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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 141)

India Spacecraft Located, Condition Unknown

Westlake Legal Group ap_19245336398360_custom-7cef9778f275973205bba53ca8ae2b8602be8557-s1100-c15 India Spacecraft Located, Condition Unknown

Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) Chairman Kailasavadivoo Sivan displays a model of Chandrayaan 2 orbiter and rover during a press conference at their headquarters in Bangalore, India on Aug. 20. Aijaz Rahi/AP hide caption

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Aijaz Rahi/AP

Westlake Legal Group  India Spacecraft Located, Condition Unknown

Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) Chairman Kailasavadivoo Sivan displays a model of Chandrayaan 2 orbiter and rover during a press conference at their headquarters in Bangalore, India on Aug. 20.

Aijaz Rahi/AP

They found it!

More than 36 hours after India lost contact with an unmanned spacecraft it was trying to land near the moon’s South Pole, scientists appear to have located it on the moon’s surface. But there’s no word on what condition it’s in.

The head of India’s space agency, K. Sivan, told the Indian news agency ANI that the orbiter which released the Vikram lander on its descent toward the moon has now captured a thermal image of the craft on the lunar surface. He said the agency is trying to establish contact with it.

With this mission, India hoped to become the fourth country to land on the moon, after the United States, the former Soviet Union and China – and the first to land at the moon’s unexplored South Pole.

But hopes were dashed just after 2 a.m. Saturday local time, when the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) lost contact with its Vikram lander about 2.1 kilometers (about 1.3 miles) above the lunar surface. It had successfully broken off from its orbiter, and was on its way toward the moon, when the signal was lost.

At the time, it was unclear whether it had crash-landed on the moon, like an Israeli probe had back in April, or if it had simply floated away.

On Sunday, Sivan told ANI the lander had indeed reached the moon. But he said it was “premature to say anything” about what condition it was in, and whether it was still functional.

The mission was supposed to spend several weeks on the lunar surface. The lander was carrying a robotic rover, which the agency planned to use to measure and take photos of ice deposits around the moon’s South Pole. That ice was spotted from above by a previous Indian moon mission, Chandrayaan-1, a decade ago. The current mission, Chandrayaan-2, is its sequel. (Chandrayaan means ‘moon craft’ in Sanskrit.)

This is also believed to be the first Indian space mission headed entirely by women.

Indians took to social media Sunday to declare the moon landing a success, even as the space agency reserved judgement.

“India is the 4th Nation to land on Moon and 1st Nation to land on Lunar Southpole.This is the best example of Hardwork and dedication always pays off,” one person tweeted.

Sunday’s online celebrations contrasted with a more somber mood a day earlier at ISRO headquarters in the southern Indian city of Bengaluru. Prime Minister Narendra Modi had traveled there, and was watching from a glass mezzanine above the control room, when scientists lost contact with the Vikram lander. Video circulated on Twitter of Modi hugging the ISRO chief Sivan, who was in tears.

“We came very close, but we need to cover more ground in the times to come,” Modi told the disappointed scientists. “Every Indian is filled with the spirit of pride as well as confidence. We are proud of our space program and scientists.”

Modi has hailed India’s space program as a symbol of the country’s aspirations to be a scientific and economic power. With 1.3 billion people, India is expected to soon overtake China as the world’s most populous country.

India has also earned a reputation for exploring space on the cheap. The total cost of this Chandrayaan-2 mission is expected to be about $140 million – less than what it cost Hollywood to make the space exploration movie Interstellar.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

MIT Media Lab chief out after 'deeply disturbing' link to Jeffrey Epstein

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close MIT Media Lab chief out after 'deeply disturbing' link to Jeffrey Epstein

Following Jeffrey Epstein’s death, at least six women who accused him of sexual abuse have already filed lawsuits against his estate and associates. USA TODAY

The head of the the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s embattled Media Lab has resigned and the school has opened an investigation into “deeply disturbing” links between the lab and disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein, MIT’s president announced.

The fallout comes three weeks after another senior lab employee said he would resign in protest over revelations lab director Joi Ito took money from Epstein, who apparently committed suicide in jail last month.

Ito, who also taught at the prestigious school, resigned Saturday, hours after an article in The New Yorker detailed how the lab accepted gifts from Epstein despite being listed as “disqualified” in MIT’s official donor database. The article claimed the lab listed Epstein’s contributions as anonymous and avoided disclosing to the school the full extent of his involvement.

MIT President L. Rafael Reif issued a statement calling the accusations “extremely serious” and said MIT’s general counsel was hiring a prominent law firm to conduct an investigation “as swiftly as possible.”

Last week, Ito disclosed that he had received $1.2 million from Epstein for investment funds Ito controlled in addition to a $525,000 donation to the lab. The New Yorker said Epstein also secured at least $7.5 million in donations, including $2 million from Microsoft founder Bill Gates and $5.5 million from Leon Black, a wealthy equities manager and chairman of the Museum of Modern Art.

“The New Yorker published an article that contains deeply disturbing allegations about the engagement between individuals at the Media Lab and Jeffrey Epstein,” Reif said. “The acceptance of the Epstein gifts involved a mistake of judgment.”

