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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 138)

Walter Mosley quit ‘Star Trek: Discovery’ over N-word backlash

Writer Walter Mosley quit “Star Trek: Discovery” in disgust after getting a formal complaint about him using the N-word in the writer’s room, according to new reports.

The author, who is African-American, first revealed in an op-ed for the New York Times on Friday that he had resigned from a high-profile gig after HR told him there had been complaints about his language.

“I am the N-word in the writers’ room,” Mosley, 67, had replied when first “chastised” for his use of the divisive term.

‘STAR TREK: DISCOVERY’ INFLUENCED BY TRUMP ELECTION

The “Devil in a Blue Dress” author did not name the show — but sources have now revealed to The Hollywood Reporter that it was CBS All Access’ “Star Trek: Discovery.”

“We have the greatest admiration for Mr. Mosley’s writing talents and were excited to have him join ‘Star Trek: Discovery,’” CBS TV Studios told the trade paper in a statement.

“While we cannot comment on the specifics of confidential employee matters, we are committed to supporting a workplace where employees feel free to express concerns and where they feel comfortable performing their best work.”

CBS ALL ACCESS’ ‘STAR TREK: DISCOVERY’ TO FEATURE FEMALE LEAD

Mosley made it clear in his Times column that he had not called anyone the offensive term but merely “telling a true story as I remembered it.”

Westlake Legal Group walter-mosley Walter Mosley quit 'Star Trek: Discovery' over N-word backlash New York Post Lee Brown fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/political fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc dc0facef-45fc-5942-b408-20eb8d6dbd6e article

Writer Walter Mosley attends the premiere of FX’s “Snowfall” season 3 at Bovard Auditorium at USC on July 08, 2019 in Los Angeles. Mosley says he left “Star Trek: Discovery” over using the N-word in the writers’ room. (Getty)

‘STAR TREK: DISCOVERY’ DIVIDES FANS WITH CONTROVERSIAL PHOTO

“I just told a story about a cop who explained to me, on the streets of Los Angeles, that he stopped all n—ers in paddy neighborhoods and all paddies in n—er neighborhoods, because they were usually up to no good. I was telling a true story as I remembered it,” he wrote.

He still does not know who complained, but was outraged when HR approached him about using the word he says is “in common parlance.”

“There I was being chastised for criticizing the word that oppressed me and mine for centuries,” Mosley wrote.

‘STAR TREK: DISCOVERY’ SHOWRUNNER DROPS DETAILS ABOUT KLINGONS

“There’s all kinds of language that makes me uncomfortable. … But I have no right whatsoever to tell anyone what they should and should not cherish or express.

“I do not believe that it should be the object of our political culture to silence those things said that make some people uncomfortable.”

He insisted, “If I have an opinion, a history, a word that explains better than anything how I feel, then I also have the right to express that feeling or that word without the threat of losing my job.”

He said his answer to HR “was to resign and move on.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“I was in a writers’ room trying to be creative while at the same time being surveilled by unknown critics who would snitch on me to a disembodied voice over the phone. My every word would be scrutinized,” he wrote.

“Sooner or later I’d be fired or worse — silenced.”

This article originally appeared in Page Six.

Westlake Legal Group walter-mosley Walter Mosley quit 'Star Trek: Discovery' over N-word backlash New York Post Lee Brown fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/political fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc dc0facef-45fc-5942-b408-20eb8d6dbd6e article   Westlake Legal Group walter-mosley Walter Mosley quit 'Star Trek: Discovery' over N-word backlash New York Post Lee Brown fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/political fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc dc0facef-45fc-5942-b408-20eb8d6dbd6e article

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Guns, impeachment push, border wall: What’s in store as Congress returns from recess

As Congress heads back to work on Monday in Washington after a six-week recess, lawmakers who already have struggled to pass substantive legislation this term are set to grapple with a slew of combustible issues, ranging from trade deals and border wall funding to gun control and impeachment proceedings.

With an already heated presidential cycle in full swing, experts have said the political landscape would afford little hope for legislative compromise, but plenty of opportunity for gamesmanship and stonewalling. To top it all off, lawmakers also need to fund the government by Oct. 1 to avert another shutdown, despite deep-seated disagreements on appropriate budget levels for the State Department, the Pentagon, and other key agencies.

“It’s a really tough environment for lawmaking,” Sarah Binder, a political-science professor at George Washington University and senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, told Fox News. “First, the parties are surely more ideologically polarized from each other than they were decades ago. Second, there’s more sheer partisanship in town than before– tit for tat, your team is for it, so my team is against it. Third, close electoral competition narrows the window for dealmaking — each election offers each party a chance to hold or gain control. … [And,] because the president is so unpopular nationally and with independents, there’s limited pressure on Democrats to resolve problems.”

“Parties may have an incentive periodically to show voters that they can govern,” Binder added. “But as often they disagree about what the problems are, their base rewards them for inaction, and they are better off blaming the other side for gridlock than negotiating solutions.”

YOO: TRUMP CAN REALLOCATE FUNDS TO THE BORDER WALL, AND THE SUPREME COURT WILL BACK HIM

In a video posted to Twitter on Sunday, President Trump seemingly dismissed the need for any bargaining at all on his border wall, which he said was being built already “on an expedited basis.”

Last week, Defense Secretary Mark Esper signed off on spending $3.6 billion in Defense Department construction funds for 175 miles of wall on the southern border with Mexico. Lower courts had frozen use of the money while a lawsuit proceeded. Last month, however, the U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way for the use of about $2.5 billion.

