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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 128)

Dorian's legacy: The slowest, strongest hurricane to ever hit the Bahamas

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Entire communities were flattened and roads washed out while hospitals and airports were swamped by several feet of water due to Hurricane Dorian. Andrew West

As Hurricane Dorian moves away from the United States, it’s now certain that the storm’s lasting legacy will be its slow, torturous rampage as a Category 5 monster across the Bahamas over the Labor Day weekend, which left dozens dead and unimaginable destruction. 

With sustained winds of 185 mph, Dorian was the strongest hurricane on record to strike the Bahamas since records began in 1851.

It was also the first Category 5 to make landfall on Grand Bahama Island, and at 185 mph was the strongest hurricane on record to hit Abaco Island.

SEE IT: Incredible before and after images reveal Dorian’s destruction in the Bahamas

What was even more stunning was its slow path across the Bahamas: According to Colorado State University meteorologist Phil Klotzbach, Dorian tracked only about 25 miles in 24 hours – the shortest distance tracked by an Atlantic major hurricane in a 24-hour period since Hurricane Betsy in 1965.

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Weather Underground meteorologist Jeff Masters said that “portions of (Dorian’s) eyewall lashed Great Abaco and Grand Bahama islands with Category 5 winds for a total of 22 hours before the great hurricane finally weakened to Category 4 strength.

“In records going back over a century, there are no cases where an Atlantic Category 5 hurricane has impacted a land area for as long as Dorian battered the Bahamas,” Masters said.

Atleast 43 people are reported dead in the Bahamas and the death toll is expected to rise significantly. Property losses in the Bahamas could hit $7 billion.

 “We expect (the death toll) to rise,” Health Minister Duane Sands said late Friday in a text message to The Associated Press.

Security Minister Marvin Dames said authorities are striving to reach everyone, but the crews can’t just bulldoze their way through fallen trees and other rubble because there might be bodies not yet recovered.

“We have been through this before, but not at this level of devastation,” Dames said. “These are very serious times and very sensitive times.”

The storm also left its mark in the record books in other ways:

As of Friday, with its landfall in North Carolina, Dorian has been a hurricane for a total of nine days. This is longer than most Atlantic storms: Klotzbach said that only about 10% of all Atlantic hurricanes last longer than eight days. 

While this may seem like a lot, it’s still a long way from the record of 19.5 days, which was set by Hurricane Ginger in 1971, according to Klotzbach. Ginger took a long and loopy path around the Atlantic before finally making landfall in North Carolina in late September 1971. 

In addition, Dorian has been a named storm for 13 days, which includes its first few days as a tropical storm. That places it in a tie for 5th place for most storm days by an Atlantic hurricane that formed in August, Klotzbach said.

What’s in name? Here’s how naming hurricanes works

Because of the death and destruction caused by Dorian, the storm’s name will almost certainly be retired by the World Meteorological Organization, the United Nations’ group that determines which hurricane names will be used in upcoming years. 

A nation hardest hit by a storm can request its name be removed because the storm was so deadly or costly that future use of the name would be insensitive. The names of two of last year’s most destructive storms – Florence and Michael – were retired by the WMO earlier this year.

Contributing: Associated Press

Reach Doyle Rice at @USATODAYWeather

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Dorian's legacy: The slowest, strongest hurricane to ever hit the Bahamas

Katrina, Maria, Harvey and Sandy are all infamous names belonging to some of the worst hurricanes in history. But where do these names come from? Just the FAQs, USA TODAY

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/09/06/hurricane-dorian-becomes-strongest-slowest-hurricane-hit-bahamas-record/2232225001/

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Biden Wants to Work With ‘the Other Side.’ This Supreme Court Battle Explains Why.

Joseph R. Biden Jr. was on the brink of victory, but he was unsatisfied.

Mr. Biden, the 44-year-old chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, was poised to watch his colleagues reject President Ronald Reagan’s formidable nominee to the Supreme Court, Robert H. Bork. The vote was unlikely to be close. Yet Mr. Biden was hovering in the Senate chamber, plying Senator John W. Warner of Virginia, a Republican of modestly conservative politics and regal bearing, with arguments about Bork’s record.

Rejecting a Supreme Court nominee was an extraordinary act of defiance, and Mr. Biden did not want a narrow vote that could look like an act of raw partisan politics.

“We already had Bork beat,” said Mark Gitenstein, who was then chief counsel to Mr. Biden’s committee. “But Biden really wanted to get Warner because he had such stature.”

Mr. Biden’s entreaties prevailed: Mr. Warner became one of 58 senators to vote against Bork, and one of six Republicans.

The Senate’s resounding rejection of Judge Bork in the fall of 1987 was a turning point, the first time it spurned a nominee to the high court for primarily ideological reasons. The vote ensured that the court’s swing seat would not go to a man with a long history of criticizing rulings on the rights of African-Americans and women. It also enraged a generation of conservatives and transformed the judge’s name into an ominous verb: Fearful of getting “Borked,” no nominee would ever again speak so freely about his views as Bork did.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160201737_1e2ce8d2-d706-499a-97fd-d70873992289-articleLarge Biden Wants to Work With ‘the Other Side.’ This Supreme Court Battle Explains Why. United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Jr Supreme Court (US) Senate Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Liberalism (US Politics) Democratic Party Conservatism (US Politics) Bork, Robert H Biden, Joseph R Jr

The Senate’s resounding rejection of Judge Robert H. Bork in the fall of 1987 was a turning point, the first time it spurned a nominee to the high court for primarily ideological reasons. CreditJose R. Lopez/The New York Times

It was also a personal turning point for Mr. Biden. In the Bork debate, Mr. Biden’s political ethos found its most vivid and successful expression.

Lessons In Power
A series that explores how the 2020 candidates learned to wield influence.

A review of Mr. Biden’s conduct in the debate — including interviews with 16 people directly involved in the nomination fight, and a review of the hearings and Mr. Biden’s speeches — yielded a portrait of Mr. Biden as an ambitious young senator determined to achieve a vital liberal goal by decidedly unradical means.

The strategy Chairman Biden deployed then is the same one he is now proposing to bring to the White House as President Biden.

In the 1980s, as today, he saw bipartisan compromise not as a version of surrender, but as a vital tool for achieving Democratic goals.

Then, as now, Mr. Biden saw the culture and traditions of the Senate not as crippling obstacles, but as instruments that could be bent to his advantage.

And in both defining moments — his leadership of the Bork hearings and his third presidential campaign — Mr. Biden made persuading moderates, rather than exciting liberals, his guiding objective.

Mr. Biden, whose campaign declined to make him available for an interview, has strained to defend this approach in the 2020 presidential primary, offering only a halting rationale for a political worldview that other Democrats see as out of date. His rivals have branded him as a timid and even reactionary figure — a creature of the Senate cloakroom who partnered with former segregationists to pass draconian anti-crime legislation and joined with the business lobby to tighten bankruptcy laws.

And Mr. Biden’s opponents point not to the Bork hearings but a different confirmation battle as proof that his instincts are flawed. Four years after Bork was defeated, Mr. Biden would again take an accommodating approach to his Republican colleagues during Justice Clarence Thomas’s confirmation hearings, allowing harsh and invasive questioning of Anita Hill, the law professor who accused the nominee of sexual harassment. Mr. Biden would later express “regret” for the treatment she endured.

But he has never regretted the conciliatory style that led him to triumph against Bork. In that process, every important decision Mr. Biden made was aimed at winning over conservative Democrats and moderate Republicans — men like Mr. Warner.

Mr. Biden and Mr. Bork sharing a light moment during the hearings.CreditJose R. Lopez/The New York Times

Now 92, Mr. Warner said in an interview that his memories of the Bork hearings had grown foggy over the years. But two impressions were indelible, he said. The first concerned Reagan’s nominee: “I never encountered a man with a shorter temper,” Mr. Warner said.

