lights beckon the next dancer to take her turn on the pole. The three guys choose a table near the stage. A group of strippers approach, sliding seductively into their laps.

“What brings you guys out tonight?” one stripper asks.

“Oh, just looking to get out,” one of the guys answers. They just got off work from a local sporting goods store, he adds, and want to cheer up their buddy, who recently broke up with his girlfriend.

Westlake Legal Group 4ea32db3-c168-43e5-b4f8-83c4ddd60105-9d206e66-b132-4219-906f-3ef5f68aa3e6 High heels, high tech, high stakes: What happened when Reno tried to kick out its strip clubs

The Wild Orchid Gentlemen’s Club in Reno, Nevada, has become a battleground in the city’s drive to remake its economy by luring high-tech companies to town. Andy Barron, USA TODAY Network

But that story is a total lie. These aren’t local guys looking to party. They are undercover cops, sent in as part of a crackdown on Reno’s strip clubs that has more to do with local politics – and economic progress – than vice.

Listen to The City, Season 2

Westlake Legal Group bbde2a56-a29c-4419-bc01-441286604a43-The_City_logo High heels, high tech, high stakes: What happened when Reno tried to kick out its strip clubs

How far will a city go to shed its reputation? Find out in an investigative podcast from USA TODAY.

These officers are at the vanguard of the city’s efforts to kick the strip clubs out of downtown. Like other cities across America, Reno is trying to remake its economy by luring high-tech companies to town. Unlike other American cities, however, some believe Reno’s down-and-out image is getting in the way.

In partnership with the Reno Gazette Journal, USA TODAY has spent the past 18 months documenting this fight over Reno’s strip clubs as a city that has thrived on vice tries to reinvent itself as a big-tech mecca.

The battle for the future of Reno plays out over six episodes in Season 2 of USA TODAY’s critically acclaimed podcast The City. Episodes 1 and 2 are out today. New chapters will be released every Tuesday until Nov. 26. The series exposes the motivations of those involved in the fight, pulls back the curtains at the strip clubs and lays bare the true consequences of luring tech giants to town.

It’s a fight being waged by powerful people. But as with many gentrification battles, some ordinary workers and the city’s more vulnerable residents are suffering the most – like the strippers targeted in the undercover police sting, the low-income motel tenants whose homes are threatened by the strip club displacement, and the Tesla factory workers trying to make a go of it in the New Reno economy. 

Westlake Legal Group 44fd29a9-793d-4719-a305-e74a16810351-The_City_Podcast-The_Wild_Orchid_6 High heels, high tech, high stakes: What happened when Reno tried to kick out its strip clubs

Dancers mingle with the customers of the Wild Orchid Gentlemen’s Club in Reno, Nevada, which has been under fire from the city. Andy Barron, Reno Gazette Journal

A Reno story

Reno, a city of 250,000 tucked into the eastern edge of the Sierra Nevada mountains, has long been famous for vice – from quickie divorces in the early 1900s to legalized gambling in the 1930s and the spread of strip clubs in the 1990s.

When Las Vegas eclipsed Reno as America’s favorite party town, Reno’s fortunes began to fade, along with its image. To the uninitiated, Reno today is a tired casino town, the butt of jokes told by late-night comedians and schlocky TV shows. 

The City podcast is back for Season 2

In Reno, Nevada, a fight over strip clubs means high stakes for business owners, government, and everyone in between.

Hannah Gaber, USA TODAY

To city officials, becoming an offshoot of Silicon Valley is the answer.

“We are truly experiencing a Reno revival,” Reno Mayor Hillary Schieve said last year during her re-election campaign. “We are truly rebranding this city, and companies like Tesla, Amazon and Apple are all building and investing right here.”

Tesla has built a giant battery factory on the outskirts of town. Apple’s massive data farm is growing. Google is building just east of Reno, and Amazon has long had a distribution center in the area.

Westlake Legal Group de55145c-e87c-430d-becf-c282b3c10f03-tesla_factory High heels, high tech, high stakes: What happened when Reno tried to kick out its strip clubs

The Tesla Gigafactory, seen in the distance, currently employs more than 7,000 people and is the centerpiece of the New Reno economy. Hannah Gaber, USA TODAY

Reno’s wooing of these tech giants has jump-started the gentrification of its urban core. As the city’s power brokers try to ride the wave of this revival, they see Reno’s strip clubs as stubborn and unnecessary obstacles. 

