web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 111)

‘It: Chapter Two’ scares up $90 million debut to top box office

A robust audience turned out to catch “It: Chapter Two” in movie theaters this weekend, but not quite as big as the first.

Warner Bros. says Sunday that “It: Chapter Two,” the only major new release, earned an estimated $91 million from North American ticket sales in its first weekend from 4,570 screens.

Trailing only its predecessor that debuted to a record $123.4 million in September 2017, the launch of “It: Chapter Two” is the second-highest opening for a horror film ever and the month of September, which before “It” was not a strong month for blockbusters. Both were directed by Argentine filmmaker Andy Muschietti.

‘IT: CHAPTER 2’ OFFERS CHILLING FIRST LOOK AT PENNYWISE’S RETURN

Jeff Goldstein, who oversees domestic distribution for Warner Bros., called the debut “sensational” and isn’t concerned that “Chapter Two” didn’t hit the heights of the first.

“How many movies open to $91 million? That was lightning in a bottle,” Goldstein said. “You don’t get lightning in a bottle twice. You get close though.”

‘IT: CHAPTER 2’ CASTS BILL HADER, JAMES MCAVOY

Westlake Legal Group it-chapter-2-pennywise-bill-skarsgard 'It: Chapter Two' scares up $90 million debut to top box office fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/events/box-office fnc/entertainment fnc ec6c2e50-28f0-526b-b2b9-0a85ec7f3b80 Associated Press article

This image released by Warner Bros. Pictures shows Bill Skarsgard as Pennywise in New Line Cinema’s horror thriller “It: Chapter 2.”

‘IT: CHAPTER 2’ HAS SCARY NUMBER OF CORPORATE SPONSORS

Based on Stephen King’s novel, “It: Chapter Two” brings the Losers Club back to Derry 27 years later to take on the demonic clown Pennywise, and stars James McAvoy, Jessica Chastain and Bill Hader as a few of the adult “losers.” The sequel cost around $79.5 million to make. Reviews were a little more mixed than for the first — 86% versus 64% on Rotten Tomatoes — but audiences were consistent. Both films got a B+ CinemaScore.

“Andy Muschietti does an incredible job of scaring the stuffing out of audiences,” Goldstein said. “I think our team, starting with New Line in making this and our marketing team in bringing it to audiences around the globe, have hit the mark right on. They nailed it.”

ANGEL HAS FALLEN’ TOPS BOX OFFICE FOR SECOND WEEK

Comscore senior media analyst Paul Dergarabedian noted that, unlike most horror films which tend drop off significantly after opening weekend, “It: Chapter Two,” like its predecessor and some of the recent high quality horror films could have “incredibly long playability.”

“It: Chapter Two” is also a big win for Warner Bros., which had a few disappointments this summer with “The Kitchen” and “Shaft,” but also have a few films that could really take off, including “Joker,” out Oct. 4, and another King adaptation, “Doctor Sleep,” out Nov. 8.

‘JOKER’ TAKES TOP PRIZE AT VENICE FILM FESTIVAL

Westlake Legal Group it-chapter-2-cast 'It: Chapter Two' scares up $90 million debut to top box office fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/events/box-office fnc/entertainment fnc ec6c2e50-28f0-526b-b2b9-0a85ec7f3b80 Associated Press article

This image released by Warner Bros. Pictures shows, from left, Bill Hader, Jessica Chastain, James McAvoy, James Ransone, Isaiah Mustafa and Jay Ryan in New Line Cinema’s horror thriller “It: Chapter 2.” (Brooke Palmer/Warner Bros. Pictures via AP)

‘GOOD BOYS’ TOPS BOX OFFICE, REVIVES R-RATED COMEDY GENRE

The rest of the top 10 was populated by holdovers: “Angel Has Fallen” took a distant second with $6 million and “Good Boys” placed third with $5.4 million. In limited release, the documentary “Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice” performed well in its first weekend, grossing $115,500 from seven locations.

After a down summer for the industry as a whole and a year that is still running 6% down, “It: Chapter Two” is a promising start to the fall movie season, which runs from the day after Labor Day weekend through November.

“It’s really important to have a movie to get the momentum going,” Dergarabedian said.

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to Comscore. Where available, the latest international numbers for Friday through Sunday are also included. Final domestic figures will be released Monday.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

1. “It: Chapter Two,” $91 million.

2. “Angel Has Fallen,” $6 million.

3. “Good Boys,” $5.4 million.

4. “The Lion King,” $4.2 million.

5. “Overcomer,” $3.8 million.

6. “Fast & Furious Presents Hobbs & Shaw,” $3.7 million.

7. “Peanut Butter Falcon,” $2.3 million.

8. “Scary Stories to Tell In the Dark,” $2.3 million.

9. “Ready or Not,” $2.2 million.

