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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 116)

Bloomy beset

Westlake Legal Group image Bloomy beset fox-news/columns/fox-news-halftime-report fox news fnc/politics fnc Chris Stirewalt article 5bde105d-f4cf-50e8-bc36-f97efbf0e8e5

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On the roster: Bloomy beset – Big turnout, big headaches in Nevada so far – Trump revs up Florida voters at Daytona – How Stella got her mixtape back

BLOOMY BESET
NYT: “For the past two months, [Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s] presidential campaign has been lining up endorsements and expanding its reach across the country with an eye toward the moment it knew would come: when Mr. Bloomberg, the 78-year-old multibillionaire, would no longer be an afterthought in the race but a prime target, and his long record – including policy stances and decades worth of impolitic and insensitive remarks  would face renewed scrutiny. … Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden said in an interview on NBC’s ‘Meet the Press’ on Sunday, ‘Sixty billion dollars can buy you a lot of advertising, but it can’t erase your record.’ And he appeared relieved that the scrutiny had shifted from him to Mr. Bloomberg. ‘You all are going to start focusing on him like you have on me,’ Mr. Biden said.”

Returns fire – AP: “With the Nevada caucuses less than a week away, Democratic presidential candidates campaigning were fixated on a rival who wasn’t contesting the state. Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden, Amy KlobucharElizabeth Warren and Pete Buttigieg all went after billionaire Mike Bloomberg and made clear they were eager to take him on in a debate. ‘He thinks he can buy this election,’ Sanders told a Carson City rally Sunday. ‘Well, I’ve got news for Mr. Bloomberg – the American people are sick and tired of billionaires buying elections!’ Bloomberg hit back Monday with a video mashup posted to Twitter of aggressive and threatening comments made by people who appear to be Sanders supporters, juxtaposed with Sanders calling for ‘civil discourse.’”

Bernie, Trump campaigns plow Bloomy over farmer talk – Fox News: “Joining the Distinguished Speakers Series at the University of Oxford Saïd Business School [in 2016], Bloomberg was responding to a question about whether it is possible to unite people in middle America and the coasts. One of the issues standing in the way of that, Bloomberg said, was the inability of blue-collar workers to adapt to the information economy even if they have their education subsidized. ‘The agrarian society lasted 3,000 years and we could teach processes. I could teach anybody, even people in this room, no offense intended, to be a farmer,’ Bloomberg said. ‘It’s a process. You dig a hole, you put a seed in, you put dirt on top, add water, up comes the corn. You could learn that. Then we had 300 years of the industrial society. You put the piece of metal on the lathe, you turn the crank in the direction of the arrow and you can have a job. And we created a lot of jobs. At one point, 98 percent of the world worked in agriculture, now it’s 2 percent in the United States.’”

Tough call for mainstream Dems – Axios: “Do these Democrats benefit strategically if Sanders leads the attacks on Bloomberg and takes the brunt of his return fire? Or must they amp up their own criticisms of Bloomberg to increase their chances of peeling away some of his supporters? … The biggest threat to him is a sustained assault on his record not by Sanders, who comes from the other end of the party, but from the more moderate alternatives. Each day they wait, Bloomberg grows stronger. Each day he grows stronger, his case for being the electable one strengthens.”

Steyer says he’s a different kind of billionaire – Fox News: “Billionaire Tom Steyer failed to generate much momentum after the Democrats’ early contests in Iowa and New Hampshire, but he’s poised for better results in Nevada and South Carolina and he credits that to more than just money. Steyer has pumped over $200 million into his campaign, but he has also been on the ground in those states. According to a RealClearPolitics average, Steyer has been polling fourth in Nevada and third in South Carolina, both ahead of the Iowa winner, former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg. Steyer said he wanted to finish in at least second place in those states. ‘I’ve spent more time in Nevada than any other candidate, and I’ve spent more time in South Carolina than any other candidate,’ Steyer told ABC News’ ‘This Week’ on Sunday. … Steyer noted that he was doing well among minority voters in those states, particularly African-American and Latino voters.”

BIG TURNOUT, BIG HEADACHES IN NEVADA SO FAR
Nevada Independent: “The line of Democrats at Sierra Vista High School Saturday morning snaked through the cafeteria, across the quad, out the front gate and to the parking lot. For some who had hoped to quickly cast their early ballots for the Democratic presidential caucus and get on with their weekend, it was frustrating. Others took it in stride. They got to know their neighbors in line. They munched on pizza delivered to the early voting site to feed hungry caucusgoers. They reveled in the fact that so many Democrats were so dedicated to participating in the political process that they stood in line for hours just to cast their presidential preferences early ahead of the state’s Feb. 22 caucus. …More than 11,800 Democrats turned out to cast their presidential preferences on the first of four days of early voting at 63 sites across Nevada, according to the Nevada State Democratic Party.”

Campaigns anxious – WaPo: “With the Nevada caucuses days away, campaign officials and Democratic activists are increasingly alarmed that they might prove a debacle as damaging as the vote in Iowa, further setting back the party in its urgent effort to coalesce around a nominee to take on President Trump. Campaigns said they still have not gotten the party to offer even a basic explanation of how key parts of the process will work. Volunteers are reporting problems with the technology that’s been deployed at the last minute to make the vote count smoother. And experts are raising serious questions about a tool the party has been feverishly assembling to replace the one scrapped after the meltdown in Iowa. … Adding to the challenge is the complexity of Nevada’s caucuses. Unlike in Iowa, where caucuses are conducted in one evening, Nevadans have the option of voting early. At sites across the state, Democrats can rank their top presidential choices on a paper ballot.”

Unions threaten Bernie’s momentum – Fox News: “The criticism from the unions, which are dominant forces in the state’s two major urban areas of Las Vegas and Reno, have created doubts about Sanders’ ability to carry the momentum his campaign has built following Iowa and New Hampshire into Nevada and beyond. While Nevada may not be traditionally thought of as a union state like Michigan, Illinois or New York, unions – particularly those representing workers at the big casinos, hotels and restaurants in Las Vegas and Reno – are potent political forces in the Silver State. And given that Census data shows that nearly three-quarters of the state’s population lives in Clark County – home to Las Vegas – it’s not surprising that the candidates who get the union backing are generally those who end up carrying the state.”

Klobuchar fundraising ramps up – CBS News: “Senator Amy Klobuchar has raked in $12 million in donations in the wake of her breakout performance during the last Democratic debate, she revealed Sunday, a haul that allows her to devote more resources to the states who will vote on Super Tuesday. ‘We’re building up our staff all over the country in the Super Tuesday states because finally I’ve gotten the resources I need, over $12 million just in a little over a week since the New Hampshire debate,’ Klobuchar said during an interview on ‘Face the Nation.’ Klobuchar’s strong performance during the last debate, which took place just before last week’s New Hampshire primary, was widely heralded and helped her finish third in the contest, behind Bernie Sanders and Pete Buttigieg. … The Minnesota senator is now in Nevada ahead of its caucuses Saturday and said she is ‘very excited’ about her chances in the state.”

