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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 14)

Kavanaugh accuser’s friend dismisses original allegations, detail also not mentioned in NYT excerpt of book

Leland Keyser, a friend of Christine Blasey Ford who allegedly was at the party where Ford says Brett Kavanaugh assaulted her decades ago, now says the story “just didn’t make any sense.”

That revelation is contained in a forthcoming book, by New York Times reporters Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly, titled “The Education of Brett Kavanaugh: An Investigation.” But the Times omitted any reference to Keyser’s comments in a widely panned article this weekend by Pogrebin and Kelly that was adapted from the book.

NYT FORCED TO ISSUE EDITORS’ NOTE, ADDING INFORMATION THAT ALLEGED VICTIM DOESN’T EVEN REMEMBER SUPPOSED ASSAULT

The Times’ article instead included an uncorroborated allegation from a Clinton-linked lawyer claiming Kavanaugh had sexually assaulted a female student, without mentioning that the student did not recall the events in question. The Times later published a major update to include those details, along with an editors’ note, but not before virtually all major Democratic presidential candidates had called for Kavanaugh’s impeachment.

“I don’t have any confidence in the story,” Keyser told the reporters of Ford’s claims, according to outlets that have reviewed advance copies of the forthcoming book.

“Those facts together I don’t recollect, and it just didn’t make any sense,” Keyser added.

Specifically, Keyser challenged Ford’s narrative that sometime in the summer of 1982, Kavanaugh and his friend Mark Judge assaulted her at a party also attended by Keyser and P.J. Smith.

“Those facts together I don’t recollect, and it just didn’t make any sense.”

— Leland Keyser

Ford has been unable to identify exactly where or when the alleged assault occurred, or how she got home after the incident.

Keyser reportedly remarked: “It would be impossible for me to be the only girl at a get-together with three guys, have her leave, and then not figure out how she’s getting home.” Keyser told Pogrebin and Kelly, “I just really didn’t have confidence in the story.”

Westlake Legal Group CBF Kavanaugh accuser’s friend dismisses original allegations, detail also not mentioned in NYT excerpt of book Gregg Re fox-news/politics/judiciary/confirmation-of-judge-kavanaugh fox news fnc/politics fnc article 13a62ff7-5c63-5eac-b128-1627b5d3fb92

Christine Blasey Ford accused Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her decades ago when they were both teenagers. (Associated Press)

Last year, Keyser, speaking through her attorney, said she could not corroborate Ford’s claims. Keyser told the FBI she felt pressured by partisan activists and Ford’s friends to change her account and later revised her statement to indicate that she believed Ford despite her lack of memory of the episode.

Keyser’s initial statement was that “Simply put, Ms. Keyser does not know Mr. Kavanaugh and she has no recollection of ever being at a party or gathering where he was present, with, or without, Dr. Ford.”

The revised statement from Keyser’s attorney read: “Ms. Keyser does not refute Dr. Ford’s account, and she has already told the press that she believes Dr. Ford’s account. However, the simple and unchangeable truth is that she is unable to corroborate it because she has no recollection of the incident in question.”

2020 DEMS CONTINUE TO PUSH FOR KAVANAUGH IMPEACHMENT, DESPITE DUD NYT ‘BOMBSHELL’ GOING BUST

The Times’ authors, in the book, cast doubt on Keyser’s memory, writing that “Keyser’s memory might be affected by her struggles with alcohol and other substances.” Keyser, though, also informed the reporters of an apparent smear campaign directed at her, in an effort to get her to change her story.

Ford, in her explosive testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee last year, indicated that it wasn’t surprising Keyser wouldn’t remember the episode.

“She didn’t know about the event. She was downstairs during the event and I did not share it with her,” Ford said.

Ford added: “Leland has significant health challenges, and I’m happy that she’s focusing on herself and getting the health treatment that she needs, and she let me know that she needed her lawyer to take care of this for her, and she texted me right afterward with an apology and good wishes, and et cetera.”

Rather than mention Keyser’s latest remarks, the Times’ article instead focused on a new accuser mentioned in the book, who was allegedly sexually assaulted by Kavanaugh. But the Times’ article omitted key details from the book, including that the accuser herself had no recollection of the event.

The Times later published an editors’ note adding information about the accuser’s denials, but not before virtually all 2020 Democratic presidential candidates demanded Kavanaugh’s’ impeachment.

Throughout the day on Sunday, Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, Beto O’Rourke, Cory Booker and Julian Castro, among others, declared that Kavanaugh must be removed from office, citing the allegation.

The Times’ update also stated for the first time that the alleged victim refused to be interviewed, and has made no other comment about the episode.

The only firsthand account concerning the supposed attack in the original piece, which was published on Saturday, came from a Clinton-connected lawyer who claimed to have witnessed it. The lawyer, Max Stier, did not actually provide his account directly; the Times acknowledged that “two officials who have communicated with Mr. Stier” had relayed his supposed version of events.