“We’ll have, by the end of next year, close to 500 miles of wall. We’re taking money from all over, because as you know, the Democrats don’t want us to build the wall,” Trump said. “They’re fighting us at every step, but our military has stepped up, and they’re doing a fantastic job.”

The decision to redirect funding could prompt many Democrats to try reining in future repurposing efforts in the new congressional session. Some courts have suggested that if Congress wanted to stop Trump from repurposing funds for the border wall, it could do so — with legislation.

But, there’s “not a lot of incentive” for House Democrats to “play along” and pass meaningful bills, given that Republicans and the White House would “take credit” for them, Northern Illinois University political science professor Scot Schraufnagel told the CQ Roll Call podcast this week.

“It’s a really tough environment for lawmaking.”

— Sarah Binder, a political-science professor at George Washington University

According to Schraufnagel, Congress has succeeded so far in passing little “substantive” legislation, even as the raw number of bills passed remained loosely comparable to previous congresses.

“If you look at sheer numbers, we’re at the summer recess of the Trump second Congress,” Schraufnagel said. “And… if you go back and look at sheer productivity, it’s … actually been more productive than the 104th under Clinton, much less than Bush Sr., who had over 382 public laws at this point in his second Congress. Right now, we’re at 56 new public laws, much less than Obama’s 112th [Congress,] but right around the same as Carter and Bush Jr. in the 108th. A little bit less.”

But, Schraufnagel said only 16 of the 56 new public laws passed by Congress this term ranked as significant.

However, despite the gridlock, experts said lawmakers likely would reach a deal to avert another government shutdown this month. The House already has okayed ten of the annual 12 spending bills, but those bills would be dead on arrival in the Senate. The House would have to compromise with the Senate to come to an agreement. In the meantime, Democrats have signaled they will craft a temporary measure to fund the government to avoid a shutdown in less than a month.

“I think the partisan environment often means that at least one party doesn’t feel the cost of saying NO to bargaining,” Binder told Fox News. “Only when the costs of refusing to negotiate are so steep for BOTH parties are we more likely to see effort. (Think about recent shutdowns– when GOP finally felt the blame, they caved).”

Compounding the problem, Binder said, were the “cleavages within the parties as well as between, such as the Progressives vs. Pelosi and her swing district members. (And when GOP controlled House, pragmatists vs the Freedom Caucus members.)”

Westlake Legal Group ocasio-cortez-1-AP Guns, impeachment push, border wall: What's in store as Congress returns from recess Gregg Re fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/topic/border-wall fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/legislation fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article aced03b1-be96-5ecb-a02c-da105d751e3e

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., has sparred openly with top Democrats on key issues — and experts say factions in the party could lead to gridlock. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Meanwhile, reports also emerged over the weekend indicating that the House Judiciary Committee was escalating its impeachment investigation into the president and was preparing a vote as soon as next Wednesday to establish procedures for hearings the panel could hold this fall.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., turned heads by claiming just before the recess began that the committee already had launched an impeachment investigation, only to send conflicting signals about the matter later. This week’s possible vote would lend more outward credibility to the idea that Nadler has been serious about putting the president on trial.

But, the move would still amount only to a technical maneuver, and top Democrats have cautioned that impeachment would be premature. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said earlier this month that the public generally still hasn’t supported impeachment, and many moderate Democrats have balked, saying there’s no chance of obtaining a two-thirds vote in the Republican-controlled Senate necessary to convict and remove Trump from office.

“I’ve been traveling all of August,” Rep. Henry Cuellar, D-Texas, said this week. “This is not an issue people bring up. I think a lot of people would rather just vote him out, vote the president out.”

And Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, said in an interview airing Sunday with Greta Van Susteren’s “Full Court Press” that impeachment proceedings would “tear our country apart.”

THE LATEST FOX NEWS POLL ON THE 2020 PRESIDENTIAL RACE

A Fox News poll from this past June showed that most Americans didn’t think impeachment was in Trump’s future and didn’t want him impeached and removed from office.

But, an August Fox News poll showed growing public support on another hot-button issue certain to appear on the agenda this congressional session: gun control. Overwhelming and bipartisan majorities of voters have favored background checks on gun buyers and taking guns from people who’ve posed dangers to themselves or others, the poll found.

Those numbers surged after deadly shootings in Dayton, Ohio; El Paso, Texas; and elsewhere. In early August, amid a national outcry on mass shootings, Pelosi wrote to Trump to demand that he invoke a little-known constitutional power to recall Congress early from its recess to pass gun-control legislation.

The DOJ last week sent a package of legislative proposals on gun violence to the White House, a person familiar with the matter told Fox News. It was not immediately clear what proposals were included in the DOJ package.

BETO O’ROURKE SAYS DEATH PENALTY FOR MASS SHOOTERS IS FUNDAMENTALLY WRONG

A bill passed by the House in February would require background checks on all gun sales, including those between strangers meeting online or at gun shows. Currently, the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) has been employed for sales involving licensed firearms dealers, constituting the majority of all firearm sales.

But, some Republicans have refused to take up several gun control bills that passed the House on support from Democrats, saying they would encroach upon the Second Amendment without preventing the vast majority of shootings.

The president has sent conflicting signals on expanding background checks — and his falling standing in many national polls could be contributing to the problem, observers said.

