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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 158)

Bride allegedly asks cancer-stricken bridesmaid to pay extra and wear a wig

There are “bridezillas,” and then there are people who feel inconvenienced by their friend’s cancer.

A post that appeared on Reddit’s “Bridezilla” forum (after it apparently appeared in a Facebook wedding group) tells the alleged story of a bride-to-be who expected one of her bridesmaids — who is stricken with cancer — to pay extra for make-up and buy a wig for the wedding.

Westlake Legal Group bride-screaming Bride allegedly asks cancer-stricken bridesmaid to pay extra and wear a wig Michael Hollan fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle/bridezillas fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 25e96000-d6f7-593f-9bdb-3b242131273b

The bride-to-be wants her cancer-stricken friend to pay extra for her bridesmaid make-up. (iStock)

BRIDE-TO-BE ATTACKS WEDDING PLANNER OVER FAILED TRIP TO DENNY’S

“My best friend is getting married in two weeks,” the post reads. “She asked me to be a bridesmaid last October, way before my cancer diagnosis. Since being diagnosed, I have lost my hair, including eyebrows and eyelashes.”

And this is where the story takes a weird turn.

“(The bride) keeps making comments about (me) getting a wig for her wedding,” the post continues. “On a daily basis I just rock my bald head and it is not financially feasible or practical for me to purchase a ‘good’ wig just for her wedding. I don’t know how to bring this up to her. I understand she doesn’t want me bald, but it’s who I am right now.”

If that wasn’t upsetting enough, the bridesmaid also added, “(The bride) also dropped the bomb that the girl she hired for makeup is going to cost me extra because ‘she will have to put in extra work on you.’ Am I wrong in feeling that this is completely unfair?”

Westlake Legal Group bald-woman Bride allegedly asks cancer-stricken bridesmaid to pay extra and wear a wig Michael Hollan fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle/bridezillas fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 25e96000-d6f7-593f-9bdb-3b242131273b

“On a daily basis I just rock my bald head and it is not financially feasible or practical for me to purchase a ‘good’ wig just for her wedding,” the bridesmaid-to-be wrote. (iStock)

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The comment section was full of responses supporting the original author. Many showed no sympathy towards the bride-to-be, with one post saying, “Just tell her that you’re terribly sorry your life-threatening condition is inconveniencing her.”

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Others came up with creative solutions to the problem. As one commenter suggested, “I’d buy a clown wig if I was in this situation. Tell the ‘friend’ that she never specified that she didn’t want a clown wig worn to her wedding.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Another commenter summed up most of the reactions, writing, “I hope (the author) bows out. ‘Forcing your bridesmaid to pay extra because cancer made her un-pretty’ is one of the most selfish things I’ve heard.”

Westlake Legal Group bald-woman Bride allegedly asks cancer-stricken bridesmaid to pay extra and wear a wig Michael Hollan fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle/bridezillas fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 25e96000-d6f7-593f-9bdb-3b242131273b   Westlake Legal Group bald-woman Bride allegedly asks cancer-stricken bridesmaid to pay extra and wear a wig Michael Hollan fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle/bridezillas fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 25e96000-d6f7-593f-9bdb-3b242131273b

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Trump Calls for Fed’s ‘Boneheads’ to Slash Interest Rates Below Zero

Westlake Legal Group 11DC-TRUMPFED-facebookJumbo Trump Calls for Fed’s ‘Boneheads’ to Slash Interest Rates Below Zero United States Politics and Government United States Economy Trump, Donald J Powell, Jerome H Interest Rates Federal Reserve System European Central Bank Europe Banking and Financial Institutions

WASHINGTON — President Trump urged the Federal Reserve to cut interest rates below zero, suggesting a last-ditch monetary policy tactic tested abroad but never in America.

His comments came just one day before European policymakers are widely expected to cut a key rate further into negative territory.

In a series of tweets, Mr. Trump said that “The Federal Reserve should get our interest rates down to ZERO, or less, and we should then start to refinance our debt,” adding that “the USA should always be paying the the lowest rate.”

Mr. Trump continued to criticize his handpicked Fed chair, Jerome H. Powell, saying “it is only the naïveté of Jay Powell and the Federal Reserve that doesn’t allow us to do what other countries are already doing.”

He concluded by calling Mr. Powell, whom he nominated to head the central bank in 2017, and his colleagues “Boneheads.”

Mr. Trump’s request is extraordinary for several reasons. The United States economy is still growing solidly and consumers are spending strongly, making this an unusual time to push for monetary accommodation, particularly negative rates, a policy that the Fed debated but passed up even in the depths of the Great Recession. It is also typical for countries with comparatively strong economies to pay higher interest rates, not the “lowest” ones.

