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BlackRock Will Put Climate Change at Center of Investment Strategy

Westlake Legal Group 14db-sorkin1-facebookJumbo BlackRock Will Put Climate Change at Center of Investment Strategy Stocks and Bonds Global Warming Fink, Laurence D Corporate Social Responsibility BlackRock Inc

Laurence D. Fink, the founder and chief executive of BlackRock, plans to announce Tuesday that his firm will make investment decisions with environmental sustainability as a core goal.

BlackRock is the largest in its field, with nearly $7 trillion under management, and this move will fundamentally shift its investing policy — and could reshape how corporate America does business and put pressure on other large money managers to follow suit.

Mr. Fink’s annual letter to the chief executives of the world’s largest companies is closely watched, and in the 2020 edition he said BlackRock would begin to exit certain investments that “present a high sustainability-related risk,” such as those in coal producers. His intent is to encourage every company, not just energy firms, to rethink their carbon footprints.

“Awareness is rapidly changing, and I believe we are on the edge of a fundamental reshaping of finance,” Mr. Fink wrote in the letter, which was obtained by The New York Times. “The evidence on climate risk is compelling investors to reassess core assumptions about modern finance.”

The firm, he wrote, would also introduce new funds that shun fossil fuel-oriented stocks, move more aggressively to vote against management teams that are not making progress on sustainability, and press companies to disclose plans “for operating under a scenario where the Paris Agreement’s goal of limiting global warming to less than two degrees is fully realized.”

Mr. Fink has not always been the first to address social issues, but his annual letter — such as his dictum two years ago that companies needed to have a purpose beyond profits — has the influence to change the conversations inside boardrooms around the globe.

And now Mr. Fink is sounding an alarm on a crisis that he believes is the most profound in his 40 years in finance. “Even if only a fraction of the science is right today, this is a much more structural, long-term crisis,” he wrote.

A longtime Democrat, Mr. Fink insisted in an interview that the decision was strictly business. “We are fiduciaries,” he said. “Politics isn’t part of this.”

BlackRock itself has come under criticism from both industry and environmental groups for being behind on pushing these issues. Just last month, a British hedge fund manager, Christopher Hohn, said that it was “appalling” of BlackRock not to require companies to disclose their sustainability efforts, and that the firm’s previous efforts had been “full of greenwash.”

Climate activists staged several protests outside BlackRock’s offices last year, and Mr. Fink himself has received letters from members of Congress urging more action on climate-related investing. According to Ceres and FundVotes, a unit of Morningstar, BlackRock had among the worst voting records on climate issues.

In recent years, many companies and investors have committed to focusing on the environmental impact of business, but none of the largest investors in the country have been willing to make it a central component of their investment strategy.

In that context, Mr. Fink’s move is a watershed — one that could spur a national conversation among financiers and policymakers. However, it’s also possible that some of the most ardent climate activists will see it as falling short.

Even so, the new approach may put pressure on the other large money managers and financial firms in the United States — Vanguard, T. Rowe Price and JPMorgan Chase, among them — to articulate more ambitious strategies around sustainability.

When 631 investors from around the world, representing some $37 trillion in assets, signed a letter last month calling on governments to step up their efforts against climate change, the biggest American firms were conspicuously absent.

BlackRock’s decision may give C.E.O.s license to change their own companies’ strategy and focus more on sustainability, even if doing so cuts into short-term profits. Such a shift could also provide cover for banks and other financial institutions that finance carbon-emitting businesses to change their own policies.

Had Mr. Fink moved a decade ago to pull BlackRock’s funds out of companies that contribute to climate change, his clients would have been well served. In the past 10 years, through Friday, companies in the S&P 500 energy sector had gained just 2 percent in total. In the same period, the broader S&P 500 nearly tripled.

In an interview, Mr. Fink said the decision developed from conversations with “business leaders and how they’re thinking about it, talking to different scientists, reading different research.” Mr. Fink asked BlackRock to research the economic impacts of climate change; it found that they are already appearing in a meaningful way in the form of higher insurance premiums, for fires and floods, and expects cities to have to pay more for their bonds.

Wherever he goes, he said, he is bombarded with climate questions from investors, often to the exclusion of issues that until recently were once considered more important. “Climate change is almost invariably the top issue that clients around the world raise with BlackRock,” he wrote in his letter.

He wrote that he anticipated a major shift, much sooner than many might imagine, in the way money will be allocated.

“This dynamic will accelerate as the next generation takes the helm of government and business,” he wrote. “As trillions of dollars shift to millennials over the next few decades, as they become C.E.O.s and C.I.O.s, as they become the policymakers and heads of state, they will further reshape the world’s approach to sustainability.”

While BlackRock makes its green push, the Trump administration is going in the opposite direction, repealing and weakening laws aimed at protecting the environment and promoting sustainability. Indeed, Mr. Fink’s effort appeared to be another example of the private sector pressing on issues that the White House has abandoned.

Still, Mr. Fink made plain that while he intends for the firm to consider climate risks, he would not pursue an across-the-board sale of energy companies that produce fossil fuels. Because of its shear size, BlackRock will remain one of the world’s largest investors in fossil-fuel companies.

“Despite recent rapid advances in technology, the science does not yet exist to replace many of today’s essential uses of hydrocarbons,” he wrote. “We need to be mindful of the economic, scientific, social and political realities of the energy transition.”

BlackRock manages money for countries across the globe as well as states and municipalities across the nation. It could face opposition for its new stance in areas that benefit from fossil fuels, like countries in the Middle East or states where oil has become a significant part of their economies.

Mr. Fink said that because much of the money BlackRock manages is invested in passive index funds like those that track the S&P 500, the firm was unable to simply sell shares in companies that it felt were not focused on sustainability. But he did say that the firm could do so in what are known as “actively managed funds,” in which BlackRock can choose which stocks are included.

BlackRock also plans to offer new passive funds — including target-date funds that are based on a person’s age and are meant to be used to prepare for retirement — that will not include fossil fuel companies. Investors will be able to choose these instead of more traditional funds. To the extent that fossil fuel companies are in an index, BlackRock plans to push them to consider their eventual transition to renewable energy. Mr. Fink said the company would vote against them if they are not moving fast enough.

“We will be increasingly disposed to vote against management and board directors when companies are not making sufficient progress on sustainability-related disclosures and the business practices and plans underlying them,” he wrote.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Russians Reportedly Hacked Ukrainian Firm At Center Of Trump Impeachment Scandal

BOSTON (AP) — A U.S. cybersecurity company says Russian military agents have successfully hacked the Ukrainian gas company at the center of the scandal that led to President Donald Trump’s impeachment.