“Trump’s deep unpopularity limits lawmaking in another way,” Binder told Fox News. “First, the Democratic base shows little interest in their representatives making deals with Trump that would give him credit and enhance his position for 2020. NAFTA 2.0 is a prime example. Really not clear whether Democrats will get the concessions their base groups demand or the extent to which the Speaker might be dragging her heels. Either way, that trade agreement is moving very slowly. And because the president is so unpopular nationally and with independents, there’s limited pressure on Democrats to resolve problems.”

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-731b7636da354867a32675b054871302 Guns, impeachment push, border wall: What's in store as Congress returns from recess Gregg Re fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/topic/border-wall fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/legislation fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article aced03b1-be96-5ecb-a02c-da105d751e3e

President Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meeting in the Oval Office this past June, behind a model of the new Air Force One design. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

And, on the Republican side, Bidner asserted, “a president’s signal contribution to lawmaking is often his ability to stake out a path forward, even if less popular, to provide cover for his party to make concessions (gun restrictions are a prime example). [Senate Majority Leader Mitch] McConnell won’t bring up a bill unless Trump stakes out a clear position, STICKS to that position, and takes the heat for giving Democrats some of what they want.

“I think that’s largely why — coupled with the partisanship — Trump has achieved very little of his legislative agenda outside what he got on taxes (that didn’t require Democratic votes) and outside issues on which both parties agree,” such as opioid-related bills, Binder said.

Among the proposals being considered: red flag laws, more money for mental health and making sure juvenile information would get into existing background checks. Additionally, White House aides have said Attorney General Bill Barr has been drafting legislation to speed up the death penalty process for mass shooters.

The issue could be contentious among Democrats seeking to unseat President Trump in 2020. Former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke has sought to revive his struggling candidacy by calling for a mandatory buyback of what he called “assault weapons” — but he also has insisted, in a recent policy shift, that capital punishment was categorically wrong.

There has been some precedent for decisive action from the Trump administration on gun control. The White House last year unilaterally banned bump stocks and other gun modifiers that would make semi-automatic firearms fire faster, after the mass shooting in Las Vegas in 2017 left 58 dead and more than 800 injured. The move angered some conservatives, but the Supreme Court rejected a push to delay its implementation earlier this year.

Despite the high-profile nature of some agenda items, the House’s legislative traffic for the upcoming week wouldn’t grab the biggest headlines. The House is tentatively scheduled to debate a bill about the Florida coastline, a measure to protect the “Arctic Cultural and Coastal Plain” and legislation dealing with “marine economies.” These plans would bar drilling and impose other environmental protections. A memo to Democrats from House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., mentioned guns but offered no timetable for legislation in the House.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Democrats are expected to hold a forum Tuesday to try pressuring McConnell to consider gun measures. Political scientists said they were wrestling with a fundamental question.

“Does (an apparent) rise in incivility complicate problem-solving and lawmaking, more so than ideological divides between the two parties?” Binder said. “Or does a rise in incivility merely reflect the increased partisan combustion we see every day on Capitol Hill?”

Fox News’ Chad Pergram, Jake Gibson, Dana Blanton and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6084213486001_6084214110001-vs Guns, impeachment push, border wall: What's in store as Congress returns from recess Gregg Re fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/topic/border-wall fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/legislation fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article aced03b1-be96-5ecb-a02c-da105d751e3e   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6084213486001_6084214110001-vs Guns, impeachment push, border wall: What's in store as Congress returns from recess Gregg Re fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/topic/border-wall fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/legislation fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article aced03b1-be96-5ecb-a02c-da105d751e3e

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Students for Trump founder faces prison after confessing to $46,000 scam while posing as attorney with a degree from an elite law school

Westlake Legal Group jaAHgg3PW4QpMt_fBtW8WvnX2sSC49ePJuW7shSp16g Students for Trump founder faces prison after confessing to $46,000 scam while posing as attorney with a degree from an elite law school r/politics

He’s big in the gaming community.

It’s scary listening to people who spend all day playing video games who think that they’re some kind of expert in politics.

I had to explain to a gamer friend of mine that Uranium 1 wasn’t real and they didn’t believe me when I showed them a fact check.

Their response was “that’s just a website, anybody can make a website. I can go to Wix.com right now and make a website.”

I’m an SEO so that comment ultra cringey on sooo many levels…

Wix? Really? 🤢🤢🤢🤮🤮🤮🤮🤮

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Report: Republicans didn’t go to Trump hotels until he became POTUS

Westlake Legal Group QK3qDMSJdSFpxWwZK6xGZ-xzkuNPeSrG3PqYwBzMy6c Report: Republicans didn't go to Trump hotels until he became POTUS r/politics

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Students for Trump founder faces prison after confessing to $46,000 scam while posing as attorney with a degree from an elite law school

Westlake Legal Group jaAHgg3PW4QpMt_fBtW8WvnX2sSC49ePJuW7shSp16g Students for Trump founder faces prison after confessing to $46,000 scam while posing as attorney with a degree from an elite law school r/politics

He’s big in the gaming community.

It’s scary listening to people who spend all day playing video games who think that they’re some kind of expert in politics.

I had to explain to a gamer friend of mine that Uranium 1 wasn’t real and they didn’t believe me when I showed them a fact check.

Their response was “that’s just a website, anybody can make a website. I can go to Wix.com right now and make a website.”

I’m an SEO so that comment ultra cringey on sooo many levels…

Wix? Really? 🤢🤢🤢🤮🤮🤮🤮🤮

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How Each Big Tech Company May Be Targeted by Regulators

Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google have been the envy of corporate America, admired for their size, influence and remarkable growth.

Now that success is attracting a different kind of spotlight. In Washington, Brussels and beyond, regulators and lawmakers are investigating whether the four technology companies have used their size and wealth to quash competition and expand their dominance.