The Times did not mention Stier’s work as a Clinton defense attorney, or Stier’s legal battles with Kavanaugh during the Whitewater investigation, and simply called him a “respected thought leader.”

The Times went on to note in the article that it had “corroborated the story with two officials who have communicated with Mr. Stier,” but the article apparently meant only that the Times had corroborated that Stier made his claim to the FBI. No firsthand corroboration of the alleged episode was apparently obtained.

The Times’ revision stated: “Editors’ Note: An earlier version of this article, which was adapted from a forthcoming book, did not include one element of the book’s account regarding an assertion by a Yale classmate that friends of Brett Kavanaugh pushed his penis into the hand of a female student at a drunken dorm party. The book reports that the female student declined to be interviewed and friends say that she does not recall the incident. That information has been added to the article.”

The Times’ update came only after The Federalist’s Mollie Hemingway, who reviewed an advance copy of the book, first flagged the article’s omission on Twitter — prompting other commentators to press the issue.

The Times did not immediately respond to an email from Fox News seeking comment. But commentators made clear they felt the paper’s note wasn’t sufficient.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Should I be surprised at this point that the NYT would make such an unforgivable oversight?” asked RealClearInvestigations’ Mark Hemingway.

Wrote the Washington Examiner’s Jerry Dunleavy: “Crazy how the ‘one element’ that wasn’t included in the original article was the part where the alleged victim’s friends said she doesn’t remember it happening.”

For his part, President Trump unloaded on the Times, and suggested Kavanaugh should sue.

“The one who is actually being assaulted is Justice Kavanaugh – Assaulted by lies and Fake News!” Trump wrote. “This is all about the LameStream Media working with their partner, the Dems.”

He added: “DO YOU BELIEVE WHAT THESE HORRIBLE PEOPLE WILL DO OR SAY. They are looking to destroy, and influence his opinions – but played the game badly. They should be sued!”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083809944001_6083805945001-vs Kavanaugh accuser’s friend dismisses original allegations, detail also not mentioned in NYT excerpt of book Gregg Re fox-news/politics/judiciary/confirmation-of-judge-kavanaugh fox news fnc/politics fnc article 13a62ff7-5c63-5eac-b128-1627b5d3fb92   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083809944001_6083805945001-vs Kavanaugh accuser’s friend dismisses original allegations, detail also not mentioned in NYT excerpt of book Gregg Re fox-news/politics/judiciary/confirmation-of-judge-kavanaugh fox news fnc/politics fnc article 13a62ff7-5c63-5eac-b128-1627b5d3fb92

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Senator Reportedly Asked FBI To Investigate New Kavanaugh Information Last Year

Days before the Senate confirmed Justice Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court last year, Sen. Christopher Coons (D-Del.) asked the FBI to look into sexual misconduct allegations against the judge that were just made public this past weekend, multiple media outlets reported Monday.

The Washington Post and CNN both obtained Coons’ Oct. 2, 2018 letter requesting that the FBI conduct an “appropriate follow up” with an individual who’d approached Coons with new sexual misconduct allegations against Kavanaugh. Several women had already accused the judge of sexual assault.

The bureau didn’t take on Coon’s request in its investigation, and Kavanaugh was confirmed to the Supreme Court four days later. 

A spokesman for Coons confirmed to the Post that the individual who contacted the senator, whose name was redacted in the letter, was Max Stier, a classmate of Kavanaugh’s whose allegation against him is relayed in a forthcoming book by New York Times reporters Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly.

According to an excerpt from the book that The New York Times published Saturday, Stier approached senators and the FBI with a story of Kavanaugh, then a freshman at Yale, pants down at a party while friends pushed his penis into the hands of a female student.

Westlake Legal Group 5d7fd4cd2300001c05551a14 Senator Reportedly Asked FBI To Investigate New Kavanaugh Information Last Year

POOL New / Reuters Multiple people have accused Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct.

The Times corroborated the allegation with two people who communicated with Stier, but Stier himself declined to be interviewed for Pogrebin and Kelly’s book. The female student also declined to speak, and her friends said she didn’t recall the incident. 

In his letter, Coons told FBI officials that “several individuals” had contacted his office wanting to share information with federal authorities but that they’d had “difficulty reaching anyone who will collect their information.” The letter is the first indication that a lawmaker had urged the FBI to look into Stier’s account.

The FBI has been criticized for the narrow scope of its investigation into Kavanaugh. Senate Democrats decried the limits on the investigation set by the White House last year, and dozens of potential witnesses who come forward to the FBI were reportedly not interviewed. 

President Donald Trump, meanwhile, is going after the Times for reporting on Stier’s letter. 