THE RULEBOOK: YOU AND YOUR STUFF
“Government is instituted no less for protection of the property, than of the persons, of individuals. The one as well as the other, therefore, may be considered as represented by those who are charged with the government.” – Alexander Hamilton or James MadisonFederalist No. 54

TIME OUT: ‘FONDLY DO WE HOPE, FERVENTLY DO WE PRAY’
WSJ: “When Abraham Lincoln was elected president in 1860, he was certainly not thought of as a man given to religious fervor. But over the next 4½ years, as hundreds of thousands of Americans died in the Civil War, the 16th president evolved into a theologian of the American idea, using the language and concepts of the Bible to reflect on the war’s larger meaning. This year on Presidents Day, Americans will observe the 211th anniversary of Lincoln’s birth. But in an age of declining biblical literacy, we are in danger of losing touch with a key source of his greatness. Why, for instance, did Lincoln begin the Gettysburg Address with the words ‘fourscore and seven years ago?’ It isn’t because he usually spoke that way, as many readers of the speech might now assume. Rather, he knew that his audience was deeply familiar with the King James Bible and would recognize the language of the Psalms… The Bible’s influence on Lincoln’s language can be seen even before he took office.”

Flag on the play? – Email us at HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM with your tips, comments or questions.

SCOREBOARD
ESTIMATED DELEGATES FOR DEMOCRATIC NOMINATION
Buttigieg: 23
Sanders: 21
Warren: 8
Klobuchar: 7
Biden: 6
[Ed. note: 1,991 delegates needed to win]

TRUMP JOB PERFORMANCE 
Average approval: 44 percent
Average disapproval: 51.4 percent
Net Score: -7.4 percent
Change from one week ago: ↓ 1.4 points
[Average includes: Monmouth University: 44% approve – 51% disapprove; Quinnipiac University: 43% approve – 53% disapprove; NBC News/WSJ: 46% approve – 51% disapprove; CBS News: 43% approve – 51% disapprove; IBD: 44% approve – 51% disapprove.]

WANT MORE HALFTIME REPORT? 
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TRUMP REVVS UP FLORIDA VOTERS AT DAYTONA
NYT: “President Trump put his showmanship skills on full display on Sunday at the Daytona International Speedway, leading the famous stock car drivers in a lap around the 2.5-mile racetrack. A sold-out crowd of 101,500 people cheered his appearance in a state he must win this year to secure re-election. Serving as the grand marshal for the kickoff race of the NASCAR season, which was ultimately interrupted and then postponed because of rain, Mr. Trump arrived at the packed stands after a rare Air Force One flyover and later rounded the track in his limousine, nicknamed The Beast, to raucous cheers from the crowd. Shortly after the president told drivers to ‘start your engines,’ Air Force Thunderbirds roared overhead.”

PLAY-BY-PLAY
Virginia lawmakers nix gun ban – AP

Dems claim GOP meddling in North Carolina Senate primary – Politico

AUDIBLE: VEGAS, BABY!
“It feels like the [Nevada state party is] making it up as they go along,” – A Democratic campaign staffer complaining to the WaPo about the seeming haphazardness of preparations for the Nevada Caucus.

FROM THE BLEACHERS
“Why is it that ‘suddenly’ all the issues the squad and the rest of the candidates have pushed like Medicare for all, free tuition, climate revolution, etc. are too radical? Are the Democrats just now realizing the America heartland does not want radical change, open borders, sanctuary cities? While many Americans don’t agree with [President Trump’s] style of tone and messaging the vast majority seem to agree with his actual policies. What are your thoughts?” – Bob Baker, Brownsville, Texas

[Ed. note: Have you ever watched a triathlon? Competitors swim 2.4 miles, bike 112 miles and then run a traditional 26.2-mile marathon. The great runners would seem to have an advantage here, but they can’t fall too far behind in the water or on the bicycle. But if they go too hard at the start, they won’t have enough when it’s time for the final leg of their eight-hour ordeals. Presidential campaigns are like that. A bunch of Democrats jumped in the water and thrashed about wildly trying to get into the early lead. That meant embracing what they wrongly believed were the positions that would bring the party’s base to their side. Most of them never made it back to dry land. But it certainly generated a great deal of activity and news coverage. Now they’re in the middle leg having cleared out a lot of the posers. Who’s still got steady legs when they start the stretch run? Keep watching to see who can pace themselves properly.]

“I heard Tucker Carlson say over 3 presidential campaigns Joe Biden has yet to score better than a fourth place in any state caucus or primary tally. Is that correct?” – Joe Guyton, San Antonio

[Ed. note: Yes, but Biden hasn’t really faced voters very often. He withdrew from his first presidential campaign in the fall of 1987, months before the first contests of 1988. So he did not finish better than fourth place, but he didn’t finish worse than fourth place either. When he mounted his long-shot candidacy in 2008, Biden staked his campaign on Iowa and did indeed finish fifth, and dropped out immediately after. So coming into this year, Biden had competed in one nominating contest in his life and had come in fifth. He finished fourth in Iowa and fifth in New Hampshire this year, so he’s still under the line. He’s 0-3 in nominating contests in his career so far.]

“I very much enjoy reading the Halftime Report, particularly when it includes your own commentary, a lethal mix of the insightful and playful.  But if I may trouble you with a slight niggle from your Catholic brethren:  in your commentary on February 14th (‘In Defense of Valentine’s Day,’) your otherwise historically legitimate description of Saint Valentine’s life and death refers to Valentine as a ‘pastor.’ In its most generic sense, you might try to argue that he was indeed a pastor, but Valentine and those who turned to him for spiritual guidance and succor would have referred to him as a ‘priest’ or ‘bishop’ (or Saint!) May God bless you and your team for your spirited defense of all that is good about America (and may your heart-shaped boxes be ever full of chocolate and good cheer!)” – Bill MadiganRichmond, Va.

[Ed. note: Brother Madigan, I wish they had an eye roll emoji on this keyboard! But I certainly send my prayers for you and your family in return along with much gratitude for your readership and support.] 

Share your color commentary: Email us at HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM and please make sure to include your name and hometown.

HOW STELLA GOT HER MIXTAPE BACK
UPI: “Stella Wedell said she vacationing with her family in Spain in the early 1990s, when she was only 12 years old, when she lost her mixtape. She said the tape was lost in Empuriabrava or on the Spanish island of Mallorca. Wedell said she was visiting the Fotografiska gallery in Stockholm more than 20 years later when she spotted the water-damaged tape and a track list. British artist and photographer Mandy Barker, whose Sea of Artifacts exhibition was about plastic pollution, said the tape washed up in 2017 on the beach at Playa de Barlovento de Jandia on Fuerteventura, a Spanish island off the coast of Africa. The island is about 1,200 miles from where Wedell believes she lost the recording. Barker said she enlisted the help of a professional audio restorer, who was able to list the tracks, which included songs by ShaggyBob Marley and the Wailers, the Pet Shop Boys, Soul Asylum and multiple Disney songs.”

AND NOW, A WORD FROM CHARLES…
“Guilt gives way now to fear.” – Charles Krauthammer (1950-2018) writing in Time magazine on June 21, 2005.

Chris Stirewalt is the politics editor for Fox News. Brianna McClelland contributed to this report. Want FOX News Halftime Report in your inbox every day? Sign up here.