Russian agents launched a phishing campaign in early November to steal the login credentials of employees of Burisma Holdings, the gas company, according to Area 1 Security, a Silicon Valley company that specializes in e-mail security.

Hunter Biden, son of former U.S. vice president and Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden, previously served on Burisma’s board.

Westlake Legal Group 5e1d77332100006000af8ccb Russians Reportedly Hacked Ukrainian Firm At Center Of Trump Impeachment Scandal

spyarm via Getty Images Russian hackers from the same military intelligence unit that Area 1 said was behind the operation targeting Burisma have been indicted for hacking emails from the Democratic National Committee and the chairman of Hillary Clinton’s campaign during the 2016 presidential race.  

It was not clear what the hackers were looking for or may have obtained, said Area 1′s CEO, Oren Falkowitz, who called the findings “incontrovertible” and posted an eight-page report. But the timing of the operation suggests that the Russian agents could be searching for material that damaging to the Bidens.

The House of Representatives impeached Trump in December for abusing the power of his office by enlisting the Ukrainian government to investigate Biden, a political rival, ahead of the 2020 election. A second charge accused Trump of obstructing a congressional investigation into the matter.

“Our report doesn’t make any claims as to what the intent of the hackers were, what they might have been looking for, what they are going to do with their success. We just point out that this is a campaign that’s going on,” said Falkowitz, a former National Security Agency offensive hacker whose company’s clients include candidates for U.S. federal elected offices. In an earlier interview, he told The Associated Press that top candidates for the U.S. presidency and House and Senate races in 2020 have in the past few months each been targeted by about a thousand phishing emails.

Falkowitz did not name the candidates. Nor would he name any clients.

Russian hackers from the same military intelligence unit that Area 1 said was behind the operation targeting Burisma have been indicted for hacking emails from the Democratic National Committee and the chairman of Hillary Clinton’s campaign during the 2016 presidential race.

Stolen emails were released online at the time by Russian agents and WikiLeaks in an effort to favor Trump, special counsel Robert Mueller determined in his investigation.

Area 1 discovered the phishing campaign by the Russian military intelligence unit, known as the GRU, on New Year’s Eve, said Falkowitz, who would not discuss whom he notified prior to going public. He said he followed the industry standard process of responsible disclosure, which would include notifying Burisma.

In the report, he said the GRU agents used fake, lookalike domains in the phishing campaign that were designed to mimic the sites of real Burisma subsidiaries.

Falkowitz said the operation targeting Burisma involved tactics, techniques and procedures that GRU agents had used repeatedly in other phishing operations, matching “several patterns that lots of independent researchers agree mimic this particular Russian actor.” Area 1 says it has been tracking the Russian agents for several years.

The discovery’s timing — just weeks before presidential primaries begin in the United States — highlights the need to protect political campaigns from targeted phishing attacks, which are behind 95 percent of all information breaches, said Falkowitz.

“This is a real specific, timely case that has real implications,” he said. “To discover it and potentially get out in front of it is a significant departure from what’s typical in the cyber security community, where someone just tells you, yeah, you’re dead.”

In phishing, an attacker uses a targeted email to lure a target to a fake site that resembles a familiar one. There, unwitting victims enter their usernames and passwords, which the hackers then harvest. Phished credentials allow attackers both to rifle through a victim’s stored email and masquerade as that person.

Area 1 said its researchers connected the phishing campaign targeting Burisma to an effort earlier last year that targeted Kvartal 95, a media organiza tion founded by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy.

In this case, the Russian military agents, from a group security researchers call “Fancy Bear,” peppered Burisma employees with emails designed to look like internal messages.

In order to detect phishing attacks, Area 1 maintains a global network of sensors designed to sniff out and block them before they reach their targets.

In July, the U.S. Federal Elections Commission gave Area 1 permission to offer its services to candidates for federal elected office and political committees at the same low rates it charges non-profits.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Is the press finally ready to take Bernie Sanders seriously?

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6119992480001_6119998199001-vs Is the press finally ready to take Bernie Sanders seriously? Howard Kurtz fox-news/politics fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc article 67c806b4-d975-5df9-b431-5c665e29153f

Elizabeth Warren began sinking when the media belatedly pressed her on supporting a “Medicare-forAll” bill that would abolish private insurance for 150 million Americans.

But Bernie Sanders, who wrote the damn bill, emerged unscathed. Even when he candidly said middle-class taxes would rise, his momentum continued unabated.

The reason, in a replay of 2016, is that the press never really saw Sanders as a threat to win the Democratic nomination. He’s never gotten the kind of tough media scrutiny that other candidates—say, Joe Biden—routinely draw when they’re riding high in the polls. Bernie has been covered more as an entertaining ideologue, an eccentric uncle, a Larry David character, than a potential president.

SOME ON THE RIGHT DISSENTING FROM TRUMP’S APPROACH TO IRAN

That may be starting to change.

When Sanders led the Des Moines Register’s Iowa poll last week for the first time—never mind he was at 20, Warren at 17, Pete Buttigieg at 16 and Biden at 15—there was some collective head-slapping among the pundits and the pols. A nationally known Republican told me Bernie is crushing it even in more conservative areas of California. You could hear the murmurs growing louder: Could Sanders win this thing?

“Sanders Surges as Progressives Flock to Him Over Warren,” Politico reported yesterday.

But what will the Sanders candidacy look like if journalists start fully reporting on the implications of his democratic socialism? Or on all the controversial comments since his days as mayor of Burlington, including about Cuba and the Soviet Union? That could be a game-changer.

Look, you’ve got to give Bernie credit for raising almost $100 million last year, without big donors, and for bouncing back from an October heart attack. The 78-year-old senator has staying power and an incredibly loyal base. But he hasn’t really been tested by the media.

Bret Stephens, the conservative New York Times columnist and Never Trumper, is no fan of Sanders. But he wrote over the weekend that Bernie can win not only the nomination but the White House.

The prevailing view, says Stephens, is that “Sanders’s support has a hard ceiling: It may be intense, but it’s also cultlike and off-putting. Too many Americans know enough about socialism to want a president who wears the term proudly (even if he insists it’s of a more benign variety). He embraces nearly all of the same policies, like Medicare for all, that raised Elizabeth Warren high in the polls but are now dragging her down.”

SUBSCRIBE TO HOWIE’S MEDIA BUZZMETER PODCAST, A RIFF OF THE DAY’S HOTTEST STORIES

Then comes the comparison to a former New York real estate developer.

“As with Sanders, Trump was seen as being way outside his party’s mainstream: a protectionist in a party of free traders; an isolationist in a party of interventionists; a libertine in a party of moralists. As with Sanders, Trump barely belonged to the party whose nomination he sought. As with Sanders, Trump’s message was that he was fighting a ‘rigged system.’”