10. “Dora and the Lost City of Gold,” $2.2 million.

Westlake Legal Group it-chapter-2-pennywise-bill-skarsgard 'It: Chapter Two' scares up $90 million debut to top box office fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/events/box-office fnc/entertainment fnc ec6c2e50-28f0-526b-b2b9-0a85ec7f3b80 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group it-chapter-2-pennywise-bill-skarsgard 'It: Chapter Two' scares up $90 million debut to top box office fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/events/box-office fnc/entertainment fnc ec6c2e50-28f0-526b-b2b9-0a85ec7f3b80 Associated Press article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Taliban Failed to Live Up to ‘Commitments’ in Peace Talks, Pompeo Says

Westlake Legal Group 08diplo-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 Taliban Failed to Live Up to ‘Commitments’ in Peace Talks, Pompeo Says Trump, Donald J Taliban September 11 (2001) Pompeo, Mike Khalilzad, Zalmay Ghani, Ashraf Afghanistan War (2001- ) Afghanistan

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Sunday that President Trump ended peace negotiations with the Taliban because the group had “failed to live up to a series of commitments they had made,” but he left open the possibility that American troops could be withdrawn from Afghanistan even in the absence of a deal.

“The Taliban overreached,” he said, apparently referring to the escalation of car bombings and other violence around Kabul as negotiators closed in on an agreement. Mr. Trump said a peace deal was supposed to have been sealed at a meeting at Camp David attended by Taliban leaders and then, separately, with Ashraf Ghani, the president of Afghanistan.

A car bombing on Thursday killed one American soldier, which Mr. Trump said in a series of tweets Saturday night had led to his decision. “President Trump said, ‘Enough,’” Mr. Pompeo said on ABC’s “This Week.” The lead American negotiator, Zalmay Khalilzad, had been recalled to the United States, Mr. Pompeo added.

Despite Mr. Trump’s tweet, it was not clear that the Taliban leadership had ever agreed to come to the president’s official Camp David retreat in Maryland for the meeting, a hastily organized effort by Mr. Trump to replicate past peace deals and declare that America’s longest war was being ended. The timing certainly would have been awkward — it was scheduled to take place just days before the 18th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, which were planned on Afghan soil by terrorists under Taliban protection.

Comments Mr. Pompeo made in a separate appearance on NBC’s “Meet the Press” made it clear that even if the Taliban had shown up, the outcome was not certain. The deal would have committed the Taliban to reducing violence, but not ending violence. And it would have incorporated an agreement for the Taliban to then negotiate with Mr. Ghani’s government over the political future of the country.

[Taliban talks hit a wall over deeper disagreements, officials say.]

The attempt to broker a deal came at what may be among the most precarious moments in Afghanistan since 2001. Mr. Trump has vowed to reduce the number of American forces there, saying two weeks ago that their numbers would come down to 8,600, from a current level of about 14,000. That is far below the 100,000 troops that were based there during the height of the war. But Mr. Trump has never set conditions on his decision to withdraw — a step many experts see as a mistake, since it has encouraged the Taliban to simply wait out the Americans, guessing they might begin a withdrawal with no agreement.

It remains unclear why Mr. Trump canceled the meeting; while he linked it to the death of the American serviceman in a car bombing, other Americans have died in similar attacks while negotiations were underway in Doha, Qatar.

But it is possible that Mr. Trump began to fear the negative reviews of the agreement, which came even from many of his Republican colleagues. The agreement called for a reduction in violence but not a complete cease-fire. It left unclear what role the Taliban would play in future politics.

And the Afghan government has objected both to the terms of a possible agreement and to how it was negotiated with the Taliban.

Only recently did the United States government brief Mr. Ghani about the details of the negotiations, and even then would not leave him with a copy of the agreement about the fate of his country. Mr. Ghani has met several times with Mr. Khalilzad, the American envoy who is in charge of the peace negotiations. The two men have known each other for years.

Mr. Ghani fundamentally does not believe that the Taliban will reach an acceptable accord with the elected government, and it appears he was not willing to travel to Washington if he felt he would be cornered into signing an agreement that would be hard to enforce. Mr. Ghani’s concerns are deeply rooted in history, as the withdrawal of the Soviet Union resulted in the Afghan state collapsing into anarchy. Mr. Ghani is cautioning against a rushed process that could bring about a repeat of that chaos.

The United States’ deal with the Taliban was to include a schedule for the withdrawal of the remaining American and NATO troops in the country, who number more than 20,000 all together. In return, the Taliban would provide assurances that they would not support international terrorist groups, so that Afghan soil would not be used for attacks against the West, and they would open direct talks with Afghan officials.

American and Western officials say they had prepared for an immediate start to direct talks between the Taliban and other Afghans, including the government, once the withdrawal schedule was announced. Before the cancellation, some officials said they hoped momentum in the talks would result in the elections being delayed.