“The one who is actually being assaulted is Justice Kavanaugh – Assaulted by lies and Fake News!” he tweeted Monday. “This is all about the LameStream Media working with their partner, the Dems.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Dog caught destroying book about, oops, canine training

This dog knows how to send a message.

The pet’s owner shared footage of the chaos he came home to one morning. While the mess would’ve been bad enough on its own, the dog apparently chose a very appropriate target.

Westlake Legal Group well-behaved-dog Dog caught destroying book about, oops, canine training Michael Hollan fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 8ce54e11-3999-538e-90ef-acee68487496

Apparently, Rev was upset about having to wait to go to the dog park. (Caters)

The video was uploaded to YouTube by the user Eldermisanthropy22, who claims that he came home to the torn-up book after leaving for school early that morning. According to him, his dog wasn’t happy about not being able to go to the dog park until later in the day.

Hilariously, the footage shows the dog standing over a shredded vikynem titled “Guide to a Well-Behaved Dog.”

The footage was captioned, “This is Rev. I had school early this morning, clearly he was mad about having to wait to go to the dog park. Don’t worry we went straight to the park to play and get some wiggles out.”

A THIRD OF PET OWNERS PREFER THEIR ANIMALS TO THEIR CHILDREN, SURVEY FINDS

Another dog was recently caught on camera, although it seems like his training is going much better.

A California resident caught his dog using his son’s training toilet in the middle of the night. The footage shows the animal properly using the small potty, although he does circle it a few times before doing the deed.

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According to the dog’s owner, he discovered that the training toilet had been used the following morning. Initially, he just assumed that his wife had forgotten to clean up after their son went to the bathroom.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

When he checked his cameras, however, he discovered something amazing.

According to him, “I got home from work at 5 am and noticed poop in my son’s training toilet and thought that’s weird how did my wife miss this? I checked the cameras and this is what I found.”

Westlake Legal Group dog-tears-up-training-book Dog caught destroying book about, oops, canine training Michael Hollan fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 8ce54e11-3999-538e-90ef-acee68487496   Westlake Legal Group dog-tears-up-training-book Dog caught destroying book about, oops, canine training Michael Hollan fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 8ce54e11-3999-538e-90ef-acee68487496

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Connecticut woman, 79, accused of drifting onto shoulder, killing man with her Volkswagen Beetle

A 79-year-old Connecticut woman was charged Monday in the death of a trucker who was struck by her Volkswagen Beetle when it drifted onto the shoulder of a roadway, police and local media reported.

Ramona Rubin, of Derby, was charged with one count of misconduct with a motor vehicle and one count of failure to drive in a proper lane, Town of Orange police said in a news release. She was released on $25,000 bond.

“The arrest stems from a lengthy investigation by the department’s accident reconstruction team into a motor vehicle collision on March 25, 2019, on Derby Avenue in which Ms. Rubin’s vehicle drifted onto the right shoulder of the roadway and fatally struck Steven Sylvester,” the news release said.

Westlake Legal Group ramona-rubin Connecticut woman, 79, accused of drifting onto shoulder, killing man with her Volkswagen Beetle Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/connecticut fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 97757230-91de-5c04-bb89-0a45dd0faed5

Mugshot for Ramona Rubin, 79, who was charged Monday. (Town of Orange Police Department )

CONNECTICUT WOMAN ARRESTED TWICE IN SAME DAY FOR ALLEGED DRUNK DRIVING

A call from Fox News to a number listed for Rubin was not answered.

Assistant Police Chief Max Martins said he did not know if Rubin had an attorney.

GIRLFRIEND OF MISSING CONNECTICUT MOM JENNIFER DULOS’ ESTRANGED HUSBAND TURNS HERSELF INTO POLICE

Steven Sylvester, 45, of Harwinton, Conn., was standing behind a tractor-trailer he was driving when he was killed, Fox 61 Connecticut reported.

He had parked on the shoulder after making a delivery.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Police said after Rubin hit the man with her Beetle, she struck the rear of the truck and then careened into a third vehicle, the Waterbury Republican-American reported, adding that Rubin was hospitalized.

Orange is about a 15-minute drive southwest of New Haven.

Westlake Legal Group ramona-rubin Connecticut woman, 79, accused of drifting onto shoulder, killing man with her Volkswagen Beetle Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/connecticut fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 97757230-91de-5c04-bb89-0a45dd0faed5   Westlake Legal Group ramona-rubin Connecticut woman, 79, accused of drifting onto shoulder, killing man with her Volkswagen Beetle Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/connecticut fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 97757230-91de-5c04-bb89-0a45dd0faed5

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Senator Asked FBI To Investigate New Kavanaugh Information Last Year: Reports

Days before the Senate confirmed Justice Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court last year, Sen. Christopher Coons (D-Del.) asked the FBI to look into sexual misconduct allegations against the judge that were just made public this past weekend, multiple media outlets reported Monday.

