web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 125)

Even ‘Fox & Friends’ Hosts Are Confused By Trump’s War On A War On ‘Thanksgiving’

Westlake Legal Group Kxo5XWPtr--wU6GbgVV5FUdUJXgTccmv5iLWdsm28qU Even 'Fox & Friends' Hosts Are Confused By Trump's War On A War On 'Thanksgiving' r/politics

This could actually play out really, really interestingly.

Fox&Freunde viewers have historically been far more pro-Trump than pro-F&F, as is arguably true for the rest of the network. Remember that Fox’s transition into state media was led far more by the viewers than the network itself – through most of the primaries Fox was actually pretty openly anti-Trump; only embracing him when their viewers started to revolt.

Additionally, Trumpeteers are preternaturally good at scouring the Internet for shit exactly like this screenshot, so it’s guaranteed to come up. Side note – I know it’s taboo to praise Trump supporters here but I wish the left would recognize how effective they’ve been at converting Internet participation into meaningful political actions. Those actions might be evil as fuck, but the underlying principle of “work together to divide up large, labor intensive projects in order to work towards realistic incremental goals” is a demonstrably effective approach towards achieving political change.

The thing is, Fox has to know this screenshot exists. Like they didn’t all forget their fearmongering but in a way so thoroughly that they felt confident potentially pissing off Trump without even looking into it; that would be insane. They also almost certainly know that Trump has a history of viciously attacking Fox for anything less than perfect absolute loyalty, and that he’s absolutely petty enough to go to war over simple shit like this. I mean fuck, this is at least as significant as “was that Hurricane going to hit Alabama” and that lasted for like a week, only culminating after escalating to a genuine threat to public security as NWS of all fucking orgs got politicized.

They’re throwing Molotov cocktails here. Right or wrong, this could start a war. Plus, this is literally Fox – it’s not like playing along and claiming that yes there absolutely is a war on Thanksgiving and liberals are trying to rename it because they hate America would be beneath their integrity here.

Donning my tinfoil hat: what does Fox & Friends know that I don’t which makes this make sense? Is retaliation genuinely unlikely for some reason, perhaps due to health issues? Are their viewers beginning to realize how overwhelming the evidence against Trump is, to the extent that betrayal is a good idea?

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

We’ve Spotted Washers, Dryers And More Home Appliances In Samsung’s Black Friday Sale

Westlake Legal Group 5dd440a11f0000330edeede6 We’ve Spotted Washers, Dryers And More Home Appliances In Samsung’s Black Friday Sale

FYI, HuffPost may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Some Cyber Week deals are time sensitive, so prices and offers are subject to change.

Though most of us start by clearing out parts of our closet to make room for what we’re splurging on for Cyber Monday, the appliances in our homes could probably do with an upgrade, too.

From a washing machine that won’t stop making weird sounds to the dryer that doesn’t dry anymore, the appliances around your home that are supposed to make your life easier might be due for some much-needed updates.

And Samsung’s having a “buy more, save more” promo, too, on certain eligible categories of home appliances, including TVs, laundry, fridges, ranges, dishwashers, wall ovens, cooktops and range hoods. So if you buy two appliances, you can get an additional 5% off your purchase, three and you get 7% off and four or more and you get 10% off.

Below are the best Black Friday deals on Samsung home appliances:

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘Will & Grace’ star joins Ellen Pompeo in blasting NBC amid Gabrielle Union controversy

Westlake Legal Group Debra-Messing-RT 'Will & Grace' star joins Ellen Pompeo in blasting NBC amid Gabrielle Union controversy Sam Dorman fox-news/world/scandals fox-news/person/debra-messing fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc e1f93479-3493-5550-b5cc-3c4469b51912 article

Television powerhouses Ellen Pompeo and Debra Messing ripped into NBC amid reports that actress Gabrielle Union left “America’s Got Talent” after she called out the network’s “toxic” work environment.

Messing commented on the controversy on Saturday while relaying Pompeo’s criticism of the network.

“Thank you for this @EllenPompeo,” she tweeted. “This is disgusting behavior from a network that has been my professional home for decades. Yes, women become ‘difficult,’ when their insistence on a respectful and professional working environment, is ignored.”