That hope is now dashed, and it seems likely the election will go forward. But American officials fear it could be deeply marred by violence if the Taliban believe the negotiations are over.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Missouri man indicted in cold case murder he was quizzed about 31 years ago

A Missouri man has been indicted for a cold case murder he was questioned about 31 years ago after it happened, according to reports.

The Lawrence County Sheriff’s Office said Friday in a news release the indictment charges Lawrence Timmons, 65, of Pierce City, with the murder of 31-year-old Cynthia Smith in 1988.

Shortly after Smith’s body was found in a cemetery, Timmons was questioned in connection with the death, but no charges were filed, KYTV reported Saturday.

TEXAS AUTHORITIES CRACK 35-YEAR-OLD COLD CASE WITH HELP OF POPULAR TV SHOW

The station reported that the popular reality TV crime show “Cold Justice” helped investigators crack the case.

In the news release, the sheriff’s office said only that the case was reopened after investigators were contacted by a “private investigation firm who wished to assist with new information that they had received.”

“After several months of ongoing investigations, information was turned over to the Lawrence County prosecutor, who presented the information to a grand jury,” the sheriff’s office said. “After receiving the information, the grand jury issued the indictment on Timmons.”

The Rochester Democrat Chronicle reported Saturday that according to Missouri investigators, Oklahoma police have reopened investigations into two homicides: the 1994 murder of his first wife and the 1998 drowning death of an 11-year-old girl.

“We call him an opportunist,” Lawrence County Sgt. Melissa Phillips told the paper. “He does not target on sex or age. He has little boys in his past. He has little girls in his past. He has women in his past.”

CANADA BOY, 13, FINDS SUBMERGED CAR, HELPS POLICE SOLVE 27-YEAR-OLD MISSING PERSON’S CASE

Westlake Legal Group lawrence-timmons Missouri man indicted in cold case murder he was quizzed about 31 years ago Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/us/crime/cold-case fox news fnc/us fnc article 0d8ee796-04bc-5227-b541-0124a4923547

Mugshot for Lawrence Timmons, indicted last week for the cold case murder of a 31-year-old woman in Missouri 31 years ago. (Lawrence County Sheriff’s Office )

Investigators found Smith’s body 10 days after she was last seen leaving a Pierce City bar with an unknown man, the Springfield News-Leader reported.

She went to the bar after leaving her two sons, 8 and 4, with a babysitter who was the one who reported her missing, according to the paper.

KYTV reported that Timmons was arrested on a forgery charge last month after being charged with gaining employment to sell alcohol and lottery tickets despite being a felon.

He served three years behind bars for the felony kidnapping of an 11-year-old boy in 1976 who he also tried to drown in a cooler of water. The boy escaped and alerted police.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP 

Since the forgery arrest Timmons has been locked up in lieu of $250,000 bond.

Westlake Legal Group lawrence-timmons Missouri man indicted in cold case murder he was quizzed about 31 years ago Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/us/crime/cold-case fox news fnc/us fnc article 0d8ee796-04bc-5227-b541-0124a4923547   Westlake Legal Group lawrence-timmons Missouri man indicted in cold case murder he was quizzed about 31 years ago Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/us/crime/cold-case fox news fnc/us fnc article 0d8ee796-04bc-5227-b541-0124a4923547

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

LSU jumps into top five of Amway Coaches Poll after win at Texas

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close LSU jumps into top five of Amway Coaches Poll after win at Texas

USA TODAY Sports’ Paul Myerberg breaks down the latest Amway Coaches Poll. USA TODAY

A couple of marquee results over the weekend produced minor shuffling in the Amway Coaches Poll, including one change in the top five.

Clemson strengthened its grip on the No. 1 spot, thanks to a convincing win against then-No. 11 Texas A&M. The Tigers received all but three first-place votes this week of the 63 ballots cast by coaches.

Second-ranked Alabama, which easily handled New Mexico State, claimed the remaining three first-place nods. No. 3 Georgia and No. 4 Oklahoma, each of whom took care of business against lesser opponents from the Football Championship Subdivision, also held their respective poll positions.

LSU, which put on an impressive aerial show at then-No. 9 Texas, edged into the No. 5 spot just ahead of Ohio State.  The Buckeyes put on a dominant performance themselves in blanking Cincinnati, but the Tigers received five more poll points.

TOP 25: The complete Amway Coaches Poll rankings after Week 2

The rest of the top 10 looks a bit different as well. Notre Dame, which had the weekend off, moved up to No. 7. Florida and Auburn claimed the next two spots as Michigan, which escaped Army in double overtime, fell to No. 10.

Auburn makes the biggest jump of the week, gaining four positions. Washington, the highest-ranked upset victim, took a nine-place hit from No. 12 to No. 21 after losing to Pac-12 opponent California on a last-minute field goal in the dead of night. Newcomers to the poll include No. 25 Maryland. The Terrapins are ranked for the first time since the final poll of the 2010 season after hanging 63 points on then-No. 22 Syracuse.