The Washington Post and CNN both obtained Coons’ Oct. 2, 2018 letter requesting that the FBI conduct an “appropriate follow up” with an individual who’d approached Coons with new sexual misconduct allegations against Kavanaugh. Several women had already accused the judge of sexual assault.

The bureau didn’t take on Coon’s request in its investigation, and Kavanaugh was confirmed to the Supreme Court four days later. 

A spokesman for Coons confirmed to the Post that the individual who contacted the senator, whose name was redacted in the letter, was Max Stier, a classmate of Kavanaugh’s whose allegation against him is relayed in a forthcoming book by New York Times reporters Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly.

According to an excerpt from the book that The New York Times published Saturday, Stier approached senators and the FBI with a story of Kavanaugh, then a freshman at Yale, pants down at a party while friends pushed his penis into the hands of a female student.

Westlake Legal Group 5d7fd4cd2300001c05551a14 Senator Asked FBI To Investigate New Kavanaugh Information Last Year: Reports

POOL New / Reuters Multiple people have accused Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct.

The Times corroborated the allegation with two people who communicated with Stier, but Stier himself declined to be interviewed for Pogrebin and Kelly’s book. The female student also declined to speak, and her friends said she didn’t recall the incident. 

In his letter, Coons told FBI officials that “several individuals” had contacted his office wanting to share information with federal authorities but that they’d had “difficulty reaching anyone who will collect their information.” The letter is the first indication that a lawmaker had urged the FBI to look into Stier’s account.

The FBI has been criticized for the narrow scope of its investigation into Kavanaugh. Senate Democrats decried the limits on the investigation set by the White House last year, and dozens of potential witnesses who come forward to the FBI were reportedly not interviewed. 

President Donald Trump, meanwhile, is going after the Times for reporting on Stier’s letter. 

“The one who is actually being assaulted is Justice Kavanaugh – Assaulted by lies and Fake News!” he tweeted Monday. “This is all about the LameStream Media working with their partner, the Dems.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

For every GM job, up to 7 other jobs are generated. Here’s how a strike affects the economy

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close For every GM job, up to 7 other jobs are generated. Here's how a strike affects the economy

If the General Motors strike lasts more than a few days, it could impact far more than the carmaker and the thousands of autoworkers who are walking the picket line.

“It could be a surprisingly significant impact,’’ says Harley Shaiken, a professor in U.C. Berkeley’s graduate school of education who specializes in the study of labor.

Striking workers may hold onto their reduced pay a little tighter, meaning that local businesses, from the dry cleaner to the movie theater, could see their profits dip.

“If it turns into a more prolonged strike, which may well happen, well then you’re going to have tens of thousands of workers with less …  probably being a lot more careful about what they purchase,” says Erik Gordon, a professor at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business who closely follows the auto industry. 

UAW workers must wait for smaller wage: UAW workers picketing GM must wait for $250 a week in strike pay

Autoworkers hope they won’t be off job for long: UAW hourly workers hope for short strike against GM as strike begins

For every job at GM’s eleven U.S. auto assembly plants, it’s estimated six or seven additional jobs are generated or connected to the facility, from people who work for outside suppliers, to employees at local restaurants where autoworkers eat, Shaiken says.

“If you have 4,000 in the plant, you could have 28,000 outside of the plant’’ whose jobs are linked, he says. “That certainly has a regional impact,” he adds, noting, “If the strike goes on probably past two weeks, it could be damaging.’’

Gordon likened the constellation of businesses revolving around the auto industry to a “spider web.”

While assembly plants use some components produced by their own companies, most parts, such as the seats and dashboards, are made by other businesses. “If the strike is more prolonged,” Gordon says, “it’s going to ripple out through this spider web of all of these other companies.’’  

Auto manufacturing creates 9.9 million jobs in the U.S., equal to slightly more than 5% of private-sector positions, according to the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers. The industry has historically been responsible for 3 to 3.5% of the nation’s GDP.

Car dealers, a key part of the auto ecosystem, may be OK in the short run, but they could struggle if their supply of larger vehicles that are the industry’s top sellers starts to shrink.

“When you drive by a car dealer, you see a huge number of cars sitting there in the display lot, so they won’t be hit right away,” Gordon says. But “as soon as they start running out of SUVs and pick up trucks, they’re in trouble.”

Smaller communities, where car dealerships are often one of the biggest businesses, would bear the brunt of a sales slump. “Small towns would be hurt a lot more than big cities that have other industries employing people,’’ he says.  

And if the strike winds on for more than a few weeks, tax revenue could also take a dip.  

“It will affect sales tax revenue if people are buying less things,” says Gordon. “When you don’t go to restaurants, when you hold off buying … a new refrigerator, the decrease in sales tax revenue really impacts cities and states who can’t really afford to take the blow.”