The second concerned the caliber of the Senate’s deliberations.

“It was a real, solid, good debate, led by Biden,” Mr. Warner said. “He showed extraordinary leadership.”

The outcome was not foreordained, for either Bork or Mr. Biden. The debate unfolded at a moment of humiliation for Mr. Biden, whose first campaign for president unraveled as the Bork hearings approached their climax. And the judge was no timid adversary, as the journalist Ethan Bronner wrote in a book on the nomination.

“Robert Bork,” Mr. Bronner wrote, “was a man of war.”

Mr. Biden was seated behind a desk in a spacious living room adjoining his study at his Wilmington, Del., home. A few aides sat or stood around the room, where pizza was in generous supply. Squared off against Mr. Biden was Robert H. Bork — or rather, a convincing simulacrum played by the constitutional scholar Laurence Tribe.

Mr. Tribe and Mr. Biden would spar for hours in a series of sessions that August, joined occasionally by other legal experts who would help Mr. Biden hone his queries on subjects from antitrust regulation to sexual privacy.

“Biden’s questions were really smart, and they also needed some sharpening,” Mr. Tribe said in an interview, citing Mr. Biden’s tendency to “ask one thing and mean something slightly different.”

Mr. Biden came to those training sessions by a jagged path, shaped by pressure from progressive activists and the delicate politics of the Judiciary Committee. He was arming himself to oppose Bork, but not with the methods of the left.

Protesters against Mr. Biden’s plans to block the nomination of Mr. Bork for Supreme Court Justice. CreditJim Cole/Associated Press

On the day Bork was nominated, liberals viewed Mr. Biden with suspicion. Taking over one of the Senate’s great committees at a boyish — for the Senate — age of 44, Mr. Biden had already split with progressives on the issue of busing as a means of desegregating schools. Until Bork, the authors Michael Pertschuk and Wendy Schaetzel would write, Mr. Biden “had been reluctant to challenge Reagan’s transformation of the federal judiciary.”

The previous November, the soon-to-be chairman had given liberals new reason for concern, suggesting to The Philadelphia Inquirer that he might one day vote to put Bork on the Supreme Court, should he be Reagan’s next nominee.

“I’m not Teddy Kennedy,” he told the newspaper.

When Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr., a flexible conservative, resigned from the court in late June, Mr. Biden found himself in the shadow of Kennedy, the party’s leading liberal, and laboring to reconcile his own moderate instincts with a mood of alarm on the left. When the White House announced Bork’s nomination on the first day of July, Kennedy delivered a thunderous warning from the Senate floor: In “Robert Bork’s America,” Kennedy said, “women would be forced into back-alley abortions, blacks would sit at segregated lunch counters.”

The scathing address was a call to arms for the left, and it helped animate a coalition of progressives — led by feminists, civil rights activists and labor unions — that applied pressure to undecided senators throughout the summer.

“His record was so extensive, and it touched almost every issue of importance to American life,” said Nan Aron, a leading anti-Bork activist. “It wasn’t simply a single issue that caused people to be alarmed.”

Another purpose of Kennedy’s speech, his allies have said, was to ensure Mr. Biden would not cave.

“One of the reasons for ‘Robert Bork’s America’ was to freeze Biden,” Jeffrey Blattner, a Kennedy aide, would say decades later, in an oral history for the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate. “He’s running for president. We didn’t want to leave him any choice.”

Mr. Biden quickly aligned himself with Kennedy, and, at his liberal colleague’s urging, secured an agreement from Senator Strom Thurmond — the 84-year-old former segregationist who was the Judiciary Committee’s top Republican — to delay Bork’s hearings until September.

“Biden was under a lot of pressure, particularly from the liberal senators,” said former Senator Dennis DeConcini of Arizona, a centrist Democrat who said he began the confirmation process favorably disposed toward Bork. “At first, I was leaning strongly to vote for him.”

Senator Strom Thurmond, Joseph Biden, and Edward Kennedy.CreditJohn Duricka/Associated Press

Even as he pledged to oppose Bork, Mr. Biden made clear to progressive leaders in a private meeting that he saw his role as sharply distinct from theirs. He would play an inside game aimed at swaying Senate moderates, starting with the four undecided members of his committee: Mr. DeConcini and two other Democrats, Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia and Howell Heflin of Alabama, and a Republican, Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania.

Ralph Neas, a civil rights activist who joined the liberals’ initial meeting with Mr. Biden, said the chairman conveyed “that he would take the lead and we would try to put together a bipartisan coalition.”

“Biden’s street cred with a lot of the centrists was quite high,” Mr. Neas said.

Mr. Biden was blunter with his aides: He would not adopt Kennedy’s rhetoric or make abortion his central cause. According to a book Mr. Gitenstein published in 1992 about the confirmation fight, Mr. Biden feared Bork would overturn Roe v. Wade but told aides he did not see the case as “great constitutional law.” More disturbing to him — and, he believed, more likely to sway undecided voters — was a Connecticut case on contraception that revealed Bork’s doubts about a broader right to privacy.

“It really concerns me more than abortion,” Mr. Biden is quoted as saying in the book.

In their sessions, Mr. Tribe said, the future vice president wrestled not just with Bork’s record but also with the idea of disqualifying nominees based on individual issues.

“I remember pushing back on Biden, saying, ‘If you think Roe v. Wade really ought to be the law of the land, shouldn’t that count?’” Mr. Tribe recalled. “He said, ‘Yes, it should count a lot, but I still don’t want to have a flat litmus test.’”

Mr. Tribe remembered thinking: “This guy’s a little bit more cautious than I am. But that’s fine, he’s playing a different role.”

Mr. Biden’s self-assigned role was readily apparent as the Bork hearings began in mid-September. Beaming down at the judge from a crowded dais, Mr. Biden praised him as man of towering achievement and “provocative” views. Flanked by Kennedy at one elbow and Thurmond at the other, Mr. Biden said the hearings should not be “clouded by strident rhetoric from the far left or the far right.”

“Anytime you feel you want to expand on an answer, you are not bound by time,” Mr. Biden encouraged Bork, adding in a tone of levity, “Go ahead and bog us down.”

In the Bork hearings, every important decision Mr. Biden made was aimed at winning over conservative Democrats and moderate Republicans.CreditJose R. Lopez/The New York Times

The judge, bearded and broad shouldered, did not recognize the trap.

Few men could have been more prepared to face a constitutional interrogation. A former Yale Law School professor who served as the country’s solicitor general and, amid the maelstrom of Watergate, as acting attorney general, Bork brought to the hearings a reputation for quick eloquence and utter mastery of the law.

Mr. Biden had no such reputation, and the columnist George F. Will spoke for much of Washington when he predicted Bork would be “more than a match for Biden.”

The chairman gave his colleagues wide latitude to question Bork, whose testimony consumed five days. It culminated in an unusual Saturday hearing that was dominated by an hourslong debate between Bork and Specter, a former district attorney who frequently rode the Amtrak rails with Mr. Biden, about the meaning of constitutional intent. Mr. Biden had offered Specter half an hour for his questions; when Specter balked at the time limit, Mr. Biden relented and opened the way for a crucial exchange.

“His debate with my father on constitutional law did reveal him to be not sufficiently respectful of precedent, which pushed my father against him, and pushed other swing senators against him,” said Shanin Specter, the senator’s son and a Philadelphia lawyer. “It would not have happened if Biden, as chair, hadn’t permitted the hearings to go exactly as long as they needed to go.”

