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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 128)

On ‘60 Minutes,’ Biden Questions Trump’s Legacy While Emphasizing His Own

Westlake Legal Group merlin_163367850_ba4061ad-2fad-4e1e-a53b-35e154c36518-facebookJumbo On ‘60 Minutes,’ Biden Questions Trump’s Legacy While Emphasizing His Own Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Biden, Joseph R Jr

In a wide-ranging “60 Minutes” interview that aired Sunday, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. declared himself the Democratic front-runner, defended his son’s foreign business dealings and explained why it was critical for the country’s future to defeat President Trump in 2020.

“What I am worried about is the country,” Mr. Biden said. “Four years of Donald Trump will be very hard to overcome, but we can. Eight years of Donald Trump will fundamentally change the nature of who we are as a country. And it’ll take a generation, a generation or more for us to get back on track.”

Making a pitch for his presidential bid as the nomination contest tightens, Mr. Biden emphasized his experience.

“I think, as I said, we need somebody who, on day one, knows exactly what to do, can command the world stage,” Mr. Biden said. “No one wonders whether I know a great deal about these issues and foreign policy and domestic policy. They’re things I’ve done.”

Noting that the president calls Mr. Biden “Sleepy Joe,” the “60 Minutes” anchor Norah O’Donnell said some people worried about whether Mr. Biden was “quick enough” to defend himself against Mr. Trump.

“What they’re really trying to make the case is about age,” said Mr. Biden, who will turn 77 in November. “And with age comes experience, with experience comes wisdom, and with wisdom comes judgment.”

The CBS interview with Ms. O’Donnell, taped at Mr. Biden’s Delaware home days earlier, marked his first major network sit-down since Mr. Trump, 73, launched attacks on the international business dealings of Mr. Biden’s son Hunter Biden.

Revelations that the president had pressured Ukrainian authorities to investigate the Bidens prompted the impeachment inquiry that Mr. Trump now faces in the House of Representatives.

Asked why Mr. Biden did not tell his son to avoid a role in the Ukrainian gas company Burisma for fear it might appear improper, Mr. Biden said, “He was already on the board. And he’s a grown man. And it turns out he did not do a single thing wrong, as everybody’s investigated.”

Mr. Biden added that he had never discussed business with his children. “They know where I have to do my job and that’s it and they have to make their own judgments,” he said.

Taking aim at Mr. Trump’s family, Mr. Biden said, “Look, I wasn’t raised to go after the children. Their actions speak for themselves,” adding, “If I’m president, get elected president, my children are not going to have offices in the White House. My children are not going to sit in on cabinet meetings,” Mr. Biden said.

“It’s just simply improper because you should make it clear to the American public that everything you’re doing is for them,” Mr. Biden said. “And the idea that you’re going to have his children, his son-in-law, et cetera, engaged in the day-to-day operation of things they know nothing about.”

The president’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, should not be negotiating Middle East peace, Mr. Biden said. “What credentials does he bring to that?”

With little more than three months until the first caucus, in Iowa, most national public polls show Mr. Biden leading his top opponents, Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Bernie Sanders of Vermont, although one poll recently placed Ms. Warren at the head of the pack.

Asked whether he was worried that his opponents were exciting young voters by offering dramatic change, Mr. Biden said that while he wants young people engaged, older voters — a demographic in which Mr. Biden has considerable support — will ultimately control the outcome of the nomination race.

“Overwhelmingly, people over the age of 50 vote in these primaries,” Mr. Biden said. He also took aim at his rivals for what he called far-reaching assertions.

“I mean, let’s talk about ‘Medicare for all,’” he said of the single-player health system that Ms. Warren and Mr. Sanders support. “Do you think there’s been any truth in advertising on that? It’s going to raise taxes on middle class people, not just wealthy people.” Mr. Biden proposes a plan that would build on the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, maintaining a public option for those who need it.

Ms. Warren’s recent advance — combined with the fund-raising difficulties of Mr. Biden’s campaign — have left some of his supporters worried.

Expressing optimism, Mr. Biden said, “I know I’m the front-runner,” adding that he wasn’t concerned about money. “We’re on a course to do extremely well,” Mr. Biden said. “I’m not — I’m not worried about being able to fund this campaign.”

In the last fund-raising quarter, his campaign said it had only $9 million cash in hand, far less than that of his key rivals. But Mr. Biden’s campaign recently reversed course on its longstanding opposition to the assistance of super PACs, opening the door for wealthy supporters to spend unlimited amounts of money to assist his Democratic primary candidacy.

Mr. Biden was pressed by a CBS News reporter on this reversal after a campaign event in Durham, N.C., also Sunday night, and the former vice president pointed to the barrage of attack ads he has faced from Mr. Trump’s allies.

“I learned after the fact from, from my folks, there are a lot of people who said, ‘We can’t let this stand,’” he said “They are able to do that. I haven’t discouraged them from doing it, but I haven’t encouraged it either. I’ve just stayed away. Hands off. But if I’m the nominee and if I win, I promise you I’m going to continue to push for a constitutional amendment to make sure that there’s public funding of elections.”

During his “60 Minutes” interview, Ms. O’Donnell also hammered Mr. Biden about his debate gaffes. While he acknowledged that the Democratic debates had presented a “learning curve” for him, his wife, Dr. Jill Biden, who sat in on part of the interview, expressed confidence that the public would overlook them.