As Messing noted, she’s spent years at NBC as a co-star on “Will & Grace.” She wasn’t the only one from NBC to scrutinize the network. The network has come under fire as news surfaced surrounding its handling of the Harvey Weinstein and Matt Lauer scandals.

GABRIELLE UNION SPEAKS OUT AMID ‘AMERICA’S GOT TALENT’ CONTROVERSY: ‘SO MUCH GRATITUDE’

Pompeo tweeted: “It’s unfortunate that @nbc the same network that protected disgusting men like Matt Lauer and punished women for speaking out or not putting up with it…has not changed their practices or culture. I support @itsgabrielleu commitment to speaking up to injustice. It takes courage.”

According to a Variety report, Union was repeatedly subject to criticism that her hair styles were “too black” for America’s Got Talent’s audience.

Messing, on Saturday, called out the “cowardice” and “greed” that helped maintain toxic work environments.

DWAYNE WADE SAYS GABRIELLE UNION WAS FIRED FROM ‘AGT,’ PRAISES WIFE FOR ‘STANDING UP FOR WHAT SHE STANDS FOR’

“Addressing a hostile work environment is inconvenient when there is a huge money making machine that is involved. It is cowardice, greed, and protection of the status quo revealed,” she tweeted.

“Being ‘hands off,’ is inexcusable and reflects a laissez faire attitude toward systemic racism and sexism.”

Pompeo specifically called out Simon Cowell, the show’s creator, and urged her followers to watch a different show. [I]nstead of wack jugglers and messy Simon Cowell watch @ReeseW and Jennifer Anniston in The Morning Show!! Soooo much better. Hard to believe these networks are still getting away with this. Our work continues,” she tweeted alongside a heart emoji and Union’s twitter handle.

JULIANNE HOUGH DENIES LEAVING ‘AMERICA’S GOT TALENT’ DUE TO ‘TOXIC’ WORKPLACE CULTURE

Pop superstar Ariana Grande piled onto the criticism, telling the network to “be better” while retweeting one of Pompeo’s posts.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

NBC did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

Westlake Legal Group Debra-Messing-RT 'Will & Grace' star joins Ellen Pompeo in blasting NBC amid Gabrielle Union controversy Sam Dorman fox-news/world/scandals fox-news/person/debra-messing fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc e1f93479-3493-5550-b5cc-3c4469b51912 article   Westlake Legal Group Debra-Messing-RT 'Will & Grace' star joins Ellen Pompeo in blasting NBC amid Gabrielle Union controversy Sam Dorman fox-news/world/scandals fox-news/person/debra-messing fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc e1f93479-3493-5550-b5cc-3c4469b51912 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Fire rages at Texas chemical plant day after explosions; 50,000 people under evacuation order

Westlake Legal Group Plantexplosion720 Fire rages at Texas chemical plant day after explosions; 50,000 people under evacuation order Samuel Chamberlain fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox news fnc/us fnc ef0c6a73-64e0-5037-9ffe-c03e93dc2f4f article

Authorities in East Texas said Thursday that they didn’t know when thousands of people evacuated from their homes following two massive explosions at a local chemical plant would be able to return as a fire continued to burn.

Jefferson County Sheriff Zena Stephens told reporters the evacuation order would remain in place due to ongoing danger from flames, explosions and debris and not due to concerns about air quality near the TPC Group facility in Port Neches, about 80 miles east of Houston.

“It’s Thanksgiving, a lot of people are displaced, they can’t go home,” Stephens told TV station KFDM, adding that the evacuation order covers a four-mile radius from the plant, which makes chemical and petroleum-based products.

Government officials and TPC Group released a joint statement Thursday saying that air quality results from 20 monitoring stations around Port Neches “continue to show no actionable levels” above state and federal standards.

The initial explosion occurred at around 1 a.m. Wednesday, sending a large plume of smoke stretching for miles and started a fire. The second blast ripped through the plant shortly before 2 p.m., sending a steel reactor tower rocketing high into the air. That prompted Jefferson County Judge Jeff Branick, the top county official, to order a mandatory evacuation of Port Neches and neighboring Groves, Nederland and part of Port Arthur. Water cannons were trained on surrounding plant works and tanks to keep them cool and avoid further explosions.

