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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 130)

As Earth faces climate catastrophe, US set to open nearly 200 power plants

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close As Earth faces climate catastrophe, US set to open nearly 200 power plants

Powerful hurricanes. Record-breaking heatwaves. Droughts that bring ruin to farmers. Raging forest fires. The mass die-off of the world’s coral reefs. Food scarcity. 

To avoid a climate change apocalypse, carbon dioxide emissions need to fall by as much as 45% from 2010 levels by 2030,  according to the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

Instead, utilities and energy companies are continuing to invest heavily in carbon-polluting natural gas. An exclusive analysis by USA TODAY finds that across the United States there are as many as 177 natural gas power plants currently planned, under construction or announced. There are close to 2,000 now in service. 

All that natural gas is “a ticking time bomb for our planet,” says Michael Brune, president of the Sierra Club. “If we are to prevent runaway climate change, these new plants can’t be built.”

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It also doesn’t make financial sense, according to an analysis by the Rocky Mountain Institute, a Colorado-based think tank that focuses on energy and resource efficiency. By the time most of these power plants are slated to open their doors, the electricity they’ll provide will cost more to produce than clean energy alternatives.

By 2023, the U.S. Energy Information Administration estimates the average cost of producing a megawatt hour of electricity will be $40.20 for a large-scale natural gas plants. Solar installations will be $2.60 cheaper and wind turbines will be $3.60 cheaper. 

Catastrophic effects ahead unless we make changes

The world needs to reduce its carbon emissions rapidly – by 50% within the next decade – or face the prospect of a global temperature rise of more than 2.7 degrees within decades, said Michael Mann, a professor of atmospheric sciences at Pennsylvania State University.

That’s enough warming to kill off the coral reefs, melt large parts of the ice sheets, inundate coastal cities and to yield what Mann calls “nearly perpetual extreme weather events.”

“By any definition, that would be catastrophic,” he said.

We’re seeing the start of it now. There’s strong data to suggest that global warming is already causing changes in the jet stream and other weather systems. That can cause hurricanes to slow down and wreak devastation in single areas for longer, said Marshall Shepherd, director of the atmospheric sciences program at the University of Georgia.

“With Dorian, we saw it stall over the Bahamas. We saw that with Harvey in Houston and Florence in the Carolinas,” he said.

More gas = more carbon dioxide

Adding dozens of new natural gas plants in the coming decades is going in the exact opposite direction of what we need, clean energy advocates say.

“If the current pipeline of gas plants were to get built, it would make decarbonizing the power sector by 2050 nearly impossible,” said Joe Daniel, a senior energy analyst with the Union of Concerned Scientists, a nonprofit based in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

An analysis by the Rocky Mountain Institute published Monday looked at 88 gas-fired power plants scheduled to begin operation by 2025. They would emit 100 million tons of carbon dioxide a year – equivalent to 5% of current annual emissions from the U.S. power sector. 

The institute calculated the cost of producing a megawatt-hour of electricity of a clean energy portfolio in each state that would provide the same level of power reliability as a gas plant. It determined that building clean energy alternatives would cost less than 90% of the proposed 88 plants.

It would also save customers over $29 billion in their utility bills, said Mark Dyson, an electricity markets analyst who co-authored the Rocky Mountain Institute paper.

“If you look at how things pencil out, we’re at a tipping point,” he said. “Here’s evidence that the switch from gas to clean energy makes economic sense and is compatible with utility companies’ need for reliability.”

More power plants coming to a state near you

USA TODAY compiled its own list of 177 planned and proposed natural gas plants through August, using data from S&P Global Market Intelligence, which tracks power plants that have been officially announced, and the Sierra Club, which tracks proposed plants.

Of those, 152 have a scheduled opening date of between 2019 and 2033, though only 130 have specific locations chosen. An additional 25 are part of companies’ long-term planning processes and don’t have estimated opening dates yet.

The plants are a mix of large-scale installations meant to provide lots of electricity much of the day and smaller plants used for short periods when demand for energy is particularly high.  

Texas has the most proposed plants, with 26. Next is Pennsylvania with 24, North Carolina with 12, Florida with 10, California with nine and Montana with eight.

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Not all will be built. Power companies are required to estimate future needs and plan as much as 15 years out, and this list includes plants which the companies may eventually decide they don’t need.

But the numbers show that greenhouse gas-producing natural gas is still on the table for many power producers, despite warnings that the energy sector needs to be quickly moving away from carbon-producing power sources.

Another concern raised by clean energy advocates is that once built, natural gas plants typically have a 30-year lifespan. Many of these plants will end up as “stranded assets,” unused because they’re too expensive to run, while consumers will still be on the hook for the cost of the construction, said Daniel.

It’s also true that power companies are building out solar and wind generation. Over the next two years, clean energy is expected to be the fastest-growing source of U.S. electricity generation, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Even so, that will only bring the share of wind and solar in the United States electricity market to slightly under 11%.

