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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 156)

Dominican convicted murderer who escaped prison twice is recaptured in Panama

PANAMA CITY — Panamanian police on Thursday recaptured a Dominican man convicted of kidnapping and murdering five young people of Chinese descent, two weeks after he escaped prison for a second time.

National Police Director Jorge Miranda told local media that Gilberto Ventura Ceballos was found in the province of Chiriquí bordering Costa Rica.

Westlake Legal Group AP20044813078201 Dominican convicted murderer who escaped prison twice is recaptured in Panama fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/world-regions/dominican-republic fox-news/world/crime fnc/world fnc fecca4c3-03cf-5095-a12f-a18623475782 Associated Press article

Police recaptured Ventura Ceballos, a Dominican convicted of the murder of five university students of Chinese descent, whose second escape at the beginning of February embarrassed security authorities in Panama. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco)

Authorities had announced Feb. 4 that Ventura Ceballos had escaped. The latest escape prompted the resignation of the country’s security minister and the firing of the interior minister.

DOMINICAN MURDER SUSPECT ESCAPES PANAMA PRISON A 2ND TIME, OFFICIALS SAY

Ventura Ceballos was sentenced along with a fellow Dominican accomplice to 50 years in July 2018 for the abduction and killing of the five university students about a decade ago. He acknowledged murdering them and burying them beneath the floor of a home in the town of La Chorrera west of Panama City, authorities say.

Westlake Legal Group AP20044813112838 Dominican convicted murderer who escaped prison twice is recaptured in Panama fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/world-regions/dominican-republic fox-news/world/crime fnc/world fnc fecca4c3-03cf-5095-a12f-a18623475782 Associated Press article

Police officers escort prison escapee Gilberto Ventura Ceballos, center, to the police headquarters in Panama City, Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco)

Investigators said at least two were buried alive. The Dominicans, who ran a cell phone sales business, collected nearly a quarter-million dollars in ransom payments from relatives.

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Ventura Ceballos escaped the first time in December 2016. He was recaptured the following September in Costa Rica. He had dyed his hair and was living under a different name, working at an auto shop.

Westlake Legal Group AP20044813078201 Dominican convicted murderer who escaped prison twice is recaptured in Panama fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/world-regions/dominican-republic fox-news/world/crime fnc/world fnc fecca4c3-03cf-5095-a12f-a18623475782 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group AP20044813078201 Dominican convicted murderer who escaped prison twice is recaptured in Panama fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/world-regions/dominican-republic fox-news/world/crime fnc/world fnc fecca4c3-03cf-5095-a12f-a18623475782 Associated Press article

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Trump insists he has ‘legal right’ to intervene in DOJ cases, but has chosen not to

Westlake Legal Group image Trump insists he has ‘legal right’ to intervene in DOJ cases, but has chosen not to fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox news fnc/politics fnc e8da8ae2-114d-53be-83b2-1b46966b35fa article Adam Shaw

President Trump on Friday insisted he has a “legal right” to intervene in criminal cases, but has so far chosen not to — amid a controversy surrounding Attorney General William Barr’s decision to overrule a recommended sentence for former Trump adviser Roger Stone.

Trump quoted comments made by Barr in which the AG said: “The president has never asked me to do anything in a criminal case.”

BARR UNDER FIRE AS DEMS VOW TO INVESTIGATE AG, CALL FOR IMPEACHMENT

“This doesn’t mean that I do not have, as president, the legal right to do so, I do, but I have so far chosen not to!” Trump tweeted.

Earlier this week, four prosecutors quit the case after top officials moved to soften the 7-9 year recommendation for Stone (who was convicted of witness tampering among other charges) after Trump tweeted about the case. Trump on Wednesday denied interfering in the case, but has been extremely vocal about it — saying Stone “was treated horribly” and called a nine-year sentence “a disgrace.”

“I want to thank the Justice Department — and I didn’t speak to them, by the way — they saw a nine-year sentence… nine years for something nobody can even define what he did,” Trump said Wednesday. “They put a man in jail, destroy his life, his family, his wife.”

TRUMP DENIES INTERFERING IN ROGER STONE CASE, STAYS MUM ON POSSIBLE PARDON

Democrats and analysts attacked Barr after the overruling of the sentencing was announced, and called on Barr to testify before the House Judiciary Committee on March 31st — which the AG agreed to. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., meanwhile demanded that the department’s inspector general investigate the matter.

“This situation has all the indicia of improper political interference in a criminal prosecution,” Schumer wrote in a letter to DOJ Inspector General Michael Horowitz on the Stone sentencing. “I therefore request that you immediately investigate this matter to determine how and why the Stone sentencing recommendations were countermanded, which Justice Department officials made this decision, and which White House officials were involved.”

Barr, on ABC News Thursday, pushed back on Trump’s initial tweet while also defending his handling of the Stone case.

“I think it’s time to stop the tweeting about Department of Justice criminal cases,” Barr said. “I’m not going to be bullied or influenced by anybody … whether it’s Congress, a newspaper editorial board, or the president.”

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Barr continued, “I’m gonna do what I think is right, and you know… I cannot do my job here at the department with a constant background commentary that undercuts me.”

White House officials told Fox News that the White House knew Barr was doing the ABC interview but that they did not know what the AG would say.