“The American people know who Joe Biden is,” Dr. Biden said. “I mean, if he misspeaks one word — that doesn’t affect the way they’re going to vote, one way or the other.”

When Ms. O’Donnell asked Dr. Biden whether she had observed any “change in his ability to communicate in recent years,” she laughed, “No. Not at all.”

Katie Glueck contributed reporting.

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Does The ‘Watchmen’ Episode 2 Twist Signal Another Is On The Way?

When it comes to “Watchmen,” you have to watch closely.

The new HBO series takes a lot of care with its details. For instance, the big twist in Episode 2 comes when Angela Abar/Sister Night (Regina King) discovers that her dearly departed boss, Chief Judd Crawford (Don Johnson), had KKK robes hidden in his bedroom closet. However, Crawford’s true leanings were seemingly hinted at several times in the premiere.

At the end of the first episode, when Crawford is supposedly heading to see a police officer in the hospital, he listens to far-right radio on his drive, signaling he’s perhaps not the progressive, happy-go-lucky police chief he seems to be. “Jud” is also the name of the villain in “Oklahoma!,” the musical Crawford and his wife are watching when he first appears on the show. And, as the citizen-detectives on Reddit point out, a picture in Crawford’s room of one of his relatives looks like an older version of one of the people shown participating in the 1921 Tulsa Massacre.

Image from the Tulsa Massacre sequence:

Westlake Legal Group 5db20fdf200000bf22506b8a Does The ‘Watchmen’ Episode 2 Twist Signal Another Is On The Way?

HBO The Tulsa Massacre scene in “Watchmen.”

Image from Crawford’s bedroom:

Westlake Legal Group 5db20ff9210000272dad3d4d Does The ‘Watchmen’ Episode 2 Twist Signal Another Is On The Way?

HBO Crawford’s house in “Watchmen.”

But does this twist with Crawford indicate another happening before our eyes?  

So far in the show, it appears that the popular “Watchmen” comic book character Rorschach has been represented by the white supremacist group Seventh Kavalry, which has appropriated his inkblot mask for its own use. 

While it’s caused some backlash among fans, a white supremacist group taking on Rorschach’s image isn’t that much of a stretch. Though he’s a protagonist in the original story, he’s also a misogynist and fan of right-wing conspiracy newspaper New Frontiersman. 

However, taking into account Abar discovering Crawford’s costume, it seems she’s also a stand-in for the character: Her storyline directly mirrors Rorschach’s journey at the beginning of the 1986 comic.

In Episode 2, while looking into a murder, Abar discovers Crawford’s hidden costume in a compartment in the back of his closet. In the comic, Rorschach, also investigating a murder, discovers a costume in a hidden closet compartment.

Additionally, Rorschach is a moral absolutist. And as Reddit user Mr_Rekshun points out, one of Abar’s lines in the second episode shows she has a similar philosophy.

“You and me, Topher, we don’t do lollipops and rainbows, because we know those are just pretty colors that hide what the world really is: black and white,” she says while revealing Crawford’s murder to her adopted son Topher.

Black and white also happen to be the colors of both Sister Night’s and Rorschach’s costumes. 

Moral gray areas are the M.O. for “Watchmen,” and having two polar opposites — a white supremacist terrorist group and a Black, female police officer — representing different aspects of the same character seems par for the course.

Rorschach’s discovery of the secret costume not only begins the comics but ultimately leads to a vast conspiracy being revealed by the end of the story. Will Abar’s arc be similar? Only time will tell. 

For those who are still confused about “Watchmen,” check out HuffPost’s Episode 1 explainer.

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On ‘60 Minutes,’ Biden Questions Trump’s Legacy While Emphasizing His Own

Westlake Legal Group merlin_163367850_ba4061ad-2fad-4e1e-a53b-35e154c36518-facebookJumbo On ‘60 Minutes,’ Biden Questions Trump’s Legacy While Emphasizing His Own Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Biden, Joseph R Jr

In a wide-ranging “60 Minutes” interview that aired Sunday, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. declared himself the Democratic front-runner, defended his son’s foreign business dealings and explained why it was critical for the country’s future to defeat President Trump in 2020.

“What I am worried about is the country,” Mr. Biden said. “Four years of Donald Trump will be very hard to overcome, but we can. Eight years of Donald Trump will fundamentally change the nature of who we are as a country. And it’ll take a generation, a generation or more for us to get back on track.”

Making a pitch for his presidential bid as the nomination contest tightens, Mr. Biden emphasized his experience.

“I think, as I said, we need somebody who, on day one, knows exactly what to do, can command the world stage,” Mr. Biden said. “No one wonders whether I know a great deal about these issues and foreign policy and domestic policy. They’re things I’ve done.”

Noting that the president calls Mr. Biden “Sleepy Joe,” the “60 Minutes” anchor Norah O’Donnell said some people worried about whether Mr. Biden was “quick enough” to defend himself against Mr. Trump.

“What they’re really trying to make the case is about age,” said Mr. Biden, who will turn 77 in November. “And with age comes experience, with experience comes wisdom, and with wisdom comes judgment.”

The CBS interview with Ms. O’Donnell, taped at Mr. Biden’s Delaware home days earlier, marked his first major network sit-down since Mr. Trump, 73, launched attacks on the international business dealings of Mr. Biden’s son Hunter Biden.