By 2020, EIA expects natural gas will make up about 36% of U.S. electricity generation. In comparison, coal is at 23%, nuclear at 20% and hydroelectric at 7%.

Why are we still building natural gas plants?

If natural gas plants contribute to global warming and most of them are going to be more expensive, why are so many still on the drawing board? The reasons are varied.    

Energy companies say gas is more reliable than renewables and cheaper and less carbon polluting than the coal it often replaces.

But renewable energy advocates say the incentives for utilities and energy producers aren’t always in line with those of consumers.

For regulated utilities, one of the easiest ways to make money is to invest capital in large building projects, such as natural gas plants. Regulators allow utilities to set rates so that they get a return on invested capital of about 10%, Dyson said. That gives energy companies an incentive to build as much as possible.

In contrast, utilities that procure wind and solar power via commonly available purchase contracts earn no returns for these projects.

“There’s a perverse incentive for some utilities to build as big as they can, rather than to build as smart as they can,” said Ben Inskeep, an analyst with EQ Research, a clean energy policy consulting firm in Cary, North Carolina.

Companies also focus on reliability. Duke Energy, a power company based in Charlotte, North Carolina, has more than 7 million customers. As it transitions away from coal, it has embraced natural gas, announcing last week that it was considering as many as five new gas plants.

Today 5% of Duke Energy Carolinas’ electricity comes from solar, a percentage it plans to increase to between 8% and 13% by 2034, according to its most recent filing with state regulators. The state has almost no wind energy because of laws restricting the placement of wind turbines.

“We know our customers and communities want cleaner energy, and we’re doing our part to deliver that,” said spokeswoman Erin Culbert.

But she emphasized that Duke doesn’t believe solar and wind can be cost-effective and reliable enough to meet all its customers’ energy needs.

“Continued use of natural gas is key to our ability to speed up coal retirements, and its flexibility helps complement and balance the growing renewables on our system,” she said. 

Government regulators favor gas

Another hurdle for renewable energy, some supporters say, is a combination of state-level rate-setting requirements and regional market rules that have led to a compensation structure for companies that favors coal and natural gas.

Who sets those rules depends on where the plant is.

In states where retail utilities own their own power generation facilities, the rates are approved by public utility commissions. Commissioners are typically appointed by state governors.

The process is less clear in the Midwest, Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, California, and Texas, where utilities buy and sell their power through organized markets run by regional transmission organizations

These are run by boards that by law must be independent. They are typically composed of people from the business and energy world and are chosen by complex systems. In some cases they are voted on by existing board members.

The boards set the rules, which are then approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

Ultimately these commissions and boards are supposed to decide what’s cost-effective for both the companies and ratepayers, said Scott Hempling, an adviser to regulators, law professor at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., and author of two books on public utility law and regulation.    

“A utility’s preference for profit is neither surprising nor wrong. But it’s not the utility’s job to balance its self-interest against the customers’ interest. It’s the job of regulators to constrain the private profit impulse with public interest principles,” he said.

It’s not news that there is bias towards profit, which can disadvantage customers. “The question is why it’s allowed to persist,” he said.

There are signs that what clean energy advocates have called an automatic rubber stamp for natural gas is beginning to change.

In April, the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission denied a permit for a southern Indiana utility named Vectren South to build a $780 million natural gas plant. The regulators weren’t convinced the utility had chosen the best option to ensure its customers weren’t in danger of being “saddled with an uneconomic investment” in the future, it said.

In Michigan last year, local utility DTE won a bruising battle to build a 1,100 megawatt natural gas plant that will open in 2022 and cost nearly $1 billion. Critics complained the projections DTE used to make its case to regulators made wind and solar look less attractive. 

The three members of the Michigan Public Service Commission, who are appointed by the governor, ended up approving the project. But the board’s 136-page opinion was not complimentary toward the utility, noting it was “concerned” about the constraints DTE built into the models it used to estimate whether renewable energy would be a viable alternative. 

Some utilities choose clean energy

Not every utility company is ignoring warnings about the planet’s health, or customers’ pocketbooks. 

Michigan utility Consumers Energy decided last year not to build new natural gas plants and instead focus on a combination of energy efficiency, renewable energy and batteries, which it says will be cheaper for customers.

The company, which has more than 4 million customers, plans to use 90% renewable energy by 2040, said Brandon Hofmeister, senior vice president for governmental, regulatory and public affairs.

When the utility was putting together its existing energy plan, it took a new approach, balancing the cost to consumers and to the Earth.

“Honestly, there was some pushback. There were several pretty tense meetings,” Hofmeister said. “You’d hear someone ask in a meeting, ‘Is that really the right thing to do for Michigan and the planet?’”