Fox News’ Tyler Olson, Mark Meredith and Brooke Singman contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group image Trump insists he has ‘legal right’ to intervene in DOJ cases, but has chosen not to fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox news fnc/politics fnc e8da8ae2-114d-53be-83b2-1b46966b35fa article Adam Shaw   Westlake Legal Group image Trump insists he has ‘legal right’ to intervene in DOJ cases, but has chosen not to fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox news fnc/politics fnc e8da8ae2-114d-53be-83b2-1b46966b35fa article Adam Shaw

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Dan Crenshaw calls out Bernie and AOC’s Green New Deal: It’s a ‘third-grade science project’

Democratic Socialists’ Green New Deal is not an actual proposal, Texas Republican Rep. Dan Crenshaw said Friday.

Appearing on “Fox & Friends” with hosts Steve Doocy, Ainsley Earhardt, and Brian Kilmeade, Crenshaw said that 2020 Democratic frontrunner Sen. Bernie Sanders’, I-Vt., controversial plan is “not serious” and “more of a third-grade science project,” prompting applause from the live audience.

CLIMATE CHANGE COULD DESTROY HALF OF THE EARTH’S ANIMAL AND PLANT SPECIES IN THE NEXT 50 YEARS, DISTURBING STUDY SAYS

In August, the New Hampshire primary winner released his Green New Deal plan promising that the multitrillion-dollar plan to radically overhaul the economy and combat climate change would “pay for itself” over the next 15 years.

The Vermont senator has long been an advocate for the Green New Deal, but only this year has it become a central policy for many of those seeking the Democratic nomination for president. The Deal was given a big push in Congress when Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass., introduced a formal resolution on it – which stalled in the Senate but drew support from a number of 2020 hopefuls.

All versions of such plans have gone beyond direct energy-related policies. Sanders’ plan is no different, promising that he will “generate the political will necessary for a wholesale transformation of our society” and proposing $16.3 trillion in public investments.

“I make no apologies for proposing the boldest and most aggressive climate proposal with our Green New Deal. This is a climate emergency,” Sanders tweeted Thursday, prompting Crenshaw to respond.

“Then why didn’t you vote ‘YES’ for the Green New Deal when it came to the Senate floor?” he tweeted. “Maybe because it’s not a plan. Or a good deal. Or even ‘Green.’ It’s a 3rd grade science project that isn’t based in science or engineering. Care about reducing emissions?”

“And the difference is, like, I’m not insulting the guy. I’m not calling him names. We’re not doing what they do to President Trump,” Crenshaw told the “Friends” hosts.

“And more importantly on this stuff, from a policy perspective, the Green New Deal is not an actual proposal. There is no actual plan in the Green New Deal. It just says, ‘Everything is going to be wind and solar and we’re going to get rid of airplanes and cows.’ That’s not a plan. That’s not a serious proposal,” he explained.

Westlake Legal Group AOC-Green-New-Deal-AP Dan Crenshaw calls out Bernie and AOC's Green New Deal: It's a 'third-grade science project' Julia Musto fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/vermont fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/us/environment/climate-change fox-news/us/energy fox-news/us/economy fox-news/us/congress fox-news/topic/green-new-deal fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/science fox-news/politics/socialism fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 1dc39991-51bc-50f5-be8b-11c5f625cc4c

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., addresses the Road to the Green New Deal Tour final event at Howard University in Washington, Monday, May 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

In November, the United Nations reported what it called “bleak” findings as it warned that the world was headed toward global “extinction” and would need to increase its efforts “fivefold” if nations wanted to reach the temperature reduction goal outlined in the Paris climate agreement.

According to the report, global temperatures are set to rise by 3.2 degrees Celsius by the end of the century — a significantly higher target than Paris’ 1.5 degrees. In order to bridge the gap, the U.N. called for a 7.6 percent per year reduction in emissions between 2020 and 2030.

The U.N. warned that the expected temperature increase would translate into “mass extinctions. Large parts of the planet would be uninhabitable” and on Thursday a disturbing new study suggested that climate change could wipe out half of the planet’s animal and plant species by 2070.

HOUSE GOP’S ENVIRONMENTAL PROPOSALS FOCUS ON CARBON CAPTURE, SEQUESTRATION AND TREE-PLANTING

Progressives like Ocasio-Cortez have called for sweeping reforms, arguing that the cost of inaction outweighs the cost of transforming the economy.

Conservatives, meanwhile, have warned about economic consequences and pointed to failed, historical climate predictions as reasons for avoiding drastic change.

While cost estimates for climate plans have varied considerably, the U.N. called for the U.S. to spend between $1.6 trillion and $3.8 trillion annually on energy investments for the next 30 years. That would mean spending as much as $114 trillion by 2050.

House Republicans on Wednesday unveiled legislation focused on carbon capture and sequestration, which includes the goal of planting a trillion trees, to counter the Democrats.

The proposal sets a goal of the U.S. planting a trillion new trees by 2050 to counter global warming by sucking carbon out of the air rather than regulating emissions, as well as incentivizing carbon capture and sequestration through a tax credit and investing in research and development of the technology to do so, according to House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy.

“And the irony of it…If you care about reducing emissions, you can’t do what [Democrats are] saying,” Crenshaw stated. “What do they say all the time? They say ‘ban fracking, ban fracking.'”

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Hydraulic fracking is a proven drilling technology used for extracting oil, natural gas, geothermal energy, or water from deep underground. However, critics of the process argue that fracking releases potentially carcinogenic chemicals, contaminates groundwater around the site, pollutes the air with methane, and can cause tremors around the area.