Westlake Legal Group image Bloomy beset fox-news/columns/fox-news-halftime-report fox news fnc/politics fnc Chris Stirewalt article 5bde105d-f4cf-50e8-bc36-f97efbf0e8e5   Westlake Legal Group image Bloomy beset fox-news/columns/fox-news-halftime-report fox news fnc/politics fnc Chris Stirewalt article 5bde105d-f4cf-50e8-bc36-f97efbf0e8e5

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Justin Timberlake recalls dodging bottles of urine from hostile crowd while performing with The Rolling Stones

Justin Timberlake recalled a disastrous charity concert in 2003 where the crowd threw bottles of urine at him on stage.

The 39-year-old singer appeared on “The Graham Norton Show” recently where the host asked him about the performance, where Timberlake sang with The Rolling Stones at an event to raise money for SARS recovery in Toronto, Canada. The benefit concert also included acts like AC/DC, The Guess Who and Rush, with Timberlake singing pop tunes to a rock music-loving crowd.

The star noted that he had a bad feeling about the event prior to going on stage, but committed to the performance all the same.

Westlake Legal Group JustinTimberlake3 Justin Timberlake recalls dodging bottles of urine from hostile crowd while performing with The Rolling Stones Tyler McCarthy fox-news/person/justin-timberlake fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc f1a5247b-8f71-5ce8-84eb-8cbbb09ec676 article

Justin Timberlake talked about a time when he had to dodge bottles of urine while performing on stage with The Rolling Stones.  (KMazur/WireImage)

JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE, JESSICA BIEL’S MARRIAGE IS IN BETTER PLACE AFTER ALISHA WAINWRIGHT SCANDAL: REPORT

“I remember saying to the band before we went on stage, ‘I don’t think this is going to go well,’” he told the host. “But little did I know, I had no idea how bad it was going to go.”

Timberlake explained that the audience was not only hostile but prepared.

“We came on stage and all of a sudden from the first two rows of probably, I think this festival housed half a million people, so that was crazy,” he explained. “But all of a sudden, bottles of urine were then thrown on the stage… It wasn’t always good times for me, you guys.”

He joked: “I still have… I still have a lot of trauma from this incident.”

Timberlake went on to note that the benefit’s leadership gave him the opportunity to get off stage after the first song. However, he refused.

JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE SUPPORTS JESSICA BIEL FOLLOWING SCANDAL WITH HIS CO-STAR ALISHA WAINWRIGHT

“I was like, ‘No man, I’m staying out here, we’re doing this!’”

Unfortunately, the star didn’t consider that the second song might be more treacherous for him than the first.

“At the first song, I was at the mic and moving around and singing at the same time. I was kind of impressed with myself,” he said. “Then the second song was ‘Senorita … I play a Rhodes electric piano on that song. So then, all of a sudden I’m thinking, ‘Oh no, I’m immobile!’”

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Timberlake ended the harrowing account saying: “After that song either one of two things happened: Either they ran out of nerve because they knew I was going to stay there, or they ran out of urine so … kids … be tenacious!”

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1149746602 Justin Timberlake recalls dodging bottles of urine from hostile crowd while performing with The Rolling Stones Tyler McCarthy fox-news/person/justin-timberlake fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc f1a5247b-8f71-5ce8-84eb-8cbbb09ec676 article   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1149746602 Justin Timberlake recalls dodging bottles of urine from hostile crowd while performing with The Rolling Stones Tyler McCarthy fox-news/person/justin-timberlake fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc f1a5247b-8f71-5ce8-84eb-8cbbb09ec676 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Former ‘Bachelor’ contestant Jubilee Sharpe arrested for DUI: report

Jubilee Sharpe, who appeared as a contestant on Ben Higgins’ season of “The Bachelor,” was arrested on Sunday.

According to TMZ, she was arrested for DUI in West Palm Beach, Fla., but was released on her own recognizance.

The 29-year-old competed on Season 20 of “The Bachelor” and was eliminated in Week 5. She was brought back as a cast member for the 3rd season of “Bachelor in Paradise” and was eliminated in Week 1.

‘BACHELOR’ CONTESTANT VICTORIA FULLER APOLOGIZES FOR ‘WHITE LIVES MATTER’ CLOTHING SCANDAL

She later returned again for the 5th season of “Bachelor in Paradise.”

Westlake Legal Group Jubilee-Sharpe Former 'Bachelor' contestant Jubilee Sharpe arrested for DUI: report Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/the-bachelor fox-news/entertainment/genres/reality fox-news/entertainment/events/arrest fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 56ee19de-cd0f-541e-a64f-2621595a51bc

Jubilee Sharpe (West Palm Beach Police Department )

Sharpe’s backstory was tragic when she revealed that her entire biological family in Haiti had died. “I told Ben the story of my family, but I left out the biggest part,” she told People magazine after getting eliminated.

‘EMPIRE’ ACTRESS AMANDA DETMER ARRESTED FOR DUI: REPORT

“My three brothers and my parents died, but I don’t know the details. I was 6, but I don’t remember my parents. My 4-year-old little sister and I went to live with my grandmother but she had leprosy and was dying and too sick to take care of us. So she put me and my little sister in an orphanage,” Sharpe explained.

“My dad came to Haiti to do relief work and he showed up to the orphanage and [wanted to adopt me]. He tried to adopt my sister, but after they went through the medical process, they found out she had an incurable disease and wasn’t able to be adopted.”

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Sharpe said she tried to find her sister but wasn’t successful.

“The person who did my adoption told me she was probably dead,” she said. “That’s where my guilt had come from.”

Her occupation on the show was listed as an Army veteran.

Westlake Legal Group Jubilee-Sharpe Former 'Bachelor' contestant Jubilee Sharpe arrested for DUI: report Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/the-bachelor fox-news/entertainment/genres/reality fox-news/entertainment/events/arrest fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 56ee19de-cd0f-541e-a64f-2621595a51bc   Westlake Legal Group Jubilee-Sharpe Former 'Bachelor' contestant Jubilee Sharpe arrested for DUI: report Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/the-bachelor fox-news/entertainment/genres/reality fox-news/entertainment/events/arrest fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 56ee19de-cd0f-541e-a64f-2621595a51bc

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Coronavirus Updates: U.S. Allows Infected Americans from Cruise Ship to Return

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_169044468_c2dc41e3-1a55-4794-84f0-b855022cd9b6-articleLarge Coronavirus Updates: U.S. Allows Infected Americans from Cruise Ship to Return Ships and Shipping Recession and Depression Epidemics Deaths (Fatalities) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

Americans evacuated from the Diamond Princess cruise ship arrived early Monday at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio.Credit…Edward A. Ornelas/Getty Images

A day before 328 Americans were to be whisked away from a contaminated cruise ship in Japan, the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo told passengers that no one infected with the new coronavirus would be allowed to board charter flights to the United States.

But those plans were hastily changed after the test results for 14 passengers came back positive — just as they were being loaded onto buses and dispatched to the airport, where two reconfigured cargo jets were waiting to fly them to military bases in California and Texas.

After consultations with health experts, the U.S. government decided to let the infected evacuees, who were not yet exhibiting symptoms, board the flights.

The reversal was the latest chaotic turn in a two-week quarantine of the ship that has become an epidemiological nightmare.