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2019/09/16/gm-strike-could-spread-into-economy/2341855001/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Oil Prices Expected to Remain Elevated After Attack on Saudi Arabia

Westlake Legal Group 16markets1-facebookJumbo Oil Prices Expected to Remain Elevated After Attack on Saudi Arabia Strategic Petroleum Reserve (US) Stocks and Bonds Saudi Arabia Prices (Fares, Fees and Rates) Oil (Petroleum) and Gasoline Economic Conditions and Trends Drones (Pilotless Planes)

HOUSTON — Fixing the damage done by the drone attack on the Saudi oil processing plant may be the easy part. The hard part will be calming energy markets, where oil prices have jumped faster than at any time in over a decade.

The attack on Saudi Arabia’s Abqaiq plant, which accounts for 5 percent of global oil supplies, and a nearby facility took 5.7 million barrels a day of production off line for at least a few days. It also revealed the significant danger that drones pose to the Persian Gulf’s sprawling processing plants, pipelines and refineries.

“The psyche has been altered,” said Tom Kloza, global head of energy analysis for Oil Price Information Service. “Now you have the thought, `What if the other shoe drops and we have a wider conflict.’”

For years, American and Saudi security analysts have worried about the Abqaiq plant, which removes sulfur impurities and makes crude oil less volatile so it can be safely exported on tankers. Without Abqaiq, much of the oil that Saudi Arabia produces at its giant Ghawar and Shaybah oil fields would have nowhere to go.

The facility has a heavily guarded perimeter, which was substantially fortified after several cars carrying Al Qaeda suicide bombers attacked it in 2006. Guards stopped those attackers before they reached the complex’s gates. But those security measures were not sufficient to stop the sophisticated weekend attack by multiple drones that crippled critical components of the facility.

While a production shortfall from an attack on one pipeline or refinery can often be replaced by others, it is not easy to make up for the loss of the processing capacity of Abqaiq, the largest facility of its kind in the world. The fires were quickly put out, and Saudi repairs have already begun. But a return to full capacity may take months, energy experts said.

“This changes the oil markets psychologically for a couple of years for sure now that everything is shown to be vulnerable,” said Dragan Vuckovic, president of Mediterranean International, an oil service company that works in Egypt and Iraq. “One drone can hit a refinery or an oil field installation and that causes fires, destruction and stops all production. It means less oil on the market and higher oil prices.”

Oil futures shot up 20 percent when trading began in Asia on Monday morning before falling back a little later in the day. It was still the biggest one-day oil price shock since Hurricane Katrina shut down production at Gulf Coast refineries in 2005, Mr. Kloza said.

The United States benchmark oil contract was up about $8 a barrel, or nearly 15 percent, to $62.75 on Monday afternoon. That is still about 7 percent below the price of a year ago. The global Brent oil benchmark also rose about 15 percent.

Prices might have jumped even more had global oil supplies not been bountiful, analysts said. It also helps that the global economy is slowing, oil production is surging in the United States and many industrialized nations have large strategic oil reserves.

The world has an estimated 90-day supply of oil available, and the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait and Iraq have spare production capacity. New oil pipelines between West Texas and the Gulf Coast are near completion and will soon boost American exports to countries like South Korea and Japan that depend on Saudi crude. And producers that have been dropping rigs in recent months will likely drill more if prices stay elevated.

Over the weekend, Saudi Arabia attempted to quicken the pace of tanker traffic from its ports to cushion the market shock.

Rob Thummel, managing director at Tortoise Advisors, a firm that makes energy investments, predicted a price hike of between 10 and 20 percent until there is a complete assessment of the damage at the Saudi plant.

“In the long term, oil prices will likely add a geopolitical risk premium of at least $5 to $10 into the price until the odds of another strike are reduced,” he said.

Mr. Thummel projected that oil prices in the United States will settle at between $60 and $70 a barrel, which would lead to a roughly 25 cent increase in the retail price of gasoline.

Americans burn about 400 million gallons of gasoline a day, so a 25 cent increase would cost consumers about $100 million a day. The national average price for regular gasoline on Monday was $2.56 a gallon, 29 cents below a year ago. Experts say the drop in gas prices over the last year afforded consumers some extra disposable income — something that is now likely to disappear.

For many years, analysts believed that higher oil prices always hurt the American economy. But in recent years, that has changed. States like Texas, Louisiana, New Mexico, North Dakota and Colorado benefit when oil prices move up.

Higher prices also help smaller oil companies and oil service companies, which have been laying off workers and struggling to pay debts in recent months. The share prices of several oil and gas company stocks, including Carrizo Oil & Gas, Chesapeake Energy, Apache and Hess, jumped by more than 10 percent on Monday.

Higher oil prices could also reduce the trade deficit now that the United States is a major exporter.