Branick told reporters late Wednesday that a loss of power at the plant prevented any investigation into the cause of the explosions or how much damage was done to the facility. Likewise, he said there was no estimate yet on the extent of damage to surrounding neighborhoods.

Troy Monk, TPC’s director of health, safety and security, said that two TPC employees and a contractor injured in the first blast were treated at hospitals and released. Branick said one worker suffered burns and the others had a broken wrist and a broken leg, adding it’s a miracle no one died.

The about 30 employees working at the plant at the time of the explosion were accounted for, according to TPC.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Texas has seen multiple petrochemical industry blazes this year, including a March fire that burned for days near Houston and another that killed a worker at a plant in nearby Crosby.

In the March fire, prosecutors filed five water pollution charges against the company that owns the petrochemical storage facility after chemicals flowed into a nearby waterway.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Plantexplosion720 Fire rages at Texas chemical plant day after explosions; 50,000 people under evacuation order Samuel Chamberlain fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox news fnc/us fnc ef0c6a73-64e0-5037-9ffe-c03e93dc2f4f article   Westlake Legal Group Plantexplosion720 Fire rages at Texas chemical plant day after explosions; 50,000 people under evacuation order Samuel Chamberlain fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox news fnc/us fnc ef0c6a73-64e0-5037-9ffe-c03e93dc2f4f article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Clive James, Writer, TV Host And Cultural Critic, Dies At 80

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-3149615-cabf3606d3cd438fe69a5becaa6823c043af19de-s1100-c15 Clive James, Writer, TV Host And Cultural Critic, Dies At 80

In childhood, “telling stories was crucial to my existence and indeed to my survival,” writer and cultural critic Clive James said. He died Sunday at age 80. David Levenson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

David Levenson/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Clive James, Writer, TV Host And Cultural Critic, Dies At 80

In childhood, “telling stories was crucial to my existence and indeed to my survival,” writer and cultural critic Clive James said. He died Sunday at age 80.

David Levenson/Getty Images

“Fiction is life with the dull bits left out.” That is just one of the many clever observations of the writer, TV host and cultural critic Clive James, who died at his home in Cambridge, England, on Sunday. James suffered from multiple illnesses in recent years, including leukemia. He was 80 years old.

James was one of Britain and Australia’s best-known wits, a playfully erudite and prolific writer whose body of work includes novels, memoirs, criticism and poetry.

“Here is a book so dull that a whirling dervish could read himself to sleep with it,” he wrote in his review of Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev’s memoirs.

His friend and fellow satirist P.J. O’Rourke marvels at James’ way with a phrase, no matter what he was writing.

“He was that rare person who could do any kind of writing,” O’Rourke said. “His memoirs … are wonderful and very un-self-indulgent, unlike the modern version of that genre. He was a good novelist. Brrm! Brrm! is lots of fun. He’s an excellent poet, one of the best living poets in the English language. And of course, he was a critic.”

O’Rourke — who is not a regular TV viewer — even delighted in James’ reviews of that medium.

“His television criticism was so good that I have read all of it, even though I haven’t the likeliest idea what he’s talking about, because I’ve never seen any of the shows,” jokes O’Rourke.

Among the flood of tributes to James, Veep creator and movie director Armando Iannucci tweeted: “I used to practically hug The Observer in spasms of laughter reading Clive James’ TV reviews; ‘The Crystal Bucket’ is one of the funniest books around. And ‘Cultural Amnesia’ is an amazing book for reminding you that thinking can be joyful. His influence is incalculable.”

James didn’t just observe from the sidelines. He spent plenty of time in front of the camera, hosting variety shows and interviewing fellow writers and other artists on Talking In The Library.

Clive James’ childhood in Sydney was rooted in tragedy. His father was a prisoner in a Japanese war camp. When he was finally released, he was killed when the plane carrying him home crashed.

“That was the cruelty of it,” James told NPR in 2009. “My mother had waited all that time, then she’d received notification he was alive after all, then all that was taken away from her when the plane crashed on the way back.”

James was five years old at the time. “I just didn’t know what was going on. I just knew that my mother was unhappy, and that’s always unsettling.” James told NPR it was “remarkable that I did not become first a delinquent, then a felon, and then a prisoner.” He said his “gift for the English language” is what saved him.