That said, more fracking means more jobs and more resources tapped for the United States.

“We just reduced emissions in this country this past year by almost 3 percent — more than any other country in absolute terms. We’ve reduced more in the last couple of decades than the last 12 countries combined. That’s a really big deal. But, why is that? Natural gas fracking,” said Crenshaw. “That’s why because natural gas is a cleaner energy and we should export it to the rest of the world.”

“It’s about investing in what is actually not science fiction,” he said, “but really interesting stuff.”

Fox News’ Adam Shaw and Chris Ciaccia contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group sanders-split Dan Crenshaw calls out Bernie and AOC's Green New Deal: It's a 'third-grade science project' Julia Musto fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/vermont fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/us/environment/climate-change fox-news/us/energy fox-news/us/economy fox-news/us/congress fox-news/topic/green-new-deal fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/science fox-news/politics/socialism fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 1dc39991-51bc-50f5-be8b-11c5f625cc4c   Westlake Legal Group sanders-split Dan Crenshaw calls out Bernie and AOC's Green New Deal: It's a 'third-grade science project' Julia Musto fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/vermont fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/us/environment/climate-change fox-news/us/energy fox-news/us/economy fox-news/us/congress fox-news/topic/green-new-deal fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/science fox-news/politics/socialism fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 1dc39991-51bc-50f5-be8b-11c5f625cc4c

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Trump becomes first president named Daytona 500 grand marshal

President Trump is taking part in this year’s Daytona 500.

Westlake Legal Group d8b709a4-trump-nascar Trump becomes first president named Daytona 500 grand marshal Gary Gastelu fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/auto/nascar fox-news/auto/attributes/racing fox news fnc/auto fnc article 0c464442-3318-5af8-ad33-a49723f0321d

Trump hosted NASCAR Champion Martin Truex Jr.’s team at The White House. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Not as a driver, but as grand marshal, which means he gets to give the “start your engines” command to the 43 entrants in The Great American Race.

It’ll mark the first time a president, sitting or former, has ever held the role. The only other time a sitting president attended the race was when George Bush came in 2004, the year Dale Earnhardt Jr. won his first 500.

WHO HAS WON THE MOST DAYTONA 500s?

Earnhardt was grand marshal in 2018 and will be on the stand this Sunday to wave the green flag as honorary starter.

Trump was endorsed in 2016 by former NASCAR CEO Brian France Jr., has hosted series champions Joey Logano and Martin Truex Jr. at The White House and gave NASCAR team owner Roger Penske the Presidential Medal of Freedom last year.

And while the president won’t be getting on the track, his name will. Just not on Sunday.

Westlake Legal Group trump-car Trump becomes first president named Daytona 500 grand marshal Gary Gastelu fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/auto/nascar fox-news/auto/attributes/racing fox news fnc/auto fnc article 0c464442-3318-5af8-ad33-a49723f0321d

(Mike Harmon Racing)

Joe Nemechek will be driving a Mike Harmon Racing car in the NASCAR Xfinity Series race on Saturday sponsored by the Patriots PAC of America that will have Trump/Pence 2020 logos on it.

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Westlake Legal Group d8b709a4-trump-nascar Trump becomes first president named Daytona 500 grand marshal Gary Gastelu fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/auto/nascar fox-news/auto/attributes/racing fox news fnc/auto fnc article 0c464442-3318-5af8-ad33-a49723f0321d   Westlake Legal Group d8b709a4-trump-nascar Trump becomes first president named Daytona 500 grand marshal Gary Gastelu fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/auto/nascar fox-news/auto/attributes/racing fox news fnc/auto fnc article 0c464442-3318-5af8-ad33-a49723f0321d

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California veteran, 104, gets 200,000 Valentine’s Day cards

Happy Valentine’s Day, Major White.

A 104-year-old Marine Corps veteran who served in World War II said he’s “floored” to have received over 200,000 Valentine’s cards from all over the world for his growing collection of keepsakes.

Last month, a friend of Maj. Bill White launched a social media campaign dubbed “Operation Valentine” to collect Valentine’s Day cards for the centenarian veteran.

VALENTINE’S DAY: DO YOU KNOW THE ORIGINS OF THE HOLIDAY?

White resides at an assisted living facility in Stockton, Calif. and cites scrapbooking as a favorite hobby. Along with his many military medals – including a Purple Heart awarded for surviving the Battle of Iwo Jima in 1945 – White enjoys keeping his scrapbooks and mementos organized, Fox 40 reports.

This year, the spirited vet hoped to grow his collection of keepsakes with 100 Valentine’s Day cards in honor of his 100 years, and was astonished to receive hundreds of thousands of love letters, Reuters reports.

On Wednesday night, White told host Martha MacCallum on “The Story” that well-wishers sent over 200,000 cards ahead of Feb. 14.

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Westlake Legal Group maj.-bill-white-KTXL-3 California veteran, 104, gets 200,000 Valentine's Day cards Janine Puhak fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e3f0c023-d861-50e2-b748-9d101083652d article /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday

Some of Maj. Bill White’s military medals, pictured. In the Second World War, White served in the Marine Corps and survived the Battle of Iwo Jima (KTXL)

“It just floored me, this is something that has never happened to me before in my life, and I doubt this will ever happen again!” he joked.

White reportedly has received so much mail that his family has had recruited volunteers to help open the letters and read them, per Reuters.