The Orange are among the week’s dropouts, along with Stanford and Nebraska. No. 23 Mississippi State and No. 24 Southern California also join the top 25.

Show Thumbnails
Show Captions

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch decries lack of access to justice for many Americans

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch decries lack of access to justice for many Americans

Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch’s new book calls for civility, and better access and understanding of the legal system for Americans. Hannah Gaber, USA TODAY

WASHINGTON – Lawyers cost too much. Getting to trial takes too long. Juries promised by the Constitution are rarely used. And just try counting all the criminal laws on the books.

Those are among the provocative criticisms made by the Supreme Court’s youngest associate justice, Neil Gorsuch, in a USA TODAY interview and his new book, “A Republic, If You Can Keep It.”

Gorsuch, 52, is convinced that warning – reportedly issued by Benjamin Franklin after the Constitutional Convention – can be met, and the republic will be preserved. But the problems he observes in the justice system and what he describes as the nation’s “crisis in civility” are obstacles he would like to see removed.

That Gorsuch would highlight civility and kindness as prescriptions for what ails us might seem counterintuitive. His was the seat that Senate Republicans blocked President Barack Obama from filling in a vituperative, year-long battle in 2016. The president who chose him, Donald Trump, berates in harsh tones the federal judges Gorsuch extols.

The book is, like the justice himself, a study in contrasts. Folksy and self-deprecating, the court’s lone westerner came from Colorado in 2017 with rhetorical guns blazing, amply filling the late conservative Associate Justice Antonin Scalia’s seat on the bench. It took him only two terms to lead his colleagues in dissents.

At the same time, Gorsuch has made peace with the court’s liberals, often siding with Associate Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg in defense of the “little guy” being surveilled, accused, tried or convicted of a crime. 

RBG: ‘My work is what saved me’ during cancer treatment

More: After decade on Supreme Court, Sonia Sotomayor is most outspoken on bench and off

Gorsuch doesn’t offer solutions for all the problems he identifies in the book. But he expresses confidence that his judicial methodology – strictly following the words in the Constitution and federal laws rather than his preferred policies – is winning the day. It’s a method decried by many liberals as a means to produce conservative results, to which Gorsuch has a simple reply: “Rubbish!”

“We got this thing called a Constitution, right? And it starts with the three words, ‘We the People’ – not ‘We the judges,’ not ‘We in Washington,’ not ‘We nine old folks’ are going to rule the country,” he says.

Avoiding the headlines

Gorsuch’s nomination to the high court became headline news within days of Trump’s inauguration. His Senate confirmation ended a 14-month conflagration dating back to Scalia’s death and federal appeals court Judge Merrick Garland’s doomed nomination that divides Republicans and Democrats to this day

But his fellow conservative Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s contentious confirmation last year amid allegations of decades-old sexual misconduct pushed Gorsuch off the front page. Now the precarious medical condition of Ginsburg, who’s been treated this year for pancreatic and lung cancers, could portend an even more titanic battle for the seat of the court’s leading liberal.

Less attention is just fine by Gorsuch, who professes to be uncomfortable with the media blitz his book requires – though perhaps not with the $225,000 in royalties it produced before publication, according to his 2018 financial disclosure report. 

As he sees it, the public’s perception of the court as just another political branch of government is best combatted by a nose-to-the-grindstone approach to handling cases. Or as he puts it: “Do our job, stick to our lane, do the judge thing, do it really well, not answer your questions about headlines.”

More: Liberal groups seek to make Supreme Court an issue in 2020 presidential race, and conservatives exult

Those questions – duly unanswered – include any misgivings Gorsuch may have about Trump’s contribution to incivility. And early on in the book, he reprises a speech he gave to new citizens at a naturalization ceremony, which he calls “a reminder to us of the wonder of our country” even as the president seeks to curtail legal immigration.

Yet Gorsuch is anything but a go-along-to-get-along guy, as made clear by his expressed desire to fix what ails the nation’s justice system.

Most Americans can’t afford to hire a lawyer – “I couldn’t afford my own services when I was in private practice,” he writes – nor endure months or years of legal wrangling to reach trial. Too often, he says, defendants are forced to cut a deal with prosecutors or accept a judge’s ruling rather than face a jury of their peers.

In a span of seven weeks last term, Gorsuch dissented twice from the court’s refusal to hear Sixth Amendment challenges to criminal prosecutions. One involved evidence he said was not subjected to proper testing and cross-examination. The other involved a decision on restitution based on findings by a judge, not a jury. He was joined both times by Sotomayor, perhaps the court’s most liberal justice.