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Ethan Zuckerman, director of the lab’s Center for Civic Media, last month announced that he would resign in protest of the lab’s involvement with Epstein.

Epstein, 66, was found dead in his cell at the federal lockup in Manhattan of what an autopsy report classified as a suicide. An indictment unsealed in July accused him of sexually exploiting and abusing dozens of underage girls at his mansions in Manhattan, Palm Beach, Florida, and elsewhere from 2002 to 2005.

The charges included sex trafficking and conspiracy, allegations that could have landed Epstein in prison for decades. The indictment led several other women to come forward with claims of sexual abuse against him.

Ito is an activist, entrepreneur and researcher who just last year earned a PhD.

“After giving the matter a great deal of thought over the past several days and weeks, I think that it is best that I resign as director of the media lab and as a professor and employee of the Institute, effective immediately,” Ito wrote in an internal e-mail obtained by The New Yorker.

The Media Lab is a research an educational program with an annual budget of about $80 million, according to its website. The lab includes a graduate enrollment of almost 200 students, and more than 200 undergraduates and grad students from other department conduct research through the lab each year.

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/09/08/mit-media-lab-chief-out-after-disturbing-link-jeffrey-epstein/2254984001/

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Albertsons joins other retails with gun policy change

Following mass shootings last month in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, that left a total of 31 people dead, a few major supermarket chains have changed their policy in an attempt to limit gun violence.

Albertsons has joined a list of retailers — including Walmart, Kroger, CVS and Walgreens — that have asked shoppers to not openly carry firearms.

“We want our stores to feel safe & welcoming for all, so we respectfully ask customers to not openly carry firearms in our stores unless they are authorized law enforcement officers,” the company said in a tweet.

KROGER JOINS WALMART IN ASKING CUSTOMERS TO ‘NO LONGER OPENLY CARRY FIREARMS’ IN STORES

Others responded to the tweet by Albertsons, including Dinah Miller, who wrote: “Thank you. No one needs a gun displayed around my Tom Thumb pharmacy or around little kids with their moms in the produce section. Signed, gun owner.”

Westlake Legal Group istock-505772463 Albertsons joins other retails with gun policy change fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 1fcc3cfa-3903-5048-ba7e-343983b16df5

Albertsons has joined a list of supermarkets and stores that have asked shoppers to not openly carry firearms. (iStock)

The new supermarket changes will occur even in states where open-carry is legal in the hope it wards off potential shooters.

It’s not clear how the companies will implement or enforce their new policies, although a Walmart spokesperson told TIME that employees will be trained on how to deal with customers who walk in with a firearm. Other changes by Walmart include an announcement last Tuesday detailing the end of handgun sales in Alaska, and the discontinuation of short-barrel rifle and handgun ammunition sales nationwide.

“We know these decisions will inconvenience some of our customers, and we hope they will understand,” company CEO, Doug McMillon said. “As a company, we experienced two horrific events in one week, and we will never be the same.”

McMillon noted the store wouldn’t change its policy and approach regarding concealed-carry permits.

JESSICA PHILLIPS: A WEEK AFTER A MASS SHOOTING, WE IN WEST TEXAS RISE WITH STRENGTH AND OUR FAITH

Walmart previously raised the minimum age for firearm and ammunition purchase to 21, while Kroger stopped selling both in its Fred Meyer locations as a response to the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Shooting in 2018.

The moves were praised by Democratic presidential contender Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt, who called upon Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., to stand up to the National Rifle Association (NRA). The NRA had responded to Walmart’s new policy on Sept. 3., by posting on Facebook: “Walmart pulls a Dick’s and disregards the Second Amendment.”

The post refers to Dick’s Sporting Goods decision to remove firearms and other hunting products from 125 of its stores. Nikolas Cruz, the Stoneman Douglas shooter, had previously bought a gun from Dick’s, although it was not used in the attack.

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Albertson Companies currently operates 34 stores across the United States.

Westlake Legal Group istock-505772463 Albertsons joins other retails with gun policy change fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 1fcc3cfa-3903-5048-ba7e-343983b16df5   Westlake Legal Group istock-505772463 Albertsons joins other retails with gun policy change fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 1fcc3cfa-3903-5048-ba7e-343983b16df5

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MIT Media Lab chief out after 'deeply disturbing' link to Jeffrey Epstein

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close MIT Media Lab chief out after 'deeply disturbing' link to Jeffrey Epstein

Following Jeffrey Epstein’s death, at least six women who accused him of sexual abuse have already filed lawsuits against his estate and associates. USA TODAY

The head of the the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s embattled Media Lab has resigned and the school has opened an investigation into “deeply disturbing” links between the lab and disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein, MIT’s president announced.

The fallout comes three weeks after another senior lab employee said he would resign in protest over revelations lab director Joi Ito took money from Epstein, who apparently committed suicide in jail last month.

Ito, who also taught at the prestigious school, resigned Saturday, hours after an article in The New Yorker detailed how the lab accepted gifts from Epstein despite being listed as “disqualified” in MIT’s official donor database. The article claimed the lab listed Epstein’s contributions as anonymous and avoided disclosing to the school the full extent of his involvement.