Revelations that the president had pressured Ukrainian authorities to investigate the Bidens prompted the impeachment inquiry that Mr. Trump now faces in the House of Representatives.

Asked why Mr. Biden did not tell his son to avoid a role in the Ukrainian gas company Burisma for fear it might appear improper, Mr. Biden said, “He was already on the board. And he’s a grown man. And it turns out he did not do a single thing wrong, as everybody’s investigated.”

Mr. Biden added that he had never discussed business with his children. “They know where I have to do my job and that’s it and they have to make their own judgments,” he said.

Taking aim at Mr. Trump’s family, Mr. Biden said, “Look, I wasn’t raised to go after the children. Their actions speak for themselves,” adding, “If I’m president, get elected president, my children are not going to have offices in the White House. My children are not going to sit in on cabinet meetings,” Mr. Biden said.

“It’s just simply improper because you should make it clear to the American public that everything you’re doing is for them,” Mr. Biden said. “And the idea that you’re going to have his children, his son-in-law, et cetera, engaged in the day-to-day operation of things they know nothing about.”

The president’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, should not be negotiating Middle East peace, Mr. Biden said. “What credentials does he bring to that?”

With little more than three months until the first caucus, in Iowa, most national public polls show Mr. Biden leading his top opponents, Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Bernie Sanders of Vermont, although one poll recently placed Ms. Warren at the head of the pack.

Asked whether he was worried that his opponents were exciting young voters by offering dramatic change, Mr. Biden said that while he wants young people engaged, older voters — a demographic in which Mr. Biden has considerable support — will ultimately control the outcome of the nomination race.

“Overwhelmingly, people over the age of 50 vote in these primaries,” Mr. Biden said. He also took aim at his rivals for what he called far-reaching assertions.

“I mean, let’s talk about ‘Medicare for all,’” he said of the single-player health system that Ms. Warren and Mr. Sanders support. “Do you think there’s been any truth in advertising on that? It’s going to raise taxes on middle class people, not just wealthy people.” Mr. Biden proposes a plan that would build on the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, maintaining a public option for those who need it.

Ms. Warren’s recent advance — combined with the fund-raising difficulties of Mr. Biden’s campaign — have left some of his supporters worried.

Expressing optimism, Mr. Biden said, “I know I’m the front-runner,” adding that he wasn’t concerned about money. “We’re on a course to do extremely well,” Mr. Biden said. “I’m not — I’m not worried about being able to fund this campaign.”

In the last fund-raising quarter, his campaign said it had only $9 million cash in hand, far less than that of his key rivals. But Mr. Biden’s campaign recently reversed course on its longstanding opposition to the assistance of super PACs, opening the door for wealthy supporters to spend unlimited amounts of money to assist his Democratic primary candidacy.

Mr. Biden was pressed by a CBS News reporter on this reversal after a campaign event in Durham, N.C., also Sunday night, and the former vice president pointed to the barrage of attack ads he has faced from Mr. Trump’s allies.

“I learned after the fact from, from my folks, there are a lot of people who said, ‘We can’t let this stand,’” he said “They are able to do that. I haven’t discouraged them from doing it, but I haven’t encouraged it either. I’ve just stayed away. Hands off. But if I’m the nominee and if I win, I promise you I’m going to continue to push for a constitutional amendment to make sure that there’s public funding of elections.”

During his “60 Minutes” interview, Ms. O’Donnell also hammered Mr. Biden about his debate gaffes. While he acknowledged that the Democratic debates had presented a “learning curve” for him, his wife, Dr. Jill Biden, who sat in on part of the interview, expressed confidence that the public would overlook them.

“The American people know who Joe Biden is,” Dr. Biden said. “I mean, if he misspeaks one word — that doesn’t affect the way they’re going to vote, one way or the other.”

When Ms. O’Donnell asked Dr. Biden whether she had observed any “change in his ability to communicate in recent years,” she laughed, “No. Not at all.”

Katie Glueck contributed reporting.

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Trump Greeted With ‘Lock Him Up’ Chants And Boos At World Series

Westlake Legal Group 5db642d6210000063334b338 Trump Greeted With ‘Lock Him Up’ Chants And Boos At World Series

President Donald Trump was greeted with a chorus of boos, some cheers and a “Lock him up!” chant during Game 5 of the World Series between the Washington Nationals and the Houston Astros Sunday night.

The president showed up shortly after the first inning, and was announced to the crowd on the scoreboard during Nationals Park’s salute to veterans, prompting loud boos:

As the fourth inning began, the crowd initiated a “lock him up” chant, a throwback to Trump’s campaign trail chant directed at Hillary Clinton in 2016.

Some cheers were also audible:

Humanitarian chef and outspoken Trump critic José Andrés threw the ceremonial first pitch, drawing rousing applause from fans. There was some chatter over the announcement that he would throw the first pitch instead of the president, who had announced he would arrive to the game late to reduce interference with fans arriving to the stadium.

Wall Street Journal White House reporter Michael Bender noted the difference in decibels between the anti-Trump chants and the applause for Andrés:

First lady Melania Trump and a number of GOP politicians joined the president in the Washington Suite, including Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) and Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.).

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Some severely obese kids in US should get weight loss surgery, medical group suggests

Nearly 5 million U.S. children and teens are severely obese, a near doubling over 20 years, and now according to new recommendations, some severely obese preteens should be considered for weight loss surgery.