A similar story played out in Indiana, one of the nation’s top 10 coal-producing states. A few years ago, Northern Indiana Public Service Company, based in Merrillville, Indiana, was getting ready to retire its old, expensive coal-fired power plants. An analysis in 2016 said they should be replaced with natural gas plants.

To be on the safe side, Joe Hamrock, president and CEO, checked again last year.

“We knew this is moving pretty fast and we needed to take a new look. A 30-year bet on a gas plant is a long time,” he said.

When his team sat down to look at the 90 project proposals that had come in, the answer came as a shock – natural gas wasn’t even in the picture anymore.

“The surprise was how dramatically the renewables and storage proposals beat natural gas,” Hamrock said. “I couldn’t have predicted this five years ago.”

The company is now set to retire all its coal-fired power plants, which produce 65% of its electricity today, and replace them all with renewables. In nine years, it expects to get 65% of its electricity from renewables and 25% from natural gas.  

What will U.S. energy look like in the future?

Electricity generators counter that it’s impossible to get entirely away from natural gas because solar and gas are intermittent. When it comes time to turn on the lights, consumers can’t wait for the sun to come up or the wind to blow.

“We believe that natural gas has a role in a clean future because we believe it will be needed to balance out renewables,” said Emily Fisher, general counsel for the Edison Electric Institute in Washington, D.C. EEI is the trade association that represents investor-owned electric utilities in the United States.

“But we’ve also got to make sure the power supply stays affordable and reliable,” she said.

Electricity generators have a point, say energy analysts who aren’t necessarily in the pro-renewable camp. But those same analysts suggest a lot less natural gas is needed than we’re using today.

“The cheapest way to reduce carbon is to replace coal with a combination of renewables and as little natural gas as you can get by with to keep the lights on,” said Arne Olson, a senior partner with Energy and Environmental Economics, a San Francisco-based energy consulting firm that works with multiple states to craft energy plans.

That makes getting to the goals of the Paris Agreement on climate change – cutting greenhouse gas emissions at least 26% below 2005 levels by 2025 – not quite so daunting. The United States initially pledged to join the agreement but President Donald Trumpsaid in 2017 that the nation would not uphold the deal. 

In fact, the electric industry is already undergoing a major restructuring. Largely because of the rapid rise of cheap natural gas, coal went from producing almost 45% of U.S. electricity in 2010 to a predicted 23% next year, according to EIA data.

The energy sector has shown it can move quickly when the prices are right, said Dyson of the Rocky Mountain Institute. And, he said, it’s imperative that a similar shift happen now with natural gas – and fast.

“Constructing these gas plants is incompatible with a low carbon future,” he said. 

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2019/09/09/climate-change-threatens-earth-us-open-nearly-200-power-plants/2155631001/

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Embattled Nissan C.E.O. Hiroto Saikawa to Resign, Carmaker Says

Westlake Legal Group 09nissan-facebookJumbo Embattled Nissan C.E.O. Hiroto Saikawa to Resign, Carmaker Says Saikawa, Hiroto Japan Ghosn, Carlos Automobiles

YOKOHAMA, Japan — The embattled chief executive of Nissan, Hiroto Saikawa, will resign, the company said Monday, following months of speculation about his ability to manage the Japanese carmaker since it was rocked by the arrest last year of its former chairman, Carlos Ghosn.

Mr. Saikawa’s resignation takes effect Sept. 16, and the company is considering a list of 10 candidates for his successor, said Masakazu Toyoda, who leads the company’s nomination committee. A decision is expected by the end of October.

Nissan’s chief operating officer, Yasuhiro Yamauchi, will serve as interim C.E.O., Mr. Toyoda said.

Mr. Saikawa “had indicated recently his willingness to resign,” the company said in a statement.

Following the company’s news conference, Mr. Saikawa stepped forward and faced the room full of reporters alone. He apologized for leaving the company before he could fulfill his promise of putting the company back on track.

News of his departure came after Nissan’s board received a briefing on the results of a nearly year-long investigation into the company’s governance. The inquiry was a prompted after Japanese prosecutors charged Mr. Ghosn with financial misconduct, including underreporting his compensation by tens of millions of dollars. He denies any wrongdoing.

Nissan also faces charges in relation to Mr. Ghosn’s compensation and it has attempted internal governance reforms.

In the months since Mr. Ghosn’s arrest in November, Nissan’s internal inquiry had grown to include many other aspects of the company’s business, including the compensation of Mr. Saikawa and other top executives.

Speculation that Mr. Saikawa — a once-loyal deputy to Mr. Ghosn who has been withering in his criticism since the arrest — would resign had grown since Thursday, when he announced that he and other executives had received unearned compensation as a result of what he described as an error by the company.

The admission was blow to Mr. Saikawa. Nissan, a partner in a global carmaking alliance with Renault and Mitsubishi, has suffered with dismal performance and a crisis of confidence over the past year, and Mr. Saikawa has been struggling to put the company back on track.