The power brokers in Reno

With developers circling and the Reno City Council looking to revitalize downtown, a loose coalition of power brokers and activists formed to pressure the council to take on the strip clubs. 

The coalition includes people with a financial stake in seeing the city’s most prominent strip club, the Wild Orchid, kicked out of its quickly gentrifying neighborhood. 

“They have a gold mine there,” said Par Tolles, a local developer who has invested heavily in the neighborhood surrounding the Wild Orchid. “We’ve all tried to buy it. We’ve all made offers. And they could redevelop that into a really, really interesting boutique hotel or apartment (building). It doesn’t have to be what it is.”

Others want it gone simply because they believe it contributes to Reno’s smutty reputation. 

Mike Kazmierski, head of the region’s economic development agency, is a straight-laced former military commander from Colorado Springs, Colorado, who almost turned down the Reno job because of the city’s seedy image.

Now he’s on a mission to put an end to that image, one strip club at a time.

“They should not be defining us,” he said.

The strip club kingpin

The focus of their fight is Reno’s strip club kingpin: Kamy Keshmiri.

Keshmiri, born and raised in Reno by Iranian immigrant parents, built an empire in Reno’s vice-driven economy starting in the 1990s. He was a record-breaking discus thrower and hometown hero. At age 50, he still has 21-inch biceps – and a shock of black hair he wears in a manic mohawk.

Today, he and his family own three of the city’s four strip clubs.

Keshmiri sees the campaign against his clubs as an affront to his status as a revered athlete and successful local businessman. He has found himself fending off rumors that his clubs were dens of drugs and prostitution while deflecting what he considers lowball offers from developers trying to scoop up his property.

“It makes me angry,” he said. “I’m a Hall of Fame athlete. I went to school here. I’m a three-time NCAA champion. I’m No. 1 in the world in my sport. I’ve always been pro-Reno. I’ve grown up in this town. And for them to do this to me, it makes me bitter.”

Keshmiri isn’t about to let the city take his clubs. He plans to keep fighting back.

“I handle things in a different way,” he said. “I’ll just be patient. There’ll be a time when I get my revenge.”

The vulnerable

In addition to strip clubs, Keshmiri owns the Ponderosa Hotel, a dilapidated motel attached to the Wild Orchid. He rents out rooms on a weekly and monthly basis to some of the city’s most vulnerable residents.

As the city closes in on his strip clubs, Keshmiri draws those tenants into the fight by threatening to double their rent if the city succeeds in closing his clubs.

That terrified people like Velma Shoals, a 64-year-old grandmother raising a teenager at the Ponderosa. She lives on a meager disability check each month and can barely afford the Ponderosa’s $750-a-month rent, not to mention the city’s $1,300 median.

Westlake Legal Group 130bac9b-0e85-433f-b596-6d519a4c69c6-Velma_Shoals High heels, high tech, high stakes: What happened when Reno tried to kick out its strip clubs

Velma Shoals lives in the Ponderosa Hotel with her granddaughter. Shoals is one of thousands of motel residents in Reno who can’t afford the area’s skyrocketing housing prices. Hannah Gaber, USA TODAY

“Thirteen hundred dollars?” Shoals said. “Who’s got that kind of money? Nobody.”

A housing crunch sparked by the big-tech rush has gripped the entire city, forcing Tesla workers to live in RVs on city streets, flooding Reno’s only homeless shelter and putting homeownership out of reach for many.

The fight 

Amid this rapid evolution, the power brokers and the strip club owners have gone head to head to persuade Reno’s political elites to see things their way. 

The Reno City Council engaged in the fight, taking up a number of measures that could ultimately oust the clubs from downtown – or make doing business there very difficult for the club owners.

To find out what happens, subscribe to The City for free on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen. You also can visit thecitypodcast.com, where you’ll find full episodes and additional material we dug up while reporting this story, including photos, court documents, videos and more. Follow the podcast on Twitter and Instagram @thecitypod and on Facebook.  