Negative rates, which have been used in economies including Japan, Switzerland and the Eurozone, mean that savers are penalized and borrowers rewarded: Their goal is to reduce borrowing costs for households and companies to encourage spending. But they come at a cost, curbing bank profitability.

While it’s unclear how effective they have been as a policy tool — some research suggests negative rates could curtail lending — they are increasingly a reality in much of the world as central banks rush to support economic growth and investors look for safe assets.

The timing of Mr. Trump’s tweet is also significant. The European Central Bank is expected to cut a key interest rate to a record-low negative 0.5 percent and roll out additional stimulus measures at its meeting on Thursday, in a bid to shore up very-low inflation and waning growth in important economies like Germany. Central banks around the world have been lowering their policy rates, partly because Mr. Trump’s trade war is combining with Brexit jitters and a global manufacturing slowdown to threaten growth in many nations.

The American president has commented on foreign central bank rate moves before, tweeting in June that “they have been getting away with this for years,” when Mario Draghi, who heads the European Central Bank, indicated that officials might provide additional stimulus to shore up the eurozone economy.

The Fed itself has already cut rates for the first time in more than a decade in July and is poised to lower borrowing costs further as risks to economic growth loom. Mr. Powell and his colleagues lowered interest rates to a range of 2 percent to 2.25 percent at their July meeting, and they are widely expected to cut by another quarter of a percentage point at their meeting next Tuesday and Wednesday in Washington.

“The Fed has, through the course of the year, seen fit to lower the expected path of interest rates,” Mr. Powell said in a speech last week, adding “that’s one of the reasons why the outlook is still a favorable one, despite these crosswinds we’ve been facing.”

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Scottish Court Says Johnson’s Suspension Of U.K. Parliament Is Illegal

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1164613876_wide-347e87e1e558a6721c29863d19391f5dcea3489b-s1100-c15 Scottish Court Says Johnson's Suspension Of U.K. Parliament Is Illegal

Member of Parliament Joanna Cherry and dozens of allies won a decision from Scotland’s Court of Session, which ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s suspension of Parliament is illegal. Cherry is seen here outside the court last month. Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Scottish Court Says Johnson's Suspension Of U.K. Parliament Is Illegal

Member of Parliament Joanna Cherry and dozens of allies won a decision from Scotland’s Court of Session, which ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s suspension of Parliament is illegal. Cherry is seen here outside the court last month.

Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images

Scotland’s highest appeals court has ruled that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s suspension of Parliament is illegal, saying the prorogation “was unlawful because it had the purpose of stymying Parliament” ahead of the Oct. 31 Brexit deadline.

The decision by a three-judge panel on the Court of Session will not immediately force the government to allow lawmakers to reconvene — their suspension officially began on Tuesday, and they’re not slated to meet again until Oct. 14.

But the court’s ruling is a victory for Member of Parliament Joanna Cherry of Edinburgh South West, who led the case, and nearly 80 lawmakers who joined her. And it’s a turnabout from last week, when a single judge — a lord ordinary, in the Scottish system — dismissed Cherry’s original petition.

After the decision was announced, Cherry called for Parliament to be recalled, saying, “now, for every moment Parliament remains prorogued, the British government are breaking the law.”

Noting that the decision was unanimous, Cherry said that in last week’s hearings, she detected “a whiff of bad faith on behalf of Boris Johnson and the British government.”

A central question in the case was whether courts have the ability to review advice that the prime minister gives to the queen — as Johnson did, in asking Queen Elizabeth II to prorogue Parliament. While they seemed to stop short of claiming that power, the Court of Session judges said they can still rule on the advice’s effect.

“The Lord President, Lord Carloway, decided that although advice to HM the Queen on the exercise of the royal prerogative of prorogating Parliament was not reviewable on the normal grounds of judicial review, it would nevertheless be unlawful if its purpose was to stymie parliamentary scrutiny of the executive,” the Judiciary of Scotland said in its summary of the opinion.

In response to the ruling, Scottish First Minister Nicole Sturgeon said, “Today’s Court of Session judgment is of huge constitutional significance — but the immediate political implications are clear. Court says prorogation was unlawful and null and void – so Parliament must be recalled immediately to allow the essential work of scrutiny to continue.”

The judges ruled that from the evidence presented, the long duration of the suspension could only be explained by Johnson’s desire to avoid legislative scrutiny. That contradicts the prime minister’s stated motive for the move — saying that his new government needs the time to lay out its agenda in a speech in the middle of next month.