MIT President L. Rafael Reif issued a statement calling the accusations “extremely serious” and said MIT’s general counsel was hiring a prominent law firm to conduct an investigation “as swiftly as possible.”

Last week, Ito disclosed that he had received $1.2 million from Epstein for investment funds Ito controlled in addition to a $525,000 donation to the lab. The New Yorker said Epstein also secured at least $7.5 million in donations, including $2 million from Microsoft founder Bill Gates and $5.5 million from Leon Black, a wealthy equities manager and chairman of the Museum of Modern Art.

“The New Yorker published an article that contains deeply disturbing allegations about the engagement between individuals at the Media Lab and Jeffrey Epstein,” Reif said. “The acceptance of the Epstein gifts involved a mistake of judgment.”

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

Ethan Zuckerman, director of the lab’s Center for Civic Media, last month announced that he would resign in protest of the lab’s involvement with Epstein.

Epstein, 66, was found dead in his cell at the federal lockup in Manhattan of what an autopsy report classified as a suicide. An indictment unsealed in July accused him of sexually exploiting and abusing dozens of underage girls at his mansions in Manhattan, Palm Beach, Florida, and elsewhere from 2002 to 2005.

The charges included sex trafficking and conspiracy, allegations that could have landed Epstein in prison for decades. The indictment led several other women to come forward with claims of sexual abuse against him.

Ito is an activist, entrepreneur and researcher who just last year earned a PhD.

“After giving the matter a great deal of thought over the past several days and weeks, I think that it is best that I resign as director of the media lab and as a professor and employee of the Institute, effective immediately,” Ito wrote in an internal e-mail obtained by The New Yorker.

The Media Lab is a research an educational program with an annual budget of about $80 million, according to its website. The lab includes a graduate enrollment of almost 200 students, and more than 200 undergraduates and grad students from other department conduct research through the lab each year.

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/09/08/mit-media-lab-chief-out-after-disturbing-link-jeffrey-epstein/2254984001/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

DNC Chair Perez defends stricter criteria for next Democratic primary debate

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6079097924001_6079071090001-vs DNC Chair Perez defends stricter criteria for next Democratic primary debate fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tulsi-gabbard fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/kamala-harris fox-news/person/julian-castro fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/cory-booker fox-news/person/beto-orourke fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 08b329b6-4a64-562a-a81a-a8fa2e28e70e

Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez defended on Sunday the criteria to qualify for the party’s next presidential primary debate, calling it a “fair bar” for the White House hopefuls to meet.

Perez’s comments come ahead of the upcoming Democratic debate on Thursday, where 10 candidates meeting the required 2 percent support in four qualifying polls and 130,000 unique donors will be on stage in Houston, Texas. The criteria to qualify for Thursday’s debate increased from the previous two, where 20 candidates sparred in two debates over consecutive nights.

“It’s going to be up to the voters to decide who this candidate is and I think our process has been the most fair, transparent and inclusive process in the history of the Democratic primary,” Perez said Sunday during an appearance on ABC’s “This Week.”

DEMOCRATIC DEBATE LINEUP SLASHED IN HALF AS NUMEROUS CONTENDERS DON’T MAKE THE CUT

Perez added: “Our field is deep, but we’re reaching a point now when voters are differentiating, and that’s what it’s about, and candidates have to demonstrate progress as we get closer to Iowa and New Hampshire.”

Perez’s comments come amid criticism from numerous mid-tier Democratic presidential primary hopefuls who failed to make the cut for Thursday’s debate.

“The DNC’s process is stifling debate at a time when we need it most,” said Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado, who did not to qualify for the third round debate.

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, who also did not qualify for the debate, argued that “these DNC debate rules have turned this primary into the ‘The Hunger Games’ — each step of this seems to be all about getting donors.”

While the criticism is not new – the DNC faced similar jabs earlier this year when many of the longer-shots for the nomination struggled to make the stage at the first and second round of debates – this time around the national party committee is specifically being attacked over the dearth of qualifying polls. Critics say this is unfairly preventing candidates close to qualifying from actually making the stage.

GABBARD SAYS SHE’LL KEEP GRAY STREAK IN HAIR TO HONOR FALLEN SOLDIERS

The campaign for Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii urged that the DNC “revise their list of debate qualifying polls in light of numerous irregularities in the selection and timing of those polls, to ensure transparency and fairness.” The Gabbard campaign also argued that “the DNC has not released their criteria for selecting the 16 polling organizations they deemed ‘certified.’”

Gabbard registered at 3 percent in the only live telephone-operator conducted poll in the first-in-the-nation presidential primary state of New Hampshire. That poll was the first to come out since the second round of Democratic presidential primary debates late last month. But the survey – from the Boston Globe and Suffolk University – is not on the DNC’s list of qualifying polls.

Gabbard’s criticism has sparked rumors that she will launch a third party bid for president, but Perez on Sunday argued against the idea – saying that Gabbard has already pledged to accept the eventual Democratic presidential nominee.