Other potential beneficiaries are steel companies and other manufacturers that supply pipes and other equipment to the energy industry. The ethanol industry will also benefit, Mr. Kloza said, because biofuels will become more attractive relative to oil. That should help corn farmers in the Midwest.

That said, higher oil prices could further slow an already weak global economy, especially if the attack on Abqaiq leads to more violence in the Middle East.

“If a full-fledged war between Iran and Saudi Arabia breaks out, there would be no limit to how high prices could go,” said Jay Hatfield, portfolio manager at InfraCap MLP, an exchange-traded fund that invests in oil pipelines.

Even without a war, global supplies could get tighter. Pipelines in the United States remain congested, which will likely reduce daily releases from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve should the Trump administration decide to tap that resource. Other countries like Japan and Korea tend to be reluctant to tap their oil reserves, which they prefer to turn to only during full-blown crises.

President Trump said on Sunday that he has authorized a release of oil from the strategic reserve “if needed,” but his energy secretary, Rick Perry, told CNBC on Monday that the administration has not made a decision about tapping the reserve.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

For every GM job, up to 7 other jobs are generated. Here’s how a strike affects the economy

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close For every GM job, up to 7 other jobs are generated. Here's how a strike affects the economy

If the General Motors strike lasts more than a few days, it could impact far more than the carmaker and the thousands of autoworkers who are walking the picket line.

“It could be a surprisingly significant impact,’’ says Harley Shaiken, a professor in U.C. Berkeley’s graduate school of education who specializes in the study of labor.

Striking workers may hold onto their reduced pay a little tighter, meaning that local businesses, from the dry cleaner to the movie theater, could see their profits dip.

“If it turns into a more prolonged strike, which may well happen, well then you’re going to have tens of thousands of workers with less …  probably being a lot more careful about what they purchase,” says Erik Gordon, a professor at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business who closely follows the auto industry. 

UAW workers must wait for smaller wage: UAW workers picketing GM must wait for $250 a week in strike pay

Autoworkers hope they won’t be off job for long: UAW hourly workers hope for short strike against GM as strike begins

For every job at GM’s eleven U.S. auto assembly plants, it’s estimated six or seven additional jobs are generated or connected to the facility, from people who work for outside suppliers, to employees at local restaurants where autoworkers eat, Shaiken says.

“If you have 4,000 in the plant, you could have 28,000 outside of the plant’’ whose jobs are linked, he says. “That certainly has a regional impact,” he adds, noting, “If the strike goes on probably past two weeks, it could be damaging.’’

Gordon likened the constellation of businesses revolving around the auto industry to a “spider web.”

While assembly plants use some components produced by their own companies, most parts, such as the seats and dashboards, are made by other businesses. “If the strike is more prolonged,” Gordon says, “it’s going to ripple out through this spider web of all of these other companies.’’  

Auto manufacturing creates 9.9 million jobs in the U.S., equal to slightly more than 5% of private-sector positions, according to the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers. The industry has historically been responsible for 3 to 3.5% of the nation’s GDP.

Car dealers, a key part of the auto ecosystem, may be OK in the short run, but they could struggle if their supply of larger vehicles that are the industry’s top sellers starts to shrink.

“When you drive by a car dealer, you see a huge number of cars sitting there in the display lot, so they won’t be hit right away,” Gordon says. But “as soon as they start running out of SUVs and pick up trucks, they’re in trouble.”

Smaller communities, where car dealerships are often one of the biggest businesses, would bear the brunt of a sales slump. “Small towns would be hurt a lot more than big cities that have other industries employing people,’’ he says.  

And if the strike winds on for more than a few weeks, tax revenue could also take a dip.  

“It will affect sales tax revenue if people are buying less things,” says Gordon. “When you don’t go to restaurants, when you hold off buying … a new refrigerator, the decrease in sales tax revenue really impacts cities and states who can’t really afford to take the blow.”

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2019/09/16/gm-strike-could-spread-into-economy/2341855001/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Jonathan Cahn’s new book draws on ancient biblical prophecies

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086060080001_6086059734001-vs Jonathan Cahn’s new book draws on ancient biblical prophecies Lauren Green fox-news/faith-values/faith fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/faith-values fnc f218d8f8-f663-5e31-afec-6826f1b5af8a article

It’s sometimes hard to tell the difference between truth and fiction when reading Jonathan Cahn‘s books. So much of what he writes about is based on real people, real events, and predictions for the future that one commentator called him a modern-day Nostradamus, the 16th Century astrologer, physician and seer, known for his predictions.

Cahn’s new book “The Oracle: Jubilean Mysteries Unveiled,” is in line with his previous offers, “The Harbinger” and “The Paradigm,” historical narratives that mix politics, espionage, and biblical prophecy.