Though Cupid’s bow certainly struck the veteran with the holiday spirit this year, White revealed he’s never celebrated Valentine’s Day in such a big way before, even when his wife of 42 years was still alive.

“It’s something I’ve never heard of or seen. All of a sudden here, like a ton of bricks. I’m sort of speechless,” he said of the outpour of love.

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Valentine’s Day cards for Maj. White can be sent to:

Operation Valentine
ATTN: Hold for Maj Bill White, USMC (Ret)
The Oaks at Inglewood
6725 Inglewood Ave.
Stockton, CA 95207

Westlake Legal Group image California veteran, 104, gets 200,000 Valentine's Day cards Janine Puhak fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e3f0c023-d861-50e2-b748-9d101083652d article /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday   Westlake Legal Group image California veteran, 104, gets 200,000 Valentine's Day cards Janine Puhak fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e3f0c023-d861-50e2-b748-9d101083652d article /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday

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Trump Admits He Sent Rudy Giuliani To Ukraine After Denying It

Westlake Legal Group 5e469f282200003100d1ce70 Trump Admits He Sent Rudy Giuliani To Ukraine After Denying It

President Donald Trump now admits he sent his personal attorney Rudy Giuliani to Ukraine to dig up dirt on 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden and his son Hunter, a central part of Trump’s impeachment. 

Trump on Thursday explained why he chose to “use Rudy” in an interview for Fox News host Geraldo Rivera’s podcast, perhaps feeling at ease after being acquitted by the Republican-led Senate earlier this month.

“Was it strange to send Rudy Giuliani to Ukraine, your personal lawyer? Are you sorry you did that?” Rivera asked Trump.

“No, not at all,” Trump said.

“Here’s my choice: I deal with the Comeys of the world, or I deal with Rudy,” he continued, referring to former FBI Director James Comey, whom he fired in 2017 after the FBI began investigating his 2016 campaign. The investigation mushroomed into special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe of Russian election interference.

Trump said he has “a very bad taste” for U.S. intelligence officials because of Mueller’s investigation, so he chose Giuliani to do his bidding.

“So when you tell me, why did I use Rudy? And one of the things about Rudy, number one, he was the best prosecutor, you know, one of the best prosecutors, and the best mayor,” Trump told Rivera. “But also, other presidents had them. FDR had a lawyer who was practically, you know, was totally involved with government. Eisenhower had a lawyer. They all had lawyers.”

In November, Trump denied that he sent Giuliani to Ukraine, despite congressional testimony from multiple witnesses, including career diplomats and government officials, who said Giuliani met with and pressured Ukrainian officials as part of Trump’s plot to coerce a foreign government into aiding his reelection.

“No, I didn’t direct him, but he is a warrior, he is a warrior,” Trump said in an interview on former Fox News host Bill O’Reilly’s radio show, when asked if he instructed Giuliani to “do anything” in Ukraine.

But then-ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland testified that Trump gave him “express direction” to work with Giuliani.

Giuliani also was mentioned in Trump’s July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, when Trump told Zelensky to “speak to him.”

“Mr. Giuliani is a highly respected man,” Trump said, according to the summary of the call released by the White House. “He was the mayor of New York City, a great mayor, and I would like him to call you. I will ask him to call you along with the Attorney General. Rudy very much knows what’s happening and he is a very capable guy. If you could speak to him that would be great.”

Giuliani said this week his Ukraine snooping uncovered “smoking gun” evidence of the Bidens’ involvement in corruption. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), a prominent Trump defender, said Attorney General William Barr told him there would be an “intake process” for Giuliani to funnel his dirt to the Justice Department.

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What Being a Mayor Taught Pete Buttigieg

Westlake Legal Group 00buttigieg-experience1-facebookJumbo What Being a Mayor Taught Pete Buttigieg South Bend (Ind) Presidential Election of 2020 Minorities Mayors Buttigieg, Pete (1982- )

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — The news was alarming: Children in some of South Bend’s poorest neighborhoods had a higher rate of lead poisoning than children in Flint, Mich.

At a meeting of anxious parents, it was revealed that two county agencies had lost funding to help combat the poisoning. Pete Buttigieg, then the city’s mayor, did not control the agencies, but his response at the meeting still struck some as a politician passing the buck. “We have state representatives. We have a state health department. We have a new governor,” he said. “They should be hearing from our community.”

Mr. Buttigieg eventually took action, after pressure by an ad hoc community group and by The South Bend Tribune, which editorialized that it was “time to get cracking” on lead. The mayor won $2.3 million from Washington to repair rundown homes with peeling paint, the cause of the lead poisoning.

“His first instinct was to say, hey, we’re covering what we’re in charge of,” said Kathy Schuth, who organized the meeting of parents in January 2017 where the mayor spoke. “And his second look at it was to say, this is a big problem. And there are ways we could play a strong role.”

The experience Mr. Buttigieg gained as a mayor is a central part of his pitch as a presidential candidate, but it has also recently become a bull’s-eye for some of his rivals, who are trying to undercut his momentum in the race by sowing doubts about whether he is prepared for the Oval Office. On Tuesday, Mr. Buttigieg finished a strong second in the New Hampshire primary and a week earlier he made history as the first candidate to prevail in the Iowa caucuses whose highest elected position was mayor. In both states he beat a former vice president and several other veteran politicians, in large part with a message about what he learned as the son of a struggling Midwestern city who was determined to turn it around.