“Telling stories was crucial to my existence and indeed to my survival,” he said. “I was actually the kind of boy who was born to be picked on. I was snotty and know-it-all and I was ganged up on and chased and ragged until I hit on the scheme when I was being chased of suddenly sitting down and organizing a discussion group and telling stories.”

The death of James’ father haunted him. According to The Guardian, James was inspired to write the poem My Father Before Me after visiting his father’s grave at the Sai Wan war cemetery in Hong Kong.

O’Rourke says he could talk to James about anything. “Absolutely anything. I mean … It could be pocket lint. And Clive would have something insightful to say about it.”

In 2010, James was diagnosed with leukemia. He also suffered from emphysema and kidney failure. A statement from his agent reads that James “endured his ever multiplying illnesses with patience and good humor, knowing … that he had experienced more than his fair share of this ‘great, good world.’ “

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Clive James, Writer, TV Host And Cultural Critic, Dies At 80

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-3149615-cabf3606d3cd438fe69a5becaa6823c043af19de-s1100-c15 Clive James, Writer, TV Host And Cultural Critic, Dies At 80

In childhood, “telling stories was crucial to my existence and indeed to my survival,” writer and cultural critic Clive James said. He died Sunday at age 80. David Levenson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

David Levenson/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Clive James, Writer, TV Host And Cultural Critic, Dies At 80

In childhood, “telling stories was crucial to my existence and indeed to my survival,” writer and cultural critic Clive James said. He died Sunday at age 80.

David Levenson/Getty Images

“Fiction is life with the dull bits left out.” That is just one of the many clever observations of the writer, TV host and cultural critic Clive James, who died at his home in Cambridge, England, on Sunday. James suffered from multiple illnesses in recent years, including leukemia. He was 80 years old.

James was one of Britain and Australia’s best-known wits, a playfully erudite and prolific writer whose body of work includes novels, memoirs, criticism and poetry.

“Here is a book so dull that a whirling dervish could read himself to sleep with it,” he wrote in his review of Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev’s memoirs.

His friend and fellow satirist P.J. O’Rourke marvels at James’ way with a phrase, no matter what he was writing.

“He was that rare person who could do any kind of writing,” O’Rourke said. “His memoirs … are wonderful and very un-self-indulgent, unlike the modern version of that genre. He was a good novelist. Brrm! Brrm! is lots of fun. He’s an excellent poet, one of the best living poets in the English language. And of course, he was a critic.”

O’Rourke — who is not a regular TV viewer — even delighted in James’ reviews of that medium.

“His television criticism was so good that I have read all of it, even though I haven’t the likeliest idea what he’s talking about, because I’ve never seen any of the shows,” jokes O’Rourke.

Among the flood of tributes to James, Veep creator and movie director Armando Iannucci tweeted: “I used to practically hug The Observer in spasms of laughter reading Clive James’ TV reviews; ‘The Crystal Bucket’ is one of the funniest books around. And ‘Cultural Amnesia’ is an amazing book for reminding you that thinking can be joyful. His influence is incalculable.”

James didn’t just observe from the sidelines. He spent plenty of time in front of the camera, hosting variety shows and interviewing fellow writers and other artists on Talking In The Library.

Clive James’ childhood in Sydney was rooted in tragedy. His father was a prisoner in a Japanese war camp. When he was finally released, he was killed when the plane carrying him home crashed.

“That was the cruelty of it,” James told NPR in 2009. “My mother had waited all that time, then she’d received notification he was alive after all, then all that was taken away from her when the plane crashed on the way back.”

James was five years old at the time. “I just didn’t know what was going on. I just knew that my mother was unhappy, and that’s always unsettling.” James told NPR it was “remarkable that I did not become first a delinquent, then a felon, and then a prisoner.” He said his “gift for the English language” is what saved him.

“Telling stories was crucial to my existence and indeed to my survival,” he said. “I was actually the kind of boy who was born to be picked on. I was snotty and know-it-all and I was ganged up on and chased and ragged until I hit on the scheme when I was being chased of suddenly sitting down and organizing a discussion group and telling stories.”

The death of James’ father haunted him. According to The Guardian, James was inspired to write the poem My Father Before Me after visiting his father’s grave at the Sai Wan war cemetery in Hong Kong.

O’Rourke says he could talk to James about anything. “Absolutely anything. I mean … It could be pocket lint. And Clive would have something insightful to say about it.”