‘The Great Dissenter’

Adorning Gorsuch’s Supreme Court chambers is a portrait of Associate Justice John Marshall Harlan, the 19th century jurist known as “The Great Dissenter.” Harlan was the lone justice to dissent from the court’s ignominious 1896 decision in Plessy v. Ferguson, which upheld the “separate but equal” doctrine permitting segregation.

It’s the sort of courageous independence Gorsuch admires. He notes that his Colorado predecessor on the court, Associate Justice Byron White, for whom Gorsuch served as a law clerk a quarter century ago, dissented frequently from the court’s refusal to hear cases. A bust of White sits on the mantel below Harlan’s portrait.

Still, Gorsuch has been a reliable member of the court’s five-man conservative majority in major cases over the past two terms. Those include 5-4 decisions upholding Trump’s ban on travel from several majority-Muslim nations, barring public employee unions from collecting “fair share” fees from non-members, and removing federal courts from policing even the most extreme partisan election maps.

And when Chief Justice John Roberts joined the court’s four liberal justices to deny the Trump administration’s effort to add a question on citizenship to the 2020 census, Gorsuch joined the other conservatives in dissent.

More: Conservatives’ takeover of Supreme Court stalled by John Roberts-Brett Kavanaugh bromance

During the interview, however, he highlighted cases in which he sided with liberals or when the justices’ votes were jumbled beyond ideological explanation. In most years, he notes, about 40% of cases are decided unanimously.

“Get nine people to agree on where to go to lunch!” he dares his inquisitor. “It happens through collegiality and hard work and persuasion and thoughtfulness.”

His votes align most often with Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, the court’s most conservative member, but Gorsuch eschews labels. Ilya Shapiro of the Cato Institute cites his “libertarian streak.” Jonathan Adler of Case Western Reserve University School of Law says he’s “more willing to question precedent” than many of his colleagues.

Gorsuch’s self-examination is simpler. 

“What I’m doing is not my preference. I am trying to follow the law,” he says. “Nobody’s telling me what to do.”

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/09/08/supreme-court-justice-neil-gorsuch-justice-system-falling-short/2214805001/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

LSU jumps into top five of Amway Coaches Poll after win at Texas

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close LSU jumps into top five of Amway Coaches Poll after win at Texas

USA TODAY Sports’ Paul Myerberg breaks down the latest Amway Coaches Poll. USA TODAY

A couple of marquee results over the weekend produced minor shuffling in the Amway Coaches Poll, including one change in the top five.

Clemson strengthened its grip on the No. 1 spot, thanks to a convincing win against then-No. 11 Texas A&M. The Tigers received all but three first-place votes this week of the 63 ballots cast by coaches.

Second-ranked Alabama, which easily handled New Mexico State, claimed the remaining three first-place nods. No. 3 Georgia and No. 4 Oklahoma, each of whom took care of business against lesser opponents from the Football Championship Subdivision, also held their respective poll positions.

LSU, which put on an impressive aerial show at then-No. 9 Texas, edged into the No. 5 spot just ahead of Ohio State.  The Buckeyes put on a dominant performance themselves in blanking Cincinnati, but the Tigers received five more poll points.

TOP 25: The complete Amway Coaches Poll rankings after Week 2

The rest of the top 10 looks a bit different as well. Notre Dame, which had the weekend off, moved up to No. 7. Florida and Auburn claimed the next two spots as Michigan, which escaped Army in double overtime, fell to No. 10.

Auburn makes the biggest jump of the week, gaining four positions. Washington, the highest-ranked upset victim, took a nine-place hit from No. 12 to No. 21 after losing to Pac-12 opponent California on a last-minute field goal in the dead of night. Newcomers to the poll include No. 25 Maryland. The Terrapins are ranked for the first time since the final poll of the 2010 season after hanging 63 points on then-No. 22 Syracuse.

The Orange are among the week’s dropouts, along with Stanford and Nebraska. No. 23 Mississippi State and No. 24 Southern California also join the top 25.

Show Thumbnails
Show Captions

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Rep. Collins points out problems with Dems defining impeachment probe: ‘This is really pathetic’

Westlake Legal Group Doug-Collins-FOX Rep. Collins points out problems with Dems defining impeachment probe: 'This is really pathetic' Ronn Blitzer fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 77f7d374-deda-542b-bb2d-e3e9afd83e1d

Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee are looking to formally define what Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., has referred to as impeachment proceedings against President Trump, leading ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., to torch members for stumbling over themselves throughout the process.

Collins pointed out what he believes are problems with how Democrats have conducted their investigation, claiming that they have acted outside the boundaries of House rules and may have made misrepresentations in court filings.

DEMOCRATS PREPARE TO FORMALLY DEFINE IMPEACHMENT PROBE DESPITE PAST RESISTANCE FROM NANCY PELOSI

“They have portrayed themselves in just a terrible way over the last eight months and they keep digging their hole,” Collins told Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures.”