Mr. Biden sought, too, to quash attacks on Bork that he saw as risking political backlash. He shot down a plan to ambush Bork with a recording of a speech he gave in 1985, insisting on sharing it with the judge before airing it in the committee. And Mr. Biden and his aides refused a request from a number of prominent activists, including Ralph Nader, to testify in opposition to Bork. The left was applying powerful pressure from outside the Senate, but Mr. Biden preferred that its leaders stay there — on the outside.

Ms. Aron, who would later clash with Mr. Biden over the nomination of Justice Thomas in 1991, said the combination of popular pressure on the Senate and Mr. Biden’s high-minded hearings doomed the nominee.

“What defeated Robert Bork was public pressure,” Ms. Aron said. “But what allowed the public to engage was a review of Bork’s record.”

And Bork did himself few favors: While he assured senators, in his rumbling voice, that he would not overturn rulings capriciously, he struggled to explain away past comments decrying “dozens” of shoddy Supreme Court decisions or deriding the Civil Rights Act of 1964, or ridiculing the concept of a constitutional right to privacy. He startled even some allies by describing as “troublesome” the reasoning behind a 1954 case desegregating public schools in the nation’s capital.

In his questions, Mr. Biden posed as a mere mortal grappling with the ideas of a giant.

“Clearly, I do not want to get into a debate with a professor,” Mr. Biden stressed, prodding Mr. Bork about the Griswold v. Connecticut case that ended a state prohibition on birth control: “As I hear you, you do not believe there is a general right of privacy that is in the Constitution.”

“Not one derived in that fashion,” Bork said of the popular decision. “There may be other arguments, and I do not want to pass upon those.”

Watching Bork’s testimony, his political backers knew he was losing. He was articulate, but he was also argumentative. His knowledge of the law was powerful, his political antennae were not.

“I can’t blame Biden,” reflected Tom Korologos, the Republican lobbyist tasked with ushering Bork onto the court. “I blame Bork and Specter, and the other senators, for going on and on.”

Every swing vote on Mr. Biden’s committee swung against Bork, sending him to the floor with a negative recommendation by a vote of 9 to 5. The White House offered Bork the chance to withdraw; he chose martyrdom instead.

Mr. Biden, right, shakes hands with Republican Senator Alan Simpson after it was voted not to recommend the confirmation of Mr. Bork. CreditJohn Duricka/Associated Press

His supporters gave him that much, accusing Bork’s opponents of bowing to activists like Mr. Neas and Ms. Aron. “The man’s been trashed in our house,” Senator John Danforth, Republican of Missouri, lamented on the Senate floor. “Some of us helped generate the trashing. Others of us yielded to it.”

Mr. Biden called Mr. Danforth’s complaint an insult to the Senate.

“I have a higher opinion of the ability of my colleagues to do what’s right than, apparently, the senator from Missouri does,” he said.

Mr. Biden’s approach to the Bork nomination was a legislative and political success, one he experienced as personal redemption after his presidential candidacy crumbled. It brought to maturity the strategic instincts that defined him in subsequent battles — including his contested stewardship of the Thomas hearings — and that shape his candidacy today.

The fate of Mr. Biden’s campaign, and perhaps a future presidency, may hinge on whether that version of leadership, defined by collegiality and adherence to procedure, can inspire Democrats and coax cooperation from Republicans. In the presidential race, there is no Ted Kennedy to sound a trumpet for the left while Mr. Biden plays a methodical inside game. And there are no Republicans to be found in the Senate like Specter, who eventually, at Mr. Biden’s urging, quit the G.O.P. to become a Democrat before his death in 2012.

Still, Mr. Gitenstein said he had encouraged the former vice president to draw public attention to his role in the 1987 court fight. The defeat of Robert Bork averted a solidly conservative majority, handing the court’s decisive seat to the more pliant Anthony M. Kennedy, who became a decisive figure in a generation’s worth of eclectic rulings on subjects from campaign finance and union rights to abortion and the legal definition of marriage.

“I don’t think he or anyone else makes enough of the fact that, but for Biden, Roe would be dead 30 years ago, and, but for Biden, we wouldn’t have the gay marriage decision,” Mr. Gitenstein said. “I’ve talked to him about it. He’s got so much on his platter.”

Mr. DeConcini, who at 82 is a supporter of Mr. Biden’s campaign, said he hoped a strategy of moderation could prevail again.

But he admitted to having doubts.

“I’d like to think so, I really would,” Mr. DeConcini said. “I’m just not sure.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Veteran model Kathy Ireland and lookalike daughter Chloe step out for New York Fashion Week

Double take!

Veteran model Kathy Ireland, 56, and her 16-year-old daughter, Chloe, stepped out on Thursday night and turned heads.

The duo walked the red carpet at The Daily Front Row’s 7th annual Fashion Media Awards in New York City and practically look like twins.

CHRISTIE BRINKLEY, 65, SHOWS OFF SVELTE FIGURE IN AMERICAN FLAG INSPIRED BATHING SUIT

The former Sports Illustrated model donned a low-cut black dress with silver jewelry and a clutch that matched her daughter’s silver dress which featured a high leg slit.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1172634898 Veteran model Kathy Ireland and lookalike daughter Chloe step out for New York Fashion Week Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/style fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6820c3d1-4ff1-53fc-b8bf-ccd86ed93d41

Chloe Olsen (L) and Kathy Ireland attend The Daily Front Row’s 7th annual Fashion Media Awards. (Brian Ach/Getty Images for Daily Front Row, Inc.)

Ireland began her modeling career in the ’80s modeling for 13 consecutive Sports Illustrated swimsuit issues and appeared on covers of such magazines like Vogue, Cosmopolitan, Forbes, and Mademoiselle.

AGE-DEFYING ELIZABETH HURLEY FLAUNTS PLUNGING YELLOW BIKINI TOP AT 54

She then transitioned into acting and booked roles on “Melrose Place” and “Boy Meets World.”

And in 1993, Ireland founded Kathy Ireland Worldwide, a design and marketing company, which grew to have an estimated $2.5 billion in revenue from retail in 2015. She designs items for the home as well as clothes and jewelry.

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Ireland married her husband Greg Olsen, a doctor, in 1988 and they also share daughter Lily, 20, and son Erik, 25.

Westlake Legal Group kathyireland Veteran model Kathy Ireland and lookalike daughter Chloe step out for New York Fashion Week Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/style fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6820c3d1-4ff1-53fc-b8bf-ccd86ed93d41   Westlake Legal Group kathyireland Veteran model Kathy Ireland and lookalike daughter Chloe step out for New York Fashion Week Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/style fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6820c3d1-4ff1-53fc-b8bf-ccd86ed93d41

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Trump Administration Is Not Funding Legal Aid In 3 Migrant Children’s Shelters

Westlake Legal Group 5cf19be1210000e108e686d1 Trump Administration Is Not Funding Legal Aid In 3 Migrant Children’s Shelters

The Trump administration is failing to fund legal services for detained immigrant children ― some under 5 years old ― in three shelters, HuffPost has learned. That violates federal law and could have life-threatening consequences for the minors, immigration lawyers say. 

In July, HuffPost reported that the administration was not providing legal services to children in a now-closed temporary facility in Carrizo Springs, Texas, which held a few hundred immigrants, even though federal law and a court settlement require the government to inform detained migrant kids of their legal rights and to ensure access to counsel “to the greatest extent practicable.”

At the time, the government acknowledged that it was not paying for legal aid in the shelter, which a spokesperson chalked up to budgetary issues that would soon be resolved. 

The government now claims it is funding legal aid for immigrant minors in all shelters. But multiple legal aid attorneys told HuffPost that’s not true. These lawyers said they are working for free, without the government money they usually receive for their services. 