Anjeanette Damon is the government watchdog reporter for the Reno Gazette Journal. You can reach her at adamon@rgj.com or follow her on Twitter @AnjeanetteDamon.

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Poll: Who’s sticking with President Trump, through trouble and tweets? His seemingly unshakable base.

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Poll: Who's sticking with President Trump, through trouble and tweets? His seemingly unshakable base.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff says President Donald Trump’s administration is “building a powerful case” for impeachment as a former White House national security adviser defied a subpoena on Monday. (Oct. 28) AP, AP

WASHINGTON – Even as support for his impeachment grows, President Donald Trump continues to be backed by a seemingly unshakable core of supporters who deny he has done anything wrong and agree that he is the target of a political “lynching,” a new USA TODAY/Suffolk University Poll finds.

Americans are split in the survey about whether Trump should be convicted by the Senate in an impeachment trial and removed from office: 46% in favor and 47% against. Having close to half of registered voters support his eviction from the White House is politically perilous territory for any president, of course.

Despite damaging new testimony, however, 30% to 40% of those surveyed remain solidly on Trump’s side. That is a significant asset for the president as the House of Representatives prepares to vote Thursday to affirm the formal impeachment investigation.

“Let’s look at the economy, wages, unemployment, foreign affairs, tariffs and other things like that,” said Steven Kay, 67, of Riverside County, California, a retiree and a Republican who was among those surveyed. “His rhetoric might be a little much, but he is making good policy.”

Hillary Clinton and impeachment: How is she connected to inquiries against three presidents?

William Skelskey, 84, a Republican and retired real-estate agent from Mission Viejo, California, blamed Democrats’ “negativity” for Trump’s troubles and called him “one of the top three presidents since Washington and Reagan.”

The president’s solid core of supporters don’t comprise a majority of the electorate, but they do provide a political foundation that energizes him – witness his speeches that stretch an hour and longer at raucous rallies – and helps limit defections from other GOP officials.

Paleologos on the Poll: On Trump impeachment, watch the voters who haven’t made up their minds

Controversy over Ukraine call 

In the poll, nearly four in 10 say his phone call pressuring the Ukrainian president to meddle in U.S. politics is itself an impeachable offense. But another 31% say there was nothing wrong with the conversation, echoing Trump’s insistence that it was “perfect.” Thirty-seven percent say the House should stop investigating the president and his administration entirely. 

“It seems like the inquiry is a tremendous waste of time and money,” said George Roma, 55, a small business owner from central Florida and a Republican. “I’m baffled why they continue to do this for three years.”

In contrast, some of Trump’s critics are baffled why he hasn’t been impeached already.

“He clearly violated the conduct that the president should hold in terms of using his power to increase his political and personal gain,” said Kate Pritchard, 63, a Democrat and retired teacher from Durango, Colorado. She said Congress was “doing a good job with the inquiry and following the rules.”

The telephone poll of 1,000 registered voters, taken Oct. 23-26, has a margin of error of plus or minus three percentage points.

Mitt Romney: A solitary GOP voice battling Trump for the soul of the Republican Party

Last week, even Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell took the rare step of distancing himself from a tweet by Trump that likened his impeachment to “a lynching.”

In the poll, though, 40% say they agree with the racially charged tweet; 54% disagree.

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Poll: Who's sticking with President Trump, through trouble and tweets? His seemingly unshakable base.

One of the country’s leading civil rights organizations condemned President Donald Trump’s tweet Tuesday. AP Domestic

Who are those who endorse the president’s analogy?

Unsurprisingly, they are overwhelmingly Republican. Conservatives by more than 2-1 agree with the president’s assertion. These core backers are disproportionately white and male. His strongest support comes from those who don’t have a four-year college degree. They also tend to be older. Those 18 to 34 years old overwhelmingly disagree with the tweet; those 65 and older narrowly agree with it. 

That is the portrait of those the White House is counting on for the impeachment battle ahead and for the re-election fight to follow.

A word’s power: Politicians have used ‘lynching’ as a metaphor for decades, but has time changed its impact?