Cahn said the story is merely the vehicle through which he delivers his message of biblical truth. He’s Jewish but was an atheist until he researched some of the biblical prophecies tied to the Jewish tradition of the reading of the scrolls.

“They’re appointed words that are read every week on the Sabbath in the synagogues,” Cahn said.

JONATHAN CAHN: WEAVING FACT FROM FICTION

This latest book draws on primarily two things — the year of jubilee and Moses’ prophetic words.

First, the Old Testament mandate of the year of jubilee. The Mosaic Law (the Law of Moses) stipulated that every seven years the Israelites were to return property to their original owners. Slaves would be freed, land would be given back, etc. But the 50th year, came at the conclusion of the heavenly number of the seventh of seven, the year of jubilee. This end of the cycle of seven sevens would be the Shmita, or Sabbatical year.

Next, a biblical prophecy, from the words of Moses that predicted a foreigner’s visit to the Land of Israel and sees its desolation (Deuteronomy 29: 22). Cahn said that visitor came 150 years ago, and that it was Mark Twain, whose famous book “The Innocents Abroad,” described the desolation of the Holy Land.

The reading of the Jewish scrolls during the same week showed the words of Moses predicting the visit.

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You can choose to not believe all that Cahn ties together, but regardless, it’s a fascinating way to view today’s events, and even today’s politicians, like President Trump, whose coming to power is also featured in the book as predicted in biblical prophecy.

“Continuously, the Bible says God sends His word into the world, and it affects history,” Cahn said.

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The fact of the matter is, the Bible says that God’s Word has power, that it’s not just words written on paper. Hebrews 4:12 says, “For the word of God is alive and active….”

That’s either true or it isn’t. Cahn believes it is, and has written his narratives to convince his readers.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086060080001_6086059734001-vs Jonathan Cahn’s new book draws on ancient biblical prophecies Lauren Green fox-news/faith-values/faith fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/faith-values fnc f218d8f8-f663-5e31-afec-6826f1b5af8a article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086060080001_6086059734001-vs Jonathan Cahn’s new book draws on ancient biblical prophecies Lauren Green fox-news/faith-values/faith fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/faith-values fnc f218d8f8-f663-5e31-afec-6826f1b5af8a article

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Saudis Say Oil Facilities Were Hit With Iranian Weapons

Saudi Arabia said Monday that Iranian weapons had been used in the aerial strikes over the weekend that interrupted much of the kingdom’s oil production. It also said the attacks had not been launched from Yemen, home of the Houthi rebel faction that has claimed responsibility.

The Saudi assertions, made without offering supporting evidence, appeared to move the kingdom closer to blaming Iran, a chief ally of the Houthis. The attacks on Saturday were the most audacious and damaging blow to Saudi Arabia in the four and a half years of civil war in Yemen.

But the Saudis did not directly accuse Iran of launching the strikes and refrained from calling for retaliation amid escalating tensions between Iran and the United States that have raised fears of a wider armed conflict.

The Houthis have claimed that they carried out the attacks, and Iran has denied any involvement. But Trump administration officials have previously said that the Iranians should be held responsible for the actions of forces in the region that they support, including the Yemeni rebels.

An investigation into the strikes is still underway, but “the initial results show that they are Iranian weapons,” Col. Turki al-Maliki, spokesman for the Saudi-led coalition fighting the Houthis in Yemen, said at a news conference in Riyadh.

“The terrorist attack was not from Yemeni territory, as the Houthi militias claimed,” he said, adding that the Saudis were still “working to determine the launch point.”

United States officials have said that Tehran was responsible and have suggested that a military response may come. But they have not said whether that meant Iran actually had a hand in directing or mounting the offensive, and offered no evidence for an Iranian role beyond satellite photos of the damage whose meaning was unclear.

The Americans, too, have cast doubt on whether the attacks were launched from Houthi territory in Yemen, far south of the targets, suggesting that they originated from the north — the direction of Iran — or northwest.

United Nations experts say that Iran has supplied the Houthis with drones and missiles that have greatly expanded their offensive capacity.

President Trump on Monday took to Twitter to suggest that Tehran could not be believed, reminding his followers of Iran’s downing of a United States surveillance drone in June. Iran’s version of events “was a very big lie,” he wrote. “Now they say that they had nothing to do with the attack on Saudi Arabia. We’ll see?”

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Westlake Legal Group 14saudi-1-videoSixteenByNine3000 Saudis Say Oil Facilities Were Hit With Iranian Weapons Yemen United States International Relations Saudi Arabia Iran Houthis Embargoes and Sanctions Drones (Pilotless Planes)

Drone strikes set fire to a Saudi Aramco plant in Abqaiq, Saudi Arabia, early Saturday. It was one of two sites hit.CreditCreditHamad I Mohammed/Reuters

Mr. Trump, who has made American policy toward Iran markedly more hostile, tweeted on Sunday night that Washington was seeking Saudi input before a potential military response. “There is reason to believe that we know the culprit,” he wrote, saying that the military was “locked and loaded depending on verification.”