Even as the Americans were flying home and countries like Australia, Canada and South Korea were preparing to evacuate their own citizens, the Japanese Health Ministry announced on Monday that 99 more cases of the coronavirus had been confirmed on the cruise ship, bringing the total to 454.

The infected Americans — who officials said were asymptomatic and “fit to fly” — were moved into a specialized containment area on the evacuation aircraft, where they were isolated and monitored.

All of the evacuated American cruise ship passengers, including those who have tested negative for the virus, will be placed in a further 14-day quarantine.

Those who develop symptoms or later test positive will be sent to “an appropriate location for continued isolation and care,” the State Department and the Department of Health and Human Services said in a joint statement.

With the arrival of the 14 infected passengers from Japan, confirmed coronavirus cases in the United States nearly doubled, to 29.

Westlake Legal Group china-wuhan-coronavirus-maps-promo-articleLarge-v30 Coronavirus Updates: U.S. Allows Infected Americans from Cruise Ship to Return Ships and Shipping Recession and Depression Epidemics Deaths (Fatalities) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

Coronavirus Map: Tracking the Spread of the Outbreak

The virus has infected more than 71,400 people in China and 25 other countries.

China signaled on Monday that it would postpone the annual session of its Communist Party-dominated legislature because of the coronavirus epidemic, a symbolic blow to a government that typically runs with regimented discipline.

The annual full meeting of the legislature, called the National People’s Congress, is a major event in China’s political cycle. President Xi Jinping, Premier Li Keqiang and other leaders were expected to lay out their agenda for the year, issue the annual budget and pass major legislation.

Each March, nearly 3,000 delegates gather in the vast Great Hall of the People, next to Tiananmen Square in Beijing.

But delay is now virtually certain, judging from an announcement from the National People’s Congress Standing Committee, which oversees the legislature. The announcement said that the committee will consider vote on Monday on whether to delay the congress.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

The National People’s Congress is dominated by Communist Party politicians, and it would be extremely unlikely that the proposal would be up for formal approval unless Mr. Xi had agreed it was necessary.

A postponement would be the first time in recent memory that the annual legislative session has been delayed. Even in 2003, when China was battling SARS, the congress went ahead as usual.

The terse wording of the announcement gave no clue when the congress would convene.

Delaying the congress is unlikely to seriously derail Chinese policymaking, which is controlled by a small circle of party leaders.

A Russian court ruled on Monday that a woman who had escaped coronavirus quarantine must be forcibly isolated in a hospital, sending a clear message to all potential escapees and dodgers.

To prevent the virus from taking hold in Russia, the country has closed its roughly 2,600-mile border with China and ordered the quarantine of hundreds of Russian citizens who recently returned from China.

But at least five people have escaped, citing poor conditions at hospitals and frustration over their status.

Alla Ilyina, the woman ordered into isolation on Monday, made headlines in Russia by carrying out an elaborate plan to escape the 14-day quarantine. On Feb. 7, she broke an electromagnetic lock in her room and fled the hospital while doctors attended to an incoming patient.

Mrs. Ilyina tested negative for coronavirus upon her arrival from China. The court ruled that she would have to stay in a hospital for at least two days and get two negative coronavirus tests before she can return home. After the ruling was issued, she was taken by ambulance to the Botkin infectious diseases hospital in St. Petersburg.

Mrs. Ilyina’s lawyer told Interfax, a Russian news agency, that they would appeal the court’s decision.

On Monday, another court in St. Petersburg registered a case against another person who had escaped quarantine in the same hospital. So far, only two people have tested positive for coronavirus in Russia, both of them Chinese nationals. Both have since been released from the hospital.

The only Russian citizen to test positive for the virus so far is aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship in Japan.

The world’s second-largest economy practically shut down three weeks ago as the coronavirus outbreak sickened tens of thousands of people, unexpectedly lengthening a Chinese holiday.

The freeze set off warnings that the global economy could be in jeopardy if the world’s pre-eminent manufacturing powerhouse stayed shut for long.

Now, as some factories rumble back into action, the monumental task of restarting China is becoming clear. China’s efforts to contain the virus are clashing with its push to get the country back to work, requiring the country’s leaders to strike a balance between keeping people safe and getting vital industries back on track.

Quarantines, blocked roads and checkpoints are stopping millions of workers from returning to their jobs. Supply lines have been severed.

The reopening of businesses means trying to bring together again much of China’s 700 million-strong labor force after what had become a nearly three-week national holiday. China’s containment efforts have effectively carved up the country. At least 760 million people — slightly over half the country’s population — are under various kinds of lockdown.

The coronavirus epidemic has prompted China to reconsider its trade and consumption of wildlife, which has been identified as a probable source of the outbreak.

The practice is driven by desire to flaunt wealth and beliefs about health benefits from products made from certain animals.

Officials drafted legislation to introduce controls and plan to present it at the next preparatory session for the annual National People’s Congress. The details of the proposal are not yet clear, but the goal is to end “the pernicious habit of eating wildlife,” according to a statement released on Monday by the Standing Committee of the congress.

Although the exact origin of the coronavirus is still under investigation, health officials and scientists say it spread outward from a wholesale market in Wuhan where vendors legally sold live animals from crowded stalls in close quarters with meats and vegetables.

The epidemic has inflamed public sentiment that the consumption of animals like reptiles, civets and hedgehogs is fundamentally unsafe.

The trafficking of endangered or threatened wildlife is prohibited in China, but Wang Ruihe, an official with the National People’s Congress, said last week that enforcement was lax.

The new coronavirus, like the one that caused the SARS outbreak in 2002 and 2003, has been traced to bats and is believed to have jumped from them to another mammal and then to humans. In the case of SARS, the virus first leapt from bats to civets.

One study has suggested that pangolins, an endangered species whose meat and scales are prized in China, might have been the carrier of the new virus.

Nearly 1,000 passengers and crew members aboard the cruise ship Westerdam in Sihanoukville, Cambodia, were being tested for the coronavirus on Monday, after a passenger who had already disembarked tested positive for the virus, officials said.

The cruise ship operator, Holland America Line, had planned to send all passengers home after a difficult voyage during which the ship was turned away by ports in five countries for fear that someone aboard might have the coronavirus.

With the discovery of the infected passenger — an ailing American woman who was screened at an airport in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia — the exodus of passengers has come to a halt.

Mang Sineth, the deputy governor of Preah Sihanouk Province, said the authorities and medical teams have been collecting samples from everyone left aboard the Westerdam to test for the virus. He said he could not estimate how long the testing would take or when the results would be available.

Holland America insisted during the cruise that all 1,455 passengers and 802 crew members were free of the disease. But when 145 passengers from the ship arrived at the airport in Kuala Lumpur and were screened and tested, one passenger was confirmed to have the virus. The passenger, 83, is now hospitalized along with her husband, 85, who is showing symptoms of the disease but has twice tested negative.

Hundreds of other passengers have made it to Phnom Penh, Cambodia’s capital but are now sequestered in hotels, where they are being tested.

Christina Kerby, a former passenger who is now with hundreds of others at a Phnom Penh hotel, said they have been told to stay in their rooms as much as possible, but they have not been barred from going outside or leaving the country.