But his record has also been challenged by some city residents and activists, particularly on problems facing black residents, and he has had some of his toughest moments in the race trying to explain his record on policing. In a debate in New Hampshire last week, he was pressed about an increase of arrests of black people for marijuana possession during his years in office, which he struggled to explain as a collateral effect of a crackdown on violent crime.

Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., fighting for the same center-left voters as Mr. Buttigieg, released a digital ad ahead of New Hampshire voting openly mocking Mr. Buttigieg’s qualifications. Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota compared him in the debate to President Trump: “We got a newcomer in the White House and look where it got us,” she said.

If elected, Mr. Buttigieg will be 39 on Inauguration Day, the youngest American leader in history. He is well aware that, if he continues to notch victories after Iowa, there will be voters wondering if a millennial who was mayor of Indiana’s fourth-largest city is truly qualified for the presidency.

A close look at some key episodes for Mr. Buttigieg shed light on how he governed, struggled and grew over his eight years in office, in particular in responding to people’s needs and frustrations. The Harvard-educated, former McKinsey consultant came into office with a technocratic approach to leadership, and some of his actions are revealing about challenges he faces today — particularly his low support among African-Americans nationally and the perception that he is most at home with his fellow elites.

Mr. Buttigieg argues that as mayor, he had to produce results every day. “If there’s a problem, you don’t get to say it’s fake news and pretend that the pothole isn’t there,” he told voters in South Carolina this fall. “You gotta go out there and deal with it.”

If Mr. Buttigieg has won over some voters with that emphasis on problem-solving, his experience working with a Democratic-majority city council to tackle road repair is a far cry from negotiating with a Republican-led Senate on a complex legislative agenda. No mayor has ever ascended directly to the Oval Office. South Bend’s budget is about one-sixth that of San Antonio when it was led by another Democrat who sought the nomination, Julián Castro.

Rahm Emanuel, a former mayor of Chicago who served as chief of staff to President Barack Obama, said voters should not measure a candidate’s readiness for the presidency in years or previous jobs.

“Nobody walks into the office on Day 1 with what they need to know, full stop,” Mr. Emanuel said. “Do you have the experience to be self-reflective, to have the capacity to grow and to have judgment, and are you secure surrounding yourself with other smart people?”

Serving as America’s youngest mayor of a city over 100,000, Mr. Buttigieg grew in office, becoming a more patient listener and more respectful of those with clashing views, supporters and critics agreed in interviews. For someone who by nature runs emotionally cool, given to detailed, clinical answers when challenged, Mr. Buttigieg came to embrace that a mayor’s primary job was not to always have the factually correct answer — as in the lead paint case — but to empathize and provide inspiration.

“It has been a hard thing for Pete and for his administration to not be a top-down policymaker, but to find ways of gaining authentic input from large varieties of people,” said Ms. Schuth, director of Near Northwest Neighborhood Inc., which helps low-income residents buy homes. “And I absolutely think he’s gotten better at that.”

To Oliver Davis, a former South Bend city council member who often tangled with Mr. Buttigieg, the former mayor is simply too green. “He’s ready on Day 2” of a crisis, is how Mr. Davis, who supports Mr. Biden, put it.

Jake Teshka, the only Republican on the South Bend city council, said that Mr. Buttigieg won his support for one initiative to address lead poisoning — requiring city inspections of rental units — over Mr. Teshka’s initial objection. “He brought in the Real Estate Investors Association, he brought tenants’ rights groups — folks from the far right, far left, he brought them to the table,” Mr. Teshka said. “We got down and dirty with it and the mayor was supportive through the whole thing.”

Mr. Teshka said Mr. Buttigieg had more relevant governing experience than either of the past two presidents, having managed more than 1,000 city employees and reached out to opponents to get things done. “Objectively speaking and removing partisanship, I’d say, look, it’s more scalable than being a reality TV star,” he said.

One morning in 2013, in his first term, Mr. Buttigieg arrived at work in the County-City Building, his body braced against the whoosh of five lanes of one-way traffic. “It’s always bothered me we have this racetrack downtown,” he told his senior staff.

Streets in the central city were designed to speed drivers to homes and shopping in the suburbs. Mr. Buttigieg believed a revival of South Bend, which Newsweek had named a “dying city,” should start with the urban core.

His Smart Streets initiative proposed converting central thoroughfares to allow two-way traffic, and adding bicycle lanes, trees and on-street parking, all to slow vehicles and encourage pedestrians.

The project was debated through 28 public meetings over two years, many of them heated, as Mr. Buttigieg and allies pitched Smart Streets as an investment that would ignite growth. Opponents called the $25 million project an expensive folly.

“There was a lot of resistance because he was spending a lot of city money,” said Mark Neal, a former city controller. “People said the streets are perfectly fine.”

Smart Streets finally passed the once-recalcitrant council. Big real estate projects flowed: the conversion of empty office buildings to residential lofts, a makeover of an abandoned Studebaker factory, a new Marriott Aloft hotel in the city’s tallest building that might have become a tear-down. There was more than $100 million in private investment, according to the city, though some of it might have happened anyway as South Bend emerged from the Great Recession. Today, about 1,000 people live downtown compared to virtually zero when Mr. Buttigieg took office.

Jeff Rea, president of the South Bend Regional Chamber of Commerce, said Mr. Buttigieg earned the support of business people, many of them Republicans. “He’s been able to get folks who in theory should oppose him on partisan ideological grounds to the table over shared goals in terms of economic progress and improved sense of pride and momentum,” Mr. Rea said.