The four firms are lumped together so often that they have become known as Big Tech. Their business models differ, as do the antitrust arguments against them. But those grievances have one thing in common: fear that too much power is in the hands of too few companies.

The attorney general of New York, Letitia James, said Friday that the attorneys general in eight states — she and three other Democrats, plus four Republicans — and the District of Columbia had begun an antitrust investigation of Facebook.

On Monday, a separate bipartisan group led by eight attorneys general is expected to announce an investigation of Google, according to two people familiar with the plan, who spoke on the condition of anonymity before the official announcement.

And in Washington on Thursday, the House antitrust subcommittee is scheduled to hold its third hearing on the impact of competition on data and privacy.

Here is the case against Big Tech — and what Big Tech has said in response.

Westlake Legal Group tech-investigations-promo-articleLarge How Each Big Tech Company May Be Targeted by Regulators Social Media Search Engines Online Advertising Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestitures Google Inc Facebook Inc E-Commerce Computers and the Internet Apple Inc Antitrust Laws and Competition Issues Amazon.com Inc

15 Ways Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon Are in Government Cross Hairs

Investigations could eventually lead to the breakup of some companies, and to new laws that might alter the balance of corporate power.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 00bigtech2-articleLarge How Each Big Tech Company May Be Targeted by Regulators Social Media Search Engines Online Advertising Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestitures Google Inc Facebook Inc E-Commerce Computers and the Internet Apple Inc Antitrust Laws and Competition Issues Amazon.com Inc

Antitrust scrutiny of Amazon centers on whether the company improperly favors its own products over those of third-party sellers.CreditHiroko Masuike/The New York Times

Over the years, politicians and regulators have floated the idea of breaking up of Amazon. That included spinning off its hugely profitable cloud computing business or rolling back its acquisition of Whole Foods.

But much of the recent scrutiny of Amazon in Europe and Washington centers on whether the company improperly favors its own products over those of third-party sellers, which depend on sales from the e-commerce giant. Regulators are also looking at whether sellers need to use certain Amazon services, like ads and its fulfillment network, to sell their products.

When Amazon began, it was mostly structured like a traditional retailer, buying products from brands and manufacturers at a wholesale price and selling the items to consumers.

Amazon has expanded what’s available on its site by having third-party merchants sell products directly to customers. By 2015, more than half the sales on Amazon — 51 percent — were made by these outside sellers. Last year, that grew to 58 percent.

One line of antitrust questioning looks at the products that Amazon sells under its own brands, like AmazonBasics for batteries or Mama Bear for diapers and wipes. Amazon has more than 140 private labels, according to TJI Research.

Lawmakers have asked if Amazon takes advantage of data it collects from sellers to develop its own offerings. They have also questioned whether Amazon’s products get preferential promotion on its site.

Amazon has told Congress that it uses aggregated data like overall sales, not information “related specifically to individual sellers,” and that private-label products make up about 1 percent of total sales.

Italy’s antitrust authority is looking into whether Amazon gives better visibility and search rankings to sellers that ship products through its vast fulfillment network, which sellers pay to use. Lawmakers in Washington have asked similar questions.

Amazon counters that products sold via its logistics network do well in its algorithms because it provides a better and more reliable shipping experience for customers.

Amazon also faces questions about its growing advertising business, which had more than $10 billion in revenue this past year. Much of that came from product ads that show up high as sponsored listings in search results.

At a House hearing in July, Representative Val B. Demings, a Democrat from Florida, asked a lawyer for Amazon what prevented it “from using ads as another way to charge a toll for using its platforms.”

The lawyer, Nate Sutton, who used to work at the antitrust division of the Justice Department, responded that the ads were “an optional service” and that the large majority of products sold on Amazon were not sold through advertisements.

Scrutiny of Apple focuses on how the company controls its App Store.CreditEmma Howells/The New York Times

Apple’s critics have homed in on its control of the App Store, the digital marketplace for apps on iPhones, iPads and Mac computers. The App Store has become a crucial way for digital businesses to reach customers, and Apple exerts strict control over which companies can appear in the store and how.

Apple says it has the right to “curate” the App Store to ensure high quality and to rid the store of fraud. As a result, Apple’s store generally includes fewer fraudulent apps than Google’s.

But while Apple is the App Store’s sole referee, it is also one of the biggest competitors on it. Apple has bet its future on getting customers to spend more on its apps and services, and that relies in part on people opting for them over the apps of rivals.

Some app developers have accused Apple of abusing its control of the App Store to harm competitors and benefit itself. Spotify has filed such a complaint with European regulators, and makers of parental-control apps have complained to regulators in Europe, Russia and the United States about Apple’s restriction of their apps after the release of its own competing service.

Apple has said that it faces fierce competition and that it doesn’t favor its own products in the App Store; and that it isn’t a monopoly because it doesn’t have a majority share in most markets.

Mark Zuckerberg has steered Facebook through several smart acquisitions. Years later, regulators are asking questions about them.CreditJessica Chou for The New York Times

For years, venture capitalists and tech strategists across Silicon Valley have admired Mark Zuckerberg’s foresight.

While many industry experts wondered during Facebook’s early years whether it would turn out to be the next MySpace, Mr. Zuckerberg was always searching for an edge to stave off any threats of digital irrelevance for his company.

His efforts have worked — perhaps too well. The Federal Trade Commission is investigating what some have called Facebook’s “program of serial defensive acquisitions,” a method of maintaining the company’s dominance in social networking.