The guidance was issued Sunday by the American Academy of Pediatrics; it’s based on a review of medical evidence, such as several studies showing that surgery in teens can result in marked weight loss lasting at least several years with few complications. In many cases, as The Associated Press reported, related health problems including diabetes and high blood pressure disappeared after surgery.

While most of those studies involved teens, one study included children younger than 12 and found no ill effects on growth, the policy said.

5 EASY HALLOWEEN TREATS TO MAKE THIS YEAR

Recent data show, as the AP reported, that pediatric obesity surgery rates have tripled in almost 20 years but still average fewer than 2,000 operations each year.

The academy’s recommendation said children and teens are generally eligible for surgery if their body mass index is 40 or higher, or at least 35 if they have related major health problems.

These criteria may vary by gender and age, said Dr. Sarah Armstrong, a Duke University pediatrics professor and the policy’s lead author.

They are similar to criteria for surgeons from the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery.

A BMI of 30 and above is considered obese.

Most kids don’t get obesity surgery, mainly because most public and private health insurance doesn’t cover it or they live far from surgery centers, said Armstrong.

Costs can total at least $20,000.

Westlake Legal Group obese-kids-1 Some severely obese kids in US should get weight loss surgery, medical group suggests Frank Miles fox-news/health/nutrition-and-fitness/obesity fox news fnc/health fnc f1b832bc-aa8b-5bc6-a5c0-e7fb37591134 article

This combination of undated photos provided by the family in October 2019 shows Faith Newsome before and after gastric bypass surgery. At 5 feet, 8 inches and 273 pounds, her BMI was almost 42 and she had high blood pressure and prediabetes when she had the procedure at age 16.  (Family photos via AP)

It’s not a quick fix, she said. “It’s a lifelong decision with implications every single day for the rest of your life.”

Many obese kids already have developed related health problems including diabetes, high blood pressure, sleep apnea and liver disease.

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The condition of obesity affected 93.3 million adults in the country from 2015 to 2016, per the CDC.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6061038904001_6061035899001-vs Some severely obese kids in US should get weight loss surgery, medical group suggests Frank Miles fox-news/health/nutrition-and-fitness/obesity fox news fnc/health fnc f1b832bc-aa8b-5bc6-a5c0-e7fb37591134 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6061038904001_6061035899001-vs Some severely obese kids in US should get weight loss surgery, medical group suggests Frank Miles fox-news/health/nutrition-and-fitness/obesity fox news fnc/health fnc f1b832bc-aa8b-5bc6-a5c0-e7fb37591134 article

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Rep. Katie Hill, Facing An Ethics Investigation, Says She Will Resign

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1135977221_custom-4ad1304f2e2f2edaf61137a280cc533c5bd9a222-s1100-c15 Rep. Katie Hill, Facing An Ethics Investigation, Says She Will Resign

Freshman Rep. Katie Hill, D-Calif., announced her resignation on Sunday following allegations that she had inappropriate sexual relations with a member of her staff. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Rep. Katie Hill, Facing An Ethics Investigation, Says She Will Resign

Freshman Rep. Katie Hill, D-Calif., announced her resignation on Sunday following allegations that she had inappropriate sexual relations with a member of her staff.

Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Rep. Katie Hill, D-Calif., says she plans to resign in the face of an ethics investigation stemming from allegations that she had an inappropriate sexual relationship with a member of her congressional staff.

“It is with a broken heart that today I announce my resignation from Congress,” Hill wrote in a statement released on Sunday. “This is the hardest thing I have ever had to do, but I believe it is the best thing for my constituents and our country.”

Hill, a freshman lawmaker, had been considered a rising star in the Democratic Party. But on Wednesday, the House Ethics Committee announced that it was opening an investigation into allegations that Hill was romantically involved with Graham Kelly, her legislative director. Hill has denied the allegation.

The allegations against Hill were first reported by the the conservative website Red State. In her statement, Hill said she was the victim of a “smear campaign” by her husband — with whom she’s engaged in a rancorous divorce proceeding — and “hateful political operatives.”

The ethics investigation against Hill was triggered by a change to House rules passed during the height of the #MeToo era. Over the course of six months between 2017 and 2018, nine lawmakers — eight men and one woman — stepped down over varying degrees of sexual misconduct allegations.

One part of the rule change, approved in February 2018, bars lawmakers from engaging in sexual relations with anyone who works in their congressional office or on any committees on which they serve.

With the launch of the ethics inquiry, Hill became the first member of Congress to face investigation for a possible violation of the rule.

Hill, who is openly bisexual, has admitted to and apologized for an “inappropriate” relationship with a female campaign staffer. However, there are no laws or House rules that prohibit consensual relationships with campaign staffers.

Hill did not say when specifically she planned to resign.

In a statement, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif, said that Hill’s “errors in judgment” made it “untenable” for her to remain in office. “We must ensure a climate of integrity and dignity in the Congress, and in all workplaces,” Pelosi said.

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Long-lost 13th-century painting found in French woman’s kitchen sells at auction for $26.6M

An old painting found in the kitchen of an elderly woman in France earlier this year — which was determined to be a work of art from a 13th-century artist — made her a multimillionaire on Sunday.