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“Congresswomen Gabbard isn’t going to run as a third party candidate because she has said so,” Perez said. “She’s a very talented part of the Democratic Party family and everyone in this family is going to come together in Milwaukee and through the election.”

The 10 candidates who will be onstage Thursday are former Vice President Joe Biden; Sens. Bernie Sanders of Vermont; Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts; Kamala Harris of California; Cory Booker of New Jersey; Amy Klobuchar of Minnesot;, South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg; former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, businessman Andrew Yang, and former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julián Castro.

Fox News Paul Steinhauser contributed to this story.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6079097924001_6079071090001-vs DNC Chair Perez defends stricter criteria for next Democratic primary debate fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tulsi-gabbard fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/kamala-harris fox-news/person/julian-castro fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/cory-booker fox-news/person/beto-orourke fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 08b329b6-4a64-562a-a81a-a8fa2e28e70e   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6079097924001_6079071090001-vs DNC Chair Perez defends stricter criteria for next Democratic primary debate fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tulsi-gabbard fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/kamala-harris fox-news/person/julian-castro fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/cory-booker fox-news/person/beto-orourke fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 08b329b6-4a64-562a-a81a-a8fa2e28e70e

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Kirstie Alley slams Trump ‘blacklist’ from Hollywood ‘yahoos’

Kirstie Alley blasted what she called “yahoos” in Hollywood who proposed exposing supporters of President Trump.

“I refuse to be part of the Hollywood a—hats who can’t see that ‘NOT working with Republicans‘ is as stupid and NASTY as ‘REFUSING to do business with gay people,'” the 68-year-old star, who hasn’t acted since “Scream Queens” in 2016, tweeted Friday. “STOP ACTING above the FRAY ya damn hypocrites…WE are the same species! let’s help each OTHER ya damn yahoos.”

The blacklist brouhaha began last week when Emmy winner Debra Messing promoted an Alabama church sign that called black Trump voters mentally ill. She later apologized for tweeting about the sign around the time that “#RacistDebraMessing” began trending on Twitter.

DEBRA MESSING RESPONDS TO TRUMP TWITTER JAB WITH A CALL FOR GUN CONTROL: ‘NOW THAT I HAVE YOUR ATTENTION’

Westlake Legal Group kirstie-alley-getty Kirstie Alley slams Trump 'blacklist' from Hollywood 'yahoos' Jessica Sager fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/debra-messing fox-news/entertainment/genres/political fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 0bb86e49-8fa4-53e7-b512-2f01080885db

Kirstie Alley enters the house during the “Celebrity Big Brother” Launch Night at Elstree Studios, Hertfordshire, England. Alley slammed working Hollywood stars for requesting media outlets to publish a list of attendees of a Donald Trump fundraiser. (Getty)

“NUMBER 1– I apologized for liking that church sign. I said I regret it. I shud have thought before recklessly supporting,” she tweeted Wednesday night.

“You won’t accept this but black people are targeted by Trump’s GOP for voter suppression,” she added. “Charlottesville was about Trump supporters hating POC and Jews.”

KIRSTIE ALLEY SAYS BETTE MIDLER IS A ‘REAL RACIST’

Messing referenced the 2017 protests in the city in opposition to removing a statue of former Civil War General Robert E. Lee; in the same weekend, white supremacists demonstrated, some screaming “Jews will not replace us.” James Fields plowed into counterprotesters at a white supremacist rally, killing 32-year-old paralegal Heather Heyer and injuring more than 30 others.

KIRSTIE ALLEY, STEPHEN BALDWIN CELEBRATE TRUMP PRESIDENTIAL VICTORY

Trump declared after Charlottesville that “there is blame on both sides” for the deadly violence, adding, “There are two sides to a story.”

Messing and “Will & Grace” co-star Eric McCormack ignited a media firestorm last week when they allegedly called for a media outlet to publish the names of people attending a fundraiser for President Trump.

Amid backlash, the two claimed they weren’t calling for a blacklist but rather wanted to bring attention to already-public information.

DEBRA MESSING TELLS SUSAN SARANDON TO ‘SHUT THE F—K UP’ ABOUT TRUMP

“I NEVER NOR WOULD I EVER call for a blacklist of anyone for any reason. The info is publicly available. I as a consumer want to know where MY … Money is going when I pay for entertainment. Just as you have the right to not watch W&G bc I don’t support Trump, I have the right to not go see (pay for) a movie with someone supporting babies in cages,” the actress said in two separate tweets on Wednesday.

WHOOPI GOLDBERG DISAGREES WITH DEBRA MESSING OVER TRUMP ‘BLACKLIST’: ‘PEOPLE CAN VOTE FOR WHO THEY WANT TO’

Messing also cited the First Amendment, adding that “there is nothing threatening about asking politely for information.”

On Thursday, Trump hit back at Messing, tweeting, “Bad ‘actress’ Debra The Mess Messing is in hot water. She wants to create a ‘Blacklist’ of Trump supporters, & is being accused of McCarthyism. Is also being accused of being a Racist because of the terrible things she said about blacks and mental illness.”