Regulators could claim the acquisitions were a violation of the Sherman and Clayton Antitrust Acts — two laws that have been foundational in the past century of federal antitrust prosecutions.

That could include some of Facebook’s largest acquisitions, like Instagram, the photo-sharing network that it bought for $1 billion in 2012. At the time, it was an enormous sum for a smartphone app. Just two years later, Facebook spent $19 billion for WhatsApp, the global messaging application used by more than a billion people.

Competitors believe that long before Facebook bought either of those companies, Mr. Zuckerberg kept a close eye on start-ups that could pose a threat to his company. Facebook has acquired more than 70 companies over roughly 15 years.

For investigators, one other eyebrow-raising acquisition was Facebook’s purchase of Onavo, a mobile analytics company, in 2013.

Onavo’s apps were marketed as free products that allowed consumers to manage and compress their data and download rates, a cost savings for people who live in countries where unlimited data plans aren’t common. But the service also gave Facebook insight into what new competitors were doing.

Facebook walked away from at least one acquisition late last year, the social video app Houseparty, for fear of attracting antitrust scrutiny from regulators in Washington, according to two people familiar with the matter.

It has also taken steps to improve its user data policies as a result of a previous Federal Trade Commission investigation into Facebook’s privacy practices. The social network reached a settlement with the agency in July, paying $5 billion in fines and agreeing to some concessions involving improved oversight of the company.

How Google, which sells everything from smartphones to business services, presents search results could be an area of interest for regulators.CreditDamien Maloney for The New York Times

Google is dominant in several different markets and could face antitrust claims in multiple jurisdictions.

One battle is likely to be in search. When Google debuted in 1996, its search results were a simple list of 10 blue links to websites it believed could answer the user’s query. “We want to get you out of Google and to the right place as fast as possible,” Larry Page, Google’s co-founder, said in an interview with Playboy in 2004.

Years later, Google has changed from sending users elsewhere to answering their questions itself. It has crowded its search results with its own products and services, such as Google Maps, Google Images and Google Flights. Google has gotten so good at answering users’ questions, more than half of Google searches now end on Google, without a click to another site, according to a recent analysis by Rand Fishkin, an online-search analyst.

Google’s new approach has given users quicker answers. But some competitors argue that Google is abusing its dominance in search and inducing internet users to not click beyond Google, which starves those competitors of customers for their products or users to see ads on their sites.

How Google presents its search results could be subject to antitrust laws because it has an effective monopoly, handling more than 90 percent of searches worldwide, according to some estimates. Because Google has become the primary way customers find businesses, steering users to its own products could be considered anticompetitive behavior under some laws.

The Federal Trade Commission investigated Google for such a practice. They settled, and the agency did not conclude there was harm to consumers. In 2017, the European Union fined Google $2.7 billion for favoring its shopping service over rivals in search results.

Google has said that it faces ample competition and that its search engine is designed to give users the most relevant results, not favor itself.

While Google is predominantly known for search, it makes most of its money on digital ads. It dominates that market, too.

Over two decades, Google has built a complex web of services that underpin the sale of most ads on the internet. Google is the biggest seller of digital ad space. It is among the biggest providers of digital-ad analytics. And it is, in effect, the broker in most digital-ad transactions.

Competitors say Google has leveraged that control of the internet’s ad ecosystem to push companies to use its advertising technology and buy its ads.

Brian O’Kelley, the former chief executive of the ad-technology firm AppNexus, said Google had undercut his business. He argued that Google forced advertisers to use Google’s competing ad technology if they wanted to work with other Google-owed services. And this year, the European Union fined Google $1.7 billion for imposing unfair terms on companies that used its search bar on their websites in Europe.

Google said in response to the fine that it had made several product changes to increase the visibility of competitors. “We’ve always agreed on one thing 一 that healthy, thriving markets are in everyone’s interest,” the company said.

Google’s Android software backs at least three of every four of the world’s smartphones, according to analyst’s estimates. Google has achieved such scale by giving Android away for free — almost. In return for handset makers’ use of its version of Android, Google has required them to place its search engine front and center on their phones and preinstall a series of other Google apps.

The strategy has helped Google broaden its dominance in online search, reach more than a billion monthly users across nine separate services and continue to expand its advertising business.

Regulators are considering whether Google unfairly leverages Android’s dominance. Handset makers are effectively locked into Android because it is the only available smartphone software that hosts the apps that users demand, like Instagram and Uber. (Apple’s software also hosts the apps but is exclusively for iPhones.) With that leverage, Google imposes unfair terms on the handset makers, critics have argued.

The European Union agreed, fining Google $5.1 billion last year.

Google has argued that Android has increased competition in the smartphone market by enabling phone makers to compete with Apple.

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Trump criticized for planning secret Camp David meeting with Taliban only days before 9/11

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Trump criticized for planning secret Camp David meeting with Taliban only days before 9/11

The top U.S. military officer says it’s too early to talk about a full American troop withdrawal from Afghanistan, as peace talks with the Taliban appear to be near a final agreement. (Aug. 28) AP, AP

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump is facing backlash after announcing he planned to hold a secret meeting with the Taliban at Camp David this weekend but canceled it over attacks overseas that left 12 dead, including one American. 

Republican and Democratic leaders sharply criticized the president over two main concerns: bringing members of the Taliban to the U.S.—specifically to Camp David, a presidential retreat for presidents used for administrations, and the timing of the meeting — just days before the 18th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. 