Now it gets interesting. There’s a left-right convergence between Bernie and Donald in certain areas, from opposition to endless wars to disdain for the party elites.

“Depth of conviction? Check. Contempt for conventional norms? Check. Opposed by all the right people? Check. Running against a ‘crooked’ opponent? Check. Commitment to drastic change? Check. Like Trump, too, he isn’t so much campaigning for office as he is leading a movement. People who join movements aren’t persuaded. They’re converted. Their depth of belief is motivating and infectious.”

The president, taking note of the shifting dynamics, yesterday jumped on a minor spat in which the Sanders camp is saying Warren mainly appeals to better educated and wealthier voters.

Trump tweeted: “Bernie Sanders’ volunteers are trashing Elizabeth ‘Pocahontas’ Warren. Everybody knows her campaign is dead and want her potential voters. Mini Mike B is also trying, but getting tiny crowds which are all leaving fast. Elizabeth is very angry at Bernie. Do I see a feud brewing?” [Typos corrected.]

The Politico piece is pegged to Sanders’ endorsement by several liberal organizations, “as well as three lawmakers in the so-called ‘Squad’ and liberal-minded labor unions…Sanders’ team has argued that he is working to expand the electorate by bringing out unlikely voters and non-voters, particularly those who are young and working-class.” I suppose the AOC factor shouldn’t be underestimated in a Democratic primary.

But here’s the real sign of respect: Sunday’s Washington Post front-pager titled “How Bernie Sanders Would Upend America’s Global Role.”

Among other things, Sanders has refused to call Venezuelan strongman Nicolas Maduro a dictator; has called Benjamin Netanyahu a “racist”; has campaigned with congressional supporters of the boycott-Israel movement, and said China has done more to address extreme poverty “than any country in the history of civilization.”

“Sanders has been accused by members of both parties of not being tough enough on repressive socialist regimes,” the Post says.

But the candidate tells voters that he was against “the two major foreign policy blunders in our lifetimes…I marched against the war in Vietnam. I was a kid. As a United States congressman in 2002, 2003, I helped lead the effort to prevent us from invading Iraq.”

This is the first major news story of the season to envision what a Sanders administration would actually look like.

We can all play the game of predicting what would happen if Sanders wins Iowa and does well in New Hampshire, and how he would fare in states (starting with South Carolina) that have large black populations. We can all wonder if he would inherit most of Warren’s voters if she fades and whether that would eclipse Biden’s support.

But until the press actually takes a hard look at how a socialistic President Sanders would govern, and we see how he responds, this is all preseason jousting.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6119992480001_6119998199001-vs Is the press finally ready to take Bernie Sanders seriously? Howard Kurtz fox-news/politics fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc article 67c806b4-d975-5df9-b431-5c665e29153f   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6119992480001_6119998199001-vs Is the press finally ready to take Bernie Sanders seriously? Howard Kurtz fox-news/politics fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc article 67c806b4-d975-5df9-b431-5c665e29153f

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

BlackRock Will Put Climate Change at Center of Investment Strategy

Westlake Legal Group 14db-sorkin1-facebookJumbo BlackRock Will Put Climate Change at Center of Investment Strategy Stocks and Bonds Global Warming Fink, Laurence D Corporate Social Responsibility BlackRock Inc

Laurence D. Fink, the founder and chief executive of BlackRock, plans to announce Tuesday that his firm will make investment decisions with environmental sustainability as a core goal.

BlackRock is the largest in its field, with nearly $7 trillion under management, and this move will fundamentally shift its investing policy — and could reshape how corporate America does business and put pressure on other large money managers to follow suit.

Mr. Fink’s annual letter to the chief executives of the world’s largest companies is closely watched, and in the 2020 edition he said BlackRock would begin to exit certain investments that “present a high sustainability-related risk,” such as those in coal producers. His intent is to encourage every company, not just energy firms, to rethink their carbon footprints.

“Awareness is rapidly changing, and I believe we are on the edge of a fundamental reshaping of finance,” Mr. Fink wrote in the letter, which was obtained by The New York Times. “The evidence on climate risk is compelling investors to reassess core assumptions about modern finance.”

The firm, he wrote, would also introduce new funds that shun fossil fuel-oriented stocks, move more aggressively to vote against management teams that are not making progress on sustainability, and press companies to disclose plans “for operating under a scenario where the Paris Agreement’s goal of limiting global warming to less than two degrees is fully realized.”

Mr. Fink has not always been the first to address social issues, but his annual letter — such as his dictum two years ago that companies needed to have a purpose beyond profits — has the influence to change the conversations inside boardrooms around the globe.

And now Mr. Fink is sounding an alarm on a crisis that he believes is the most profound in his 40 years in finance. “Even if only a fraction of the science is right today, this is a much more structural, long-term crisis,” he wrote.

A longtime Democrat, Mr. Fink insisted in an interview that the decision was strictly business. “We are fiduciaries,” he said. “Politics isn’t part of this.”

BlackRock itself has come under criticism from both industry and environmental groups for being behind on pushing these issues. Just last month, a British hedge fund manager, Christopher Hohn, said that it was “appalling” of BlackRock not to require companies to disclose their sustainability efforts, and that the firm’s previous efforts had been “full of greenwash.”

Climate activists staged several protests outside BlackRock’s offices last year, and Mr. Fink himself has received letters from members of Congress urging more action on climate-related investing. According to Ceres and FundVotes, a unit of Morningstar, BlackRock had among the worst voting records on climate issues.

In recent years, many companies and investors have committed to focusing on the environmental impact of business, but none of the largest investors in the country have been willing to make it a central component of their investment strategy.

In that context, Mr. Fink’s move is a watershed — one that could spur a national conversation among financiers and policymakers. However, it’s also possible that some of the most ardent climate activists will see it as falling short.

Even so, the new approach may put pressure on the other large money managers and financial firms in the United States — Vanguard, T. Rowe Price and JPMorgan Chase, among them — to articulate more ambitious strategies around sustainability.

When 631 investors from around the world, representing some $37 trillion in assets, signed a letter last month calling on governments to step up their efforts against climate change, the biggest American firms were conspicuously absent.

BlackRock’s decision may give C.E.O.s license to change their own companies’ strategy and focus more on sustainability, even if doing so cuts into short-term profits. Such a shift could also provide cover for banks and other financial institutions that finance carbon-emitting businesses to change their own policies.

Had Mr. Fink moved a decade ago to pull BlackRock’s funds out of companies that contribute to climate change, his clients would have been well served. In the past 10 years, through Friday, companies in the S&P 500 energy sector had gained just 2 percent in total. In the same period, the broader S&P 500 nearly tripled.