Trump’s strongest support comes from those who say Fox News is the TV network they trusted most; 78% of Fox viewers say they agree that Trump’s impeachment was like a “lynching.” In contrast, just 2% of those who trust MSNBC most and 10% of those who trust CNN most agree with the statement.

Removed from office? 

On one issue, the president’s support sinks to just one in four, a sign of a potential vulnerability. Asked if the White House had an obligation to comply with subpoenas from the House committees demanding testimony and documents, 66% of those surveyed say yes, 26% say no. Those who think the White House should comply with congressional subpoenas include 35% of Republicans.

Who’s been subpoenaed?: All the people subpoenaed in impeachment inquiry

“I do feel it is inappropriate for the executive branch to be stonewalling,” said Michael Dunford, 35, a Democrat from Solana Beach, California. “I don’t know if it is obstruction of justice, but it is obstruction.”

In the new USA TODAY/Suffolk survey, Americans of all stripes are inclined to think the House won’t end up voting to impeach Trump, 56%-37%. Most Democrats and most Republicans agree that he’s not likely to be removed from office. Nearly three in four of all those surveyed, 73%, predict he won’t be.

“He should be impeached to discourage the awful behavior,” Andre Mendes, 60, an engineer from Baltimore who supports the Green Party, said of Trump. “But Republicans would have to grow a spine in order for removal from office to occur.”

2020 elections: Poll shows Iowa ‘up for grabs’ as Buttigieg surges into top tier

Pelosi vs. Trump: Combatants in impeachment showdown that will test them, nation

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Fire rages around famous California Getty museum, but priceless art is staying put

Sitting in the Santa Monica Mountains, the Getty Center is no stranger to wildfires in its proximity. Just two years ago during the Skirball Fire, a small fire started on the museum’s adjoining hill. It was put out without incident, in part thanks to the Getty’s massive irrigation system.

“The safest place for the artwork to be is right here in the Getty Center,” then-vice president of communications for the J. Paul Getty Trust, Ron Hartwig, said at the time.

On Monday, an even larger fire that bears the museum’s name—the Getty Fire—was burning near its campus and forced thousands to evacuate the area. But the museum, home to 1,000-year-old manuscripts, multimillion-dollar paintings and the world’s largest art library, has no plans to evacuate its treasures. The museum holds 125,000 objects of art and 1.4 million volumes in its library.

“We’ve sealed all of the archives, all of the galleries. No one is going in or out,” current vice president of communications Lisa Lapin said.

Kincade fire:‘Diablo’ winds are fanning the northern California wildfires

Getty fire:‘Dynamic’ wildfire in Los Angeles drives more evacuations in California

The Getty Center’s security team heard news of the fire crackling on the scanner shortly before 2 a.m. Monday. The museum’s emergency operations center was activated.

Heavy, double doors locked in place, hermetically sealing every gallery—including a current exhibition of irreplaceable Manet paintings—and archive zone. The air system switched to recycled—much like a car—guaranteeing smoky outside air couldn’t reach the artworks and historic documents explained Lapin. 

Why the Getty is so fire-resistant

The $1 billion-complex was designed by Richard Meier and completed more than 20 years ago. His design included safeguards for both earthquakes and fires.

The complex includes 1.3 million square feet of thick travertine stone, a highly fire-resistant material that lines the museum buildings’ outside walls. The crushed stone used on the roofs of the museum buildings is also fire-resistant.

Westlake Legal Group  Fire rages around famous California Getty museum, but priceless art is staying put

Inside, reinforced concrete walls and automatic folding fire doors can trap fires in the unlikely event fire enters or starts inside. The Getty’s air-conditioning system can push smoke out instead of letting it in.

On-site is also a 1 million-gallon water tank that sits underground, below the museum’s parking lot. It supplies water to an irrigation system that includes a network of pipes on the property.

But the idea is to avoid a fire — and water damage. 

“You don’t want to use sprinklers if possible,” noted Lapin, because water could damage fragile, rare works.

How close did the Getty Fire come to the museum?

The fire did reach the campus, Lapin said, racing down from a ridge above to the Tram parking area where all visitors begin their journey, about a mile below the main campus. When day broke, helicopters and air tankers began “an aggressive attack” on the flames, said Lapin. “They’re real heroes.”