Legal service organizations confirmed that the federal Office of Refugee Resettlement, which is responsible for sheltering kids detained at the border without their parents, is not paying for legal aid in two recently opened shelters. One in Phoenix houses children under 5 years old, and another in Modesto, California, holds teenage mothers and their children. There is also no legal service contract in place for a separate shelter in Phoenix that is being reopened and is expected to start detaining up to 420 children as early as next week, according to Golden McCarthy, the children’s program director at the Florence Immigrant and Refugee Rights Project, which provides aid to detained children in Arizona. 

Without legal help, immigrant kids must go through complex legal proceedings on their own and may more easily be deported back to violent situations in their home countries. 

“The stakes are literally life and death,” said Jennifer Podkul, an interim vice president at Kids In Need of Defense (KIND), which provides services to the Modesto shelter. “If a kid does not know how to tell their story to an adjudicator, our government runs the risk of sending a child back to their death.” 

The stakes are literally life and death. If a kid does not know how to tell their story to an adjudicator, our government runs the risk of sending a child back to their death. Jennifer Podkul of Kids In Need of Defense

But in a statement to HuffPost, an Office of Refugee Resettlement spokesperson denied that there was an issue with the contracts and said the government is now providing funding for legal services in all shelters. 

“ORR has completed the necessary contractual modifications in assuring the continuity of holistic legal services to all UAC [unaccompanied alien children] in ORR care provider programs,” the spokesperson wrote in an email. “The availability and assignment of local providers at ORR care provider programs is currently the contractual responsibility of Vera.” 

“Vera” is the Vera Institute of Justice, a nonprofit research organization that has six regional contracts with the government under which it then subcontracts with legal service providers to visit the shelters. 

A representative from that organization told HuffPost, “Any statement that Vera has withheld services we are allowed to provide, or failed to advocate for additional services where they are needed, is simply false.” 

In the absence of government funding, lawyers have been visiting the shelters pro bono to make sure detained children know their rights, understand what to expect in immigration court and receive at least some legal representation. An unaccompanied child with legal representation is four times more likely to be granted status in the U.S. than one without, according to an analysis of court data by Syracuse University

Legal aid lawyers said that since June they have received no warning from ORR before a new shelter opens. McCarthy only found out the Phoenix center was being reopened in early September, she said, when she received an email from an employee of Southwest Key, the nonprofit operator for the shelter. McCarthy’s team is now scrambling to come up with a plan to service the anticipated hundreds of children on a pro bono basis.

Children in detention centers usually receive a date to show up in immigration court, where they have to answer basic questions about themselves, their families and the legal relief they are seeking. McCarthy said her staff recently helped a 4-year-old girl tell the judge difficult information about her family and how she wanted to be reunited with her sister ― whose whereabouts she didn’t know ― and return to Central America. 

Without her organization’s help, McCarthy said the 4-year-old would have been in court alone, struggling to navigate a legal system too complicated for most adults to grasp. 

“It’s really on the immigrant typically to explain their case,” she said, “and when you have a client who is 4 years old, they truly cannot explain or defend themselves.” 

If children miss their initial court hearing, they are given a deportation order to leave the country. But without lawyers visiting the shelters, kids might not be aware of how the process works and the consequences of being absent. 

“How will that 15-year-old child know she has to attend court or will be deported?” said Katie Annand, a managing attorney at KIND’s San Francisco and Fresno, California, offices. “She hasn’t been to law school and has had no preparation session on the immigration court process.” 

I don’t think one has to be a conspiracy theorist to believe that the government is attempting to systematically dismantle every framework of support for any immigrant in this country. Jonathan Ryan of RAICES

Some immigration advocates told HuffPost they saw the lack of legal aid funding as part of a larger attempt to strip immigrants of their basic rights. 

“Our government is engaged in premeditated, deliberate acts of cruelty against children,” said Jonathan Ryan, the executive director at the migrant advocacy and legal aid group Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education (RAICES). “I don’t think one has to be a conspiracy theorist to believe that the government is attempting to systematically dismantle every framework of support for any immigrant in this country.”

KIND and the Florence Project are trying to meet the children’s needs in Modesto and Phoenix, but it’s a struggle without additional government funding. It can take KIND’s lawyers an entire day to travel to and from the Modesto shelter, where the organization is providing pro bono services, and KIND lacks the money to hire additional staff, Annand said. They alternate trips to the shelter with lawyers from another legal service organization to make the work more manageable, but it’s not a permanent solution, especially if the number of detained kids grows. 

In Phoenix, McCarthy said the Florence Project would ideally hire a full-time team of six people to service a shelter with hundreds of kids, but that’s not possible without government funding. Instead, she will have to ask existing staff to take on the additional work, which again is not a sustainable solution. 

McCarthy hopes the government will come through with a contract, but worries about the long-term consequences if ORR does not fund legal aid. 

“I think that children will inevitably go into court by themselves,” she said. “If a child doesn’t have parents or a legal guardian moving through the process with them, then they are really doing it on their own. That’s concerning.”

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Justin Haskins: Sleep well, Ocasio-Cortez, and consider having a family. Here’s the truth about our planet

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6079358738001_6079366521001-vs Justin Haskins: Sleep well, Ocasio-Cortez, and consider having a family. Here's the truth about our planet Justin Haskins fox-news/us/environment/climate-change fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article a5d1782d-fc31-55ee-8af2-3225dd98d3a9

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., is absolutely terrified of climate change — I mean really, terrified. In fact, according to the freshman congresswoman, she’s so scared of climate change that it’s waking her up “in the middle of the night.”

“Even while I was on vacation, I woke up in the middle of the night, at 3:30 in the morning, just concerned about climate change,” Ocasio-Cortez said in an Instagram livestream recently.

Ocasio-Cortez even wondered if, in a world with a changing climate, she should have children. “I’m 29 years old,” she said. “I really struggle sometimes with the idea of how to be a policymaker and potentially have a family in the time of climate change. And it really, like, freaks me out and it can be really, really scary.”

DANIEL TURNER: LABOR DAY BETRAYAL – OCASIO-CORTEZ LEADS DEM CANDIDATES TO EMBRACE ANTI-LABOR POLICIES

Wow, that’s depressing. I almost feel bad for her.

Ocasio-Cortez’s post came just one day after she lamented that there could be an untold number of ancient diseases hidden within glaciers, and that if those glaciers melt because of climate change, well, humanity could be in huge trouble.

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“Scientists fear that there’s a potential that a lot of diseases could escape these melted glaciers, things that were frozen for thousands of years, and that they’re going to get into our water,” Ocasio-Cortez said, “and that humans could contract them, and they are going to be diseases that are thousands of years old that have vectors that we are not prepared for, that we have never seen.”

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On other occasions, Ocasio-Cortez has warned that climate change will cause the dangerous sea-level rise and lead to deadly increases in mosquito populations, along with dozens of other horror stories.

I suppose if I believed that climate change will cause oceans to swallow up whole cities and release killer diseases that could wreak havoc on the human race, I, too, might think twice about bringing more humans into the world. But unlike Ocasio-Cortez, I have absolutely no trouble sleeping at night, and when I do, it sure as heck isn’t because of climate change.

Does the evidence show Earth has warmed over the past century? Yes, of course. Is warming likely to continue for the next several decades, at least? Yes, probably.

The hard data overwhelmingly shows that recent warming has not been catastrophic and that humans are better off in our moderately warmer world.

But the available evidence shows that warming is not dangerous and not likely to be catastrophic, despite numerous dire reports from climate alarmists like Ocasio-Cortez and biased government agencies, which are often more interested in accomplishing political goals than engaging in real scientific inquiry.

For example, the evidence clearly shows that sea-level rise is not accelerating at a dangerous pace and that it’s in line with sea-level rise measured prior to the widespread use of fossil fuels.

And I know this will come as a shock to Ocasio-Cortez and her climate alarmist acolytes, but the hard data overwhelmingly shows that recent warming has not been catastrophic and that humans are better off in our moderately warmer world that they would otherwise be, because lower global temperatures are associated with more significant societal problems, like famine and weather-related deaths.