But no clear public message has emerged yet about what response the Saudis prefer.

Prominent supporters of the monarchy have portrayed the strikes as an assault on the world and its energy markets, not just Saudi Arabia, and some have talked of retaliation.

“What is required is nothing more than the destruction of Iran’s oil installations, and if there is a capacity, nuclear facilities and military bases as well,” argued Turki al-Hamad, a prominent Saudi political analyst and novelist.

But other social media accounts known for pro-government propaganda argued for patience, saying that wisdom favors choosing the right time and means to respond.

Mohammed Alyahya, editor in chief of the English website of the Saudi-owned Al Arabiya news channel, emphasized that the rulers of the kingdom were deliberating carefully. The attacks show that Iranians are feeling the pain of the Trump administration’s sweeping sanctions, he said, and “they are more likely to take risks like the one they took recently.”

“A conventional military response must only be embarked upon with the utmost care in terms of the legality and consequences, after looking at all the other alternatives,” Mr. Alyahya said. “If there is a military conflict, Iran will inevitably be the biggest loser, but the reality is that everybody will lose. A conventional war will take its toll on everyone.”

The Houthis insisted on Monday that they had carried out the strikes using drones, and threatened more. They made no reference to whether Iranian equipment or training had played a role.

A spokesman for the Houthi military, Brig. Gen. Yahya Sare’e, “warned companies and foreigners not to be present in the factories that were hit by our strikes because we may target them again at any moment,” Almasirah, the Houthi news organization, reported on Monday.

The Houthis can strike at will anywhere in Saudi Arabia, he said, and their actions against the kingdom “will expand and be more painful.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160847475_b46b1514-31d5-4185-8e52-54a74ab571a7-articleLarge Saudis Say Oil Facilities Were Hit With Iranian Weapons Yemen United States International Relations Saudi Arabia Iran Houthis Embargoes and Sanctions Drones (Pilotless Planes)

A satellite image provided by the United States government of damage at the Abqaiq oil processing facility in Saudi Arabia on Saturday.CreditU.S. Government/DigitalGlobe, via Associated Press

Saudi Arabia is leading the coalition that is fighting the Houthis in Yemen, waging a bombing campaign that has killed thousands, many of them civilians. The war there is considered the world’s greatest humanitarian crisis of recent years, displacing millions of people and leaving millions more at risk of starvation.

The Houthis claimed to have used 10 drones in the Saturday attack; American officials said that there were 17 points of impact. The rebel group has launched missile and drone attacks into Saudi territory before, but never anything on that scale, or against such vital targets, or so deep into the kingdom, some 500 miles from Yemeni territory.

The attacks on Saturday forced the shutdown of facilities at Abqaiq and Khurais, which ordinarily process most of the crude oil produced by Saudi Arabia; the kingdom supplies about a tenth of the worldwide total. A Saudi official said Monday that the kingdom had shut down about half of its production because of the attacks, but expected its output to return to normal soon.

Saudi Arabia and other exporters keep large oil stockpiles. Experts say it is unclear whether the Saudi equipment will be out of commission long enough to affect global oil supplies, but prices rose sharply in the immediate aftermath of the attacks.

The Iraqi government said Monday that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had told Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi on Sunday night that the information reviewed by the United States showed that the attacks had not come from Iraqi territory.

That would mean the United States does not suspect that Shiite militias in Iraq with ties to Iran are responsible for the attacks. Some of those militias are under the umbrella of Iraq’s Popular Mobilization Forces, which fought against the Islamic State and whose salaries are paid by Baghdad.

“The prime minister stressed that Iraq’s task is to maintain its own security and stability and avoid any step of escalation and to prevent the use of its territory against any neighboring or brotherly or friendly country,” the Iraqi statement said.

The State Department declined to comment on Mr. Pompeo’s call or the official Iraqi statement. The department did not provide its own summary of the call.

Tensions between the United States and Iran have increased sharply since last year, when Mr. Trump withdrew from the 2015 deal limiting Iran’s nuclear program and reimposed economic sanctions against Iran. This spring, he imposed new sanctions, and Iran, which had continued to abide by the 2015 accord after the United States withdrawal, began stepping back from some of their obligations.

In May and June, several tankers were damaged in or near the Strait of Hormuz, in what American officials said were Iranian attacks. Iran has also seized several foreign ships.

On Monday, the Iranian Foreign Ministry said that a British-flagged tanker, Stena Impero, which Iran impounded while it sailed near its coast in July, would be released within days. Iran took the ship after British and Gibraltar forces seized an Iranian tanker, which was released last month after more than six weeks’ detention.

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