The outdoor visitor plaza and sculptures have also not been damaged, she said. “We will be cleaning up some ash, though.”  

By mid-morning, fire trucks were parked in the central plaza, as a precaution, but also because the spot offers excellent views of the surrounding hillsides and canyons, where the fire had fingered its way in, burning some homes.

The complex is normally closed on Mondays to the public, but nearly all of the 800 to 1,000 staff were told to work from home, with a core group of about a dozen staffers, along with full security teams, at the on-site emergency center. 

As of early Monday afternoon, the Getty Fire was at zero containment and had grown to 618 acres. About 1,100 firefighters were battling the blaze.

Follow Janet Wilson and Nate Chute on Twitter: @janetwilson66 @nchute.

Westlake Legal Group  Fire rages around famous California Getty museum, but priceless art is staying put   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Australia Says Google Misled Consumers Over Location Tracking

Westlake Legal Group 29oz-google-facebookJumbo Australia Says Google Misled Consumers Over Location Tracking Privacy Online Advertising Google Inc Consumer Protection Computers and the Internet Australia Android (Operating System)

SYDNEY, Australia — Australian regulators on Tuesday accused Google of misleading consumers about its collection of their personal location information through its Android mobile operating system, the latest government action against a tech company over its handling of vast quantities of user data.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission alleged in a lawsuit that Google falsely led users to believe that disabling the “Location History” setting on Android phones would stop the company from collecting their location data. But users were actually required to also turn off a second setting, “Web and App Activity,” that was enabled by default.

Google did not properly disclose the need to disable both settings from January 2017 until late 2018, the suit alleges. The company changed its user guidance after The Associated Press revealed in August 2018 that it was continuing to collect the data even after the Location History setting was switched off.

The commission also said that while Google made it clear to users what features they would lose by turning off location services, the company did not inform them adequately about what it would do with the data collected.

“This is part of a system of not being able to make informed choices about what’s being done with your data,” said Rod Sims, the commission’s chairman.

Mr. Sims called the lawsuit the first of its kind by a national government against a tech company over its use of personal data. The agency is seeking what he called significant financial penalties against Google, among other corrective measures. He added that he hoped the case would raise awareness among consumers over how much data is being collected.

“We need to be getting ahead of them, because this is a whole new world,” he said of data collection issues.

A Google spokeswoman said in a statement that the company was reviewing the allegations. She said Google would continue to engage with the commission over its concerns but intended to defend itself.

The action by Australian regulators comes as governments and consumer groups around the world have expressed growing concern about the power of tech companies, including their collection of personal data from devices that are indispensable to the lives of billions of people.

Consumer groups from several European countries had already sued Google over the location tracking issue under a comprehensive data privacy law adopted in Europe last year. Under that law, a French agency fined Google 50 million euros, or about $55 million, in January for not properly disclosing to users how it collected data to create personalized ads.

In the United States, regulators approved a $5 billion fine against Facebook this year over its role in allowing Cambridge Analytica, a political data firm hired by President Trump’s 2016 election campaign, to gain access to private information on more than 50 million Facebook users.

While Google has made changes to Android in later iterations that limit the location data it gathers, the business incentives for collecting as much personal data as possible remain great. Location-targeted advertising is worth an estimated $21 billion a year, and Google, along with Facebook, dominates the mobile ad market.

The Australian lawsuit is in part the product of a 19-month investigation by the consumer commission into the market power of Google and Facebook. It issued 23 recommendations, including an overhaul of privacy laws, to limit their reach and force them to take more responsibility for the content they disseminate.

The Australian government has also passed legislation challenging the power of tech companies, including a law in 2018 that compelled tech-industry giants to disable encryption. And under a new law criminalizing “abhorrent violent material” online, Australia is using the threat of fines and jail time to pressure platforms like Facebook to block such content, and it is moving to take down websites that hold any illegal content.