Mr. Saikawa had long been fighting an uphill battle: The company’s profits dropped 94 percent in the last quarter, its alliance with Renault is coming apart at the seams, and many Nissan employees have lost faith in Mr. Saikawa’s ability to lead the company out of its most difficult crisis in years.

Renault had no immediate response to Nissan’s news.

Whether Mr. Saikawa’s resignation opens the way for a new era between Renault and Nissan remains to be seen. Relations have been fraught since Mr. Ghosn’s arrest, and tensions over the future of the alliance flared regularly, despite efforts by Renault’s chief executive, Jean-Dominique Senard, to cultivate a personal relationship with Mr. Saikawa, with whom he spoke by telephone nearly every day.

A top issue facing Mr. Saikawa’s successor will be how to strengthen the alliance as the global auto industry rapidly consolidates, with giants like BMW and Daimler cooperating on crucial innovations like autonomous driving technology. Analysts say that only by combining forces can Nissan and Renault afford the huge technology investments necessary to avoid obsolescence.

Renault and Nissan have acknowledged they still need one another to survive and thrive. But Mr. Senard told Renault shareholders recently that “a tense climate” reigned between his company and Nissan.

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Harry Kazianis: China is the new evil empire, and Trump is using Reagan’s playbook to defeat it

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083875646001_6083875312001-vs Harry Kazianis: China is the new evil empire, and Trump is using Reagan's playbook to defeat it Harry J. Kazianis fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fox-news/newsedge/international fox news fnc/opinion fnc article a101c554-8e9f-5b7d-8ab1-42acabe78144

The Trump administration, despite constant criticism at home and overseas, has made the right decision in taking on China. And yet, very few pundits and so-called experts understand Trump’s strategy, the stakes involved and how America will implement it.

I can sum up Trump’s China strategy in one word: containment. And considering it brought down Soviet communism for good, Beijing should be shaking in its boots.

But let’s step back for a second. This isn’t your father’s version of containment meant to pull back the iron curtain and deliver freedom to hundreds of millions of people. China is clearly not the land of Gorbachev, and it is not a nation that, while large in size and military might, is economically weak and technologically backward.

US WORRIED CHINA’S DORIAN RELIEF EFFORT IN BAHAMAS MAY BE BID TO GAIN INFLUENCE — AND FOOTHOLD, REPORTS SAY

No, China is a much more cunning and sinister opponent. An oppressor at home and a bully abroad, Beijing, now at the height of its economic power with a GDP worth more than $12 trillion and a military budget as high as $250 billion, possesses a one-two punch that the old Soviet Union could only dream of possessing. Beijing threatens America’s economic livelihood through mercantilist policies while also building weapons systems designed to attack and destroy our aircraft carriers, cyber infrastructure and more.

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The good news is that Trump is clearly borrowing the playbook from a past and beloved American president who took on the “evil empire” of his time and was largely responsible for its demise.

You guessed it: Ronald Reagan.

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Amen.

You shouldn’t be surprised. If you consider how Reagan took on the Soviets and compare it to Trump’s approach on China, the similarities are shocking.

Trump is determined to ensure that no more factories or blue-collar jobs leave for China, a practice that essentially transfers economic wealth to our top geopolitical foe.

Consider the times in which both men inherited the great power challenge in front of them and how both responded. First, just like Reagan, Trump inherited a crumbling U.S. military that was in desperate need of rebuilding thanks to progressive policies that damaged its ability to deter our enemies. Both Trump and Reagan passed large defense budgets focused on taking on their principal rivals, making key investments that were sorely needed to not only stay ahead of the threat curve, but ensure military dominance. And just like Reagan, Trump seeks to ensure that if a conflict were to break out, America would have the tools to fight — and to win.

We also can’t forget the way each man uniquely communicates the dangers posed by the threats of their era — with great impact, done in a way that America’s foes can’t easily rebut. For Reagan, the act of calling Soviet Russia the “evil empire” in 1983, while mocked by dovish liberals, was a simple but effective way of calling Moscow out. It was that simple play on words that gave Russia a label that would stick and made it clear America was on the right side of history.

While Trump hasn’t labeled China the evil empire just yet, his use of Twitter to constantly convey the state of trade negotiations, to call out China’s president — both positively and negatively — or to convey his anger at Beijing is, just like Reagan, using his own unique style of communication to box his opponent in and force it to respond to something it can hardly refute. Unless Chinese President Xi Jinping gets on Twitter to rebut Trump — technically he cannot as Twitter is not allowed in China — China has no effective means to respond. What a shame.

Next, both Reagan and Trump realized that the core foundation of any nation is economic strength, with both doing all they could to ensure that America’s financial foundation is as strong and as vibrant as ever. Both leaders passed tax cuts that led to economic growth and higher wages, while reversing the anti-business and burdensome regulations their predecessors enacted. And while both men share a similar challenge in growing U.S. debt, the Soviet Union was bankrupted by the time the Cold War was over and China faces a staggering total national debt of over 350 percent to GDP when shadowy loans and faulty financial instruments that Beijing works hard to keep off the books are factored in.