In an interview, Mr. Fink said the decision developed from conversations with “business leaders and how they’re thinking about it, talking to different scientists, reading different research.” Mr. Fink asked BlackRock to research the economic impacts of climate change; it found that they are already appearing in a meaningful way in the form of higher insurance premiums, for fires and floods, and expects cities to have to pay more for their bonds.

Wherever he goes, he said, he is bombarded with climate questions from investors, often to the exclusion of issues that until recently were once considered more important. “Climate change is almost invariably the top issue that clients around the world raise with BlackRock,” he wrote in his letter.

He wrote that he anticipated a major shift, much sooner than many might imagine, in the way money will be allocated.

“This dynamic will accelerate as the next generation takes the helm of government and business,” he wrote. “As trillions of dollars shift to millennials over the next few decades, as they become C.E.O.s and C.I.O.s, as they become the policymakers and heads of state, they will further reshape the world’s approach to sustainability.”

While BlackRock makes its green push, the Trump administration is going in the opposite direction, repealing and weakening laws aimed at protecting the environment and promoting sustainability. Indeed, Mr. Fink’s effort appeared to be another example of the private sector pressing on issues that the White House has abandoned.

Still, Mr. Fink made plain that while he intends for the firm to consider climate risks, he would not pursue an across-the-board sale of energy companies that produce fossil fuels. Because of its shear size, BlackRock will remain one of the world’s largest investors in fossil-fuel companies.

“Despite recent rapid advances in technology, the science does not yet exist to replace many of today’s essential uses of hydrocarbons,” he wrote. “We need to be mindful of the economic, scientific, social and political realities of the energy transition.”

BlackRock manages money for countries across the globe as well as states and municipalities across the nation. It could face opposition for its new stance in areas that benefit from fossil fuels, like countries in the Middle East or states where oil has become a significant part of their economies.

Mr. Fink said that because much of the money BlackRock manages is invested in passive index funds like those that track the S&P 500, the firm was unable to simply sell shares in companies that it felt were not focused on sustainability. But he did say that the firm could do so in what are known as “actively managed funds,” in which BlackRock can choose which stocks are included.

BlackRock also plans to offer new passive funds — including target-date funds that are based on a person’s age and are meant to be used to prepare for retirement — that will not include fossil fuel companies. Investors will be able to choose these instead of more traditional funds. To the extent that fossil fuel companies are in an index, BlackRock plans to push them to consider their eventual transition to renewable energy. Mr. Fink said the company would vote against them if they are not moving fast enough.

“We will be increasingly disposed to vote against management and board directors when companies are not making sufficient progress on sustainability-related disclosures and the business practices and plans underlying them,” he wrote.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

CES 2020: virtual reality, artificial intelligence and a small glimpse of the future

Flying taxis, virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and even a new energy drink were among the products that graced the convention floor at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES).

You can find yourself spending hours walking the seemingly endless halls filled with the latest technology propelling the world into the future. And, while it’s virtually impossible to see everything that CES has to offer, below are just a few items that caught the eye of Fox News.

SEGWAY S-POD 

Instead of standing, the Segway S-Pod takes comfort one step further by allowing the user to sit, shifting their center of gravity for a smooth ride that is eerily reminiscent of the hover chairs in the popular Pixar movie, “Wall-E.”

Westlake Legal Group IMG_8500 CES 2020: virtual reality, artificial intelligence and a small glimpse of the future fox-news/tech/topics/computers fox-news/tech/technologies/robots fox-news/tech/technologies fox-news/auto/make/hyundai fox-news/auto fox news fnc/tech fnc d4344532-ec43-5b9d-9bde-aa321f4eb625 Benjamin Brown article

The S-Pod can reach up to 24 mph. (Ben Brown / Fox News)

“It is the first-class transporting pod designed for everybody. So, we are envisioning this as part of the future of this smart city,” Jeff Wu, marketing and growth lead at Segway told Fox News. “We can see it in enclosed campuses, in our shopping malls and the airport, for example.”

After the chair finds its center of gravity, the user can glide around up to 24 miles per hour navigating with a simple joystick. The S-pod can travel up to 43 miles on a single charge.

Wu said the inspiration behind the design came from the gyro sphere featured in the 2015 “Jurassic World” movie starring Chris Pratt, telling Fox News it “really feels like they are flying, levitating when they are navigating” the S-Pod.

There is currently no price point set for the S-pod but it will be available for consumers in 2021.

“Starting off it will definitely be more of private use in enclosed campuses, but essentially in the future, maybe, you know, for the rideshare pickup, people will be able to use their cell phone to call something like a Segway as part to pick them up to complete a transportation from A to B,” Wu told Fox News, adding that there is more exciting news to come soon.

HACHI INFINITE

Forget lugging that bulky computer around.

Westlake Legal Group IMG_8505 CES 2020: virtual reality, artificial intelligence and a small glimpse of the future fox-news/tech/topics/computers fox-news/tech/technologies/robots fox-news/tech/technologies fox-news/auto/make/hyundai fox-news/auto fox news fnc/tech fnc d4344532-ec43-5b9d-9bde-aa321f4eb625 Benjamin Brown article

The Hachi Infinite can turn any flat surface into a computer. (Ben Brown / Fox News)

The Hachi Infinite can turn any flat surface into a fully-interactive touch screen computer, equipped with web-browsing, Microsoft Word and Excel.

“It has built-in Android OS 9.0 … It’s a computer. It works just like a tablet or your phone on any flat surface,” Hannah Wilkinson, marketing for Hachi told Fox News. “You can use Microsoft Word, you can use YouTube, you can search the Internet, you can play Candy Crush, you can do anything on this — anything you could do on a computer or your phone.”

It essentially looks like a portable mini projector and has brightness sensors so it can be used indoors and outdoors, even on a sunny day.

 In addition to functioning like a computer, the device can flip on its other side to be used as the ultimate movie viewing experience with a 120 inch HD display and an ultra-short throw DLP built-in,” Wilkinson said.

The Hachi Infinite also has built-in artificial intelligence capabilities, including the ability to identify foods and offer up unique dinner recipes centered around that identified item.

“There’s already three A.I. functionalities built right into it —  So, it can recognize objects and uses deep learning algorithms. There’s a variety of learning experiences for children, cooking experiences — it can recognize any kind of fruit or vegetable in front of it and tell you the nutritional information, tell you recipes you can use with it,” Wilkinson said, adding that “Hachi is developing a number of apps that work with A.I. functionalities.”