The Trump administration and leaders of the Taliban, an extremist Islamic organization that controls about half of Afghanistan, have been in peace talks for months and closing in on a possible deal that would remove about 5,000 American troops from five bases over the next five months if the Taliban fulfills promises to reduce violence and prevent Afghanistan from becoming a haven for terrorists. 

More: Donald Trump’s secretary of state says Afghanistan talks are dead ‘for now’

More: Trump suspends Afghanistan peace talks after attack, cancels secret Camp David meeting

The president revealed plans to host Taliban leaders on Twitter Saturday evening, explaining that it was canceled and all peace talks were off after the group claimed responsibility for a car bomb this week that killed an American and 11 others. 

But the news that a meeting was planned drew criticism as skeptics have said the Taliban, itself a militant Islamic group that harbored Osama bin Laden and al Qaeda —which carried out the 9/11 attacks — cannot be trusted. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle vented their frustrations. 

More: ‘Agreement in principle’ reached with Taliban to withdraw 5,000 US troops within five months

More: 15 years after Sept. 11, the questions that still remain in our minds

Rep. Liz Cheney, one of most powerful House Republicans whose father was vice president during the 9/11 attacks, said “no member of the Taliban should set foot” at Camp David. 

“Camp David is where America’s leaders met to plan our response after al Qaeda, supported by the Taliban, killed 3000 Americans on 9/11,” said Cheney, R-Wyoming, on Sunday. “No member of the Taliban should set foot there. Ever. The Taliban still harbors al Qaeda.”

Republican Rep. Adam Kinzinger, an Air Force veteran who flew missions throughout the Middle East — including Afghanistan, said members of the group should “NEVER” be allowed in the U.S.  

“Never should leaders of a terrorist organization that hasn’t renounced 9/11 and continues in evil be allowed in our great country,” tweeted Kinzinger, R-Ill. “NEVER. Full stop.” 

Democrats also piled on. After Trump’s announcement, Rep. Eric Swalwell, D- Calif., wrote on Twitter: “You brought the Taliban to the United States the week of September 11?” 

Rep. Justin Amash, who recently switched from the Republican party to become an independent, also blasted the move.

“How about we end the war without inviting the Taliban to dinner on the week of 9/11?” he wrote on Twitter. 

Others pointed to posts the president made while his predecessor, Barack Obama, was in the White House and working to negotiate a peace deal in Afghanistan. 

“While @BarackObama is slashing the military, he is also negotiating with our sworn enemy the Taliban–who facilitated 9/11,” Trump wrote in 2012. 

But the controversial meeting and its cancelation have boosted uncertainty over Trump’s hopes to fulfill a campaign promise in ending America’s longest war and bringing U.S. troops home from Afghanistan. 

On Sunday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the peace talks were dead “for now” and defended Trump’s now aborted meeting. 

“The Taliban tried to gain negotiating advantage by conducting terror attacks inside of the country,” Pompeo said on CNN’s ‘State of the Union,’ one in a string of television interviews he conducted Sunday. “It made no sense for the Taliban to be rewarded for that kind of bad behavior.”

After the 9/11 attacks, U.S.-led forces invaded Afghanistan, toppled the Taliban and tried to foster democracy in the war-torn country. But remnants of the extremist group have been fighting the government ever since, and the Taliban now controls about half the country again.

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Trump criticized for planning secret Camp David meeting with Taliban only days before 9/11

President Donald Trump told Cabinet members the Islamic State and Taliban should fight each other instead of having the U.S. involved. USA TODAY

More than 2,400 American soldiers have been killed in the war, according to the most recent figures from the Pentagon. There are currently about 22,000 coalition troops in Afghanistan now, 14,000 of them Americans.

Trump’s hope for a speedy withdrawal of U.S. forces has drawn opposition from within his own administration, including military leaders who want a more phased approach. Critics fear a premature withdrawal would encourage the Taliban to re-take control of the country.

Contributing: David Jackson, Deirdre Shesgreen and John Fritze

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/09/08/president-trump-criticized-taliban-camp-david/2255653001/

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Trump criticized for planning secret Camp David meeting with Taliban only days before 9/11

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Trump criticized for planning secret Camp David meeting with Taliban only days before 9/11

The top U.S. military officer says it’s too early to talk about a full American troop withdrawal from Afghanistan, as peace talks with the Taliban appear to be near a final agreement. (Aug. 28) AP, AP

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump is facing backlash after announcing he planned to hold a secret meeting with the Taliban at Camp David this weekend but canceled it over attacks overseas that left 12 dead, including one American. 

Republican and Democratic leaders sharply criticized the president over two main concerns: bringing members of the Taliban to the U.S.—specifically to Camp David, a presidential retreat for presidents used for administrations, and the timing of the meeting — just days before the 18th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. 

The Trump administration and leaders of the Taliban, an extremist Islamic organization that controls about half of Afghanistan, have been in peace talks for months and closing in on a possible deal that would remove about 5,000 American troops from five bases over the next five months if the Taliban fulfills promises to reduce violence and prevent Afghanistan from becoming a haven for terrorists. 

More: Donald Trump’s secretary of state says Afghanistan talks are dead ‘for now’

More: Trump suspends Afghanistan peace talks after attack, cancels secret Camp David meeting

The president revealed plans to host Taliban leaders on Twitter Saturday evening, explaining that it was canceled and all peace talks were off after the group claimed responsibility for a car bomb this week that killed an American and 11 others. 

But the news that a meeting was planned drew criticism as skeptics have said the Taliban, itself a militant Islamic group that harbored Osama bin Laden and al Qaeda —which carried out the 9/11 attacks — cannot be trusted. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle vented their frustrations. 