But here is where Reagan and Trump diverge — and for good reason. Soviet Russia was not tied into the global economy like Communist China. With Beijing stealing trillions of dollars in U.S. intellectual property, closing off markets and providing illegal subsidies to domestic industries to the tune of hundreds of billions of dollars, Trump confronts an economic juggernaut that Reagan did not.

Thankfully, the administration has made leveling the playing field its mission, slapping hundreds of billions of dollars of potential tariffs on Chinese goods unless Beijing not only abides by its obligations under international law but also stops taking advantage of America’s open markets and consumers. Trump is determined to ensure that no more factories or blue-collar jobs leave for China, a practice that essentially transfers economic wealth to our top geopolitical foe.

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And then, perhaps most important of all, were the sacrifices both men knew and expected Americans would have to make in order to win such a struggle. The good news is that both men get the idea that such threats, if left unchecked, will only grow. And in the case of China, nothing could be worse than a rogue state with an economy someday larger than America’s that has the military prowess to defeat Washington both economically and militarily.

Combine that with China’s ability to stifle its own people’s human rights — and sell the technology to do it to other rogue states. America must continue to ensure China’s vision for the 21st century, with a totalitarian Beijing atop the global pecking order, does not come to pass.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY HARRY KAZIANIS

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083875646001_6083875312001-vs Harry Kazianis: China is the new evil empire, and Trump is using Reagan's playbook to defeat it Harry J. Kazianis fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fox-news/newsedge/international fox news fnc/opinion fnc article a101c554-8e9f-5b7d-8ab1-42acabe78144   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083875646001_6083875312001-vs Harry Kazianis: China is the new evil empire, and Trump is using Reagan's playbook to defeat it Harry J. Kazianis fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fox-news/newsedge/international fox news fnc/opinion fnc article a101c554-8e9f-5b7d-8ab1-42acabe78144

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Trump mocks Sanford for 2009 affair after GOP primary challenge announced

Westlake Legal Group Trump-Sandford-AP Trump mocks Sanford for 2009 affair after GOP primary challenge announced Ronn Blitzer fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning/trump-2020-campaign fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/mark-sanford fox news fnc/politics fnc article 39c7b002-665b-5282-86b3-94c24443c558

President Trump did not waste time going after Mark Sanford after the former South Carolina governor became the third Republican to challenge him in the party’s presidential primary race.

A day after Sanford announced his campaign on “Fox News Sunday,” Trump brought up the 2009 scandal where Sanford, as governor, disappeared for days only to later admit that he was in Argentina having an extramarital affair.

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“When the former Governor of the Great State of South Carolina, @MarkSanford, was reported missing, only to then say he was away hiking on the Appalachian Trail, then was found in Argentina with his Flaming Dancer friend, it sounded like his political career was over. It was, . . . but then he ran for Congress and won, only to lose his re-elect after I Tweeted my endorsement, on Election Day, for his opponent,” he tweeted Monday.

Trump was referring to when Sanford’s whereabouts were unknown for almost a week in 2009, as a spokesperson falsely claimed he was hiking the Appalachian Trail. It was later discovered he was in Argentina with María Belén Chapur.

The affair led Sanford and his wife Jenny to get divorced. In 2012, he and Chapur were engaged, but they broke it off in 2014. Sanford blamed the breakup on pressures from the divorce proceedings and obligations to his children.

SEVERAL STATE GOP PARTIES COULD SCRAP PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES, INFURIATING POTENTIAL TRUMP CHALLENGERS

Despite the scandal, Sanford went on to win a seat in Congress after a special election in 2013. He then lost a close primary battle in 2018, when Trump tweeted support of Sanford’s opponent, state legislator Katie Arrington, the day of the primary vote.

Trump also mocked Sanford at a 2018 rally, when he referred to Chapur as a “flamingo dancer.” Chapur fired back at Trump at the time. While “flamenco” is a Spanish dance,” she pointed out that she is from Argentina, where they dance the tango. Trump’s Monday tweet calling her a “Flaming Dancer” appears to be a variation on flamingo.

Trump finished his Twitter slam by addressing Sanford’s newly announced presidential bid.

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“But now take heart, he is back, and running for President of the United States,” Trump said. “The Three Stooges, all badly failed candidates, will give it a go!”

Those “Three Stooges” include Sanford, former Illinois Rep. Joe Walsh, and former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld, who have also announced campaigns against Trump in the Republican primaries.