As James Taylor, my colleague and a senior fellow in environment and climate issues for The Heartland Institute, noted in a recent policy study, “During the past 150 years, as Earth has emerged from the Little Ice Age, the warming climate has brought immeasurable benefits that continue today, including crop yields that have set records in the United States and globally nearly every year.

Higher temperatures have also spurred a significant increase in global plant life, as measured by NASA satellites. Recent warming has led to a reduction in persistently lower temperatures, which researchers estimate kill 20 times more people than higher temperatures, and objective data show extreme weather and climate events have actually become slightly less frequent and severe in recent decades, despite numerous false or misleading media reports to the contrary.”

Taylor isn’t alone. Numerous scientists have made similar observations in recent decades, a reality the mainstream press continues to ignore. For example, noted meteorologist Joe Bastardi, who now serves as the chief meteorologist at weatherbell.com, has found that “in the fossil fuel era, in spite of a four-fold increase in population,” the number of deaths related to climate has “plummeted.”

Patrick Michaels, Ph.D., a former senior fellow in environmental studies at the Cato Institute, noted in 2018, “we don’t live in the best of all possible climates,” adding, “So what’s happened as it’s warmed this half a degree in the late 20th century and the CO2 has gone up and up in the atmosphere, well, what we’ve done is we’ve created a greener and greener planet and the greening of the Planet Earth is profound.”

Alarmists like Ocasio-Cortez also ignore the many important economic benefits provided by affordable, reliable energy sources like oil and natural gas. Unlike more expensive wind and solar, conventional energies work regardless if the wind is blowing or the sun is shining. Many conventional energy power facilities, especially nuclear, often last significantly longer than solar or wind facilities. And conventional energy sources require a lot less land.

If Ocasio-Cortez had it her way and the country was forced to abandon oil, natural gas, and coal — one of the most important provisions in her “Green New Deal” plan — more than 100 million acres of land would need to be consumed by solar facilities and wind turbines. That’s a landmass larger than the state of California. How many hundreds of millions of animals and countless animal habitats would need to be wiped out in the name of “saving the planet”?

And where does Ocasio-Cortez think all of the required rare earth minerals needed to build and operate those windmills and solar panels would come from? Someone is going to have to dig them out of the earth, destroying even more land. And in some cases, the only place to find these materials is in countries with notorious and abysmal human rights records, like the Congo, which has frequently experienced intense violence dnd even permits child labor.

Millions of dead animals, more than 100 million acres of destroyed land, significantly higher energy costs, and child labor — now, that sounds like a nightmare worth keeping you up at night.

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Will global warming cause some problems, yes, but probably not nearly as many as proposals like the Green New Deal. And whatever problems do come humans’ way will likely be outweighed by the benefits of warming and could easily be dealt with through technological innovations, human ingenuity, and, if necessary, behavioral changes.

So, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez, feel free to have as many kids as you’d like and sleep well. Humans are going to be just fine!

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6079358738001_6079366521001-vs Justin Haskins: Sleep well, Ocasio-Cortez, and consider having a family. Here's the truth about our planet Justin Haskins fox-news/us/environment/climate-change fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article a5d1782d-fc31-55ee-8af2-3225dd98d3a9   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6079358738001_6079366521001-vs Justin Haskins: Sleep well, Ocasio-Cortez, and consider having a family. Here's the truth about our planet Justin Haskins fox-news/us/environment/climate-change fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article a5d1782d-fc31-55ee-8af2-3225dd98d3a9

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Surveillance rights, deleting people from photos, smart mirrors, and more: Tech Q&A

Video Doorbell Rights

Q: I have a Ring video doorbell and am deeply concerned about my rights. Can the police department get access to the footage? I heard this is happening.

A: Video evidence is gold in prosecutions, so, understandably, the police would be interested in seizing street-level surveillance. But Ring owners should be aware of how their service can be used and their rights when law enforcement comes knocking. Owned by Amazon, Ring has garnered a lot of criticism from civil liberties experts, and nobody wants to live in a full-on panopticon. Make sure you know what you’re signing up for. On my site, I have a map that shows the over 400 police departments working with Ring. Tap or click here to learn more about Amazon’s nationwide police partnership.

Tune Into My Show

Q: I used to listen to your show on WLS 890 AM in Chicago. I moved. Is there a list of radio stations that broadcast your show?

A: It’s a good thing we live in the 21st century! In years past, you could have turned that dial all day long, looking for a station that carried my show, and you would probably only find it by accident. Even in our digital age, finding a specific show on a specific frequency in a specific city can be pretty hard. I’ve made that process instantaneous, thanks to my online station finder. All you have to do is enter a city, state, or zip code, and you’ll get all the scheduling info you need. Happy listening! Tap or click here to find the station in your hometown that broadcasts my show.

Legacy Concerns

Q: I have cancer. I want to set things up now for my passing. Can I have Google delete my account when I die?

A: First off, my heart goes out to you. I have lost many loved ones, and I know how significant this time is to you. Putting your affairs in order can be a major concern, and in a digital world, we all have to recognize what a footprint we will leave behind. Managing your virtual life can be as significant as a living will and last rites. Rest assured that you can delete your Google account, along with all the data you have personally stored. This won’t include material that’s been copied or has seeped into other accounts, but you will be able to erase your Gmail, Calendar, YouTube, Drive, Docs, and other connected applications. Tap or click here to clear Google of all your posthumous data.

Doctor Photos

Q: Is there an easy way to remove people from photos? Sometimes, the picture would be perfect if the people were not in the shot!

A: I am going to recommend the Bye Bye Camera App, but before you go ahead and download it, you should know how weird this thing is. Bye Bye doesn’t just remove random people who obstruct a picture; it removes all people, making it appear that nobody was there in the first place. It’s shockingly effective, but a little bit disturbing. The app was developed as an art project, not for strictly practical use. So if you have a landscape that would look better without any human obstruction, this is the app for you. If you just want to nix some photo-bombers and unwanted exes, you’ll probably have to learn a little Photoshop – or use a free editing program like GIMP. Tap or click here to learn more and download this special app.

Fitness Tech

Q: On your cable TV show, you were talking about a mirror that has live yoga, Pilates, and boxing classes. Do you think it’s worth the money?

A: Okay, this is a pretty neat gadget, like something out of a science fiction flick. Simply called “Mirror,” it looks like a regular sheet of reflective glass until you decide to run a fitness program, and then it transforms into a personal trainer. Such technology comes at a price: Mirror costs nearly $1,500, and you’ll have to sign up for a monthly subscription. Unless you’ve experienced the tech firsthand and know that it works well for you, Mirror might be too extravagant to purchase on a whim. But you might take an interest in some other sports tech that’s a little more reasonable – and can really get your heart rate up. Tap or click here for more innovations in fitness tech.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch the Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2019, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group 485467-ring-video-doorbell-2 Surveillance rights, deleting people from photos, smart mirrors, and more: Tech Q&A The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/privacy fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc fe97c2c3-94a2-56cb-9934-4f5b82f65f89 article   Westlake Legal Group 485467-ring-video-doorbell-2 Surveillance rights, deleting people from photos, smart mirrors, and more: Tech Q&A The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/privacy fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc fe97c2c3-94a2-56cb-9934-4f5b82f65f89 article

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Is Xi Mishandling Hong Kong Crisis? Hints of Unease in China’s Leadership

BEIJING — China’s leader, Xi Jinping, warned a gathering of senior Communist Party officials in January that the country faced a raft of urgent economic and political risks, and told them to be on guard especially for “indolence, incompetence and becoming divorced from the public.”