COKE ENERGY

An energy drink that tastes like your favorite soda … no wonder it made it onto the CES floor.

Westlake Legal Group IMG_8446 CES 2020: virtual reality, artificial intelligence and a small glimpse of the future fox-news/tech/topics/computers fox-news/tech/technologies/robots fox-news/tech/technologies fox-news/auto/make/hyundai fox-news/auto fox news fnc/tech fnc d4344532-ec43-5b9d-9bde-aa321f4eb625 Benjamin Brown article

Coca-Cola Energy hits shelves on January 20th. (Ben Brown / Fox News)

Coca-Cola is trying to shake-up the buzzing energy drink market with its own tasty concoction. No longer does one have to choose between an energy drink or a soda to provide that much-needed caffeine boost throughout the day, because Coca-Cola has come up with the solution – Coca-Cola Energy.

“Coca-Cola has always looked at a consumer-focused approach to innovation, and as we learned about consumers and what they were looking for in the US, we learned that they love Coca-Cola. They love the uplift of Coke,” Jaideep Kive, vice president for Coca-Cola trademark in the United States told Fox News. “But there are moments in their day when they want that extra boost, but they want it in a way that’s familiar and approachable —  and that’s how Coke Energy was born.”

The new beverage unveiled at this year’s CES comes in four flavors:  Coca-Cola Energy, Coca-Cola Energy Zero, Coca-Cola Energy Cherry and Coca-Cola Energy Cherry Zero.

A regular Coke is about 34 grams of caffeine, but the recipe for this [Coca-Cola Energy} is like that of an energy drink. So it does have 114 grams of caffeine. It has Guarana and it has B vitamins,” Kive said. “So, it’s comparable to all the leading energy drinks, but it has the familiar and approachable taste of Coca-Cola, which people know and love.”

Coke partnered with Amazon’s Alexa to create an interactive booth that allowed CES attendees to get some of the first sips of the new energy drink that is set to hit the market on January 20th.

“Coca-Cola has always been at the forefront of innovation. Our choices have always been driven not by ourselves, but by what our consumers were looking for,” Kive said. “And when you look at the energy category around the world, and most especially in the U.S., there’s a lot of growth, there’s a lot of need thanks to our modern-day lifestyles for that extra boost and an extra kick.”

CYBERSHOES

While companies have made great strides in virtual reality gaming, there are limitations to how truly “interactive” the experience can be when you’re confined certain amount of space – whether you’re playing inside an apartment or at an arcade.

Westlake Legal Group IMG_8520 CES 2020: virtual reality, artificial intelligence and a small glimpse of the future fox-news/tech/topics/computers fox-news/tech/technologies/robots fox-news/tech/technologies fox-news/auto/make/hyundai fox-news/auto fox news fnc/tech fnc d4344532-ec43-5b9d-9bde-aa321f4eb625 Benjamin Brown article

Cybershoes allows users to run and walk-in virtual reality games. (Ben Brown / Fox News)

Cybershoes might just be the first step into figuring out a solution to adding another layer into immersing the user into the game.

For about $360 gamers can purchase the Cybershoes Gaming Station, which includes the shoes along with a cyberchair and cybercarpet.

The Cybershoes strap on over your normal footwear and have a wheel attached to the bottom allowing the user to sit in the cyberchair and mimic walking/running while remaining sit. The motions then translate into the game and voila! no more stationary gaming – and it is actually quite the workout!

HYUNDAI S-A1 FLYING TAXI

Traffic jams and flat tires might soon be a thing of the past, as Hyundai and Uber Elevate are teaming up to offer a new way to travel.

Hyundai unveiled its full-scale concept Urban Mobility Vehicle dubbed the S-A1, which essentially looks like a souped-up helicopter that Uber will use for its flying taxi service.

“This is a game-changer for the aerospace industry because historically production rates have been fairly low in aviation. When you bring the capabilities of an automaker to this sector, it creates an opportunity for scale as it relates to the production and that can make sure that technology gets in the hands of more people around the world,” Wyatt Smith, head of business development of Uber Elevate told Fox News.

Uber Air would work similarly to how Uber operates now – with a push of a button a car would pick you up and take you to a Skyport where an Urban Air Mobility (UAM) vehicle is waiting to fly you to the next hub most proximate to your destination. The passenger will then hop in another car that will take them the rest of the way.

The S-A1 would just be one component of the urban air mobility ecosystem connecting the whole network together to allow passengers to get from point A to B.

While this might all sound farfetched and lightyears away, both Hyundai and Uber expect the next form of consumer transportation to hit the market within the next decade.

TRUMEDIC’S $5,500 MASSAGE CHAIR

TruMedic’s InstaShiatsu+ Massage Chairs can be found in celebrity homes like the Kardashians, but it’ll cost you a pretty penny.

Westlake Legal Group IMG_8475 CES 2020: virtual reality, artificial intelligence and a small glimpse of the future fox-news/tech/topics/computers fox-news/tech/technologies/robots fox-news/tech/technologies fox-news/auto/make/hyundai fox-news/auto fox news fnc/tech fnc d4344532-ec43-5b9d-9bde-aa321f4eb625 Benjamin Brown article

TruMedic’s InstaShiatsu+ Massage Chairs range in price from a few hundred dollars up to $5,500. (Ben Brown / Fox News)

If you have a few thousand dollars and want to be pampered like a celebrity, the full-body massage chair will do the trick – from your arms to your waist to your neck and shoulders, this chair does it all. However, there are less expensive options that don’t come with as many bells and whistles.

Prices range from as low as $400 to as high as $5,500.

In addition to the massage chairs, truMedic offers a cheaper but just as effective option dubbed the MagicHands truShiatsu Neck and Back Massager which has deep-kneading massage nodes that act like a human “thumb” to help penetrate sore muscles or offer an effective pre-workout warmup. The Magichands retail for $299.95 and is a favorite among celebrities like Hailey Bieber, Lily Aldridge, Joan Smalls, Winnie Harlow.

Westlake Legal Group IMG_8470 CES 2020: virtual reality, artificial intelligence and a small glimpse of the future fox-news/tech/topics/computers fox-news/tech/technologies/robots fox-news/tech/technologies fox-news/auto/make/hyundai fox-news/auto fox news fnc/tech fnc d4344532-ec43-5b9d-9bde-aa321f4eb625 Benjamin Brown article

MagicHands truShiatsu Neck and Back was selected for Oprah’s Favorite Things in December 2019. (Ben Brown / Fox News)

MagicHands was also selected for Oprah’s Favorite Things in December 2019.