The work, a masterpiece titled “Christ Mocked” and attributed to the Italian painter Cimabue, sold for $26.6 million (24 million euros) to an anonymous buyer near Chantilly, north of Paris, reportedly making it the most expensive medieval painting ever sold.

The expected sale price of the unsigned work, measuring about 10 inches by 8 inches, had been between $4.4 million to $6.6 million.

Westlake Legal Group Painting-1 Long-lost 13th-century painting found in French woman's kitchen sells at auction for $26.6M Talia Kaplan fox-news/world/world-regions/france fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/good-news fox-news/entertainment/genres/arts fox news fnc/world fnc article 624cbaaa-d7de-53be-a3c4-29b5c4b0794e

The 13th-century painting by Italian master Cimabue, seen in a photo last month. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)

LONG-LOST 13TH CENTURY PAINTING FOUND IN WOMAN’S KITCHEN

In June, an auctioneer discovered the painting hanging on a wall while inspecting the woman’s house in Compiegne, which is in northern France, and recommended that she bring it to experts to be evaluated. The painting hadn’t attracted much attention from the woman, who is in her 90s, or her family, who thought it was an old icon from Russia, according to The Guardian.

Acteon Auction House, which sold the masterpiece to the anonymous buyer, said the woman will receive “the majority” of the sale money.

Dominique Le Coent of Acteon Auction House said the sale represented a “world record for a primitive, or a pre-1500 work.”

Westlake Legal Group Painting-2 Long-lost 13th-century painting found in French woman's kitchen sells at auction for $26.6M Talia Kaplan fox-news/world/world-regions/france fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/good-news fox-news/entertainment/genres/arts fox news fnc/world fnc article 624cbaaa-d7de-53be-a3c4-29b5c4b0794e

Art expert Stephane Pinta with the painting by Italian master Cimabue in Paris. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

“It’s a painting that was unique, splendid and monumental. Cimabue was the father of the Renaissance, but this sale goes beyond all our dreams,” Le Coent said.

DA VINCI MYSTERY: ‘ABANDONED’ ANGEL AND CHRIST DISCOVERED BENEATH MASTERPIECE

Art experts said the painting likely was part of a larger diptych that Cimabue painted around 1280; two other panels were displayed at the Frick Collection in New York and the National Gallery in London. The experts at Turquin in Paris reportedly used infrared reflectography to confirm that the piece was part of the diptych containing eight scenes of the passion and crucifixion of Christ.

Cimabue, who was said to have taught Italian master Giotto, broke from the Byzantine style, popular in the Middle Ages, and started including elements of movement and perspective that came to characterize Western painting. Only 11 works painted on wood, none of them signed, have been attributed to Cimabue, as The Guardian reported.

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The painting had hung on the kitchen wall of the woman’s home for so long that she reportedly told the auction house she could not remember how she got it.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Painting-1 Long-lost 13th-century painting found in French woman's kitchen sells at auction for $26.6M Talia Kaplan fox-news/world/world-regions/france fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/good-news fox-news/entertainment/genres/arts fox news fnc/world fnc article 624cbaaa-d7de-53be-a3c4-29b5c4b0794e   Westlake Legal Group Painting-1 Long-lost 13th-century painting found in French woman's kitchen sells at auction for $26.6M Talia Kaplan fox-news/world/world-regions/france fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/good-news fox-news/entertainment/genres/arts fox news fnc/world fnc article 624cbaaa-d7de-53be-a3c4-29b5c4b0794e

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Disney Is New to Streaming, but Its Marketing Is Unmatched

Westlake Legal Group 27disneymarket-02-facebookJumbo Disney Is New to Streaming, but Its Marketing Is Unmatched Walt Disney Company Television Iger, Robert A Advertising and Marketing

LOS ANGELES — Tom Bergeron, the host of the ABC reality show “Dancing With the Stars,” looked into the camera at the start of a recent Disney-themed episode and made a forceful sales pitch. Disney Plus, a new streaming service, was arriving on Nov. 12, he told the seven million people watching at home. With his voice rising, he added, “It’s available for you to pre-enroll right now!”

At that moment, Disney Plus employees, watching the live broadcast from Disney headquarters in Burbank, Calif., broke into applause. By the end of the hourlong broadcast, they had sore hands. Mr. Bergeron plugged the service over and over again.

Anything for a corporate sibling: ABC, which is owned by Disney, has been blowing trumpets for Disney Plus as part of a kingdom-wide advertising offensive — one that Ricky Strauss, president for content and marketing at Disney Plus, has described as “a synergy campaign of a magnitude that is unprecedented in the history of the Walt Disney Company.” That is quite a statement given the gusto with which Disney typically approaches cross-promotions. But the streaming wars are escalating. Now is not the time for subtlety.

Two years ago, when Disney unveiled plans for a Netflix-style video platform, Robert A. Iger, the chief executive, made a bold proclamation: “We’re going to launch big, and we’re going to launch hot,” he said. Netflix, Amazon Prime and even a few of Disney’s traditional competitors snickered. What did Disney know about streaming and the complex technology needed to pull off that kind of service?

Whether Disney has surmounted the tech hurdles remains to be seen. But no one is underestimating Disney Plus anymore, in part because the company has started to exercise its unrivaled marketing power, including in areas that Silicon Valley and Hollywood often overlook.