Now, after months of political tumult in Hong Kong, the warning seems prescient. Only it is Mr. Xi himself and his government facing criticism that they are mishandling China’s biggest political crisis in years, one that he did not mention in his catalog of looming risks at the start of the year.

And although few in Beijing would dare blame Mr. Xi openly for the government’s handling of the turmoil, there is quiet grumbling that his imperious style and authoritarian concentration of power contributed to the government’s misreading of the scope of discontent in Hong Kong, which is only growing.

On Friday night, the protests and clashes with the police continued in Hong Kong, even after the region’s embattled chief executive, Carrie Lam, made a major concession days earlier by withdrawing a bill that would have allowed the extradition of criminal suspects to the mainland, legislation which first incited the protests three months ago.

The Communist Party’s leadership — and very likely Mr. Xi himself — has been surprised by or oblivious to the depth of the animosity, which has driven hundreds of thousands into the streets of Hong Kong for the past three months. While it was the proposed extradition bill that sparked the protests, they are now sustained by broader grievances against the Chinese government and its efforts to impose greater control over the semiautonomous territory.

Beijing has been slow to adapt to events, allowing Ms. Lam to suspend the bill in June, for example, but refusing at the time to let her withdraw it completely. It was a partial concession that reflected the party’s hard-line instincts under Mr. Xi and fueled even larger protests.

As public anger in Hong Kong has climbed, the Chinese government’s response grew bombastic and now seems at times erratic.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160288134_3e966b73-03cb-4e1a-b813-305dcfaaca19-articleLarge Is Xi Mishandling Hong Kong Crisis? Hints of Unease in China’s Leadership Xi Jinping Hong Kong Protests (2019) Hong Kong Communist Party of China China

Protesters in Hong Kong on Friday.CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

In July, at a meeting that has not been publicly disclosed, Mr. Xi met with other senior officials to discuss the protests. The range of options discussed is unclear, but the leaders agreed that the central government should not intervene forcefully, at least for now, several people familiar with the issue said in interviews in Hong Kong and Beijing.

At that meeting, the officials concluded that the Hong Kong authorities and the local police could eventually restore order on their own, the officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations.

There are hints of divisions in the Chinese leadership and stirrings of discontent about Mr. Xi’s policies.

Jean-Pierre Cabestan, a political science professor at Hong Kong Baptist University and an expert on Chinese politics, said it appeared that there was debate during the annual informal leaders’ retreat in Beidaihe, a seaside resort not far from Beijing.

Some party leaders called for concessions, while others urged action to bring Hong Kong more directly under the mainland’s control, he said. Mr. Cabestan said he believed that “the Chinese leadership is divided on Hong Kong and how to solve the crisis.”

Wu Qiang, a political analyst in Beijing, said Mr. Xi’s government had in effect adopted a strategy to procrastinate in the absence of any better ideas for resolving the crisis. “It is not willing to intervene directly or to propose a solution,” he said. “The idea is to wait things out until there is a change.”

The upshot is that instead of defusing or containing the crisis, Mr. Xi’s government has helped to widen the political chasm between the central government and many of the seven million residents in a city that is an important hub of international trade and finance, critics say.

Another sign of the disarray within the government was the reaction to Ms. Lam’s withdrawal of the bill. On Tuesday, officials in Beijing declared there could be no concessions to the protesters’ demands. A day later, when Ms. Lam pulled the bill back, she claimed to have Beijing’s blessing to do so. The same officials were silent.

Xi Jinping during a visit to Hong Kong in 2017, as the city commemorated the 20th anniversary of its handover to China from Britain.CreditPool photo by Dale De La Rey

On Friday, China’s premier, Li Keqiang, said during a news conference with Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, who was visiting China, that the government supported Hong Kong in “halting the violence and disorder in accordance with the law.”

Mr. Xi, who is 66 and in his seventh year of his now unlimited tenure as the country’s paramount leader, has cast himself as an essential commander for a challenging time. He has been lionized in state media like no other Chinese leader since Mao.

This has made political solutions to the Hong Kong situation harder to find, because even senior officials are reluctant to make the case for compromise or concessions for fear of contradicting or angering Mr. Xi, according to numerous officials and analysts in Hong Kong and Beijing.

“Beijing has overreached, overestimating its capacity to control events and underestimating the complexity of Hong Kong,” said Brian Fong Chi-hang, an associate professor at the Academy of Hong Kong Studies at the Education University of Hong Kong.

The tumult in Hong Kong could pose a risk to Mr. Xi, especially if it exacerbates discontent and discord within the Chinese leadership over other issues.

“I think the danger is not that his standing will collapse, but that there is a whole series of slowly unfolding trends that will gradually corrode his position,” said Richard McGregor, a senior fellow at the Lowy Institute in Sydney and author of “Xi Jinping: The Backlash.”

“Hong Kong is one, as the protests look set to carry on despite the concessions,” Mr. McGregor said. “The trade war is adding to the pain,” he added, referring to the current standoff with the United States.

Mr. Xi returned on Tuesday to the same venue as his speech in January — the Communist Party’s Central Party School — and reprised the warnings he raised in January without suggesting they were in fact worsening.

A 2017 ceremony in Hong Kong marking the anniversary of the handover. Mr. Xi has not visited the city since.CreditHong Kong’s Information Services Department

“Faced with the grim conditions and tasks of struggle looming down on us, we must be tough-boned, daring to go on the attack and daring to battle for victory,” he said.

While he warned of “a whole range” of internal and external threats — economic, military and environmental — he mentioned Hong Kong only once, and then only in passing.

“By painting a dark picture of hostile foreign forces or even unrelenting internal challenges the Communist Party faces in retaining power, it helps justify his continuing strong hand,” said Christopher K. Johnson, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington.

Some analysts see a parallel between Mr. Xi’s handling of Hong Kong and the trade war with the United States, which, like the economy more broadly, seems to be the greatest worry for his government at the moment.

In Hong Kong, Mr. Xi’s government unwaveringly supported the extradition bill. And it stuck by that position, refusing to allow Mrs. Lam to withdraw it formally, even as the protesters’ demands grew broader. Her pledge to withdraw it now has been dismissed as too little, too late.

In the trade talks, China also balked at accepting President Trump’s initial demands for concessions. When the two sides came close to an agreement in the spring, outlined in an 150-page document, Mr. Xi appeared to balk, scuttling the process.

Now Mr. Xi faces an even bigger trade war, with much higher tariffs and greater tensions. The government appears to be hewing to a strategy of waiting out Mr. Trump, possibly through his 2020 re-election campaign, even as the dispute has become a drag on the economy.

It remains unclear how Mr. Xi’s government conveyed its approval for Mrs. Lam’s decision — or whether it did. Mrs. Lam’s sudden shift evolved in a matter of days after another weekend of clashes between protesters and the police, several officials said.

Hong Kong’s embattled chief executive, Carrie Lam, withdrew the bill that sparked the protests and said she had Beijing’s blessing to do so.CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

Mrs. Lam said the decision to withdraw the extradition was hers, but she also asserted that she had Beijing’s full support for doing so, suggesting more coordination than either side has publicly acknowledged.

The silence from officials and in state media about Mrs. Lam’s concession suggested that if Mr. Xi’s government did approve of the sudden shift, it wanted to stifle public discussion of it in the mainland.

Mrs. Lam herself described the tightrope she must walk during recent remarks to a group of business leaders that was subsequently leaked and published by Reuters.

“The political room for the chief executive who, unfortunately, has to serve two masters by constitution, that is, the central people’s government and the people of Hong Kong, that political room for maneuvering is very, very, very limited,” she said.

She also offered a candid assessment of Beijing’s views, even if one she did not intend to make public. She said Beijing had no plan to send in the People’s Liberation Army to restore order because “they’re just quite scared now.”