Westlake Legal Group Trump-Sandford-AP Trump mocks Sanford for 2009 affair after GOP primary challenge announced Ronn Blitzer fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning/trump-2020-campaign fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/mark-sanford fox news fnc/politics fnc article 39c7b002-665b-5282-86b3-94c24443c558   Westlake Legal Group Trump-Sandford-AP Trump mocks Sanford for 2009 affair after GOP primary challenge announced Ronn Blitzer fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning/trump-2020-campaign fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/mark-sanford fox news fnc/politics fnc article 39c7b002-665b-5282-86b3-94c24443c558

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Los Angeles Rams’ Eric Weddle left bloodied after taking flying knee to the head

Los Angeles Rams safety Eric Weddle’s debut with the team against the Carolina Panthers on Sunday probably didn’t go exactly the way he would have wanted.

Weddle was forced to exit in the second quarter of the game after he took a flying knee to the head from Panthers running back Christian McCaffrey. Weddle was seen bleeding profusely from the forehead.

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WARNING: GRAPHIC VIDEO

Weddle was carted off the field. The team later announced he was in the concussion protocol.

The Rams held on for the victory, 30-27.

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He tweeted after the game he was “as good as gold.”

Weddle is in his first season with the Rams. He had previously spent two years with the Baltimore Ravens and nine years with the San Diego Chargers.

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He’s earned six Pro Bowl and two All-Pro selections over the course of his career.

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Eric-Weddle Los Angeles Rams' Eric Weddle left bloodied after taking flying knee to the head Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/los-angeles-rams fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc c6429e8c-abf5-5558-a5bd-a9649b3cf5cd article   Westlake Legal Group NFL-Eric-Weddle Los Angeles Rams' Eric Weddle left bloodied after taking flying knee to the head Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/los-angeles-rams fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc c6429e8c-abf5-5558-a5bd-a9649b3cf5cd article

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Little Mix star Jesy Nelson recalls suicide attempt: ‘I couldn’t tolerate the pain any more’

Little Mix star Jesy Nelson says she tried to kill herself after she was subjected to relentless trolling on Twitter about her appearance.

She took an overdose of pills and went to bed — but was saved because her then-boyfriend found her and called an ambulance.

Jesy, 28, speaking for the first time about her suicide attempt, said: “I just remember thinking, ‘I just need this to go away, I’m going to end this.’

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“I remember going to the kitchen and just took as many tablets as I could. Then I laid in bed for ages and kept thinking, ‘Let it happen. Hurry up’.”

Westlake Legal Group little-mix-getty Little Mix star Jesy Nelson recalls suicide attempt: 'I couldn’t tolerate the pain any more' The Sun fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fnc/entertainment fnc f4654b6b-d0ba-5874-a3c8-314b507c5a7f Dan Wootton article

Perrie Edwards, Jesy Nelson, Jade Thirlwall and Leigh-Anne Pinnock of ‘Little Mix’ in the winners room during The BRIT Awards 2019 held at The O2 Arena on February 20, 2019 in London, England.

A source close to the star said: “She confessed to him what she had done. An ambulance came to the house and was able to sort her out.

“They were able to get there in time and save her life. Jesy told her close family members, one member of her management team and her bandmates, who were devastated.”

Jesy has spoken out about her November 2013 suicide attempt for the first time to help raise awareness of the effect trolling can have on young people.

’13 REASONS WHY’ MAY HAVE TRIGGERED SUICIDE SEARCHES ONLINE

Her mental health was so affected by the abuse she began struggling to keep up with her commitments in the band, which was becoming a pop music force with hits such as “Move,” “DNA” and “Wings.”

Westlake Legal Group jesy-nelson-getty Little Mix star Jesy Nelson recalls suicide attempt: 'I couldn’t tolerate the pain any more' The Sun fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fnc/entertainment fnc f4654b6b-d0ba-5874-a3c8-314b507c5a7f Dan Wootton article

Jesy Nelson of Little Mix attends the Capital Summertime Ball at Wembley Stadium on June 10, 2017 in London, United Kingdom. (Karwai Tang/WireImage)

Jesy, recalling her ordeal in BBC1 documentary “Odd One Out,” said: “I just remember thinking this is never going to go.

“I’m going to constantly wake up and feel sad for the rest of my life. So what is the point in being here? I physically couldn’t tolerate the pain anymore.”

Jesy, who is now dating Love Island star Chris Hughes, has turned her life around and permanently quit Twitter, deleting the app from her phone.

KATY PERRY DISCUSSES HER STRUGGLES WITH SUICIDE

The source added: “She got rid of Twitter and immediately felt better. She will never go back on it.

“It’s a big decision to open up about something so personal but she’s determined to help others.”

Jesy had been subjected to horrific online bullying since finding fame as an “X Factor” winner in 2011. She had been put together with Perrie EdwardsJade Thirlwall and Leigh-Anne Pinnock to form Little Mix.

She told how all four members were forced to sign up to social media in the wake of their win. Jesy said: “We were all told we had to have social media and it completely changed my life.

“The whole world had an opinion on me and they weren’t good ones.

“From the minute those comments started, it became one of the worst times of my life.