More: ‘Agreement in principle’ reached with Taliban to withdraw 5,000 US troops within five months

More: 15 years after Sept. 11, the questions that still remain in our minds

Rep. Liz Cheney, one of most powerful House Republicans whose father was vice president during the 9/11 attacks, said “no member of the Taliban should set foot” at Camp David. 

“Camp David is where America’s leaders met to plan our response after al Qaeda, supported by the Taliban, killed 3000 Americans on 9/11,” said Cheney, R-Wyoming, on Sunday. “No member of the Taliban should set foot there. Ever. The Taliban still harbors al Qaeda.”

Republican Rep. Adam Kinzinger, an Air Force veteran who flew missions throughout the Middle East — including Afghanistan, said members of the group should “NEVER” be allowed in the U.S.  

“Never should leaders of a terrorist organization that hasn’t renounced 9/11 and continues in evil be allowed in our great country,” tweeted Kinzinger, R-Ill. “NEVER. Full stop.” 

Democrats also piled on. After Trump’s announcement, Rep. Eric Swalwell, D- Calif., wrote on Twitter: “You brought the Taliban to the United States the week of September 11?” 

Rep. Justin Amash, who recently switched from the Republican party to become an independent, also blasted the move.

“How about we end the war without inviting the Taliban to dinner on the week of 9/11?” he wrote on Twitter. 

Others pointed to posts the president made while his predecessor, Barack Obama, was in the White House and working to negotiate a peace deal in Afghanistan. 

“While @BarackObama is slashing the military, he is also negotiating with our sworn enemy the Taliban–who facilitated 9/11,” Trump wrote in 2012. 

But the controversial meeting and its cancelation have boosted uncertainty over Trump’s hopes to fulfill a campaign promise in ending America’s longest war and bringing U.S. troops home from Afghanistan. 

On Sunday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the peace talks were dead “for now” and defended Trump’s now aborted meeting. 

“The Taliban tried to gain negotiating advantage by conducting terror attacks inside of the country,” Pompeo said on CNN’s ‘State of the Union,’ one in a string of television interviews he conducted Sunday. “It made no sense for the Taliban to be rewarded for that kind of bad behavior.”

After the 9/11 attacks, U.S.-led forces invaded Afghanistan, toppled the Taliban and tried to foster democracy in the war-torn country. But remnants of the extremist group have been fighting the government ever since, and the Taliban now controls about half the country again.

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Trump criticized for planning secret Camp David meeting with Taliban only days before 9/11

President Donald Trump told Cabinet members the Islamic State and Taliban should fight each other instead of having the U.S. involved. USA TODAY

More than 2,400 American soldiers have been killed in the war, according to the most recent figures from the Pentagon. There are currently about 22,000 coalition troops in Afghanistan now, 14,000 of them Americans.

Trump’s hope for a speedy withdrawal of U.S. forces has drawn opposition from within his own administration, including military leaders who want a more phased approach. Critics fear a premature withdrawal would encourage the Taliban to re-take control of the country.

Contributing: David Jackson, Deirdre Shesgreen and John Fritze

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/09/08/president-trump-criticized-taliban-camp-david/2255653001/

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'Do less': Princess Diana's ex-secretary dubs Duchess Meghan 'constitutionally irrelevant'

A scathing piece from 60 Minutes Australia on Sunday painted the picture of a royal house divided, with Duchess Meghan at the root of all Buckingham Palace problems. 

“Can the ghost of Diana save Harry and Meghan’s fractured fairy tale?” prompted presenter Karl Stefanovic, who has been slammed on social media for the story, which many argued painted a baseless picture of the duchess as a source of drama and a “major headache for the royal family.” 

Buckingham Palace told USA TODAY it had no comment on the report.  

Patrick Jefferson, formerly Princess Diana’s private secretary, criticized the duchess for promising to “hit the ground running” without knowing where she’s “running to” and argued that Meghan should do “less” because “she is, after all, wife of the sixth in line to the throne. That means that she is constitutionally irrelevant.” 

“Meghan isn’t and never has been an ordinary British person, so part of her challenge is to work out what it feels like, what it is to be an ordinary British person and not to be one, but to understand therefore how to best use her extraordinary influence and high profile,” he added. 

Westlake Legal Group  'Do less': Princess Diana's ex-secretary dubs Duchess Meghan 'constitutionally irrelevant'

“As colorful as the British royal family has always been, their whiteness has dominated. And that brings us to a sensitive subject,” Stefanovic narrated, by way of introducing a one-sided debate over how Meghan’s race has influenced the way she has been criticized. 

“Honestly, it’s not even a second thought to me,” said Katie Hopkins, the controversial British commentator who once described African migrants as “cockroaches.” “It only comes up in the minds of people who are truly racist, and that’s never people like me. I’m just observing that the dress is better on Kate, how she wears it is better.”

Hopkins later speculated that Prince Harry’s relationship with Meghan was part of his determination to “go anti-establishment.”

“He’s flicking the V sign to everything that he was brought up by,” she added. “It’s Harry’s (fault), but Harry is redeemable because Harry was in a uniform. He was in a helicopter and he was in Afghanistan. Meghan was only ever in cheap movies.” 

Royal support:Duchess Meghan turns up at U.S. Open to watch pal Serena Williams try to make history

Parallels have been drawn between paparazzi coverage of Duchess Meghan and Princess Diana. Andrew Morton, who has written biographies on both women, chimed in to note similarities in how public opinions on women who married into the royal family declined in the years after their “fairy tale” weddings. 