“Because they know that the price would be too huge to pay,” she went on. “Maybe they don’t care about Hong Kong, but they care about ‘one country, two systems.’ They care about the country’s international profile. It has taken China a long time to build up to that sort of international profile.”

Hong Kong’s unique status, with its own laws and freedoms, has long created a political dilemma for China’s leaders, especially for Mr. Xi, who has made China’s rising economic and political might a central pillar of his public appeals.

China’s recovery of sovereignty over the former British colony is a matter of national pride that reversed a century and a half of colonial humiliation. But the mainland maintains what amounts to an international border with Hong Kong.

Chinese police vehicles last month in Shenzhen, the mainland Chinese city bordering Hong Kong.CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

The government’s deepest fear now appears to be that the demands for greater political accountability and even universal suffrage heard on the streets in Hong Kong could spread like a contagion through the mainland. So far, there have been few signs of that.

As the crisis has grown, the government has dispatched thousands of troops from the People’s Armed Police to Shenzhen, the mainland city adjacent to Hong Kong, but the exercise was hastily organized and used an outdated plan drawn up after the protests in 2014, according to one official in Hong Kong.

Beijing also stepped up its propaganda, launching an information — and disinformation — campaign against the protesters and opposition leaders in Hong Kong.

Mr. Xi continues to barely mention Hong Kong. He has said nothing about the protests, even in his passing reference on Tuesday. He has not visited since 2017, when he marked the 20th anniversary of the handover from Britain.

After the traditional August holiday break, Mr. Xi’s public calendar of events has since betrayed no hint of political upheaval or threats to his standing. The media’s portrayal of him, already verging on hagiography, became even more fawning. State television and the party’s newspapers now refer to him as “The People’s Leader,” an honorific once bestowed only on Mao.

“The People’s Leader loves the people,” The People’s Daily wrote after Mr. Xi toured Gansu, a province in western China.

Mr. Xi’s calculation might be simply to remain patient, as he has been in the case of President Trump’s erratic shifts in the trade war. In his remarks on Tuesday, Mr. Xi also gave a possible hint of the government’s pragmatism.

“On matters of principle, not an inch will be yielded,” he said, “but on matters of tactics there can be flexibility.”

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‘Brady Bunch’ star Maureen McCormick says she and costar Ann B. Davis were ‘so close’ after sitcom ended

Maureen McCormick says she developed a strong bond with Ann B. Davis while on the set of “The Brady Bunch.”

Davis, the comic actress best known for playing devoted housekeeper Alice Nelson on the hit ‘70s series, died in 2014 at age 88 after suffering a fall in her San Antonio home.

‘BRADY BUNCH’ STAR MAUREEN MCCORMICK RECALLS HER RELATIONSHIP WITH ON-SCREEN MOM FLORENCE HENDERSON

“Gosh, we were so close,” McCormick, who famously played Marcia Brady in the series, recently told Closer Weekly.

Westlake Legal Group 91253405-060114_FR_Davis_640 ‘Brady Bunch’ star Maureen McCormick says she and costar Ann B. Davis were ‘so close’ after sitcom ended Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/sitcom fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 737e8636-5af8-5575-af1e-6b5626f38de3

“We used to fly to Texas and we would hang out and go out to dinner and we really spent a lot of time together — you know years after the show, and just admire her,” McCormick continued.

McCormick told the outlet she also shared a loving relationship with her TV mom Florence Henderson.

“Florence of course, we got very, very close, and spent really amazing moments together at the end,” said McCormick. “I’m really grateful because they all taught me a lot and they’ll always be with me.”

‘BRADY BUNCH’ STAR MAUREEN MCCORMICK SLAMS ANTI-VAXXERS

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-105854903 ‘Brady Bunch’ star Maureen McCormick says she and costar Ann B. Davis were ‘so close’ after sitcom ended Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/sitcom fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 737e8636-5af8-5575-af1e-6b5626f38de3

Left to right: Ann B. Davis, Florence Henderson and Maureen McCormick (Photo by Lester Cohen/WireImage)

At the time of Davis’ death, McCormick said in a statement that the comic “made me a better person. How blessed I am to have had her in my life. She will be forever missed.”

Davis originally made her mark as the razor-tongued secretary on “The Bob Cummings Show,” which earned her two Emmys. She appeared on that sitcom from 1955 until 1959. She went on to appear on “The Brady Bunch” from 1969 until 1974.

“I know at least a couple hundred glamour gals who are starving in this time,” Davis told the Los Angeles Times in 1955. “I’d rather be myself and eating.”

Davis said she told NBC photographers not to retouch their pictures of her, but they ignored her request and “gave me eyebrows.”

Westlake Legal Group ann-b-davis-getty-1970 ‘Brady Bunch’ star Maureen McCormick says she and costar Ann B. Davis were ‘so close’ after sitcom ended Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/sitcom fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 737e8636-5af8-5575-af1e-6b5626f38de3

Ann B. Davis portrayed slightly odd but kindly housekeeper, Alice. She often solved family conflicts on the series and served as the children’s confidant. In the last season, Alice’s character became engaged to longtime boyfriend and neighborhood butcher, Sam. (Getty)

MAUREEN MCCORMICK REVEALS SHE WANTED TO BUY THE ICONIC ‘BRADY BUNCH’ HOUSE

In her maid’s uniform, Davis’ character in “The Brady Bunch” was constantly cleaning up messes big and small, and she was a mainstay of stability for her family.

“I think I’m lovable,” Davis told The Associated Press in 1993. “I don’t do anything to be lovable. I have no control.”

According to The Associated Press, Davis lived a quiet religious life long after “The Brady Bunch” came to an end.

Westlake Legal Group ann-b-davis-getty-2007 ‘Brady Bunch’ star Maureen McCormick says she and costar Ann B. Davis were ‘so close’ after sitcom ended Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/sitcom fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 737e8636-5af8-5575-af1e-6b5626f38de3

The Alice character never truly left the heart of Ann B. Davis. The actress reprised the role in several Brady reunions and even appeared in several disposable mop commercials. She lived in Texas and kept busy with her involvement in her local church up until her death in 2014 at the age of 88. (Getty)

“I was born again,” she told the outlet in 1993. “It happens to Episcopalians. Sometimes it doesn’t hit you till you’re 47 years old. It changed my whole life for the better… I spent a lot of time giving Christian witness all over the country to church groups and stuff.”

‘BRADY BUNCH’ CAST DISCUSSES ICONIC TV HOME

Davis never married, saying she never found a man who was more interesting than her career.

“By the time I started to get interested (in finding someone), all the good ones were taken,” she told the Chicago Sun-Times.

Like Davis, Henderson left an undeniable impression on McCormick.

Back in 2017, McCormick was one of 19 celebrities who participated in The American Heart Association’s (AHA) Go Red For Women Red Dress Collection fashion show, which was presented by Macy’s at New York City’s Hammerstein Ballroom.

FLORENCE HENDERSON WAS EXPECTED TO ‘BOUNCE BACK’ FROM ILLNESS

The annual show was created to raise awareness of heart disease among women. According to AHA, cardiovascular diseases cause one in three deaths among women each year — more than all cancers combined.

Good heart health was also an important cause to Henderson, who participated in the event in 2016. As Carol Brady, the Hollywood veteran could solve any problem that arose in the Brady household, but in real life, she battled heart problems from a very young age — and they weren’t as simple to resolve.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-634530820-1 ‘Brady Bunch’ star Maureen McCormick says she and costar Ann B. Davis were ‘so close’ after sitcom ended Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/sitcom fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 737e8636-5af8-5575-af1e-6b5626f38de3

Maureen McCormick attends the “Go Red for Women” fashion show during Fall 2017 New York Fashion Week at Hammerstein Ballroom on February 9, 2017, in New York City. (Photo by Taylor Hill/FilmMagic)

Henderson passed away in 2016 at age 82 from congestive heart failure.