Walt Disney World in Florida has more buses (many of which are being wrapped in Disney Plus ads) than the city of St. Louis. Disney Cruise Line carries more than 12,000 passengers at any given moment, and sneak-peek screenings of the Disney Plus show “High School Musical: The Musical: The Series” are being offered onboard. Disney Store locations, which still number in the hundreds, will host “pep rallies” for the series. Starting on Nov. 12, more than 7,000 of Disney’s retail employees will be wearing lanyards emblazoned with a QR code; shoppers can scan the code with their smartphones and connect directly to a Disney Plus sign-up page.

“Think of Disney like a giant pinball machine, with content and initiatives pinging between divisions in an effort to drive up the ultimate score,” said Gene Del Vecchio, a marketing professor at the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business.

Consider what Mr. Strauss and Joe Earley, executive vice president for marketing and operations, have planned for Monday. They are calling it “blitz day.”

Weather forecasters at Disney-owned ABC stations in cities like Houston and Chicago will be chit-chatting about Disney Plus. It is expected to come up on “Live With Kelly and Ryan” and “The View.” Guests at Disney World will see it everywhere — on billboards, on parking lot trams, on the info-channel in more than 22,000 Disney-owned hotel rooms.

Disney will also push out information about Disney Plus on almost all of the company’s social media accounts, which combined have more than a billion followers. (Tinker Bell has 9.3 million friends on Facebook alone.)

In many ways, Mr. Iger, who took over Disney in 2005, has staked his legacy on the success of Disney Plus, which will cost $7 a month and offer movies and shows from six brands: Disney, Pixar, Marvel, “Star Wars,” National Geographic and “The Simpsons.” Disney has spent billions on the effort. It paid $2.5 billion for BamTech, a company known for helping Major League Baseball and HBO create successful video platforms. Mr. Iger positioned Disney’s recent $71.3 billion acquisition of Rupert Murdoch’s Hollywood businesses as helping to supercharge Disney’s streaming efforts.

The video platform represents a make-or-break attempt by Mr. Iger to reposition Disney for growth — its traditional cable businesses are in decline — and compete with the tech giants that are aggressively moving into Hollywood.

Apple TV Plus, available on Friday, will cost $5 month. For anyone who buys a new iPhone, iPad or Mac laptop, a one-year subscription will be thrown in free. Netflix and Amazon will spend more than $20 billion on programming next year.

Disney has promised Wall Street that Disney Plus will have between 60 million and 90 million subscribers worldwide by 2024. To reach that goal, it needs to hit the ground running.

Mr. Strauss and Mr. Earley may have an enviable array of resources, but the Disney brand also presents challenges. The company does not want people to think that Disney Plus is only for families. So marketing materials need to make it clear that there will be something for everyone, even A.W.O.C.s, which is how some people at Disney refer to Adults Without Children.

“We need to educate consumers and explain that this is not the Disney Channel app,” Mr. Earley said. “People also may or may not know that Disney owns Marvel and Lucasfilm and National Geographic. So we are having to do a lot of positioning in a very short amount of time.”

To show that Disney Plus is not just for young viewers, marketers for the service are playing up one original offering in particular: “The Mandelorian,” a live-action “Star Wars” series (the first ever) that follows a gunfighter on the edge of the galaxy. The series, created by Jon Favreau (“Iron Man”), cost an estimated $15 million an episode to make and stars Pedro Pascal, perhaps best known for his role as Oberyn Martell on HBO’s “Game of Thrones.”

“The Mandelorian,” which contains a dramatic “Star Wars”-universe spoiler in the first episode and will be available the moment Disney Plus starts, has been as heavily promoted as a traditional feature film, with billboards, 30-second television commercials, radio spots and digital ads. Disneyland and Disney World, both of which opened monumental “Star Wars” lands this year, have also been promoting the show.

The marketing onslaught for Disney Plus started in August at D23 Expo, a biennial event for Disney fans in Anaheim, Calif., that attracts more than 100,000 people. Disney showcased the original Disney Plus films and shows by trotting more than 50 participants onto a stage — stars, directors, droids, dogs — and showering the crowd with confetti in the shape of plus signs. As part of the three-day expo, Disney unveiled a special promotion: three years of Disney Plus for $4 a month.

The bargain generated media coverage. Every few weeks since, Disney has offered another subscription deal that has been covered as news. Verizon customers can get a year free, for instance, and holders of Disney-branded Visa cards can buy two- and three-year subscriptions for a discount.

“They have gotten more awareness for Disney Plus from press coverage of these subscription deals than they ever would have been able to get through paid avenues,” Mr. Del Vecchio said.

Another move involved digital media. To emphasize the size of the library offerings on Disney Plus, Mr. Earley and his team strung together 20-second snippets from every old film and series that will be available on the service. The finished video, posted on YouTube on Oct. 14, is more than three hours long. Disney simultaneously published a colossal Twitter thread made up of posters of everything coming to Disney Plus.

Disney has declined to say how many people have signed up so far, but the marketing campaign appears to be working. Analysts at UBS said last week that they polled 1,000 consumers in mid-October and 86 percent had heard of Disney Plus. About 44 percent said they were likely to subscribe.

But the marketing department at Disney Plus is just getting started, Mr. Earley said. Just the other day, for instance, a counterpart at Disney’s theme park division called to say that 20 more billboards could be put up, this time on the sides of semi-trailers that haul supplies to Disney World from vendors across the country.