The number of new coronavirus cases dropped to a three-week low, according to official data released on Monday. Experts said the dip was largely because of the lockdown measures the Chinese government has imposed on several cities to keep the spread of the virus at bay.

On Monday, the government of China reported 2,048 new infections and 105 deaths over the previous 24 hours. The number of new coronavirus cases reported in China had started to level off around Feb. 6, suggesting that the outbreak might be slowing. But last Thursday, officials added more than 14,840 new cases to the tally of the infected in Hubei Province, the center of the outbreak, after they changed the criteria for diagnosing patients.

The trend suggests that the epidemic that once seemed hopelessly out of control a few weeks ago could be contained — at least, for now.

“The measures taken have been extraordinary and we are seeing the effects,” said Raina MacIntyre, the head of biosecurity research at the Kirby Institute at the University of New South Wales.

China has sealed off several cities, threatened quarantine violators with stiff punishments and rounded up sick people in mass quarantine centers in Wuhan.

But public health experts caution that the worst is not over.

Some experts view the figures reported by China with some skepticism. The government has a history of covering up data that makes it look bad, and the combination of flawed tests and limited medical resources means some cases would be missed even with the best intentions.

Public health experts say the coronavirus is also highly contagious, more so than the virus that caused the SARS outbreak of 2002-3, and may be more difficult to curtail.

Organizers of the Tokyo Marathon, citing the confirmation of a coronavirus case in Tokyo, are limiting the race this year to elite runners, including wheelchair elites, the event announced on its website Monday.

A statement posted on the site said that all registered runners could defer their entry to the 2021 event, but that runners who defer would have to pay again and would not receive refunds for this year’s race. About 38,000 participants had signed up for the race scheduled for March 1. Of that number, 245 are elite runners and 30 are elite wheelchair athletes, Reuters reported.

The Hong Kong Marathon, scheduled for Feb. 9, was canceled as coronavirus cases in the semiautonomous Chinese city increased. Hong Kong now has 57 confirmed coronavirus cases.

Japan’s Imperial Household Agency also canceled birthday celebrations for the emperor, an event within the Imperial Palace that normally draws large crowds in Tokyo. Emperor Naruhito turns 60 on Feb. 23. This would be his first birthday since he became emperor.

Three masked robbers appeared at dawn on Monday outside a Hong Kong supermarket. There, they held a deliveryman at knife point and made off with over a $100 worth of one of the most sought after commodities in this city of seven million: toilet paper.

Toilet paper has been sold out across the city for weeks after a run on the product was prompted by rumors that manufacturers in mainland China would cease production or that the border would be sealed as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.

Retailers have dispelled the rumor, saying there is no genuine shortage. But bulk packs of toilet paper are snatched off supermarket shelves almost as soon as they are restocked, and city blocks are crowded with residents lined up at shops just to buy the product.

So short is the supply that lovers exchanged individual rolls on Valentine’s Day as a sort of pragmatic joke. Online, users have offered to barter surgical masks, which actually are in short supply, for a few rolls of toilet paper. And one hoarder was shamed on social media when neighbors spotted an apartment whose windows were crowded by a wall of toilet paper rolls.

The toilet paper stolen in Monday’s heist was later discovered stashed at a hotel, local news outlets reported, but the perpetrators remain at large. The police said two people had been arrested in connection with the heist, but they were looking for others.

Last week, the police arrested a man charged with stealing eight boxes of heavy-duty face masks, known as N-95 masks, from a parked car after smashing its windows.

Senator Tom Cotton, Republican of Arkansas, has repeated an unsubstantiated conspiracy theory that has spread from small-town China to the right-wing news media in the United States: The new coronavirus originated in a high-security biochemical lab in Wuhan.

In a television interview on Fox News on Sunday, Mr. Cotton suggested that a dearth of information about the origins of the virus raised more questions than answers.

“We don’t know where it originated, and we have to get to the bottom of that,” Mr. Cotton said on the program Sunday Morning Futures. He then raised the possibility that the virus originated in a “biosafety level-4 super laboratory.” Such laboratories are used for research into potentially deadly infectious diseases.

“Now, we don’t have evidence that this disease originated there but because of China’s duplicity and dishonesty from the beginning we need to at least ask the question to see what the evidence says, and China right now is not giving evidence on that question at all,” he added.

The Chinese authorities say the outbreak began in a market in Wuhan where wild animals were sold. The city is also home to a biochemical laboratory.

After receiving criticism for lending credence to what has been largely considered a fringe theory, the senator took to Twitter to say he did not necessarily think the virus was an “engineered bioweapon.”

That idea, he said, was just one of several hypotheses that included the possibility that the outbreak was a “deliberate release.”

He also said it was possible that the virus spread naturally, “but almost certainly not from the Wuhan food market.”

Research and reporting was contributed by Russell Goldman, Austin Ramzy, Ivan Nechepurenko, Steven Lee Myers, Claire Fu, Tiffany May, Richard C. Paddock, Sui-Lee Wee, Alexandra Stevenson, Roni Caryn Rabin, Ben Dooley and Keith Bradsher.

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Prominent Hollywood Therapist Killed In Fall From Balcony

Westlake Legal Group 5e4ac030230000320039b3ba Prominent Hollywood Therapist Killed In Fall From Balcony

Amie Harwick, a prominent therapist and author, died Saturday after falling from the balcony of her apartment in Hollywood, California. Police have arrested an ex-boyfriend in connection with her death.

Harwick, 38, writer of “The New Sex Bible For Women,” was found “gravely injured” beneath her third-floor Hollywood apartment balcony with injuries “consistent with a fall,” police said in a statement. The fire department rushed her to a hospital, where she was pronounced dead.

Hours later, an FBI-LAPD task force arrested Gareth Pursehouse, 41, in Playa del Rey, several miles from Hollywood. Police said they would ask the district attorney to charge him with murder. Pursehouse, who police said was a former boyfriend, was held on $2 million bail, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Harwick filed a restraining order against Pursehouse that recently expired, police said. She had seen him two weeks ago, according to the police statement, and “had recently expressed fear about a former boyfriend.”

Officers were summoned to Harwick’s home after a call reporting a woman screaming, police said. Her roommate, who had jumped a wall to escape their apartment to get help from a neighbor, flagged down officers and told them Harwick was being attacked inside.

As they prepared to enter the building, officers found Harwick’s body on the ground, police said.

Police noted they found evidence of a struggle and forced entry inside the apartment. Witnesses told detectives they saw a suspect entering the apartment and leaving after Harwick fell, the police statement said.

Harwick was a family and sex therapist who appeared in the 2015 documentary “Addicted To Sexting.” She previously worked as a Playboy model, KTLA wrote. Harwick and “The Price Is Right” host Drew Carey became engaged in 2018 and broke up less than a year later, Deadline reported.

Need help? In the U.S., call 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) for the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

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The “What happened in your state last week?” Megathread, Week 7

Welcome to the ‘What happened in your state last week’ thread, where you can post any local political news stories that you find important in the comments. This is a weekly thread posted every Monday, in order to facilitate more discussion on local issues on r/politics. Since this is intended to be a thread about local politics, top-level comments that are exclusively about national issues will not be allowed. When commenting, please include the state you’re living in, and don’t forget to link sources. Also, please actually describe what happened. “I live in X, you know what happened” isn’t helpful to users and will be removed.