“Florence had a heart disease issue from the time that she was a child,” McCormick told Fox News in 2017. “She had a heart murmur and about a decade ago, she had something really frightening happened to her. She went into Cedars-Sinai in LA and they discovered a mitral valve leakage. And fortunately, they were able to revive her and repair her valve, instead of replacing it.”

‘MARY TYLER MOORE’ STAR TELLS ALL

Just three days before her death, Henderson attended a taping of ABC’s “Dancing with the Stars” to cheer on McCormick, who was participating in the dance competition series.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-537794018 ‘Brady Bunch’ star Maureen McCormick says she and costar Ann B. Davis were ‘so close’ after sitcom ended Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/sitcom fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 737e8636-5af8-5575-af1e-6b5626f38de3

Florence Henderson (L) and Maureen McCormick arrive at the Television Academy’s 70th Anniversary Gala on June 2, 2016, in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Gabriel Olsen/FilmMagic)

“[Florence was] a person who wanted to spread love and laughter,” said McCormick about her friend. “She loved people, she loved life. She’s born on Valentine’s Day, how perfect, right? [She was] just a great woman. Someone I really admired.”

McCormick was also grateful to have Henderson by her side during the grueling dance competition.

“I’ve always admired people that can dance and move their bodies,” said McCormick on her involvement with “Dancing with the Stars.” “It’s something I’ve always thought, ‘Oh, if only I can do that, wouldn’t that be great?’ But it’s something I always thought I could not do. I was afraid to do it in public because I was afraid to look bad doing it. I was just afraid to be that vulnerable.”

‘THE LOVE BOAT’ STARS TELL ALL

Westlake Legal Group 7912cba0-brady-bunch-cast-photo-getty-1972 ‘Brady Bunch’ star Maureen McCormick says she and costar Ann B. Davis were ‘so close’ after sitcom ended Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/sitcom fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 737e8636-5af8-5575-af1e-6b5626f38de3

Maureen McCormick, who played Marcia Brady, said she developed a lasting bond with her on-screen family. (Getty)

McCormick had a message for women everywhere — one that the ever-doting Henderson would have approved.

“Just be careful, women,” said McCormick. “This is the number one killer of women. Heart disease. Ask questions, go talk to your doctor, get all the tests and check-ups that we’re supposed to do for cholesterol, and blood pressure, and blood sugar. Exercise a good amount. And eat right. And take care of yourself. Life is short, you know.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-105854903 ‘Brady Bunch’ star Maureen McCormick says she and costar Ann B. Davis were ‘so close’ after sitcom ended Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/sitcom fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 737e8636-5af8-5575-af1e-6b5626f38de3   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-105854903 ‘Brady Bunch’ star Maureen McCormick says she and costar Ann B. Davis were ‘so close’ after sitcom ended Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/sitcom fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 737e8636-5af8-5575-af1e-6b5626f38de3

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Why washing chicken ups risk of foodborne illness

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6032268685001_6032267467001-vs Why washing chicken ups risk of foodborne illness Michelle Pugle Healthline.com fox-news/health/infectious-disease/foodborne-illness fox-news/health/healthy-living fox-news/food-drink fnc/health fnc f9dec10d-6284-5cb3-b8a2-0fd57078013a article

You shouldn’t wash raw chicken before you cook it.

That’s what experts are saying after a new consumer study was released from North Carolina State University and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

In it, researchers say that washing chicken actually increases the risk of contamination and foodborne illnesses.

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“Some consumers think they are removing bacteria and making their meat or poultry safe,” the USDA’s “Ask Karen” team told Healthline. “However, some of the bacteria are so tightly attached that you could not remove them no matter how many times you washed.”

Other bacteria strains will rinse off, but this isn’t necessarily a good thing.

Raw chicken almost always contains Campylobacter, a bacteria strain that causes diarrhea, fever, and cramping. The meat also may contain SalmonellaClostridium perfringens, and other bacteria.

“The splashing of water, holding the chicken in your hands, and even the juices running through the sink all create this heightened risk [of contamination and illness],” Kristin Kirkpatrick, MS, RDN, author of “Skinny Liver” and manager of wellness nutrition services at Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, told Healthline.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1 in 6 people in the United States becomes ill from improperly prepared food every year.

Reducing your risk means cooking without washing.

What about antibacterial solutions?

Water splashes can quickly spread foodborne germs across your kitchen, but what about antibacterial agents such as lemon juice and white vinegar?

Experts say it doesn’t matter if you’re rinsing with water, soap, or an antibacterial agent. They all pose risks.

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“I don’t recommend any of these methods as they all involve actually washing the chicken,” Kirkpatrick said.

“Washing your chicken or meat can actually increase your risk of foodborne illness as you more easily cross-contaminate other parts of your kitchen when you do,” Katie Ferraro, MPH, RDN, CDE, dietitian and nutrition communications consultant, told Healthline.

Kirkpatrick says she doesn’t wash her chicken for those exact reasons.

“I use culinary gloves to handle the chicken straight from the packaging to pan or baking dish,” she said.

Then, she follows the USDA’s advice for safely preparing poultry.

“Remember, cooking poultry to its correct internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit will kill bacteria,” says Kirkpatrick.

The USDA’s “Ask Karen” team told Healthline that baking, broiling, grilling, and boiling are all safe methods of preparing food, so long as the meat reaches the necessary internal temperature.

Reducing kitchen contamination

According to the USDA, “Using a food thermometer is the only sure way of knowing if your food has reached a high enough temperature to destroy foodborne bacteria.”

Both Kirkpatrick and Ferraro agree.

You can find a food thermometer online or at kitchenware stores.

Kirkpatrick suggests other simple ways to prevent contamination and illness:

Use separate cutting boards for vegetables, meat, and poultry. Many stores have them color-coded to remember what goes where

Wash your hands often when handling meat and poultry, even when using gloves.

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Take the temperature of meat and poultry to ensure it has reached acceptable internal cooking temps.

Store meat and poultry on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator to avoid juices from dripping down onto fresh food.

Hold cold foods on ice and hot foods in warm devices, such as chafing dishes, if being served over a long period (like with a buffet).

This article first appeared on HealthLine.com.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6032268685001_6032267467001-vs Why washing chicken ups risk of foodborne illness Michelle Pugle Healthline.com fox-news/health/infectious-disease/foodborne-illness fox-news/health/healthy-living fox-news/food-drink fnc/health fnc f9dec10d-6284-5cb3-b8a2-0fd57078013a article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6032268685001_6032267467001-vs Why washing chicken ups risk of foodborne illness Michelle Pugle Healthline.com fox-news/health/infectious-disease/foodborne-illness fox-news/health/healthy-living fox-news/food-drink fnc/health fnc f9dec10d-6284-5cb3-b8a2-0fd57078013a article

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Lifetime Releases Trailer For Its College Admissions Scandal Movie

Westlake Legal Group 5d73669823000098025126bb Lifetime Releases Trailer For Its College Admissions Scandal Movie

And the aptly titled “The College Admissions Scandal” will premiere on the network on Oct. 12.

Penelope Ann Miller, Mia Kirshner, Sarah Dugdale, Sam Duke and Kendra Westwood star in the film centered on the scandal, which saw dozens of wealthy parents (including actors Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin) accused of paying bribes in exchange for getting their children places at prestigious schools.

IMDb, the online movie database, details the storyline as being about “two wealthy mothers, Caroline, a sought after interior designer and Bethany, an owner of a successful financial services firm, who share an obsession with getting their teenagers into the best possible college.”

In July, Lifetime said the film would see the mothers facing “the consequences of their crimes and the loss of trust and respect from their families.”

Check out the trailer here:

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