“We don’t want to overdo it,” Mr. Earley said. “But it’s mind-boggling what this company can do.”

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Al-Baghdadi Raid Was a Victory Built on Factors Trump Derides

Westlake Legal Group 27dc-assess-promo-facebookJumbo Al-Baghdadi Raid Was a Victory Built on Factors Trump Derides United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Terrorism Syria National Security Agency Middle East Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) Iraq Espionage and Intelligence Services Defense and Military Forces central intelligence agency bin Laden, Osama

WASHINGTON — The death of the Islamic State’s leader in a daring nighttime raid vindicated the value of three traditional American strengths: robust alliances, faith in intelligence agencies and the projection of military power around the world.

But President Trump has regularly derided the first two. And even as he claimed a significant national security victory on Sunday, the outcome of the raid did little to quell doubts about the wisdom of his push to reduce the United States military presence in Syria at a time when terrorist threats continue to develop in the region.

Mr. Trump has long viewed the United States intelligence agencies with suspicion and appears to see its employees as members of the “deep state.” He also has a distinctly skeptical view of alliances — in this case, close cooperation with the Kurds, whom he has effectively abandoned.

“The irony of the successful operation against al-Baghdadi is that it could not have happened without U.S. forces on the ground that have been pulled out, help from Syrian Kurds who have been betrayed, and support of a U.S. intelligence community that has so often been disparaged,” Richard N. Haass, the president of the Council on Foreign Relations, said on Sunday.

“While the raid was obviously a welcome success, the conditions that made the operation possible may not exist in the future,” he said.

To Mr. Trump, the death of the Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi was proof of the wisdom of his strategy of defending America at home without committing United States forces to “endless wars” abroad.

To the president and his supporters, the arguments from critics amount to sour grapes, an effort by an impeachment-crazed opposition to play down the success of a focused, successful clandestine operation that echoed the killing of Osama bin Laden.

That, of course, was the 2011 moment that Democrats celebrated as proof that a progressive president with little national security experience could take out the world’s most wanted terrorist. And while it had faded a bit in memory by the time President Barack Obama was up for re-election the following year, it was a talking point for his campaign.

Mr. Trump seemed to be laying the predicate for his own campaign talking points on Sunday, when he recounted telling his own forces that “I want al-Baghdadi,” rather than a string of deceased terrorist leaders who were “names I never heard of.” And clearly he is hoping that the success of the raid has a wider resonance: He sees the al-Baghdadi raid, some former Trump aides said, as a counterweight to the impeachment inquiry, which is based in part on an argument that he has shaped foreign policy for his political benefit.

It is too early to know whether any political boost will be lasting. But navigating the complex morass of the Middle East is no less complex for the death of Mr. al-Baghdadi. It is not clear if the president’s decision to pull back American forces in northern Syria in recent weeks complicated the planning and execution of the mission.

And while the raid achieved its goal, it did little to resolve the question of whether Mr. Trump’s instinct for disengagement will create room for new strains of violent radicalism that he and his successors will be forced to clean up.

For Mr. Trump, the aftermath of the Bin Laden killing eight years ago should also sound a warning.

Even without its leader, Al Qaeda evolved and spread. The Islamic State began its killing spree in the vacuum of the Middle East by early 2014, in both Iraq and Syria. Mr. Trump himself, in the heat of the 2016 campaign, accused Mr. Obama of creating the conditions for a new iteration of Islamic terrorism to prosper.

He was the founder,” Mr. Trump said in August 2016, talking about Mr. Obama and ISIS. “The way he got out of Iraq, that was the founding of ISIS.”

The history of the Middle East is rife with the rise of extremist movements, and there is no reason to believe ISIS will be the last. Long after the cinematic details of the daring raid — from its patient beginnings in Iraq last summer to the tense flight into Syria and the chase down a sealed tunnel where Mr. al-Baghdadi met his end — the enduring question will be whether the Trump administration capitalizes on the moment to address the region’s deep sectarian and political fissures and the underlying causes of terrorism.

Clint Watts of the Foreign Policy Research Institute wrote on Sunday that “al-Baghdadi’s death will dash the dreams of an Islamic State centered in the Levant, but its years of operations recruited, trained and dispatched foreign fighters from dozens of countries that will lead the next generation of jihad to other frontiers.”

He added: “Islamic State-trained foreign fighters will be a future terrorism problem for the decade to come.”

Mr. Obama and his administration grappled with that challenge endlessly, and their memoirs are filled with Situation Room meetings searching for an approach beyond drone strikes. But they never solved the problem.

Mr. Trump’s team, in contrast, rarely discusses it. And that is in part because of the president’s very different philosophy of how to secure the country, one that was on display in his sometimes rambling news conference after the announcement of Mr. al-Baghdadi’s death.

Mr. Trump’s approach to the region has never been consistent, but he has struck consistent themes. The first is that the United States does not need to keep forces in the region to reach out and kill its enemies. The high price of occupation, rebuilding and vacuum-filling, he suggests, can be paid by allies, or by Russians, Turks and even the Syrian government of Bashar al-Assad.

“That’s why I say they should start doing a lot of the fighting now, and they’ll be able to,” Mr. Trump told reporters on Sunday. “I really believe they’ll be able to.”

All the terrorists need to know, he said, is that the United States will hunt them down, if necessary, even from afar.