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“If Roseanne Barr said what she did, even being on a much higher rated show, she would have been thrown off television,” he griped. “Will Fake News NBC allow a McCarthy style Racist to continue? ABC fired Roseanne. Watch the double standard!”

Westlake Legal Group kirstie-alley-getty Kirstie Alley slams Trump 'blacklist' from Hollywood 'yahoos' Jessica Sager fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/debra-messing fox-news/entertainment/genres/political fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 0bb86e49-8fa4-53e7-b512-2f01080885db   Westlake Legal Group kirstie-alley-getty Kirstie Alley slams Trump 'blacklist' from Hollywood 'yahoos' Jessica Sager fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/debra-messing fox-news/entertainment/genres/political fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 0bb86e49-8fa4-53e7-b512-2f01080885db

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Ali Noorani: Trump asylum policies harming refugee families — and Americans

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083982490001_6083977380001-vs Ali Noorani: Trump asylum policies harming refugee families — and Americans fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc b0839aae-bc4e-5e4a-b6f8-67bea8cb4141 article Ali Noorani

If it seems that lately President Trump has ramped up efforts to make it even harder for those seeking refuge to enter and stay in the U.S. — it’s because he has.

As we get closer to the election, expect the policy changes to come fast and furious. And who loses as a result? Americans.

Ken Cuccinelli, acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), is the new face of the administration’s immigration policy. He has called immigrants “invaders” and said the sonnet at the base of the Statue of Liberty is really just about people coming from Europe, is the new face of the administration’s immigration policy. In fact, last week he reportedly pushed out John Lafferty, the head of the USCIS asylum office who last year won a leadership award.

YOO AND PETERSON: TRUMP CAN MOVE FUNDS FOR BORDER WALL — AND THE SUPREME COURT WILL BACK HIM

Just last week we learned about a new administration policy to use videos instead of human interpreters in immigration court, which has delayed asylum proceedings by adding steps and in some cases extraneous information. Furthermore, the videos focus on voluntary departures and criminal penalties, not asylum seekers’ legal right to apply for protection. Subtlety is not a characteristic of the administration’s approach.

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On Monday, the administration is expected to publish a proposed rule that would make it harder for asylum seekers to work. The rule would eliminate a requirement that USCIS process asylum seekers’ initial work permit applications within 30 days, potentially leading to lengthy delays in work authorization.

In addition to putting up a roadblock to integration, the move would shrink a pool of workers in an already tight labor market, reduce tax revenue, and potentially encourage asylum seekers to work without authorization.

While the economic impact of Trump’s changes to immigration policy are remarkable, the moral collapse of our role in the world is most striking.

And, later this week, the administration is due to determine the Fiscal Year 2020 refugee cap. Reports are that the cap could fall to 15,000 refugees granted admission per year. Numbers like this would decimate cities and towns throughout the Midwest that have grown increasingly dependent on refugee contributions to grow labor forces and tax bases.

While the economic impact of Trump’s changes to immigration policy are remarkable, the moral collapse of our role in the world is most striking.

Putting families in danger — ones fleeing violence, persecution and destitution —before they come to America or after they’ve arrived hurts our standing on the world stage. It’s bad policy. It’s morally bankrupt. It runs counter to the country we should continue to be. It also runs counter to United Nations tenets of asylum — that countries should not turn away “a refugee in any manner whatsoever to the frontiers of territories where his life or freedom would be threatened on account of his race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.”

But this is exactly what the Trump administration’s “remain in Mexico” policy does: it prevents migrants from countries south of Mexico from entering the U.S. until they have sought asylum in one of the nation’s they’ve first traveled through, which is simply an effort to prevent Guatemalans, Salvadorans and Hondurans — who represent the vast majority of asylum seekers, and 75 percent of Border Patrol apprehensions — from ever entering the U.S.

That leaves them in border towns in Mexico, which are unsafe. Last week the Los Angeles Times reported that asylum seekers awaiting U.S. immigration court hearings in these towns are increasingly becoming targets for kidnapping by cartels, which seek ransoms from migrants’ American relatives. More and more, migrants are returning to the danger and poverty they fled.

Does every person requesting asylum deserve protection? No.

But the courts, not the cartels, should determine whether or not someone lives in the U.S.

Asylum seekers do not pose a threat to us: people who request asylum go through a comprehensive process that includes background checks and screenings.

The thousand-cuts campaign against asylum seekers also contributes to the administration’s message to talented foreign-born students, innovators and entrepreneurs, as well as hardworking laborers and many others, that America isn’t open to newcomers. That we no longer wish to give people a chance to lend their talents, passion and creativity to enrich our communities.

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There is a better way forward, both morally and from a policy perspective. Instead of punishing people from Northern Triangle countries, we could partner with their governments to prevent human smuggling operations and provide critically needed aid and investment to spur economic growth and create new jobs — so people find opportunity in the place they call home.

This isn’t wishful thinking, it’s based on what has worked in the past. Migration to the U.S. from Mexico dropped a whopping 90 percent over the last two decades, as the U.S. worked with Mexico to ensure stronger economic growth, more visas for temporary work, and better border enforcement.