In 2010, James was diagnosed with leukemia. He also suffered from emphysema and kidney failure. A statement from his agent reads that James “endured his ever multiplying illnesses with patience and good humor, knowing … that he had experienced more than his fair share of this ‘great, good world.’ “

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Ex-Polish President Who Serves On Burisma Board Suggests Hunter Biden Never Said Anything About His Father

Westlake Legal Group u7fBFdAqlD20ccmYeVG5d1rV025JICXlF9EfnrYEPQs Ex-Polish President Who Serves On Burisma Board Suggests Hunter Biden Never Said Anything About His Father r/politics

As a reminder, this subreddit is for civil discussion.

In general, be courteous to others. Debate/discuss/argue the merits of ideas, don’t attack people. Personal insults, shill or troll accusations, hate speech, any advocating or wishing death/physical harm, and other rule violations can result in a permanent ban.

If you see comments in violation of our rules, please report them.

For those who have questions regarding any media outlets being posted on this subreddit, please click here to review our details as to whitelist and outlet criteria.


I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Clarence Thomas criticizes Biden’s handling of confirmation process in new documentary

Westlake Legal Group Clarencethomasap1991 Clarence Thomas criticizes Biden's handling of confirmation process in new documentary Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/media fnc article 7ceaf9f1-9e32-544d-bcff-a44d47cd4b60

A new documentary shows Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas opening up about his confirmation process, criticizing the way people used his race against him and sharing his thoughts about former Vice President Joe Biden.

“I understood what he was trying to do. I didn’t really appreciate it,” Thomas said of Biden, the former chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee. Biden, who oversaw Thomas’ confirmation hearings in 1991, had tried to ask Thomas about “natural law” — a thinly veiled attempt to get at his views on abortion, according to the justice.

“Natural law was nothing more than a way of tricking me into talking about abortion,” Thomas said, according to ABC News.

His comments came as part of the documentary “Created Equal: Clarence Thomas in His Own Words.” The film is set to be released in early 2020, nearly 30 years after he assumed his spot on the nation’s highest court.

CLARENCE THOMAS FRIEND: JOE BIDEN TOLD THOMAS THAT HE DIDN’T BELIEVE ANITA HILL’S SEXUAL HARASSMENT CLAIMS

Manifold Prodcutions described it as a way to “tell the Clarence Thomas story truly and fully, without cover-ups or distortions.” It reportedly offers Thomas’ reflections on what was perhaps the most contentious Supreme Court confirmation process before Brett Kavanaugh’s.

“There’s different sets of rules for different people,” he said. “If you criticize a black person who’s more liberal, you’re a racist whereas if you can do whatever to me — or now, Ben Carson — and that’s fine because you’re not really black because you’re not doing what we expect black people to do.”

In the film, Thomas was apparently put off by Biden’s questioning. According to Time, he indicated the 2020 frontrunner had “no idea” what he was talking about.

WOULD IT GO VIRAL TODAY? EXPLOSIVE TESTIMONY IN CLARENCE THOMAS/ANITA HILL SAGA: NEW DOC

““One of the things you do in hearings is you have to sit there and look attentively at people you know have no idea what they’re talking about,” he said, referring to Biden’s questioning.

He also addressed professor Anita Hill’s accusations of sexual misconduct. “Do I have like stupid written on the back of my shirt? I mean come on. We know what this is all about,” he said.

More from Media

“People should just tell the truth: ‘This is the wrong black guy; he has to be destroyed.’ Just say it. Then now we’re at least honest with each other.”

He added that the goal of his opposition was to “get rid” of him and then “undermine” him.

CLARENCE THOMAS CALLS FOR ABANDONING ‘DEMONSTRABLY ERRONEOUS’ PRECENDENT, TOUCHING OFF ROE V. WADE SPECULATION

Thomas, the second African American to serve on the court, also spoke about the treatment he and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson experienced as black conservatives.

“There’s different sets of rules for different people,” he said in a clip released in October. “If you criticize a black person who’s more liberal, you’re a racist whereas if you can do whatever to me — or now, Ben Carson — and that’s fine because you’re not really black because you’re not doing what we expect black people to do.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Thomas famously described his confirmation process as a “high-tech lynching,” telling the Judiciary Committee they were participating in a “circus.”