LITTLE MIX SINGER JADE THIRLWALL SAYS SHE ALMOST DIED FROM ANOREXIA

“I wasn’t known as one of the singers from Little Mix. I was always known as the fat, ugly one. It literally consumed every part of me.” In the documentary, which screens on Thursday night, she reveals the sort of abuse she suffered.

The cruel comments included: “Fat singing whale,” “The fat one is repulsive,” “Kill your f—ing self,” “Go chop your f—ing head off,” “Jesy’s face is deformed,” “That one from Little Mix looks like Miss Piggy from the Muppets.”

Jesy said she did not have body confidence issues before joining social media.

She added: “As a kid I was very very confident. I never had any issues with the way I looked, my weight — until everything changed. Being in Little Mix is just the best thing that’s ever, ever happened to me. But I hit such a low point in my life that I stopped turning up for work.

ARIANA GRANDE SLAMS PIERS MORGAN OVER COMMENTS ABOUT LITTLE MIX’S PARTIAL NUDITY

“From the minute the comments started it got worse and worse. My brain started to believe everything people were saying about me. I felt embarrassed. I felt ashamed.”

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

This article originally appeared in The Sun.

Westlake Legal Group jesy-nelson-getty Little Mix star Jesy Nelson recalls suicide attempt: 'I couldn’t tolerate the pain any more' The Sun fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fnc/entertainment fnc f4654b6b-d0ba-5874-a3c8-314b507c5a7f Dan Wootton article   Westlake Legal Group jesy-nelson-getty Little Mix star Jesy Nelson recalls suicide attempt: 'I couldn’t tolerate the pain any more' The Sun fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fnc/entertainment fnc f4654b6b-d0ba-5874-a3c8-314b507c5a7f Dan Wootton article

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New England Patriots’ Tom Brady racks up another first to kick off 20th season

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Tom-Brady11 New England Patriots' Tom Brady racks up another first to kick off 20th season Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/pittsburgh-steelers fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/tom-brady fox news fnc/sports fnc article 1bfd616f-2824-5139-a154-313cbcb48fa0

Tom Brady has been playing at a high level for so long that generations of opponents have been bested by the future Hall of Famer.

The 42-year-old quarterback, who’s playing in his 20th NFL season with the New England Patriots, experienced yet another career first during Sunday night’s season opener against the Pittsburgh Steelers when he peered over his offensive line and saw he was about to go against the son of an opponent Brady had faced during his rookie year.

TOM BRADY WILLING TO HAVE ANTONIO BROWN MOVE IN WITH HIM WHILE HE GETS SETTLED WITH NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS

The six-time Super Bowl champion had Devin Bush Jr. staring back at him at the line of scrimmage, giving Brady déjà vu from 2001, when he dealt with Cleveland Browns safety Devin Bush Sr., according to ESPN.

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“It really hits you when you think about both of us living our dream of playing in the NFL, and to be playing against the same opponent, how many times does that happen?” Bush Sr. told ESPN.

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But like father, like son: Brady got the best of Bush Sr. in 2001 and Bush Jr. in 2019. The Patriots defeated the Browns, 27-16, in 2001 en route to Brady’s first Super Bowl title. On Sunday, Brady led the Patriots to a blowout win, 33-3, on the night New England celebrated its sixth championship.

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Tom-Brady11 New England Patriots' Tom Brady racks up another first to kick off 20th season Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/pittsburgh-steelers fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/tom-brady fox news fnc/sports fnc article 1bfd616f-2824-5139-a154-313cbcb48fa0   Westlake Legal Group NFL-Tom-Brady11 New England Patriots' Tom Brady racks up another first to kick off 20th season Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/pittsburgh-steelers fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/tom-brady fox news fnc/sports fnc article 1bfd616f-2824-5139-a154-313cbcb48fa0

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Trump’s wall is officially a flop: Even Fox News now calls his big campaign promise a mistake

Westlake Legal Group biN4S-MxsH7t9MitCRjOxbt3YmpT9u7ipmn9kKvJGm8 Trump's wall is officially a flop: Even Fox News now calls his big campaign promise a mistake r/politics

I’m still baffled by the “Mexico will pay for it” position. Why would a sovereign nation agree to cover costs for another nation? These are not reparations. If anyone owes anyone anything, we owe Mexico. Most of the gang violence is around smuggling routes INTO the US, and most of the guns used in that violence are American imports. I hate Trump with a passion, but that position didn’t seem even a little bit defensible by his standards.

Then I look across the pond and Boris Johnson is telling people the EU is going to have to give them a Brexit deal, which is absolute poppycock! Why would the EU make life easier for the UK? What possible motive would there be for them to help the UK? If anything, the EU is going to make Brexit miserable in case any other country is thinking the same thing.

These two idiots really are cut from the same dirty nappy.