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Last week’s developments and reports weren’t the first evidence that the Trump administration is closing the doors on those most in need, just the latest.

Doing so not only harms vulnerable men, women and children. It ultimately weakens the idea of America.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083982490001_6083977380001-vs Ali Noorani: Trump asylum policies harming refugee families — and Americans fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc b0839aae-bc4e-5e4a-b6f8-67bea8cb4141 article Ali Noorani   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083982490001_6083977380001-vs Ali Noorani: Trump asylum policies harming refugee families — and Americans fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc b0839aae-bc4e-5e4a-b6f8-67bea8cb4141 article Ali Noorani

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Ali Noorani: Trump asylum policies harming refugee families — and Americans

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083982490001_6083977380001-vs Ali Noorani: Trump asylum policies harming refugee families — and Americans fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc b0839aae-bc4e-5e4a-b6f8-67bea8cb4141 article Ali Noorani

If it seems that lately President Trump has ramped up efforts to make it even harder for those seeking refuge to enter and stay in the U.S. — it’s because he has.

As we get closer to the election, expect the policy changes to come fast and furious. And who loses as a result? Americans.

Ken Cuccinelli, acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), is the new face of the administration’s immigration policy. He has called immigrants “invaders” and said the sonnet at the base of the Statue of Liberty is really just about people coming from Europe, is the new face of the administration’s immigration policy. In fact, last week he reportedly pushed out John Lafferty, the head of the USCIS asylum office who last year won a leadership award.

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Just last week we learned about a new administration policy to use videos instead of human interpreters in immigration court, which has delayed asylum proceedings by adding steps and in some cases extraneous information. Furthermore, the videos focus on voluntary departures and criminal penalties, not asylum seekers’ legal right to apply for protection. Subtlety is not a characteristic of the administration’s approach.

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On Monday, the administration is expected to publish a proposed rule that would make it harder for asylum seekers to work. The rule would eliminate a requirement that USCIS process asylum seekers’ initial work permit applications within 30 days, potentially leading to lengthy delays in work authorization.

In addition to putting up a roadblock to integration, the move would shrink a pool of workers in an already tight labor market, reduce tax revenue, and potentially encourage asylum seekers to work without authorization.

While the economic impact of Trump’s changes to immigration policy are remarkable, the moral collapse of our role in the world is most striking.

And, later this week, the administration is due to determine the Fiscal Year 2020 refugee cap. Reports are that the cap could fall to 15,000 refugees granted admission per year. Numbers like this would decimate cities and towns throughout the Midwest that have grown increasingly dependent on refugee contributions to grow labor forces and tax bases.

While the economic impact of Trump’s changes to immigration policy are remarkable, the moral collapse of our role in the world is most striking.

Putting families in danger — ones fleeing violence, persecution and destitution —before they come to America or after they’ve arrived hurts our standing on the world stage. It’s bad policy. It’s morally bankrupt. It runs counter to the country we should continue to be. It also runs counter to United Nations tenets of asylum — that countries should not turn away “a refugee in any manner whatsoever to the frontiers of territories where his life or freedom would be threatened on account of his race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.”

But this is exactly what the Trump administration’s “remain in Mexico” policy does: it prevents migrants from countries south of Mexico from entering the U.S. until they have sought asylum in one of the nation’s they’ve first traveled through, which is simply an effort to prevent Guatemalans, Salvadorans and Hondurans — who represent the vast majority of asylum seekers, and 75 percent of Border Patrol apprehensions — from ever entering the U.S.

That leaves them in border towns in Mexico, which are unsafe. Last week the Los Angeles Times reported that asylum seekers awaiting U.S. immigration court hearings in these towns are increasingly becoming targets for kidnapping by cartels, which seek ransoms from migrants’ American relatives. More and more, migrants are returning to the danger and poverty they fled.

Does every person requesting asylum deserve protection? No.

But the courts, not the cartels, should determine whether or not someone lives in the U.S.

Asylum seekers do not pose a threat to us: people who request asylum go through a comprehensive process that includes background checks and screenings.

The thousand-cuts campaign against asylum seekers also contributes to the administration’s message to talented foreign-born students, innovators and entrepreneurs, as well as hardworking laborers and many others, that America isn’t open to newcomers. That we no longer wish to give people a chance to lend their talents, passion and creativity to enrich our communities.

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There is a better way forward, both morally and from a policy perspective. Instead of punishing people from Northern Triangle countries, we could partner with their governments to prevent human smuggling operations and provide critically needed aid and investment to spur economic growth and create new jobs — so people find opportunity in the place they call home.

This isn’t wishful thinking, it’s based on what has worked in the past. Migration to the U.S. from Mexico dropped a whopping 90 percent over the last two decades, as the U.S. worked with Mexico to ensure stronger economic growth, more visas for temporary work, and better border enforcement.

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Last week’s developments and reports weren’t the first evidence that the Trump administration is closing the doors on those most in need, just the latest.