One developer, Frank Perri, recalled that Mr. Buttigieg reached out to him about a downtown parcel he owned on the St. Joseph River that had sat empty for more than a decade. “What do we have to do to make this happen?” the mayor asked. Mr. Perri repeated what he had told earlier mayors without success: He wanted the city to build underground parking on the site.

Mr. Buttigieg agreed. The city provided a $5 million incentive. Mr. Perri’s seven-story glass-wrapped building, the Cascade, is set to open soon with condos starting at $625,000. “It will pay off in spades in taxes,” Mr. Perri said.

“As far as I’m concerned, he’s the reason South Bend is coming around,” he said of Mr. Buttigieg.

But drive a few blocks west of downtown, into poor and largely black and Hispanic neighborhoods, and there are no $625,000 condos. You see many crumbling houses and empty storefronts instead. Prosperity has not been shared equally in South Bend, a source of criticism and resentment by some in minority communities.

“It’s hard for me to say this is a turnaround city,” Regina Williams-Preston, a former member of the council, said in an interview last spring as Mr. Buttigieg was officially starting his presidential bid.

Mr. Buttigieg’s major initiative for low-income neighborhoods was attacking blight by bulldozing vacant and abandoned houses. Postindustrial South Bend, like many Rust Belt cities, had lost nearly a quarter of its population. The West Side especially was dotted with empty houses that attracted squatters and crime.

Setting an ambitious goal to address 1,000 houses in 1,000 days, Mr. Buttigieg was able to meet it two years later, in September 2015, ahead of schedule. According to the city, none of the demolished houses were occupied.

Some critics said the city reached its target by too aggressively issuing code violations, and when poor landlords could not pay, calling in the bulldozer. “Our housing stock is being demolished and there’s no program to replace it with affordable housing,” said Henry Davis Jr., a black member of the city council.

Stacey Odom, a resident of the West Side, was working on a rundown house she had bought for about $6,000 when she learned it was on the list to be demolished. Ms. Odom, who hoped to move into the house, staked out the County-City Building. When she spotted Mr. Buttigieg walking with other officials, she jumped out of her car.

“I told him I am having all of these problems with the City of South Bend wanting to tear down houses,” Ms. Odom said. “He was with a group of people and they were not happy that he took the time to stop and speak with me. But he still stayed there and listened to everything I had to say. He said, ‘Well, we can work on that together.’”

Ms. Odom got her home off the demolition list by showing she was slowly fixing it up. She credits Mr. Buttigieg with listening to people like her and adjusting the city’s policy from tearing down houses to rehabilitating many of them. The city introduced a series of home repair programs that currently award $1 million to homeowners.

“He’s a person willing to change, willing to listen, willing to work with you and make things better,” Ms. Odom said.

The question of whether the mayor improved the lives of poor minority residents of South Bend is complicated. For his presidential campaign, Mr. Buttigieg’s team released a sweeping program known as the Douglass Plan last summer, aimed at addressing structural racism in America. But it rings hollow to some at home because he did not always live by its promises there.

Federal data shows that poverty for black households citywide dropped by six percentage points from Mr. Buttigieg’s first year in office through 2018, compared to a 2.3 percent drop nationally.

Yet, while the Douglass Plan calls for directing 25 percent of federal contracts to companies with black and women owners, in South Bend, a city-commissioned study found that between 2015 and 2017, no city contracts went to black-owned businesses.

Supporters of the mayor in the black community said African-American poverty has long persisted in South Bend, but Mr. Buttigieg was the first mayor to pay for studies to fully expose it, which led to policies aimed at a solution. The “disparity study” of city contracting noted that 12 percent of contracts went to firms owned by women and minorities other than African-Americans. It prodded the city to pass an ordinance to raise contracts with minority- and women-owned firms to 15 percent.

Sharon McBride, a black council member and Buttigieg supporter, said the former mayor’s plan to revive the downtown ahead of residential neighborhoods was the right call. “In order to live, your heart has to function,” she said. “If you don’t have businesses coming in to sustain revenue, you can’t thrive. And now we are a thriving city.”

For all of Mr. Buttigieg’s focus on the economy and housing, his time as mayor remains defined in the eye of the nation by his management of the police. Perhaps the most searing crisis he handled in office came last summer after the fatal shooting of Eric Logan, a black resident, by a white officer. At a chaotic community meeting, residents called on the mayor to fire the police chief. When a representative of the Rev. Al Sharpton tried to speak, the crowd booed him down, saying this was a South Bend affair.

Mr. Davis, the former council member, said the outbursts reflected years of frustration by some black residents over Mr. Buttigieg’s oversight of the police, including his demotion of a black chief and the failure to increase diversity among officers.

But Mr. Davis also praised the mayor for directly engaging with anguished residents. “In many cities — you’ve seen the Ferguson, Missouris — you didn’t have city leaders there in the heart of it,” he said.

Days after the shooting, community members gathered on the basketball court of the Martin Luther King Jr. Center to share stories about the toll of gun violence in minority neighborhoods, as city officials listened.

“I was watching Pete and he was listening, he was really concerned about people as individuals — in their take, in their experience of what has gone on,” said Tim Scott, president of the city council. “I think he saw it in probably a little more visceral way than he has ever before.”

“Sometimes you’ve got to take a few cuts to understand what’s going on, and he did that,” he said. “I’ve seen Pete grow in the eight years he’s been here: better outreach, better communication within the African-American community.”