Democrats on the committee are planning on voting on how the investigation is defined, through a resolution that would set the boundaries of the probe, Politico reported. Collins stated that this is not the way that impeachment investigations are done.

“If they really want to do this, they have to bring impeachment to the floor,” he said, pointing to rules that call for the full House to vote on approving an impeachment investigation. “This is simply a show, a travesty, and frankly they should be ashamed.”

The Georgia Republican said that Democrats “can change committee rules as long as they don’t violate House rules.”

TULSI GABBARD SAYS TRUMP IMPEACHMENT WOULD ‘TEAR OUR COUNTRY APART’

It was early August when Nadler first told CNN that “formal impeachment proceedings” were taking place, at the same time that he filed a court petition for the disclosure of secret grand jury material from Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation. A court filing in a separate case over former White House counsel Don McGahn’s refusal to comply with a subpoena to testify indicated that an impeachment investigation had been underway since March. Other statements by various Democrats who called for an investigation led to confusion over whether such a probe had begun yet.

Collins brought up Democrats’ inconsistencies, and how the planned resolution to define a probe that they already claimed was taking place could lead to complications in legal battles.

“They claimed to the court … that they had proper procedures in place for grand jury material and sensitive material. They made a filing in court saying this happened. We made a letter to him saying ‘you don’t have this,’ now this resolution seems to be addressing that issue. I want to know if they’re going to go back to court and say, ‘Sorry judge we lied.’”

Several Democrats, however, had cited various sources for why they can conduct an impeachment investigation without a vote from the full House. A recent court filing from committee Democrats cited their impeachment power under Article I of the Constitution. An op-ed in the South Florida Sun-Sentinel by Rep. Ted Deutsche, D-Fla., claimed that while a House vote was needed in the past, broad committee powers that resulted from changes in 2015 allow them to move forward with an impeachment probe.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has yet to join her colleagues in giving full support for impeachment. Democratic presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, said in a new interview airing Sunday that she opposes an impeachment inquiry into President Trump because it would “tear our country apart.”

When asked if the persistent push toward impeachment was a result of Nadler being worried about leftist primary challenger Lindsey Boylan, Collins said, “It certainly appears that way,” given his recent behavior.

“He simply keeps taking a hard left,” Collins said.

Fox News’ Brie Stimson contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Doug-Collins-FOX Rep. Collins points out problems with Dems defining impeachment probe: 'This is really pathetic' Ronn Blitzer fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 77f7d374-deda-542b-bb2d-e3e9afd83e1d   Westlake Legal Group Doug-Collins-FOX Rep. Collins points out problems with Dems defining impeachment probe: 'This is really pathetic' Ronn Blitzer fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 77f7d374-deda-542b-bb2d-e3e9afd83e1d

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump needs to give Senate guidance on gun legislation, Blunt says

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083789865001_6083789053001-vs Trump needs to give Senate guidance on gun legislation, Blunt says fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc f0b94cc6-a73d-5ca6-84f6-f4d28fdb685b article Andrew O'Reilly

Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., said Sunday that he wants President Trump to let Senate leaders know what kind of gun control legislation he would be willing to sign.

Amid several mass shootings in recent months, Blunt said that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., won’t bring forth any legislation on gun control that Trump won’t put his signature on.

“The president needs to step up here and set some guidelines for what he would do,” Blunt said during an interview on NBC’s “Meet The Press.” “I’m afraid what’s going to happen here is what always happens, is we take this silly ‘if we don’t get everything, we won’t do anything.’”

NRA RIVALS SEE OPENING AS TURMOIL GRIPS NATION’S BIGGEST GUN RIGHTS GROUP

Gun control legislation has been a hotly debated topic for decades in Congress, but has recently taken on a new urgency in the wake of a number of mass shootings across the country. In August, back-to-back mass shootings in Texas and Ohio left at least 31 people dead just days after another gunman opened fire at a festival in California, killing four and injuring 13 others. Last weekend, another gunman in Texas killed seven people and wounded more than 20 in a rampage between the cities of Odessa and Midland.

Blunt said one area he thinks there is agreement on between Republicans and Democrats is finding a way to detect individuals with mental health issues and treat them earlier in the hopes of preventing more shootings.

“There’s a moment here where we can expand what we’re already doing on that front,” he said.

Authorities in Texas, however, said that despite failing a background check due to a mental health issue, the shooter in last weekend’s slayings, Seth Aaron Ator, was able to obtain a gun by purchasing the weapon he used through a private transaction.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Under federal law, private sales of firearms — such as between friends, relatives or even strangers — are not required to undergo a federal background check. Some 21 states plus Washington, D.C., have laws that require background checks on some private sales, but Texas isn’t one of them. Two other states — Maryland and Pennsylvania — require a background check for handguns but not long guns.