“As a black American, as far as I’m concerned, it is a high-tech lynching for uppity blacks who in any way deign to think for themselves … and it is a message that unless you kowtow to an old order, this is what will happen to you — you will be lynched, destroyed, caricatured by a committee of the U.S. Senate rather than hung from a tree,” he said.

Westlake Legal Group Clarencethomasap1991 Clarence Thomas criticizes Biden's handling of confirmation process in new documentary Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/media fnc article 7ceaf9f1-9e32-544d-bcff-a44d47cd4b60   Westlake Legal Group Clarencethomasap1991 Clarence Thomas criticizes Biden's handling of confirmation process in new documentary Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/media fnc article 7ceaf9f1-9e32-544d-bcff-a44d47cd4b60

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Dutch dad accused of keeping kids on isolated farm charged with sex abuse

Prosecutors in the Netherlands have charged a father who allegedly held six of his children against their will on an isolated farm for nine years with sexually abusing two of his other children, authorities said Thursday.

The 67-year-old father was previously charged along with a 58-year-old Austrian national with illegal deprivation of liberty and abuse for their alleged role in keeping the six young adults on a farm near the village of Ruinerwold, about 80 miles northeast of Amsterdam. Police located the father and five young adults during an October raid triggered by a 25-year-old man — also part of the family — who raised the alarm at a local bar. Officers who went to the farm, which was largely obscured by trees and had a large vegetable garden, found improvised rooms where the family lived in effective isolation.

Westlake Legal Group Ruinerwold Dutch dad accused of keeping kids on isolated farm charged with sex abuse Samuel Chamberlain fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/crime fox news fnc/world fnc article 1f67d5ae-3db2-5bcd-97ba-a2c508889350

A view of the farm where a father and six children had been living in the cellar in Ruinerwold, northern Netherlands. (WILBERT BIJZITTER/ANP/AFP via Getty Images)

Investigators say the 67-year-old fathered a total of nine children with a woman who died in 2004. Prosecutors allege that he sexually abused two of his oldest three children, who had already left home. Details of when and where the alleged abuse happened were not released.

The father’s identity has not been made public by authorities, but numerous reports in the European media have identified him as Gerrit Jan van Dorsten. In October, the Family Federation for World Peace and Unification, also known as The Unification Church, told Fox News that van Dorsten “was briefly a member of our movement in the mid-1980s,” but added that he “is known to have suffered from mental health issues and left our organization in 1987.”

FLASHBACK: DUTCH MAN WHO REPORTED FAMILY IN FARMHOUSE ACTIVE ON SOCIAL MEDIA, HAD ESCAPED SEVERAL TIMES

Dutch media have reported that the father had written extensively online about his self-styled religious beliefs, including a video apparently showing him working out on a home-made fitness machine.

Prosecution spokeswoman Debby Homans told national broadcaster NOS that the father still has not been questioned for health reasons. She declined to elaborate on the health issues, but media have reported that he has suffered a stroke.

Meanwhile, a filmmaker working on a documentary about the case released statements from the oldest four children — the three who had left home and the 25-year-old who raised the alarm — who said that they “recognize” their experiences in the indictment and have faith in the legal proceedings.

However, the younger five siblings stood by their father.

“We have learned from our father to seek happiness in your relationship with God and to take your education into your own hands and we still believe in that,” they said in the statement.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Prosecutors said in a statement that the father and the 58-year-old man will remain jailed as investigations continue. The pair are expected to appear in court in January.

Both men are also accused of holding a 69-year-old Austrian man against his will in the eastern town of Meppel for several months in 2009, as well as money laundering after large amounts of cash were discovered at the farm.

Fox News’ Travis Fedschun and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Ruinerwold Dutch dad accused of keeping kids on isolated farm charged with sex abuse Samuel Chamberlain fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/crime fox news fnc/world fnc article 1f67d5ae-3db2-5bcd-97ba-a2c508889350   Westlake Legal Group Ruinerwold Dutch dad accused of keeping kids on isolated farm charged with sex abuse Samuel Chamberlain fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/crime fox news fnc/world fnc article 1f67d5ae-3db2-5bcd-97ba-a2c508889350

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Visits Afghanistan and Says He Reopened Talks With Taliban

Westlake Legal Group 28dc-prexy-facebookJumbo Trump Visits Afghanistan and Says He Reopened Talks With Taliban United States Politics and Government United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces Terrorism Taliban Defense Department Al Qaeda Afghanistan War (2001- ) Afghanistan

BAGRAM AIR FIELD, Afghanistan — President Trump paid an unannounced Thanksgiving visit to American troops in Afghanistan on Thursday and declared that he had reopened peace negotiations with the Taliban less than three months after scuttling talks in hopes of ending 18 years of war.