“We’re pioneering the category of ‘Intelligent Wellness,’ and in doing so, truMedic is creating a world beyond relief,” Russell Izzo, truMedic CEO said. “With our newest innovations, consumers will experience amazing new designs with cutting edge form and functionality that deliver ultimate relaxation and recovery in the comfort of their homes and on-the-go. We spent years delighting customers with our quality and commitment to this category and we are excited to be leading its evolution into the next decade.”

Westlake Legal Group IMG_8422 CES 2020: virtual reality, artificial intelligence and a small glimpse of the future fox-news/tech/topics/computers fox-news/tech/technologies/robots fox-news/tech/technologies fox-news/auto/make/hyundai fox-news/auto fox news fnc/tech fnc d4344532-ec43-5b9d-9bde-aa321f4eb625 Benjamin Brown article   Westlake Legal Group IMG_8422 CES 2020: virtual reality, artificial intelligence and a small glimpse of the future fox-news/tech/topics/computers fox-news/tech/technologies/robots fox-news/tech/technologies fox-news/auto/make/hyundai fox-news/auto fox news fnc/tech fnc d4344532-ec43-5b9d-9bde-aa321f4eb625 Benjamin Brown article

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Lawyer for Jeffery Epstein cellmate calls for hearing on lost video

The lawyer for Jeffrey Epstein‘s former cellmate is calling for an immediate probe into why the prison video on that night of Epstein’s first suicide attempt was destroyed, according to a letter filed on Monday in New York to Judge Kenneth K. Karas.

The video would have recorded the hallway outside the cell around the time of the attempt.

Bruce Barket, the attorney for the accused killer Nicholas Tartaglione, told the judge he wants a “prompt evidentiary hearing to ascertain circumstances surrounding the government’s failure to preserve the video surveillance footage at Metropolitan Correctional Center (MCC).”

The video would have shed more light on the alleged attempt which occurred between the late hours of July 22 and early morning hours of July 23 last year, he says.

SURVEILLANCE VIDEO OF EPSTEIN CELL ON NIGHT OF 1ST ALLEGED SUICIDE ATTEMPT DELETED, ‘TECHNICAL ERRORS’ BLAMED

Epstein was later found in his jail cell on July 23 with a bedsheet around his neck. The facility placed him on temporary suicide watch, prosecutors say. Earlier this month they revealed to the court that the video had been deleted due to “technical errors.”

Westlake Legal Group AP20009804971668 Lawyer for Jeffery Epstein cellmate calls for hearing on lost video fox-news/us fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 3353b1c7-000b-5ab4-935d-24d87e9f6adb

Federal prosecutors said Thursday that jailhouse video no longer exists of the area around Jeffrey Epstein’s jail cell on a day he survived an apparent suicide attempt. (New York State Sex Offender Registry via AP, File)

“The MCC inadvertently preserved video from the wrong tier within the MCC, and, as a result, video from outside the defendant’s cell… no longer exists,” prosecutors wrote, according to Fox News.

“Accordingly, we ask that the Court conduct a hearing to determine (1) how the video was destroyed, who was responsible for its destruction, and why it was not preserved; (2) whether there are any witnesses who reviewed the video footage prior to its destruction who can describe what they observed, and, in turn, preserve at least some the video’s exculpatory value; and (3) whether and to what extent the destruction of the video was deliberate or reckless, and whether there was any bad faith on the part of the Government in connection with the video’s destruction,” Barket added.

JEFFREY EPSTEIN CASE: JUDGE WILL NOT GRANT PUBLIC ACCESS TO DOCUMENTS INVOLVING ALLEGED MADAM GHISLAINE MAXWELL

Barket says his team has reviewed letters filed by the government to explain why the video no longer exists, but they believe the explanation is “inadequate” because it is “non-specific, unsworn and untested.”

He added the government hasn’t provided a name of “a single individual” responsible for the video’s loss, according to the letter filed on Monday.

Tartaglione is facing the death penalty after he was accused of a quadruple homicide, according to Fox News. His lawyers have been seeking the video evidence at the time of Epstein’s alleged suicide in anticipation of the death penalty phase of the trial if Tartaglione is convicted — hoping it would reduce the severity of his crimes for a jury deciding his fate, the letter said.

Barket says the video footage would have shown efforts made by Tartaglione to alert BOP staff that Epstein was in distress.

“In sum, evidence that Mr. Tartaglione, in an institutional setting, demonstrated concern for the life of his cellmate, took steps to aid a fellow inmate in distress, and summoned staff for assistance, is a factor that, in a jury’s mind, may weigh against the imposition of the death penalty,” he said, according to the letter.

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“The video footage is mitigating evidence that Mr. Tartaglione, should he be convicted, would have had a due process and Eighth Amendment right to present. Accordingly, sworn witness testimony explaining the apparent loss of this evidence is necessary and appropriate.”

Fox News’ Bryan Llenas contributed to the report

Westlake Legal Group AP20009804971668 Lawyer for Jeffery Epstein cellmate calls for hearing on lost video fox-news/us fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 3353b1c7-000b-5ab4-935d-24d87e9f6adb   Westlake Legal Group AP20009804971668 Lawyer for Jeffery Epstein cellmate calls for hearing on lost video fox-news/us fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 3353b1c7-000b-5ab4-935d-24d87e9f6adb

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Trump’s Supporters See U.S. Victory in China Trade Deal

Westlake Legal Group merlin_166902132_c0c9b3d9-c225-42b1-be91-4353afde4aca-facebookJumbo Trump’s Supporters See U.S. Victory in China Trade Deal United States Economy Trump, Donald J Presidential Election of 2020 International Trade and World Market Factories and Manufacturing Customs (Tariff) Agriculture and Farming

TOLEDO, Ohio — President Trump’s supporters nodded approvingly last week as Mr. Trump extolled the “big, beautiful monster” of a trade deal that he will sign with China on Wednesday.

The enthusiastic group, gathered at Toledo’s Huntington Center, nodded again as Mr. Trump insisted that America’s farmers, who have been hurt by the trade war with China, were winners and as he asserted, incorrectly, that American importers were not paying for the tariffs.

“And now the deal is done,” Mr. Trump said.

The packed arena roared triumphantly.

On Wednesday, Mr. Trump will sign an initial trade agreement with Beijing that will help cool tensions between the world’s two largest economies but leaves many of the biggest issues unresolved. Key details of the agreement remain murky, the text remains under wraps and more complicated matters, like China’s financial support for companies that compete with American firms, have been pushed until after the 2020 election.

But to Mr. Trump’s most faithful backers, the president took on China and scored a major win.

“Instead of giving all the money to China, now we’re going to get some of it back,” said Kim Lewis, 65, a corn and soybean farmer from Jamestown, Ind., who drove four hours to see Mr. Trump’s speech. “He had the guts to stand up to these other countries.”