Blunt argued that any expansion of background checks was something that the president probably wouldn’t sign and thus off the table for the time being. Trump said earlier this year that he supported universal background checks, but has since walked back on the comment.

The Democratic-controlled House passed a universal background check bill in February, but the Republican-majority Senate has not called it to a vote.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083789865001_6083789053001-vs Trump needs to give Senate guidance on gun legislation, Blunt says fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc f0b94cc6-a73d-5ca6-84f6-f4d28fdb685b article Andrew O'Reilly   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083789865001_6083789053001-vs Trump needs to give Senate guidance on gun legislation, Blunt says fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc f0b94cc6-a73d-5ca6-84f6-f4d28fdb685b article Andrew O'Reilly

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Education Department rejected 99 percent of applicants for student loan forgiveness program

The U.S. Department of Education accepted just 1 percent of applicants in the first year of a revamped student loan forgiveness program, according to a government watchdog report.

The Temporary Expanded Public Service Loan Forgiveness program (TEPSLF) was funded by Congress in 2018 to help students who were having trouble qualifying for loan forgiveness.

It expanded upon the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program (PSLF), which was established in 2007 to forgive federal student loans for those who go to school and work in public service for at least 10 years. Borrowers in the program are expected to make 120 payments via specific repayment plans, among other requirements, according to a report by the Government Accountability Office.

INVESTIGATION UNDERWAY AFTER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT EMPLOYEE’S ‘FIGURINES AND PICTURES’ DAMAGED

Westlake Legal Group DeVos-Loans Education Department rejected 99 percent of applicants for student loan forgiveness program fox-news/us/education/dept-of-education fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 6fd9534d-160e-55d7-a181-db85f220feab

The U.S. Department of Education accepted just one percent of applications in the first year of a revamped student loan forgiveness program, according to a government watchdog report.  (iStock)

The report comes after the American Federation of Teachers sued Education Secretary Betsy DeVos over the Education Department’s handling of its student loan forgiveness program in July.

Congress had set aside $700 million in 2018 to temporarily expand the PSLF program with the goal to forgive the loans of students who didn’t initially qualify. Just $27 million of the amount has been used.

There were 54,184 applications completed between May 2018 and May 2019 for the TEPSLF program and only 661 were approved. Steps were “not clear to borrowers,” with many not aware they had to apply for the original PSLF program, even if they knew they didn’t qualify, according to the report.

A bulk of all applications — 71 percent– were considered ineligible for the program because they hadn’t submitted a PSLF application, with the report labeling the process as “confusing for borrowers.”

MIT MEDIA LAB DIRECTOR RESIGNS AFTER REPORT ON FINANCIAL TIES TO JEFFREY EPSTEIN

“As a result, some eligible borrowers may miss the opportunity to have their loans forgiven,” the report said.

Three percent of borrowers were denied because they had yet to make 120 payments, while 4 percent were denied because they had no qualifying federal loans.

What makes it difficult for borrowers is that some of the Department of Education’s key resources for students didn’t include information on the expanded program and they don’t require federal loan services to include TEPSLF information on their websites, according to the report. A Department of Education official did say they will have a new online portal this fall that could include a simplified application process, “if they had sufficient resources and time.”

Right now they don’t have any specific plans to do so.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Donald Trump recently signed an executive order on Aug. 21., forgiving all student loan debt for any permanently disabled U.S. military veteran.

Westlake Legal Group DeVos-Loans Education Department rejected 99 percent of applicants for student loan forgiveness program fox-news/us/education/dept-of-education fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 6fd9534d-160e-55d7-a181-db85f220feab   Westlake Legal Group DeVos-Loans Education Department rejected 99 percent of applicants for student loan forgiveness program fox-news/us/education/dept-of-education fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 6fd9534d-160e-55d7-a181-db85f220feab

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Actor Hosea Chanchez accuses college official of sex abuse

Actor Hosea Chanchez says a friend’s father sexually assaulted him in Alabama when he was 14 years old, identifying his abuser as a college administrator who later worked at a state university in Pennsylvania and faced accusations that he harassed and molested several male students.

Chanchez, who starred in BET’s long-running series “The Game,” described what he says happened to him in an Instagram post this week, writing that he decided to go public now “in hopes that my TRUTH helps to free someone else from guilt and shame at the hands of a predator, rapist, pedophile.”

The actor confirmed to The Associated Press on Friday that the Isaac Sanders he says assaulted him in the 1990s is the same man who worked at Pennsylvania’s East Stroudsburg University in the 2000s.

JUDGE ALLOWS CONSOLIDATION OF CHARGES AGAINST HARVEY WEINSTEIN

Sanders’ lawyer in Pennsylvania, Harry Coleman, told the AP on Wednesday that he had not spoken to his client about Chanchez. Coleman did not immediately respond to phone and email messages Friday. Two messages were left at a phone number associated with Sanders seeking comment on Chanchez’s accusation.