“The Taliban wants to make a deal, and we’re meeting with them,” Mr. Trump said during a meeting with Afghanistan’s president, Ashraf Ghani, at the main base for American forces north of Kabul.

“We’re going to stay until such time as we have a deal, or we have total victory, and they want to make a deal very badly,” Mr. Trump added even as he reaffirmed his desire to reduce the American military presence to 8,600 troops, down from about 12,000 to 13,000.

Mr. Trump’s sudden announcement on peace talks came at a critical moment in the United States’ long, drawn-out military venture in Afghanistan, a time when the country is mired in turmoil over disputed election results and Americans at home are increasingly tired of an operation that began shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks.

The scope and prospects of any renewed negotiations remained unclear and White House officials gave few details beyond Mr. Trump’s sudden revelation. On the flight to Afghanistan, Stephanie Grisham, the White House press secretary, had insisted that the secret trip was “truly about Thanksgiving and supporting the troops” and “nothing about the peace process” with the Taliban.

The Taliban made no official comment immediately after the late-night visit and Mr. Ghani afterward said little about any peace talks. “Both sides underscored that if the Taliban are sincere in their commitment to reaching a peace deal, they must accept a ceasefire,” Mr. Ghani wrote on Twitter. “We also emphasized that for any peace to last, terrorist safe havens outside Afghanistan must be dismantled.”

But while the Afghan government has long demanded that the Taliban agree to a cease-fire, no evidence has emerged that the group was willing to grant one. Instead, it has said it would discuss the possibility in negotiations with Afghanistan’s political leaders over the future of the country once the Americans agree to leave.

Mr. Trump made the visit, his first to Afghanistan, under a shroud of secrecy, arriving in a darkened airplane just after 8:30 p.m. local time and departing a few hours later on a trip that the White House had concealed from his public schedule for security reasons.

The president carried out the traditional role of feeding turkey and mashed potatoes to American troops in fatigues, then dined, mingled and posed for photographs before delivering remarks celebrating the American military before about 1,500 troops in an aircraft hangar.

But his visit also had an important political dimension. Mr. Trump, who angrily called off talks with the Taliban in September just as the sides appeared close to an accord, is searching for foreign policy achievements he can celebrate on the campaign trail over the next year. Several of his other marquee initiatives, including nuclear talks with North Korea and an effort to squeeze concessions out of Iran with economic pressure, have yielded few results.

During his short visit on the ground on Thursday, Mr. Trump boasted of American military successes against Al Qaeda and the Islamic State and suggested that the Taliban is eager to make a peace deal, but that he himself is indifferent to the outcome.

“The Taliban wants to make a deal — we’ll see if they make a deal. If they do, they do, and if they don’t, they don’t. That’s fine,” Mr. Trump said.

He also said that the Taliban is willing to agree to a cease-fire pending the more extensive accord, a matter of contention in the earlier talks but one that Mr. Ghani’s government has insisted on.

Mr. Trump arrived in Afghanistan one day after at least 13 people were killed when their car struck a roadside bomb on the way to a wedding party in Taliban-controlled territory in northern Afghanistan, officials said. Most of the victims were related to each other.

Mr. Trump’s suggestion that the United States would either reach a peace with the Taliban or achieve “total victory” was a sharp departure from his public expressions of frustration with what he has called America’s unending wars. American military leaders and diplomats have long ruled out the possibility of a military victory in Afghanistan. To the contrary, they say, a political settlement is the only path out of the war.

“Peace talks are the only responsible way forward, but it will be a hard and lengthy road,” said James Dobbins, who served as special envoy for Afghanistan and Pakistan under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama.

“Some time ago, the choice seemed to be between talking or winning on the battlefield,” Mr. Dobbins added. “More recently, the options under consideration seem to be talking or losing — that is, withdrawing unilaterally.”