But the story of Mr. al-Baghdadi’s demise is more complex. He was living in territory that was essentially ungoverned space, dominated by two different Qaeda groups — Mr. al-Baghdadi’s rivals — and now an emerging territory for ISIS fighters on the run. The Syrians and the Russians control the airspace.

It is exactly the kind of area that American military and intelligence leaders — and the Republican leadership in Congress — have urged Mr. Trump to keep an eye on by keeping a small force in the country.

David H. Petraeus, the former general and C.I.A. director, often says that ungoverned space inevitably becomes extremist space. “Las Vegas rules do not obtain in these locations,” he said this year. “What happens there doesn’t stay there.”

Mr. Trump does not subscribe to that theory. In his view, American surveillance can keep track of the terrorists from above, while the National Security Agency can bore into their networks.

To Mr. Trump, a United States military presence on the ground becomes an excuse for others not to act; it does not bother him, he says, that Russia now occupies an area that was essentially an American protectorate before.

“I’ll tell you who loves us being there: Russia and China,” he said. “Because while they build their military, we’re depleting our military there.”

Mr. Trump acknowledged the help of some of those governments on Sunday, thanking the Russians first for allowing in the American helicopters, saying that the Kurds “gave us some information,” that Turkey was “not a problem.” (He did not give a similar heads-up to the congressional leadership that has been pressing for his impeachment, saying, “Washington is a leaking machine.”) While he declined to say where the operation began and ended, it was from Iraqi territory.

But it is far from clear that, in the absence of American engagement, that access is assured.

The one exception to Mr. Trump’s disengagement philosophy may come over oil.

Mr. Trump said he would not ask American taxpayers to “pay for the next 50 years” of containing mayhem. But in recent days he has indicated he is willing to keep troops around Syria’s oil fields, a consistent exception to the Trump no-troops rule. When the Iraq invasion happened, he noted Sunday, he argued for America to “keep the oil.”

Now he is making a similar case about the oil in Syria. Oil money fueled ISIS, he notes, and more recently it helps feed the Kurds — not mentioning that their access to it is being jeopardized by his sudden decision three weeks ago to abandon the American posts along the Turkey-Syria border.

But in recent days his defense secretary, Mark T. Esper, has indicated Mr. Trump was willing to commit forces to secure the fields, and the president went further on Sunday, saying he intends to “make a deal with an Exxon-Mobil or one of our great companies to go in” and exploit the field properly.

“We should be able to take some also,” he said.

The risk, of course, is that America looks like a force of exploitation, willing to enter hostile foreign lands for two reasons only: killing terrorists and extracting resources. The mission of the American Century — helping other nations to develop their economies and build democratic institutions — is missing from the strategy.

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Hundreds of Pakistani children test positive for HIV after rogue doctor reused syringes, report says

Health officials in a southern Pakistani city say a rogue pediatrician’s reuse of syringe needles has led to nearly 900 children testing positive for HIV since an epidemic began earlier this year, according to a Saturday report.

Dr. Muzaffar Ghanghro, a pediatrician in the city of Ratodero, was arrested in May on charges of negligence and manslaughter after patients alerted investigators of his alleged unsavory practices, Pakistani media reported.

An investigation by police and health officials concluded Ghanghro’s “negligence and carelessness” was responsible for an outbreak of HIV in Ratodero, where about 200 adults also have tested positive for HIV since April, The New York Times reported.

Westlake Legal Group needle1 Hundreds of Pakistani children test positive for HIV after rogue doctor reused syringes, report says fox-news/world/world-regions/pakistan fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/health/infectious-disease/hiv-aids fox news fnc/world fnc d5a408ef-235d-55c6-a7cb-063cd3163eca Bradford Betz article

A Pakistani doctor is accused of reusing syringes on patients, leading to an outbreak of nearly 900 children and 200 adults.  (npin.cdc.gov)

But, health officials said the number of affected patients was likely higher, given that less than a quarter of Ratodero’s 200,000 have been tested, according to report.

The allegations against Ghanghro reflected a wider trend across much of Pakistan, where lack of knowledge on the subject has contributed to cases doubling since 2010, according to the United Nations’ task force on HIV and AIDS.

PAKISTANI HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVIST WHO FLED TO AMERICA SAYS HER FATHER HAS BEEN ABDUCTED

The organization said some 600,000 unqualified doctors were thought to be operating unlawfully in Pakistan – nearly half of them in the province where Ratodero is located.

After the outbreak was first reported, the government shut down clinics with unregistered doctors and illegal blood banks.

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But clinics were said to have started reopening after media coverage dropped.

Imran Akbar, the doctor who first brought attention to the outbreak, told The Times: “Unless these quack doctors, barbers and dentists are not checked, the number of incidents of HIV infection will continue going up.”

Westlake Legal Group needle1 Hundreds of Pakistani children test positive for HIV after rogue doctor reused syringes, report says fox-news/world/world-regions/pakistan fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/health/infectious-disease/hiv-aids fox news fnc/world fnc d5a408ef-235d-55c6-a7cb-063cd3163eca Bradford Betz article   Westlake Legal Group needle1 Hundreds of Pakistani children test positive for HIV after rogue doctor reused syringes, report says fox-news/world/world-regions/pakistan fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/health/infectious-disease/hiv-aids fox news fnc/world fnc d5a408ef-235d-55c6-a7cb-063cd3163eca Bradford Betz article

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