Many black leaders in South Bend said their former mayor’s standing among minority residents has been distorted as he stepped onto the national stage, with a handful of dissident voices from the city providing an echo chamber in the news and on social media.

In December, pushing back, a group of black South Bend leaders — council members, pastors and the president of the local N.A.A.C.P. — held a public forum to dispute what they called the false narrative of Mr. Buttigieg’s lack of minority support at home.

“I have no idea where all this I-don’t-like-Pete attitude came from,” said Muhammad Shabazz II, a county employee. Mr. Shabazz used to set up lemonade stands with other community activists at scenes of gun violence, to get residents and victims’ family members to talk to one another. “Every time we did one of these things, Pete would somehow find his way there,” he said.

In a bizarre scene, a protester seized the mic at the black leaders’ forum and demanded, “Who chose these black leaders?” while an older woman raised her cane to shoo him away. The protester, who wore a Black Lives Matter shirt, was a supporter of Senator Bernie Sanders.

Days later, a founder of the Black Lives Matter group in South Bend, Jorden Giger, held a rally for Mr. Sanders at which Mr. Buttigieg was denounced.

Nonetheless, Mr. Giger said in an interview that if Mr. Buttigieg becomes the nominee, he would vote for him.

“He can be pushed,” he said. “It takes him a while to get there, but he can be pushed.”

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More Than 1,700 Chinese Health Workers Infected By Coronavirus, 6 Die

Westlake Legal Group 5e46a3f22200003200d1ce7d More Than 1,700 Chinese Health Workers Infected By Coronavirus, 6 Die

BEIJING (AP) — More than 1,700 Chinese medical workers have been infected by the new virus that has killed nearly 1,400 people and spread to other parts of Asia and as far as the U.S. and Europe, a senior Chinese official announced Friday.

Six of the workers have died, Zeng Yixin, vice director of the National Health Commission, said at a news conference.

The health commission is “highly concerned about this issue” and has issued guidelines for the prevention and control of infection within medical institutions, he said.

Medical workers account for about 3.8% of confirmed cases as of several days ago, Zeng said.

The commission also reported another sizable rise in the number of infections as a result of a new way of counting adopted by Hebei province, the hardest-hit area.

Confirmed cases in mainland China rose to 63,851 by the end of Thursday, up 5,090 from the previous day. The death toll rose 121 to 1,380.

Hubei province is now including cases based on a physician’s diagnosis before they have been confirmed by lab tests. Of the 5,090 new cases, 3,095 fell into that category.

The acceleration in the number of cases does not necessarily represent a sudden surge in new infections of the virus that causes COVID-19 as much as the revised methodology.

The health commission has said that the change was aimed at identifying suspected cases so they can be treated more quickly, though experts also saw it as a reflection of the crush of people seeking treatment and the struggle to keep up with a backlog of untested samples in Hubei and its capital, Wuhan, where the disease first surfaced in December.

In Taiwan, about 100 family members of people stuck in Hubei province protested outside Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council headquarters in the capital, Taipei.

About 1,000 Taiwanese hoping to fly home on charter flights have sparked a dispute between their government and China.

One flight brought 247 people back on Feb. 4. Three were not on a passenger list that Taiwan gave to Chinese authorities and one tested positive for the virus, Taiwan’s Central News Agency has reported.

Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council wants China to step up quarantine work and reach agreements with Taiwan on the names of people on priority lists for flights.

China’s Taiwan Affairs Office accused Taiwan on Wednesday of “using all kinds of excuses to obstruct and delay” flights. China sees self-ruled Taiwan as part of its territory rather than an independent state.

“We don’t want to politicize it, we want charter flights,” said protester Chung Chin-ming, chairman of the Chinese Cross-Strait Marriage Coordination Association in Taipei.

Elsewhere, Japan confirmed seven more cases, a day after it reported its first death from the virus. Japan now has 258 confirmed cases, including 218 from a cruise ship, the Diamond Princess, that has been quarantined in Yokohama.

Health officials allowed 11 elderly passengers to leave the ship on Friday after they tested negative for the virus. They are the first group of dozens of older passengers expected to get off the vessel before their 14-day quarantine period ends on Feb. 19 to reduce risks of their health deteriorating.

Japanese Health Minister Katsunobu Kato on Thursday said passengers age 80 or older with chronic health issues or in cabins without windows that can open will be able to leave the ship if they pass the virus test.

More than 580 cases have been confirmed outside mainland China and three deaths, one each in the Philippines and Hong Kong and now a Japanese woman in her 80s. Health officials are investigating how she got infected.

In an unprecedented attempt to contain the disease, the Chinese government has placed the hardest-hit cities — home to more than 60 million — under lockdown. People are restricted from entering or leaving the cities, and in many places can only leave their homes or residential complexes for shopping and other daily needs.

Associated Press writers Ralph Jennings in Taipei, Taiwan, and Mari Yamaguchi in Tokyo contributed to this report.

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5 of the deadliest US air disasters

A number of passenger planes have crashed throughout world history as a result of mechanical failures and human error.

Ranging from failing engines to planes striking objects, here are five of the deadliest air disasters in the United States, not directly caused by terrorism, suicidal pilots or other nefarious instances:

273 deaths – American Airlines flight crashes in Chicago

Flight 191 crashed near Chicago’s O’Hare Airport on May 25, 1979, after an engine fell off the plane 1 second prior to takeoff and was forced to take off with one engine.