Doing so not only harms vulnerable men, women and children. It ultimately weakens the idea of America.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY ALI NOORANI

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083982490001_6083977380001-vs Ali Noorani: Trump asylum policies harming refugee families — and Americans fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc b0839aae-bc4e-5e4a-b6f8-67bea8cb4141 article Ali Noorani   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083982490001_6083977380001-vs Ali Noorani: Trump asylum policies harming refugee families — and Americans fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc b0839aae-bc4e-5e4a-b6f8-67bea8cb4141 article Ali Noorani

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How Top-Valued Microsoft Has Avoided the Big Tech Backlash

Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple are targets of government investigations and public outrage, facing accusations that they abuse their power in various ways, from exploiting personal information to stifling rivals.

Conspicuously absent from most of that criticism? Microsoft, a tech company worth more than them all.

The software giant, valued at more than $1 trillion by investors, is no stranger to government scrutiny and public criticism. It endured years of antitrust investigations, and faced a long public trial that almost split up the company. In the end, Microsoft paid billions in fines and settlements, and absorbed humbling lessons.

But its “Evil Empire” moniker, once a label favored by the company’s critics, , has fallen by the wayside.

Today, Microsoft has positioned itself as the tech sector’s leading advocate on public policy matters like protecting consumer privacy and establishing ethical guidelines for artificial intelligence. Though it has sued to limit government access to users’ data, Microsoft is seen in capitals around the world as the most government-friendly of the tech companies.

“It’s in a league of its own,” said Casper Klynge, a foreign-service officer who is Denmark’s ambassador to the technology industry, based in Silicon Valley. “There is self-interest, of course. But Microsoft actively engages with governments on important issues far more than we see from the other big tech companies.”

Market shifts and the evolution of Microsoft’s business over the years help explain the transformation. It is less a consumer company than its peers. For example, Microsoft’s Bing search engine and LinkedIn professional network sell ads, but the company as a whole is not dependent on online advertising and the harvesting of personal data, unlike Facebook and Google.

And while big, Microsoft no longer looms as the threatening bully it was in the personal computer era. The company is a healthy No. 2 in markets like cloud computing (behind Amazon) and video games (behind Sony) rather than a dominant No. 1.

“Microsoft can afford to be more self-righteous on some of those social issues because of its business model,” said David B. Yoffie, a professor at the Harvard Business School.

But Microsoft has also undergone a corporate personality change over the years, becoming more outward looking and seeking the views of policymakers, critics and competitors. That shift has been guided by Brad Smith, Microsoft’s president, diplomat-in-residence and emissary to the outside world. His work has been endorsed and his role enlarged under Satya Nadella, who became chief executive in 2014 and led a resurgence in the company’s fortunes.

In a new book, Mr. Smith makes the case for a new relationship between the tech sector and government — closer cooperation and challenges for each side.

“When your technology changes the world,” he writes, “you bear a responsibility to help address the world that you have helped create.” And governments, he writes, “need to move faster and start to catch up with the pace of technology.”

In a lengthy interview, Mr. Smith talked about the lessons he had learned from Microsoft’s past battles and what he saw as the future of tech policymaking — arguing for closer cooperation between the tech sector and the government. It’s a theme echoed in the book, “Tools and Weapons: The Promise and the Peril of the Digital Age,” which he wrote with Carol Ann Browne, a member of Microsoft’s communications staff.

Mr. Smith, 60, was at Microsoft during the company’s antitrust conflict in the 1990s, but he did not direct the legal strategy.

Microsoft lost the suit filed by the Justice Department and 20 states, narrowly avoided being broken up and then settled the case with the Bush administration in 2001. Mr. Smith, who became general counsel in 2002, then served as Microsoft’s global peacemaker, settling the follow-on cases with companies and governments.

From that experience, Mr. Smith had some advice for the young platform companies today — Google, Facebook and Amazon. Major antitrust confrontations, he noted, last a long time. The landmark cases in technology — AT&T, IBM and Microsoft — all went on for decades.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_114578450_9df64c7b-7b55-4674-9be8-05ac2e2159f4-articleLarge How Top-Valued Microsoft Has Avoided the Big Tech Backlash Smith, Bradford L Regulation and Deregulation of Industry Microsoft Corp Computers and the Internet Antitrust Laws and Competition Issues

Microsoft’s campus in Redmond, Wash. Microsoft, valued at more than $1 trillion by investors, has the highest worth of all tech companies.CreditIan C. Bates for The New York Times

“And once you’re in the cross hairs, it is hard to get out,” Mr. Smith said.

The natural tendency for the young tech powers is to fight. “They didn’t get to where they are by compromising,” Mr. Smith said. “They got to where they are because they stuck to their guns. And so they tend to think they’re right and the government is wrong.”

That mentality is especially true for immensely successful and wealthy founders. The Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, according to Mr. Smith, “learned that life actually does require compromise and governments actually are stronger than companies,” if only after a bruising confrontation.

Mr. Gates, who wrote the foreword in Mr. Smith’s book, recalled that for years he was proud of how little time he spent talking to people in government. “As I learned the hard way in the antitrust suit,” he wrote, “that was not a wise position to take.”