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Cal Thomas: Al-Baghdadi’s death is a big deal. Democrats ought to ditch the partisanship and laud his demise

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6098274051001_6098270329001-vs Cal Thomas: Al-Baghdadi's death is a big deal. Democrats ought to ditch the partisanship and laud his demise Tribune Media Services fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/us/terror fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Cal Thomas article 1bd94d94-840e-5aa2-b59b-98ab69cbe44c

Only extreme partisans intent on denying President Trump any credit for any success would be critical of the operation he ordered that resulted in the death of Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

These extreme partisans include Speaker Nancy Pelosi who, while praising the “heroism” of the special unit that conducted the raid on al-Baghdadi’s location in Northern Syria, could not bring herself to say anything nice about the president. Instead, she said the House should have been notified in advance. Why? Does the House command troops? Pelosi lamented that Russia was informed, but that was because Russian weapons and troops were in areas over which American helicopters flew in order to reach their target.

Kudos to senator and presidential candidate Amy Klobuchar, who said on CBS’s “Face the Nation that the president’s decision was a “good one.” She even acknowledged without rancor that it could benefit him politically.

PIERS MORGAN BLASTS TRUMP CRITICS AFTER AL-BAGHDADI RAID: THEY ‘SHAMED THEMSELVES AND SHAMED THEIR COUNTRY’

In a Sunday morning appearance at the White House, the president reminded forgetful Americans of the type of organization al-Baghdadi led. He recalled prisoners dressed in orange jumpsuits, who were shown on videos with knives at their throats and later beheaded. He also said, “Baghdadi was vicious and violent, and he died in a vicious and violent way — as a coward, running and crying,”

For much of the world this was a “Wizard of Oz” moment when the curtain is pulled back and the man behind it is not as frightening as he appeared to be.

Some commentators on various TV networks kept referring to al-Baghdadi’s “ideology.” His was more than an ideology. Communism is an ideology. Fascism is an ideology. What motivated al-Baghdadi and other ISIS fighters was religion. When one believes he is on “a mission from God,” to invoke a line from the film “The Blues Brothers,” there is little to stop him, other than death. Radical Islamists believe their death in fighting us “infidels” is a guaranteed ticket to Heaven. How does one deter that, other than by helping them punch their ticket?

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Radical Islam is a virus. It is not contained within borders. It does not have a capital that can be bombed. That is why its evil nature must always be exposed and its goals thwarted. Yes, others will sign up and those currently ISIS members will likely be even more motivated by revenge. Still, others may see the cowardly behavior of al-Baghdadi and be motivated to either quit the organization, or not join it in the first place.

Americans have a short attention span and need to have their memories jogged from time to time about the multiple threats that confront all free people who wish to maintain their freedom, which is never cheap.

One of the cable channels has been showing the film “United Flight 93,” the story of the hijacking of one of four planes on Sept. 11. This is the plane that Todd Beamer and other passengers saved from likely hitting the Capitol or the White House by breaking into the cockpit and driving the plane into the ground in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. The film portrays the religious motivations of the four Muslim hijackers and their brutality as they stabbed and slashed the captain, co-pilot and several passengers.

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Thinking about the flawless operation by American forces brought to mind Lord Byron’s classic poem, “The Destruction of Sennacherib.” It includes this line:

“For the Angel of Death spread his wings on the blast,

And breathed in the face of the foe as he passed;

And the eyes of the sleepers waxed deadly and chill,

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And their hearts but once heaved, and for ever grew still!”

Our troops deserve praise, as does the president for making this happen. There will be more terrorist leaders, but at least this one has bitten the dust.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6098274051001_6098270329001-vs Cal Thomas: Al-Baghdadi's death is a big deal. Democrats ought to ditch the partisanship and laud his demise Tribune Media Services fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/us/terror fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Cal Thomas article 1bd94d94-840e-5aa2-b59b-98ab69cbe44c   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6098274051001_6098270329001-vs Cal Thomas: Al-Baghdadi's death is a big deal. Democrats ought to ditch the partisanship and laud his demise Tribune Media Services fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/us/terror fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Cal Thomas article 1bd94d94-840e-5aa2-b59b-98ab69cbe44c

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Ex-CIA Bigwig Slams ‘Absolutely Despicable’ Fox News Attack On New Trump Witness

Westlake Legal Group 5db7f368210000283bad4340 Ex-CIA Bigwig Slams ‘Absolutely Despicable’ Fox News Attack On New Trump Witness

A former chief of staff in the CIA slammed Fox News for an “absolutely despicable” attack on a decorated combat veteran who is set to testify on Tuesday in the impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump. 

Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, the top Ukraine expert on the National Security Council, will reportedly tell lawmakers that he heard Trump pressure Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky into digging up dirt on former Vice President Joe Biden and son Hunter Biden.

Vindman, who listened in on the July 25 call between Trump and Zelensky, is set to testify that he twice reported the incident to a superior, according to an opening statement obtained by The New York Times. Vindman received a Purple Heart after suffering an injury from a roadside bomb and remains an active-duty officer. 

But people on Fox News are already questioning his loyalty and patriotism.  Laura Ingraham noted a detail in the Times story that Vindman had emigrated to the U.S. from Ukraine as a child and that Ukrainian officials asked him in English for advice on dealing with Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani. She then accused Vindman of working “apparently against the president’s interests” while inside the White House.

“Isn’t that kind of an interesting angle on the story?” she asked guest John Yoo, the former Justice Department lawyer who helped write the infamous “torture memos” during the George W. Bush presidency. 

Yoo went far beyond “interesting.” 

“I find that astounding,” he said. “Some people might call that espionage.”

MSNBC’s Brian Williams described the Fox News attack as “an opening salvo in character assassination.” His guest, former CIA Chief of Staff Jeremy Bash, agreed.

“I think they’re alleging a U.S. Army colonel is a traitor,” Bash said, adding:

“Here we have the followers of Donald Trump doing what I think is absolutely despicable, which is claiming that not only is he against Trump but he’s un-American and I don’t think Republicans, Democrats, anybody who cares about our country, are going to stand for that.”

See his full discussion with Williams above. 

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Graham warns Trump to ‘keep your foot on the throat’ of ISIS

Westlake Legal Group sne-lindsey-graham Graham warns Trump to 'keep your foot on the throat' of ISIS fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics fox-news/person/lindsey-graham fox news fnc/media fnc Danielle Wallace article 4437d274-090b-5b2d-97e4-d1ade1abf65c

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., on Monday praised President Trump for his “bold move” in overseeing a military raid that resulted in the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and urged the president to “keep your foot on the throat” of ISIS fighters to ensure they don’t come to the United States.

The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee said on Fox News’ “Hannity” that, in destroying the psychical caliphate, “we’ve just killed their spiritual leader of the ISIS movement… that’s the Nazis without Hitler. So this is a big deal.”

TRUMP DETERMINED TO DESTROY ISIS ‘UNLIKE ANYBODY I’VE EVER MET,’ LINDSEY GRAHAM SAYS

“What the president did deserves great credit for it,” he said. “It was a bold move. The caliphate is dead and the leader of the caliphate is dead so this is a good day for the home team.”

Graham also supported the president’s strategy of partnering with the Kurds to “keep the oil out of the hands of ISIS and in the hands of our allies.” 

The South Carolina senator also reacted to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi calling on a House-wide vote set for Thursday to formalize—and establish the parameters of—the Democrat-led impeachment inquiry against Trump.

Graham called on Rep. Richard Burr, R-N.C., and other GOP House members to push for the whistleblower’s identity to be revealed in order to uncover if the individual has any bias and allow Trump to be able to defend himself.

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“They vote Thursday but what kind of process do they give the president? Will he be able to defend himself? And why did you pick the Intel committee versus the judiciary committee?” Graham asked. “And, just back to Nancy Pelosi. There’s no way in hell she’d be having this vote in the House unless 50 Republican senators called her out for engaging in a sham process.”

Westlake Legal Group sne-lindsey-graham Graham warns Trump to 'keep your foot on the throat' of ISIS fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics fox-news/person/lindsey-graham fox news fnc/media fnc Danielle Wallace article 4437d274-090b-5b2d-97e4-d1ade1abf65c   Westlake Legal Group sne-lindsey-graham Graham warns Trump to 'keep your foot on the throat' of ISIS fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics fox-news/person/lindsey-graham fox news fnc/media fnc Danielle Wallace article 4437d274-090b-5b2d-97e4-d1ade1abf65c

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