If someone from your state made a news round-up that you think is insufficient, feel free to comment to that round-up with further news stories. Enjoy discussion, and review our civility guidelines before engaging with others.


Hi there, r/politics. A reminder that news about presidential election primary candidates is considered off topic for this thread. Thank you, and have a good week!

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Liberal media reaction to Michael Avenatti conviction slammed as ‘Orwellian,’ ‘appalling’

Some members of the mainstream media have issued mea culpas for building up now-disgraced attorney Michael Avenatti, while others have shirked responsibility and some have even blamed President Trump – but it all falls flat for critics who watched his rise from lawyer for a porn star to potential Democratic presidential candidate.

Avenatti, who represented adult film actress Stormy Daniels in a lawsuit against President Trump, appeared on CNN and MSNBC a combined 229 times over two years, according to the Media Research Center. CNN’s Brian Stelter was Avenatti’s biggest cheerleader, once declaring that he was a “serious” contender to challenge Trump in the 2020 presidential election.

EX-CNN DARLING MICHAEL AVENATTI CONVICTED OF TRYING TO EXTORT NIKE

But a New York jury found Avenatti, 48, guilty Friday of extortion, wire fraud and transmission of interstate communications with intent to extort up to $25 million from Nike. He faces up to 42 years in prison and still faces two other trials.

Westlake Legal Group Toobin-Stelter-Avenatti Liberal media reaction to Michael Avenatti conviction slammed as ‘Orwellian,’ ‘appalling’ fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc f57378ee-e05c-545e-9ea1-9894552f6361 Brian Flood article

CNN pundits Jeffrey Toobin and Brian Stelter discussed their role in turning Michael Avenatti into a household name.

In another upcoming trial in Manhattan, he faces charges that he cheated Daniels out of the proceeds of a book deal. The most serious charges are in a federal case in Los Angeles, where he is accused of defrauding clients and others.

“CNN and MSNBC are playing victim, as if Avenatti snookered them,” Cornell University Law School professor and media critic William Jacobson told Fox News. “In fact, they exploited Avenatii and others like him for use against Trump. It was a mutually manipulative relationship in which Avenatti gained fame and CNN/MSNBC gained viewers.”

Conservative strategist Chris Barron told Fox News that the reaction by the liberal media has been “largely Orwellian” so far.

PRO-TRUMP MEME KING CARPE DONKTUM EXPLAINS HIS MEDIUM: ‘HATE IS POISON TO COMEDY’

“Instead of saying ‘we made a mistake, we didn’t properly vet this guy and we are sorry,’ we are hearing how actually this is Trump’s fault,” Barron said. “Few reporters are willing to admit they got this wrong and this is symptomatic of a much bigger problem in journalism.”

“Few reporters are willing to admit they got this wrong and this is symptomatic of a much bigger problem in journalism.”

— Chris Barron

Stelter addressed the debacle on Sunday when he asked guests to critique his infamous claim that Avenatti could challenge Trump in 2020 because of his presence on cable news.

“Give me a media critique,” Stelter asked. “Was that stupid on my part? What do you make of how Avenatti was covered by CNN and MSNBC?”

CNN’S BRIAN STELTER DELETES TWEET CLAIMING HE COVERED MICHAEL AVENATTI STORY: ‘I GOT MIXED UP’

Panelist Lachlan Markey and Asawin Suebsaeng, who were on the show to promote an anti-Trump book, managed to essentially blame the president for the situation.

“This was a guy, who in many ways, was very similar to Trump. He really knew how to operate in the modern media environment,” Markey said. “I think that’s what really drew a lot of Trump’s critics to him, was this idea that he could sort of beat Trump at his own game.”

Markey then said journalists need to ask themselves if they were played by Avenatti’s strategy.

Westlake Legal Group CNN-Avenatti-2 Liberal media reaction to Michael Avenatti conviction slammed as ‘Orwellian,’ ‘appalling’ fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc f57378ee-e05c-545e-9ea1-9894552f6361 Brian Flood article

Brian Stelter once told Avenatti on air, “Looking ahead to 2020, one of the reasons why I’m taking you seriously as a contender is because of your presence on cable news.”

“A lot of folks did take him very seriously without looking at the extensive personal, financial, legal baggage that was out there just waiting to be reported,” Markey said as Suebsaeng chimed in.

DON LEMON’S BOYFRIEND IMPLIED ‘LIBERAL’ CNN STAR WENT EASY ON PAL AVENATTI

“His crookedness aside, it would have been weird at that time, sort of during the Michael Avenatti boomlet, not to take him seriously at least in the form of someone who was getting in the president’s head,” Suebsaeng said. “Obviously, objectively speaking, news at the time.”

Stelter, who did not ask someone with opposing political views for a critique or feedback, smirked as he said reporters need to be more skeptical of the manipulation, “whether it’s Trump or Avenatti,” that’s occurring.

“There are no lessons learned, no moments of self-reflections and no one being held accountable for failing to meet basic journalistic standards. It’s always someone else’s fault. Never the fault of the corporate media.”

— Chris Barron

“There are no lessons learned, no moments of self-reflections and no one being held accountable for failing to meet basic journalistic standards. It’s always someone else’s fault. Never the fault of the corporate media,” Barron said. “Truly appalling.”

MICHAEL AVENATTI HOBNOBS WITH CNN STARS IN RARE FREE TIME BETWEEN APPEARANCES ON NETWORK

Avenatti became a hero of the media elite and even spent his time away from cable news greenrooms partying with CNN hosts. CNN legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin explained that he “go to know” Avenatti when the now-disgraced lawyer was a fixture on the liberal network but admitted he now feels “snookered”

“I remember once at the peak of all of this, we went to lunch in Midtown, when our offices were in Midtown, and we walked back together to CNN, and it was like walking with a major, major celebrity,” Toobin told Anderson Cooper on Friday. “People came up to him.”

Toobin explained that Avenatti floated the idea of a potential 2020 White House run at the height of his fame, even visiting Iowa and New Hampshire to test the waters.

“To call it hubris … doesn’t do it justice. I mean the craziness of this,” Toobin said. “When you look at this case and the three cases, he’s 48 years old, he could be looking at decades in prison… the total collapse of his life is really sort of extraordinary. Frankly, I feel kind of snookered because I took him seriously.”

NBC PARENT COMPANY COMCAST FIGHTS SEX HARASSMENT ACCUSATION REVIEW CALLS

While CNN addressed the awkward situation, MSNBC reported Avenatti’s conviction and quickly moved on.

DePauw University professor and media critic Jeffrey McCall told Fox News that it’s “noteworthy and appropriate” that some individuals in the media acknowledge they got duped by Avenatti but others should speak up.

“It is curious, however, that there has been no such acknowledgment coming from the hierarchy at CNN, MSNBC or other mainstream outlets that were enraptured by Avenatti and allowed him to dominate the news agenda for months,” McCall said. “The Avenatti publicity tour just couldn’t have happened without blessings from the highest levels of the media establishment.”

“The Avenatti publicity tour just couldn’t have happened without blessings from the highest levels of the media establishment.”