At Microsoft, Mr. Smith pushed for the new path. Horacio Gutierrez, a former senior Microsoft lawyer, who is now the general counsel of Spotify, said, “We went from dealing with governments in a reactive, defensive way to reaching out and being proactive.”

As Mr. Smith was cleaning up Microsoft’s legacy of legal troubles, the tech industry was moving on. The personal computer was no longer the center of gravity, displaced by smartphones, internet search, social networks and cloud computing.

“What you saw at Microsoft was acknowledging reality and a response to changed circumstances,” said A. Douglas Melamed, a professor at Stanford Law School. Microsoft is not in a spotlight of criticism today, he said, “largely because the company is not dominant in visible ways as it used to be.”

Under Mr. Nadella, Microsoft has fully embraced the cloud, including offering its lucrative Office productivity software as a cloud service. While Mr. Nadella was transforming the business, Mr. Smith increasingly became Microsoft’s envoy to the world on policy matters. In 2015, he was named the company’s president as well as chief legal officer.

Mr. Smith, whose first stint at Microsoft was a posting in Paris, is a globalist on tech policy. He has called for a Digital Geneva Convention, new rules to protect the public from the dangers of digital warfare, just as governments pledged in 1949 to protect civilians in times of war waged with bombs and bullets.

In 2018, Mr. Smith played a leading role in marshaling support for the Paris Call for international norms of behavior on the internet, which was endorsed by dozens of nations, and hundreds of companies and public interest groups. And this year, he did the same for the Christchurch Call to curb terrorist and extremist content online. While these initiatives lack the force of law, Mr. Smith said they could start global conversations that shaped policy.

After the terrorist attack at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, in which an Australian gunman killed 51 people and video of the carnage spread rapidly on social media, Australia enacted legislation that holds social networks responsible if they do not remove violent video quickly enough.

Mr. Smith pointed to the Australian move and similar proposals in Britain, France and Germany as evidence that a wave of technology regulation can move quickly.

Even states can set policy. Microsoft, for example, is supporting a proposed law in Washington State on facial recognition technology.

The legislation would require organizations deploying facial recognition to clearly tell people how they are using it. Law enforcement could not use the technology for ongoing surveillance of someone without a warrant. And companies that sell facial recognition software would have to make their code available for testing to check for racial and gender bias — a crucial weakness if the software is trained on data sets with too few images of women or people of color.

The American Civil Liberties Union opposes the Microsoft-supported proposal, calling for tighter restrictions and a ban on facial recognition until it can be shown to be biasproof.

But the biggest impact on Microsoft’s policy posture is Europe. The Continent may not be leading the way in high-tech innovation, but it is the pacesetter in tech policy.

Mr. Smith is a fan. He calls Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation “a Magna Carta for data.” The law, which took effect last year, lets people request their online data and restricts how businesses obtain and handle information. At another point, Mr. Smith said Europe is “the world’s best hope for privacy’s future.”

In America, there have been activist states on privacy, like California, but the political gridlock in Washington has held back a national policy.

“That means the decisions that impact Americans,” Mr. Smith said, “are going to be made in Brussels and interpreted in Berlin, because those are the two places that have the most impact.”

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Tony Dungy on Antonio Brown: 'He’ll be the big loser in the end'

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Tony Dungy on Antonio Brown: 'He’ll be the big loser in the end'

SportsPulse: Despite all the drama the past month, days, and hours, Antonio Brown wins big and is likely closer to a championship than he’s ever been before says USA TODAY’s Mike Jones. USA TODAY

Hall of Fame NFL coach Tony Dungy had some stern words for Raiders-turned-Patriots wide receiver Antonio Brown on Saturday.

Among them: Brown “thinks he’s the victim” and Brown will “be the big loser in the end.”

Dungy, who won the Super Bowl while coaching the Indianapolis Colts from 2002 to 2008, revealed his feelings about the drama involving 31-year-old Brown on Twitter.

He said the former Central Michigan University and Steelers player was “blessed with amazing talent” but has “lost track of the fact football is a team game.”

He went on to say that he “feels sorry for” Brown, who is “missing out on the real joy that comes from being  part of a team.”

A sixth-round pick by the Steelers in 2010, Brown has racked up more receptions and receiving yards than any other player in the past nine seasons.  

After requesting to be traded from Pittsburgh earlier this year due to, among other reasons, a rocky relationship with quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, Brown landed with the Raiders during the off-season.

Oakland made the Pro Bowler the highest paid receiver in the league but that relationship quickly soured. After some off-the-field drama, Brown took to Instagram early Saturday asking to be released by the Raiders. Oakland had fined him more than $215,000.for “conduct detrimental to the team.”

On Saturday, New England signed Brown to a one-year deal worth up to $15 million, according to ESPN. The deal includes a $9 million signing bonus, $10 million guaranteed and $5 million in incentives, ESPN reported.

Brown posted an illustration of him on Instagram in a Patriots jersey surrounded by money, with the words “Business is Boomin.”

Brown will be eligible to play Week 2 at the earliest, missing New England’s opener Sunday against Brown’s former Steelers team.

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