“Meghan seems to be a version of the Antichrist, as far as Fleet Street is concerned,” Morton said of British press’ opinion of the duchess. “It’s almost a royal rite of passage you’ve got to go through. …The kind of casual vituperation of Meghan and Harry makes you shudder. It’s not like she’s done anything wrong; she’s just basically living her life. In my view, she’s done everything right.” 

Hopkins also called Duchess Meghan “fickle, of the moment” and shallow, slamming the royal couple for claiming to care about the environment while using private jets.

Last week, Harry opened up about the controversy, saying he spends “99% of my life traveling the world by commercial” but flying privately is sometimes necessary to keep his family safe. 

“What is she really? She’s a noone,'” Hopkins said of the duchess. “She’s a divorcee. When did we want a divorcee in the royal family? She wears bad clothes; when did we ask for that?” 

Contributing: Maria Puente, USA TODAY. 

Instagram:Here’s why Duchess Meghan and Prince Harry just unfollowed everyone

Related:Duchess Meghan launches clothing line to support unemployed women looking for work

Westlake Legal Group  'Do less': Princess Diana's ex-secretary dubs Duchess Meghan 'constitutionally irrelevant'

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Dr. Robi Ludwig: How to transform your back-to-school stress and turn it into a positive

Westlake Legal Group iStock-607037165 Dr. Robi Ludwig: How to transform your back-to-school stress and turn it into a positive Robi Ludwig fox-news/topic/back-to-school fox-news/opinion fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/health/education fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 35146d9a-18cf-598c-9f2c-a92b774c431b

When the carefree days of summer come to an end, it can be difficult to dive back into a scholastic routine equated with pressure and demands. Going back to school is often a stressful time of year for both parents and children.

One study found that being a parent is more stressful for mothers than it is fathers, anyway.

According to Kelly Musick, an associate professor of policy analysis and management at Cornell University, mothers experience more stress than dads because they are more involved with the day-to-day parenting tasks society expects of them.

FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL PHOTO SHOWING 8-YEAR-OLD COMFORT CLASSMATE WITH AUTISM GOES VIRAL: ‘HE HELPED ME AND I WAS HAPPY’

Another recent survey conducted by the Kiddie Academy found that 62 percent of mothers have the hardest time in the family when it comes to dealing with the first day of school. This stress is a lot more common than you’d think, especially for mothers of younger children.

It makes perfect sense. Parents are trying to make their child’s life happy and comfortable as they head off to school, and they want to make everything as perfect for their children as they can.

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Parents suddenly find they must be very pragmatic and check off all the items on the school supply list.

It is the parent who must acclimate their children to the early to rise school schedule.

Life might be stressful in the moment, but that doesn’t make it unmanageable. Try to turn your negatives into a positive.

Parents have to create an upbeat attitude in their children toward school so they can feel comfortable. All these new routines after a relaxed summer are enough to spike anyone’s stress hormones. This anxiety often stems from a basic belief that we are not able to control or resolve stressful situations. It’s this feeling that causes us to question our capabilities, overestimate potential dangers, and to doubt positive outcomes.

For the mother who is sending her child off to school for the very first time, the fear she feels on her child’s behalf is very real.

Will her child make new friends?

Will the pressure cause too much stress?

Will his or her new teacher be kind and nurturing?

Will their child feel safe and be safe?

These concerns are not easy for any parent to manage, especially for new moms.

The reality is that going to school is a rite of passage all kids and their parents need to experience. It is a milestone moment that can be filled with understandable worry. Still, it’s important and healthy for children to get into a regular routine, to achieve moments of independence and to develop a sense of self-reliance when away from home.

As the school year begins, it’s essential to keep in mind some trusted ways to combat this common “back to school angst.”

Remember, kids will often reflect parents’ feelings, so it helps to try to take things one day at a time. Realize you are not alone. Most parents and children are a bit nervous at the beginning of the school year.

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Having said this, It is important for parents to put a calm perspective on re-starting school. The calmer and more positive the parent, the more comfortable the child.

In order to feel more relaxed, know everything will come together. Don’t overdo it. Take a step back, take little breaks, call another mom-friend who is probably also going through a similar experience.

We know stress can be harmful to our well-being, so de-stress by having a relaxed and positive conversation with your child about school.

Contact friends and family members who are supportive and positive people.

Focus on all the good that school life can bring both you and your child.

Life might be stressful in the moment, but that doesn’t make it unmanageable. Try to turn your negatives into a positive.

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Going back to school can also be an exciting time and provide moments to look forward to such as going to interesting classes, meeting old friends, making new ones, and joining school activities. With wise parental guidance, every child can have something to get enthusiastic about.

When you figure out what to look forward to, even the most stressed-out parents and kids can reduce their concerns and transform the stress of a new school year into exciting new moments filled with lots of possibilities.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY ROBI LUDWIG

Westlake Legal Group iStock-607037165 Dr. Robi Ludwig: How to transform your back-to-school stress and turn it into a positive Robi Ludwig fox-news/topic/back-to-school fox-news/opinion fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/health/education fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 35146d9a-18cf-598c-9f2c-a92b774c431b   Westlake Legal Group iStock-607037165 Dr. Robi Ludwig: How to transform your back-to-school stress and turn it into a positive Robi Ludwig fox-news/topic/back-to-school fox-news/opinion fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/health/education fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 35146d9a-18cf-598c-9f2c-a92b774c431b

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com