On Instagram, Chanchez, now 37, recounted an assault he said happened in Montgomery, Alabama, when he was around 14.

He said Sanders had been grooming him with explicit sexual banter. One day, he wrote, Sanders was giving him a ride home from his house when he detoured, pulled to the side of a dirt road and said he wanted to talk to Chanchez about his future.

“He worked at a university so he said he’s only looking out for me and my future. Then out of nowhere he said he wanted to see what the girls are going crazy over, then he reached over unzipped my pants and told me to trust him,” Chanchez wrote.

JAIL WHERE JEFFREY EPSTEIN DIED HAS HISTORY OF SECURITY BREACHES

Westlake Legal Group hosea-chanchez Actor Hosea Chanchez accuses college official of sex abuse fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc Associated Press article 66d0bb57-a7d2-52e6-9266-5f8755aeb8fa

This May 20, 2013 file photo shows actor Hosea Chanchez at the LA Premiere of “The Hangover: Part III” in Los Angeles. Chanchez says a friend’s father sexually assaulted him in Alabama when he was 14 years old. Chanchez, who starred in BET’s long-running series “The Game,” identifies his abuser as a college administrator who later worked at a state university in Pennsylvania and faced highly publicized accusations that he harassed and molested several male students. (AP)

OHIO TV METEOROLOGISTS FACES CHILD PORNOGRAPHY CHARGES

Chanchez wrote that Sanders performed oral sex on him. Afterward, he said, Sanders ordered him to keep quiet about it. “He told me he’s a very powerful man and if I’d ever told anyone he would ruin my life and no one would believe me anyways,” Chanchez wrote.

He said he buried the memory for decades.

“As a man, a black man, I always thought acknowledging this would make me less of a man. I was afraid to be judged, talked about, laughed at or even worse … not believed at all.”

The actor said Friday that he had not contemplated filing a police report in Alabama, but that he decided to speak out now in part to prevent Sanders from hurting anyone else: “No one will leave their kid around him now and say they didn’t know that he’s a pedophile.”

PLACIDO DOMINGO FACES MORE SEX MISCONDUCT CHARGES

The Associated Press does not typically name people who say they are the victims of sexual assault unless they identify themselves publicly, as Chanchez has done.

The case at East Stroudsburg University, a state-run university in the Pocono Mountains, involved college-age accusers.

There, the former students said Sanders used his high-powered job to offer them gifts, scholarships and campus jobs, then sexually harassed or assaulted them, including with forced oral sex. The students’ lawyer has portrayed Sanders, who is black, as a predator who targeted emotionally fragile black men from broken homes because he believed they would be less likely to report the abuse.

TEXAS MAN WHO SENT UNDERCOVER OFFICERS CHILD PORN SENTENCED TO 34 YEARS IN PRISON

JEFFREY EPSTEIN’S EXPLICIT, BIZARRE TASTE IN ART SEEN IN PALM BEACH RAID

The state’s investigation into Sanders, which led to his 2008 ouster from East Stroudsburg, found he “exercised exceedingly poor judgment toward” students and mishandled donor funds, according to his termination letter.

Sanders has never been charged with a crime and has always categorically denied sexually touching any of the men. A federal jury sided with the former university official in a 2014 lawsuit brought by the students.

Sanders, who faced a similar accusation of sexual misconduct when he worked at Stillman College in Alabama in the 1990s, filed a wrongful termination suit against the state of Pennsylvania last year. A federal judge dismissed it.

NORTH CAROLINA WOMAN ACCUSED OF TRAFFICKING THREE MINORS TO PAY FOR MAN’S JAIL BOND

The accusers in the East Stroudsburg case saw Chanchez’s post this week, said their attorney, Albert R. Murray Jr.

“They’re sick about this. They have to relive it all over again,” he said Friday.

Murray, a former federal prosecutor, has long accused Pennsylvania authorities of a cover-up in the Sanders case, saying Sanders was never subject to a proper criminal investigation.

Pennsylvania’s state university system — which is separate from Penn State University, whose former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was convicted of child sexual abuse — has consistently refused to release its investigative report on Sanders. A spokesman said Chanchez’s allegations have not changed its position.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Chanchez told the AP that he had been unaware of the Pennsylvania case but that he “figured that maybe I wasn’t the only one.”

Westlake Legal Group hosea-chanchez Actor Hosea Chanchez accuses college official of sex abuse fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc Associated Press article 66d0bb57-a7d2-52e6-9266-5f8755aeb8fa   Westlake Legal Group hosea-chanchez Actor Hosea Chanchez accuses college official of sex abuse fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc Associated Press article 66d0bb57-a7d2-52e6-9266-5f8755aeb8fa

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com