The optimism surrounding the outcome of the negotiations reflects the deep trust that Mr. Trump’s supporters have in a president who promised to stop China from “ripping off” the United States and has declared victory in rewriting the terms of trade.

Mr. Trump’s public selling of the deal, along with his rosy views about the American economy, have transcended any downside of his economic policies. Support for Mr. Trump and his trade deal remain strong in places like Ohio, where economic growth and manufacturing employment shows signs of slowing.

National employment data released Friday showed that 12,000 factory jobs were shed in December. Manufacturing employment has been slumping in the industrial Midwest in the last year amid the lingering trade war. Employment in the state’s goods-producing industries decreased by 10,100 from November 2018 to November 2019, according to the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services.

For those devoted enough to Mr. Trump to brave frigid weather and long lines to attend a midweek campaign rally, any responsibility for economic malaise was directed elsewhere.

“Tariffs aren’t the answer, but Trump’s back was put up against the wall,” said Timothy Pedro, the Republican mayor of Waterville, Ohio, who noted that businesses in his town had been holding back investment as a result of trade uncertainty. “He had to do something.”

At the Toledo rally, Mr. Trump steered clear of specifics about the trade agreement, focusing on the promise that it will be enforced with the threat of more tariffs and the commitment he received from China to increase its purchases of American farm products to $50 billion a year — nearly double what it bought at the 2012 peak.

Critics of the deal have said it is unrealistic that China will ramp up its farm purchases so quickly. And they argue that Mr. Trump chose political expediency by settling for an interim agreement that would calm markets amid his re-election campaign but do little to resolve the administration’s biggest concerns about China’s unfair economic practices.

To Mr. Trump’s most ardent backers, however, the piecemeal approach was yet another sign of the president’s deal-making prowess.

“You can’t get everything at one time,” said Jeff Colwell, 54, a car parts manufacturer who lives near Columbus. “Anything we can do to equalize trade with China is a good thing.”

In agreeing to the deal last month, Mr. Trump reduced tariffs he had placed on $360 billion of Chinese goods and opted against taxing another $160 billion of imports. China agreed to enforce stronger protections for American intellectual property, open its markets to American financial institutions and commit to greater transparency surrounding the management of its currency.

The agreement provides Mr. Trump with a policy win to hail, but it also deprives him of a useful foil to rail against. China-bashing is a well-worn tradition for Republicans and Democrats in election years. Former Presidents Bill Clinton and Barack Obama both criticized their predecessors for coddling China despite its human rights abuses and unfair trade practices during their campaigns in 1992 and 2008. As the Republican candidate in 2012, Mitt Romney assailed Mr. Obama for allowing China’s theft of American intellectual property to flourish under his watch.

Mr. Trump has made being tough on China one of his hallmarks and has spent much of his first term assailing it as an enemy and threatening to tax all of its imports. But polling that showed his tariffs were wearing thin on his base and a desire to score a policy victory ahead of the election spurred him to strike an interim deal.

Michael Pillsbury, a China scholar at the Hudson Institute who advises Mr. Trump, said that Mr. Trump’s campaign advisers have realized that the president’s supporters are less concerned about China’s record of human rights abuses or fears that it is an existential threat and more interested in having greater access to its market. He said that Mr. Trump appears to be shifting his tone on China away from the caustic rhetoric used by Stephen K. Bannon, his former chief strategist, in favor of an argument that shows how the president succeeded in “opening up” China.

“The concern of the base about China is not the demonization of China; the concern is the ripped-off jobs and lost trade opportunities, the money part of it,” said Mr. Pillsbury.

Democrats have largely struggled to settle on a forceful critique of Mr. Trump’s China strategy, accusing him of settling for a weak deal and warning that China may ultimately ignore the agreement.

Still, supporters of the president appear ready to blame China, rather than Mr. Trump, if the deal does not hold.

Randy Rothenbuhler, who owns a corn and soybean farm 45 minutes south of Toledo, said that his soybeans had been piling up in bins for the last year because of Chinese retaliation. He is hopeful that the new agreement will mean the reopening of China’s market, but he will remain skeptical until he sees it happen.

“That’s the billion-dollar question, will China live up to its promise?” Mr. Rothenbuhler, 42, said. “We’ll have to wait and see.”

Although Mr. Trump might have to shift away from lashing out at China in the wake of the agreement, he appears likely to make the case that he alone could have struck such a deal and that no one else can hold China to its word.

“They’re going to do what he wants them to do,” said Michelle Sellati, a forklift driver from Lima, Ohio. “If China just works with Trump, they’ll benefit, too.”

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CNN’s Chris Cuomo rips Trump for ‘pathetic’ Schumer-Pelosi tweet: ‘He has nothing else to offer’

CNN anchor Chris Cuomo blasted President Trump over his “pathetic” retweet of a photoshopped image depicting House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer in traditional Muslim attire with a backdrop of the Iranian flag.

“This wasn’t just anti-Muslim, it was anti-American again,” Cuomo said, before handing over CNN’s programming to his primetime colleague Don Lemon.

“It really is sad, don’t you think? Lemon later asked.

“Yeah, I think it’s pathetic,” Cuomo replied. “He has to be this way, Don. He will not win if he is not this way. He has nothing else to offer. He doesn’t have anything that captures the imagination of a hopeful America. He’s not a bridge builder.”

CNN’S DON LEMON ENCOURAGES ‘SHAMING’ OF REPUBLICANS, CALLS THEM ‘PARTY OF HYPOCRISY’

Westlake Legal Group Chris-Cuomo-1 CNN's Chris Cuomo rips Trump for 'pathetic' Schumer-Pelosi tweet: 'He has nothing else to offer' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 4fffcec4-7fbc-5bcd-a985-c7d54a6d64a4

LATE NIGHT WITH SETH MEYERS — Episode 867 — Pictured: (l-r) CNN’s Chris Cuomo during an interview with host Seth Meyers on August 1, 2019 — (Photo by: Lloyd Bishop/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images via Getty Images)

“What do you mean?” Lemon interrupted. “He has no couth? He has no dignity?”

“No, I don’t have to insult him,” Cuomo continued. “It’s just what he is. He has to have people upset. He has to be an agent for their animous or he can’t win.”

Lemon insisted he wasn’t trying to “insult” the president and that he was simply telling the “truth,” quickly suggesting that Trump “doesn’t have class.”