— Jeffrey McCall

McCall believes Avenatti “found it easy to ‘snooker’ the media establishment” that wanted to attack the president at all costs.

NBC KILLED MY SEX ASSAULT STORY AFTER FARROW’S WEINSTEIN PIECE, AUTHOR CLAIMS

“He was slick, had Stormy Daniels as a client, and was going after Trump. The mainstream media found that combination irresistible and failed to carefully scrutinize Avenatti or put him in a measured context. This kind of performance by the media, following the sensational without due diligence, continues to harm media credibility,” McCall said.

CNN contributor Amanda Carpenter published a piece in The Bulwark headlined, “Trump is why you got Michael Avenatti,” which declared the Avenatti story isn’t about media malfeasance.

“There are plenty of problems with The Media — for instance, the gifting of $2 billion worth of free air time to Donald Trump in 2016 because it was good for ratings. But the rise and fall of Michael Avenatti wasn’t The Media’s fault. They didn’t make him,” Carpenter wrote. “They were just forced to cover him … if you hate Michael Avenatti, don’t blame the Media. Trump is the one who brought him into your life.”

Carpenter was widely criticized on social media for blaming Trump.

“This is embarrassing. The major media promoted a goofball political gadfly simply because he was attacking Trump,” Media Research Center vice president Dan Dainor told Fox News.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Meanwhile, not everyone in the mainstream media assigned blame elsewhere and MSNBC contributor Sam Stein was praised on social media for the way he handled the situation.

“I admit it. I gave Avenatti far more credibility than he deserved,” Stein tweeted. “I need to do better and will strive to do so. No point in trying to pretend otherwise.”

Fox News’ Marta Dhanis and Jennifer Olivia contributed to this report.

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Ted Cruz Can’t Believe A Lawmaker Is Trying To Legislate Away A Man’s Reproductive Rights

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DOJ investigates the investigators: 5 internal probes underway on Russia and more

Several federal prosecutors have been tapped to investigate high-profile Russia, Ukraine and Clinton-related matters under the Trump administration.

Here is a list of the internal Justice Department probes underway:

The case of former national security adviser Michael Flynn

Attorney General Bill Barr appointed the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Missouri Jeff Jensen to review the case of former national security adviser Michael Flynn. Justice Department officials told Fox News that Jensen will work hand-in-hand with Brandon Van Grack — the lead prosecutor on the Flynn case — during his review.

Flynn’s case has gone through years of twists and turns, with sentencing postponed repeatedly over the last two years. Flynn’s supporters have insisted he is innocent but was forced to plead guilty when his son was threatened with prosecution and he exhausted his financial resources.

As part of former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation, Flynn pleaded guilty to making false statements to the FBI about his communications with former Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak.

Barr’s move to tap Jensen comes after Flynn and his attorney last month moved to withdraw his guilty plea, citing “the government’s bad faith, vindictiveness, and breach of the plea agreement.”

Ukraine information

Barr last week confirmed that the Justice Department is reviewing information about Ukraine coming from President Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani and others. Barr has tapped U.S. Attorney from the Western District of Pennsylvania Scott Brady to handle that Ukraine information.

That review comes after the president was acquitted on charges — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — stemming from the Ukraine controversy.

Giuliani, for months, has focused on the circumstances surrounding Hunter Biden’s past board position with Ukrainian natural gas firm Burisma Holdings and the role of his father, former Vice President Joe Biden, in ousting a prosecutor who had been looking into the firm’s founder.

The impeachment of Trump focused largely on his efforts to press Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate that issue. The president’s request came after millions in U.S. military aid to Ukraine had been frozen, which Democrats argued showed a “quid pro quo” arrangement. Trump denied it.

CBS News first reported last week that the review, which has been going on for several weeks, will go beyond the Biden-Ukraine connection.

Durham probe into origins of Russia investigation

Last year, Barr appointed U.S. Attorney from Connecticut John Durham to review the events leading up to the 2016 presidential election and through Trump’s January 20, 2017 inauguration. But, as Fox News first reported, Durham has since expanded his investigation to cover a post-election timeline spanning the spring of 2017 — when Mueller was appointed as special counsel.

Durham investigated CIA officials and other officials throughout the intelligence community. Former CIA Director John Brennan has said that Durham plans to interview him and former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper. Those interviews have yet to take place, a source familiar with the investigation told Fox News last week.

Clinton Foundation, Uranium One

In November 2017, then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions directed U.S. Attorney for Utah John Huber and other senior prosecutors to evaluate “certain issues” involving the sale of Uranium One and alleged unlawful dealings related to the Clinton Foundation.

The status of the Huber probe, and whether he is still investigating, is unclear.

FISA warrant, Clinton server document release

In April 2018, the Justice Department appointed U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois John Lausch to oversee the gathering of documents in response to a subpoena issued by the House Judiciary Committee in an effort to obtain materials related to the FBI’s probe into Hillary Clinton’s private email server and potential Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) abuses.

The move came after the president blasted the Justice Department and the FBI for “slow walking” turning over requested documents to Congress.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-ba876a08d09644dba48c4a85bedcd04b DOJ investigates the investigators: 5 internal probes underway on Russia and more fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc Brooke Singman article aa7af04b-9651-552b-81a1-f88f0bb93df0

John R. Lausch Jr., U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, center, briefs reporters on the trial of Floyd Brown in the killing of Special Deputy United States Marshal Jacob Keltner on Wednesday, March 20, 2019, U.S. District Courthouse in Rockford. Brown pleaded not guilty Wednesday to federal charges accusing him of fatally shooting Keltner, who was trying to serve an arrest warrant at a hotel. (Scott P. Yates/Rockford Register Star via AP)

“[T]he attorney general and FBI director asked U.S. Attorney John Lausch from the Northern District of Illinois to oversee this production moving forward. Mr. Lausch, who has experience in the department and in private practice, will ensure that production moves at an acceptable pace and that any redactions are necessary and consistent under the relevant laws and regulations,” then-DOJ spokeswoman Sarah Isgur Flores said at the time, noting Lausch will have “independent authority” to oversee the production and report progress to Sessions.

It is unclear whether Lausch still has oversight of document production from the DOJ and FBI to Congress.

Westlake Legal Group image DOJ investigates the investigators: 5 internal probes underway on Russia and more fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc Brooke Singman article aa7af04b-9651-552b-81a1-f88f0bb93df0   Westlake Legal Group image DOJ investigates the investigators: 5 internal probes underway on Russia and more fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc Brooke Singman article aa7af04b-9651-552b-81a1-f88f0bb93df0

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Bloomberg News’s Dilemma: How to Cover a Boss Seeking the Presidency

Westlake Legal Group 16BLOOMBERG-MEDIA-bloomberg-facebookJumbo Bloomberg News’s Dilemma: How to Cover a Boss Seeking the Presidency United States Politics and Government Presidential Election of 2020 News and News Media Micklethwait, John Conflicts of Interest Bloomberg, Michael R Bloomberg News

John Micklethwait, the editor in chief of Bloomberg News, walked into his Washington bureau on a Friday morning in December with a daunting task: explaining to his political reporters how to cover a presidential campaign when the boss is a candidate.