Westlake Legal Group ChicagoDC-10_fig01_photo 5 of the deadliest US air disasters Greg Norman fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/disasters fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-orleans fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/detroit fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/chicago fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/us fnc article 4020bb6a-d790-5b97-a379-9dab96ca345d

American Airlines Flight 191 was spotted flying sideways before crashing in Chicago on May 25, 1979. (FAA.gov)

The crew on board reacted to the engine separation and started following the airline’s protocol for that event, the Federal Aviation Administration says.

But by the time the DC-10 aircraft reached 300 feet, it started to turn and roll left. A chilling photo taken from the ground during those moments shows the plane flying sideways.

It eventually crashed into a mobile home park next to the airport, killing all 271 onboard and two people on the ground.

265 deaths – American Airlines flight crashes shortly after 9/11

Flight 587 plunged into a residential neighborhood near New York City’s JFK International Airport on Nov. 12, 2001, just two months after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

The plane’s co-pilot, in reaction to turbulence caused by another flight that took off just before, initiated a series of “unnecessary and excessive rudder pedal inputs” which ultimately led to the aircraft’s vertical stabilizer snapping off, according to the FAA.

The subsequent loss of control forced the plane to crash, killing all 260 on board and five on the ground.

230 deaths – TWA Flight 800 explodes in the air

In a disaster that led to a media frenzy, TWA Flight 800, which left New York for Paris on July 17, 1996, crashed into the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Long Island.

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A large piece of wing floats in the Atlantic Ocean where TWA Flight 800 exploded in midair and crashed, killing all 230 people aboard. (Getty Images)

The National Transportation Safety Board ruled the plane went down following the explosion of one of its fuel tanks, caused by the ignition of fuel and air vapors inside. But the source of that ignition was never officially determined, the FAA says.

Witnesses on the ground reported seeing the explosion and debris falling out of the sky.

156 deaths – Northwest Airlines Flight 255 strikes light poles, rental car facility

This flight crashed on Aug. 16, 1987, after striking a number of objects shortly after takeoff.

The passenger jet was observed rolling left and right, and then hitting light poles and the roof of a rental car facility beyond the runway of Detroit’s Metropolitan Wayne County Airport, according to the FAA.

It eventually came to a halt on the ground, breaking up as it slid and leaving fire in its wake. Two people on the ground were killed and the only person to survive out of those onboard the plane was a 4-year-old girl.

The NTSB ruled the likely cause of the accident was the flight crew’s failure “to ensure that the flaps and slats were extended for takeoff” and an unexplained loss of power to the plane’s takeoff warning system.

153 deaths – Pan Am Flight 759 goes down in a thunderstorm

A Boeing 757 operated by Pan Am went down in New Orleans on July 9, 1982 during a period of bad weather.

The FAA says it was only around 100 feet off the ground when it started to descend, striking trees and a residential area.

The likely cause of the crash, it added, was the airplane traveling into winds “the effects of which the pilot would have had difficulty recognizing and reacting to in time for the airplane’s descent to be [prevented].”

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Lionel Richie wishes ‘lots of failure’ for daughter Sofia Richie

Westlake Legal Group Lionel-Richie-Sofia-Richie Lionel Richie wishes 'lots of failure' for daughter Sofia Richie Nate Day fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc bd6f0834-8d09-5cbf-818f-c3dd18c6b817 article

Lionel Richie knows how to give his daughter Sofia some tough love.

The 70-year-old singer offered some advice to Sofia, 21, when she expressed interest in an acting career.

“I told her, ‘I wish you lots of failure, young,’” Richie told reporters at an “American Idol” event, according to People. “We’re in a business where it’s how you recover and ‘yes, yes, yes’ does not feel terrible, so you have to get smacked in the face.”

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“I said, ‘You’re going to have a little bit more of a different time because you’re coming from a family where they expect a little bit more.’”

Richie then recalled a memory of Sofia feeling the pressure of her father’s fame.

“When Nicole was about 4 years old, she went on a talent show,” said Richie. “She’s about to go on to do her little act and they said, ‘And now we have Lionel Richie’s daughter’ and she froze. She said, ‘Dad I don’t want to be here.’”

The “All Night Long” singer called that memory a “terrifying moment.”

Richie said that he also offers his children another piece of advice: “Do your best, give them attitude and kill it.”

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“She’s got the attitude,” Richie noted of Sofia. “She sings too. I’m so excited about her.”

Richie is also father to Nicole, 38, an actress and reality star, and Miles, 25, a model. Their famous father noted that all of his kids “have great attitudes” about working in the entertainment industry.

“They’re all taking chances and I want them to do it now,” he added of his children. “Sofia’s doing fabulous right now.”

Richie is happy to provide his kids with career advice, but when it comes to their personal lives, mum’s the word.

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“You can’t step in there,” he said of offering Sofia advice on her personal life. “It just doesn’t work. If you’re a parent, you’ll understand.”

Westlake Legal Group Lionel-Richie-Sofia-Richie Lionel Richie wishes 'lots of failure' for daughter Sofia Richie Nate Day fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc bd6f0834-8d09-5cbf-818f-c3dd18c6b817 article   Westlake Legal Group Lionel-Richie-Sofia-Richie Lionel Richie wishes 'lots of failure' for daughter Sofia Richie Nate Day fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc bd6f0834-8d09-5cbf-818f-c3dd18c6b817 article

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