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“Either way, what I’m saying is this is what works for him,” Cuomo elaborated. “Saying, ‘You know what, Don Lemon? I appreciate what you’re saying and I don’t disagree with you, but you have every right to say it and I wish you well.’ Nope, doesn’t work. Why? It keeps people, ‘I’m not sure, I’m not sure which way I want to go.’ If I say, ‘Don Lemon, you said to me, you are the worst. And people like you, Don Lemon, you are the enemy.’ Now, what am I playing to? Am I playing to race? Am I playing to identity? Am I playing to media? Am I playing institutions? He doesn’t know. He just knows it’s good for him, Don. The more angry for the most reasons- best for him.”

The “Cuomo Prime Time” host added that he made a “bet” to Trump that the president “can’t go a week without lying about a material fact, denying something that you are responsible for, or defying a norm to keep people apart.”

Fox News’ Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group Chris-Cuomo-1 CNN's Chris Cuomo rips Trump for 'pathetic' Schumer-Pelosi tweet: 'He has nothing else to offer' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 4fffcec4-7fbc-5bcd-a985-c7d54a6d64a4   Westlake Legal Group Chris-Cuomo-1 CNN's Chris Cuomo rips Trump for 'pathetic' Schumer-Pelosi tweet: 'He has nothing else to offer' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 4fffcec4-7fbc-5bcd-a985-c7d54a6d64a4

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CNN’s Chris Cuomo rips Trump for ‘pathetic’ Schumer-Pelosi tweet: ‘He has nothing else to offer’

CNN anchor Chris Cuomo blasted President Trump over his “pathetic” retweet of a photoshopped image depicting House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer in traditional Muslim attire with a backdrop of the Iranian flag.

“This wasn’t just anti-Muslim, it was anti-American again,” Cuomo said, before handing over CNN’s programming to his primetime colleague Don Lemon.

“It really is sad, don’t you think? Lemon later asked.

“Yeah, I think it’s pathetic,” Cuomo replied. “He has to be this way, Don. He will not win if he is not this way. He has nothing else to offer. He doesn’t have anything that captures the imagination of a hopeful America. He’s not a bridge builder.”

CNN’S DON LEMON ENCOURAGES ‘SHAMING’ OF REPUBLICANS, CALLS THEM ‘PARTY OF HYPOCRISY’

Westlake Legal Group Chris-Cuomo-1 CNN's Chris Cuomo rips Trump for 'pathetic' Schumer-Pelosi tweet: 'He has nothing else to offer' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 4fffcec4-7fbc-5bcd-a985-c7d54a6d64a4

LATE NIGHT WITH SETH MEYERS — Episode 867 — Pictured: (l-r) CNN’s Chris Cuomo during an interview with host Seth Meyers on August 1, 2019 — (Photo by: Lloyd Bishop/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images via Getty Images)

“What do you mean?” Lemon interrupted. “He has no couth? He has no dignity?”

“No, I don’t have to insult him,” Cuomo continued. “It’s just what he is. He has to have people upset. He has to be an agent for their animous or he can’t win.”

Lemon insisted he wasn’t trying to “insult” the president and that he was simply telling the “truth,” quickly suggesting that Trump “doesn’t have class.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Either way, what I’m saying is this is what works for him,” Cuomo elaborated. “Saying, ‘You know what, Don Lemon? I appreciate what you’re saying and I don’t disagree with you, but you have every right to say it and I wish you well.’ Nope, doesn’t work. Why? It keeps people, ‘I’m not sure, I’m not sure which way I want to go.’ If I say, ‘Don Lemon, you said to me, you are the worst. And people like you, Don Lemon, you are the enemy.’ Now, what am I playing to? Am I playing to race? Am I playing to identity? Am I playing to media? Am I playing institutions? He doesn’t know. He just knows it’s good for him, Don. The more angry for the most reasons- best for him.”

The “Cuomo Prime Time” host added that he made a “bet” to Trump that the president “can’t go a week without lying about a material fact, denying something that you are responsible for, or defying a norm to keep people apart.”

Fox News’ Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group Chris-Cuomo-1 CNN's Chris Cuomo rips Trump for 'pathetic' Schumer-Pelosi tweet: 'He has nothing else to offer' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 4fffcec4-7fbc-5bcd-a985-c7d54a6d64a4   Westlake Legal Group Chris-Cuomo-1 CNN's Chris Cuomo rips Trump for 'pathetic' Schumer-Pelosi tweet: 'He has nothing else to offer' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 4fffcec4-7fbc-5bcd-a985-c7d54a6d64a4

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LSU’s Joe Burrow points to finger after TD pass, says he knew his ring size before game

Westlake Legal Group Joe-Burrow12 LSU's Joe Burrow points to finger after TD pass, says he knew his ring size before game Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/ncaa/lsu-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa/college-football-bowl-season fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/person/joe-burrow fox news fnc/sports fnc article 046ac7d6-3307-5067-83a5-1a8aa5f66bfc

LSU quarterback Joe Burrow had an incredible national-championship performance Monday night against Clemson.

Burrow finished with 463 passing yards and five touchdown passes in the game. He also had a rushing touchdown to add to the stat line. After one of his touchdown passes, Burrow was pointing to his finger to signify that he put the national tile game away and was ready for his championship ring.

LSU DEFEATS CLEMSON FOR COLLEGE FOOTBALL NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP

Naturally, ESPN’s Maria Taylor asked Burrow about the small celebration and if he knew what his ring size was already.

“Ten-and-a-half,” Burrow said smiling when Taylor asked him in the question. “We already got fitted for ‘em.”

LSU’S JOE BURROW BREAKS SINGLE-SEASON PASSING TOUCHDOWN RECORD DURING NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP GAME

Burrow and the Tigers defeated Clemson 42-25 to win their first title since the 2007 season. The national championship is just another piece of hardware the LSU star will add to his collection this season.

Burrow was awarded the Offensive Player of the Game for his performance in the title game and the Heisman Trophy for his incredible performance overall during the season. He also received the Maxwell Award as the best all-around college football player in the nation and the Walter Camp Award as the college football player of the year.

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Burrow is likely going to turn pro and experts believe he will the No. 1 pick come April. The Cincinnati Bengals have the top pick.

Westlake Legal Group Joe-Burrow12 LSU's Joe Burrow points to finger after TD pass, says he knew his ring size before game Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/ncaa/lsu-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa/college-football-bowl-season fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/person/joe-burrow fox news fnc/sports fnc article 046ac7d6-3307-5067-83a5-1a8aa5f66bfc   Westlake Legal Group Joe-Burrow12 LSU's Joe Burrow points to finger after TD pass, says he knew his ring size before game Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/ncaa/lsu-tigers fox-news/sports/ncaa/college-football-bowl-season fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/person/joe-burrow fox news fnc/sports fnc article 046ac7d6-3307-5067-83a5-1a8aa5f66bfc

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