Addressing roughly 100 journalists spilling out of a glass-walled conference room, Mr. Micklethwait said Michael R. Bloomberg’s entry into the Democratic race had not changed his commitment to skeptical coverage. “We always knew it would be tough,” he told the group. “But we are actually showing what we are: an independent news organization.”

Not every reporter was reassured. Rival candidates had attacked the journalists’ coverage as biased; some sources had stopped returning calls. One reporter said the bureau’s credibility was at stake, citing Mr. Micklethwait’s public memo that Bloomberg News would refrain from “investigating” Mr. Bloomberg and his Democratic competitors.

Mr. Micklethwait said he had been referring to a team of specialized investigative reporters and not the broader political staff, but he declined requests from the journalists in the room to issue a clarification. Many reporters left feeling unsure how to proceed, according to several people who described the previously unreported town hall meeting.

Two months later, the pressure and unease inside Bloomberg News have only increased. Journalists who hoped Mr. Bloomberg’s candidacy would prove short-lived have watched him vault to the upper tier of the Democratic race. Now there are discussions about what a President Bloomberg could mean for a news organization already grappling with a perceived conflict of interest.

There are few precedents for a media mogul in charge of a major news operation seeking the presidency, though William Randolph Hearst, a Democratic candidate in 1904, enjoyed cheerleading coverage from his network of newspapers.

But Mr. Bloomberg’s presence looms large for the 2,700 journalists at his financial data company. New employees receive a copy of his autobiography, “Bloomberg by Bloomberg,” and company guidelines prohibit coverage of his “wealth or personal life.” In 2018, Mr. Bloomberg told an interviewer: “I don’t want the reporters I’m paying to write a bad story about me.”

That policy proved awkward during Mr. Bloomberg’s three terms as mayor of New York City and in his subsequent life as a billionaire philanthropist and political donor. Now it is bordering on untenable, according to interviews with half a dozen Bloomberg journalists who requested anonymity, citing fear of retribution from bosses who emphasize discretion.

When Mr. Bloomberg declared his candidacy in November, Mr. Micklethwait, an Oxford graduate and former editor in chief of The Economist, pledged in the memo he sent to the staff that the news outlet “will write about virtually all aspects of this presidential contest in much the same way as we have done so far.” But he said Mr. Bloomberg would remain off-limits from investigations, “and we will extend the same policy to his rivals in the Democratic primaries.”

Bloomberg News’s campaign reporters operate separately from the news outlet’s Projects and Investigations team. But the memo was widely perceived as a signal that Bloomberg News would cease accountability coverage of the Democratic field, even as Bloomberg executives called that a misunderstanding.

Mr. Micklethwait told reporters at the December town hall that Bloomberg News management had not prevented any political story from being published. “If you look at what we’re doing and the pieces we’re writing, any doubt that we’re reporting this aggressively disappears,” he said.

Political reporters at Bloomberg News, however, say the memo left them vulnerable to undue criticism from readers and campaign aides. And they express frustration that it suggested a level of internal censorship that they say is not reflective of their experience.

In December, the outlet published an article noting that Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren had criticized Amazon while paying the company for services. It was a run-of-the-mill story by the standards of a presidential race, where minor hypocrisies are fair game for journalists. But the candidates and their allies seized on the story to accuse Bloomberg News of bias.

There was outcry from Team Trump, too.

Because Mr. Micklethwait said in the memo that his staff would keep investigating the White House “as the government of the day,” the Trump campaign called Bloomberg News biased and barred it from covering its events. On the day of the Iowa caucuses, a Bloomberg reporter, Jennifer Jacobs, was escorted out of a Trump news conference outside Des Moines. (Mr. Micklethwait said in a statement last year that the Trump campaign’s “accusation of bias couldn’t be further from the truth.”)

Reporters are also battling a perception that Bloomberg News is an adjunct of its boss’s political operation.

Two opinion journalists at the company, Timothy L. O’Brien and David Shipley, who both previously worked at The New York Times, took a leave of absence to join the Bloomberg campaign. One editor at Bloomberg News jumped to the campaign, as well, along with a handful of staff members on the TV and video production side.

Mr. Micklethwait has had no contact with Mr. Bloomberg or his campaign since he declared his bid, according to a spokeswoman for Bloomberg News.

The distinction has not stopped critics like Ms. Warren from accusing Mr. Bloomberg of betraying the First Amendment. “He should let reporters do their jobs and report on him, and everyone else, as they see fit,” Ms. Warren wrote on Twitter last month, adding: “This ban puts reporters in an impossible situation and undermines a free press.”

Mr. Micklethwait declined to be interviewed for this article. A spokeswoman for Bloomberg News said in a statement: “Over the past 30 years, editorial independence has been at the core of Bloomberg News. We are proud of the more than 760 articles Bloomberg News has published on the election and the candidates, not to mention a host of broadcast interviews, since Mike Bloomberg announced he was running for president.”

To reassure readers, the news outlet is updating an “Election Coverage Snapshot” on its website, citing a promise “that we would be as transparent as possible” about election coverage. Bloomberg News also carries coverage about Mr. Bloomberg written by competitors, like The Times and The Washington Post, on its subscription-only terminals.

One Bloomberg News journalist has been assigned full-time to cover Mr. Bloomberg’s bid: Mark Niquette, a veteran reporter based in Columbus, Ohio, who previously covered infrastructure.

He has not shied from reporting on negative developments. Last week, his byline appeared atop a 600-word article about an audio recording from 2015 of Mr. Bloomberg praising stop-and-frisk policing. On Sunday, Mr. Niquette co-authored a story on concerns about Mr. Bloomberg’s “comments about policing, women and race.”

Mr. Niquette, who travels to many of Mr. Bloomberg’s campaign events, has also published a critical look at Mr. Bloomberg’s economic, health care and infrastructure plans under the headline “Bloomberg Offers Few Details to Back Up Trillions in Spending.”

In Washington, at the December town hall, Mr. Micklethwait said he was accustomed to hearing complaints about conflicts of interest. He cited Wall Street executives displeased with Bloomberg News’s coverage of their companies — companies that spend significant sums for access to Bloomberg L.P.’s financial data.

As for the challenges of covering his boss, Mr. Micklethwait noted that Mr. Bloomberg’s political second act could last anywhere from a few months to nine years.

It was a point not lost on the reporters gathered before him. The prospect of Mr. Bloomberg in the White House has become another matter of significant concern among Bloomberg News journalists.

If Mr. Bloomberg, as he has mused in the past, were to sell his company if elected, some journalists there believe a new owner may not be willing to subsidize an expensive news-gathering operation that is ultimately tangential to the company’s core product, the financial data terminals that command princely subscription sums from the investing class.

And if a President Bloomberg held onto his media organization, how would Bloomberg News reporters cover Washington and a federal administration controlled by the man ultimately responsible for their paychecks?

The company declined to comment on those questions, and reporters there say it is too early to earnestly begin preparing for such an eventuality.

As for Mr. Bloomberg himself, he was asked by CBS News in December about his staff’s concerns about not being allowed to investigate his rivals in the presidential race.

“You just have to learn to live with some things,” Mr. Bloomberg told the anchor Gayle King. “They get a paycheck. But with your paycheck comes some restrictions and responsibilities.”

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