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Dan Bongino, Rahm Emanuel agree: 2020 Dems making big mistake going into general election

Westlake Legal Group Bongino-Rahm Dan Bongino, Rahm Emanuel agree: 2020 Dems making big mistake going into general election fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/regulation/health-care fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc fd173871-1789-5581-b8ce-27b026478c74 David Montanaro article

Fox News contributor Dan Bongino expressed agreement Monday on “Fox & Friends” with former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who warned 2020 Democratic presidential candidates against going too far left on health care and immigration.

Speaking on ABC News’ “This Week” on Sunday, the former Obama White House chief of staff said that it’s “reckless” to support “Medicare-for-all” and also support giving health care to migrants who cross the border.

“We’ve taken a position so far, the candidates have … few have not, about basically ‘Medicare-for-all,’ which is we’re gonna eliminate 150 million people’s health care and we’re gonna provide health care for people that [have] just come over the border,” said Emanuel.

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“That is an untenable position for the general election. … This is reckless. You don’t have to take the position to win the primary and you’re basically, literally hindering yourself for the general election.”

Bongino joked that he has almost never agreed with Emanuel, but the Democrats’ argument on health care goes against basic economics.

“The very bedrock of economics is the allocation of scarce resources. A doctor’s time and hospital beds are scarce resources. You can either price them or you can ration them,” he said.

SALLY PIPES: BERNIE’S ‘MEDICARE-FOR-ALL’ MEANS WORSE INSURANCE AT HIGHER COST FOR MOST AMERICANS

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Bongino said government-run health care can only lead to “rationing,” similar to other single-payer health care systems like the United Kingdom, and Americans will reject it.

“If you instill a rationing system, Rahm Emanuel is right, it will be economic and political suicide for the Democratic Party.”

Westlake Legal Group Bongino-Rahm Dan Bongino, Rahm Emanuel agree: 2020 Dems making big mistake going into general election fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/regulation/health-care fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc fd173871-1789-5581-b8ce-27b026478c74 David Montanaro article   Westlake Legal Group Bongino-Rahm Dan Bongino, Rahm Emanuel agree: 2020 Dems making big mistake going into general election fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/regulation/health-care fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc fd173871-1789-5581-b8ce-27b026478c74 David Montanaro article

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Amazon Has 30,000 Open Jobs. Yes, You Read That Right.

Westlake Legal Group 09amazon-facebookJumbo Amazon Has 30,000 Open Jobs. Yes, You Read That Right. United States Labor and Jobs Hiring and Promotion Amazon.com Inc

SEATTLE — Engineers in the Bay Area. Advertising managers in Chicago. Freight specialists in Arizona. At Amazon, the job listings keep piling up, reflecting a company growing in many directions amid one of the tightest labor markets in memory.

On Monday, Amazon said it had 30,000 open positions in the United States, including full- and part-time jobs, in corporate and tech roles, in locations ranging from headquarters offices to tech hubs to fulfillment centers.

The posts, which Amazon said it hoped to fill by early next year, are permanent jobs and do not include hourly, seasonal positions like warehouse workers. More than half the jobs are tech-oriented, the company said.

It’s the most open positions the company has ever had, Amazon said.

The sheer number of openings is the latest sign of the company’s ambitions colliding with the reality of strong labor markets for both white- and blue-collar workers. Last fall, Amazon raised the minimum wage at its warehouses to $15 an hour, and this summer, the company said it planned to spend $700 million to retrain about a third of its American workers to perform higher-skilled tasks. The effort included a major focus on bulking up the technical chops of its corporate and tech work force, such as turning entry-level coders into data scientists.

In August, the national unemployment rate remained near a 50-year low at 3.7 percent, even as hiring has slowed in the face of a trade war and lagging global economy.

Amazon had 653,300 employees globally as of the end of June, not including temp workers and contractors. A little less than half of those are in the United States.

The company has another shadow work force of contractors, ranging from drivers delivering packages to customer service representatives who help sellers on its marketplace.

Amazon has signaled to investors that it is entering a reinvestment cycle, where its costs will increase as it seeks to grow in strategic areas. In its latest earnings call with Wall Street analysts, Amazon called out recent growth in sales and marketing staff for its cloud computing services as well as the logistics and transportation networks it is building to bring packages to customers.

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The 30,000 open positions do not herald a single major new investment, such as two years ago when Amazon announced that it would search for a second headquarters to complement its home in Seattle, which has all but turned into a company town. It said the new headquarters would create 50,000 jobs.

Amazon is now having to rejigger its hiring after the plan to split that second headquarters between two locations — New York City and Arlington, Va., just outside Washington — stumbled. Amazon backed out of New York, saying it would take the 25,000 positions that would have gone to the city and spread them among various smaller hubs, including New York.

The company is holding hiring fairs in six cities on Sept. 17, including Nashville, where Amazon is building a major outpost for its vast logistics operations network, as well as Arlington, Boston, Chicago, Dallas and Seattle.

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