The president made a similar point when he stuck to his prepared remarks, declaring that the war “will not be decided on the battlefield” and that “ultimately there will need to be a political solution.” The vow of “total victory” absent a peace negotiation appeared to be spontaneous.

American diplomats have quietly tried to keep the peace process alive since Mr. Trump called off the talks, using small measures like a prisoner swap to build trust. In recent weeks, informal meetings between the two sides have been reported, though neither side had publicly acknowledged that peace negotiations had formally resumed.

Even after Mr. Trump broke off negotiations, the Taliban refrained from criticizing him too harshly, which analysts took as evidence that the group still wanted a deal with the United States.

The Thanksgiving trip also allowed the president to stand against a backdrop of visible military support amid his decision to intervene in several high-profile war crimes cases, which has roiled the Pentagon and strained his relations with military leaders.

The secretary of the Navy, Richard V. Spencer, was fired after Mr. Trump refused to allow the Navy to oust Chief Petty Officer Edward Gallagher from the Navy SEALs in a case that has taken on enormous symbolic importance. Chief Gallagher was convicted of bringing discredit to the armed forces by posing for photos with a teenage captive’s dead body in Iraq but acquitted of the most serious allegations, including killing the captive with a hunting knife and threatening to kill SEALs who reported him.

“This was a shocking and unprecedented intervention in a low-level review,” Mr. Spencer wrote in The Washington Post on Wednesday.

Administration officials said Mr. Trump remains eager to bring an end to the American role in Afghanistan, which costs billions of dollars each year and continues to claim American lives. Earlier this month, Mr. Trump visited Dover Air Force Base in Delaware to pay respects during the return of two Americans killed in a Nov. 20 helicopter crash in Afghanistan.

The peace negotiations with the Taliban collapsed in stunning fashion on Sept. 7, after Mr. Trump disclosed via Twitter that he was quashing plans for a dramatic meeting at his Camp David presidential retreat with Taliban leaders and Afghan government officials. Angrily citing a Taliban attack in Kabul which killed an American soldier as the plans were coming together, Mr. Trump called off the discussions entirely. “As far as I’m concerned, they are dead,” he said.

It was never clear how imminent a peace agreement truly was. Taliban leaders said they had not committed to a Camp David visit, and Mr. Ghani, who was shut out of the talks, was deeply skeptical of a separate United States agreement with the Taliban that did not involve his government. Uncertainty about the country’s future in the wake of its unresolved election dispute could make brokering peace even more difficult now.

Mr. Trump may be proceeding on his own. The goal of his past talks with the Taliban was to trade an American pledge to withdrawal for a Taliban renunciation of its terrorist allies like Al Qaeda and the start of Taliban negotiations with Afghanistan’s government.

But American troops are already exiting the country as some units rotate out without being replaced. A month ago, the top American commander in Afghanistan, Gen. Austin Miller, said that United States forces in the country had dropped by 2,000 over the past year.

Some current and former military officials are worried that Mr. Trump’s appetite for a troop reduction he can boast about on the campaign trail as a fulfillment of his promise to scale back American foreign interventions could lead to serious national security risks.

Retired Gen. David Petraeus, a former commander of American forces in Afghanistan, has warned that a premature withdrawal could lead to a Taliban conquest of the country, and Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina and a close adviser to Mr. Trump on foreign policy, has said removing troops could “pave the way for another 9/11.”

Mr. Trump flew to Afghanistan on one of the modified blue-and-white 747 jets known as Air Force One when the president is onboard. He had flown to Florida on Tuesday in another one of those planes but left it behind for his secret trip, which involved first flying back to Washington, where he boarded an alternate plane out of public view.

Ms. Grisham acknowledged that the White House had arranged for Mr. Trump’s Twitter account to post generic Thanksgiving messages while he was in the air to prevent an unusually long silence that might draw suspicion about his activities.

Joining Mr. Trump were his acting chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney; the national security adviser, Robert C. O’Brien; and Senator John Barrasso, Republican of Wyoming and a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee who has regularly visited troops in Afghanistan on holidays.

Reporting was contributed by Peter Baker from Washington and Mujib Mashal from Kabul, Afghanistan.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com