“Although Johnson claimed he was shutting down Parliament for five weeks to work on his legislative agenda,” NPR’s Frank Langfitt reports from London, “most political observers think he was trying to sideline legislators so they couldn’t block his plan to crash the U.K. out of the European Union without a withdrawal agreement.”

Langfitt adds, “The ruling is yet another blow to Johnson, who has lost every vote he’s called in Parliament.”

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The holy ground of Flight 93, one of 9/11’s enduring mysteries

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close The holy ground of Flight 93, one of 9/11’s enduring mysteries

We will never forget the lives lost on September 11th at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and on United Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. USA TODAY

Though we do not know their full story, we know their sacrifice.

SHANKSVILLE, Pa. — As horrific as the 9/11 attacks were, they would have been even worse if not for a heroic group of everyday airline passengers whose remains rest here amid a common field of wildflowers and hemlock groves.

Eighteen years ago on Wednesday, radical Islamic terrorists, trained in Afghanistan as part of Osama bin Laden’s al-Qaida network, hijacked four commercial jetliners and aimed them at the emblems of America’s financial and military might.

Two destroyed the twin towers of Manhattan’s World Trade Center. The third smashed into the Pentagon. And the fourth — United Airlines Flight 93 — crashed, upside down, at 563 miles per hour outside this small town, just 20 minutes flying time from the nation’s capital.

Lingering questions

What was the ultimate target of Flight 93? That remains one of the enduring mysteries of 9/11.

The authoritative 9/11 Commission report notes that the hijackers had turned the navigation to guide the Boeing 757 toward Washington. But the report is inconclusive about the final destination: The objective of Ziad Jarrah, the pilot among the hijackers, “was to crash his airliner into symbols of the American Republic, the Capitol or the White House.” 

On the week of 9/11:The Taliban hardly deserve Camp David talks with a president. What was Trump thinking?

Have we learned more since the report was issued?

“There is no new evidence so far as I am aware,” Chris Kojm, who served as the commission’s deputy director, tells me in an email. “Bin Laden wanted the hijackers to hit the White House. (Ringleader) Mohamed Atta was focused on the Capitol because it is an easy target to find. We really don’t know what Ziad Jarrah and Flight 93 planned to hit.”

In either case, the decision of the unarmed Flight 93 passengers to fight back against their hijackers spared many lives and prevented the even greater blow to America’s psyche that smashing a center of U.S. government would have brought.

To anyone who lived through 9/11, the story of Flight 93 is familiar. But a whole new generation has been born since 2001. The Flight 93 National Memorial serves as both a moving history lesson and a reminder of a time when America was more unified.

The memorial that enshrines the sacrifice of 40 people

The first thing you notice about the 2,200-acre site is how quiet it is. Four days before the 18th anniversary, gentle breezes turn the wind turbines in the distance. The mostly clear sky is reminiscent of the deep blue one on 9/11.

“You’re on holy ground. It’s goose bumps every time,” says Maryann Brett of nearby Johnstown, Pennsylvania, as she stands on the observation platform, looking out at the crash site and memorial plaza. “This is peaceful. … You can’t be divided when you are here.”

An exhibit inside the visitors’ center relates the story of Flight 93. It tells how the flight took off 25 minutes late because of air traffic delays in Newark, New Jersey. How the four hijackers, seated in first class, took control at 9:28 a.m. over eastern Ohio. How passengers used Airfones to contact loved ones and learned of the other attacks. How, in one heartbreaking recording, a passenger left the code to her safe on an answering machine. How an Airfone operator heard passenger Todd Beamer, who worked for Oracle, tell his fellow flyers, “Are you ready? OK. Let’s roll.”

And how, after a desperate struggle, at 10:03 a.m. Flight 93 came down, killing all 33 passengers and seven crew members.

Learning from 9/11: 18 years later — Terrorism needs to be prevented at the source

“They made the ultimate sacrifice to help us,” says Craig Sutherly, a first-time visitor from Ada, Ohio, as he stands in front on the Wall of Names. Nearby, a 17-ton sandstone boulder marks the site of impact.

Here in the Laurel Highlands, politics and partisan bickering seem far away. You can’t help but wonder what might have been if not for the courageous actions of the Americans aboard Flight 93. You can’t help but yearn for the sense of unity that fleetingly brought the nation together after the 9/11 attacks.

And you can’t help but regret that it takes a devastating tragedy to overcome what separates us.

Bill Sternberg is the editor of the editorial page. Follow him on Twitter: @bsternbe

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2019/09/11/flight-93-911-anniversary-enduring-mysteries-column/2269018001/

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Scottish Court Says Johnson’s Suspension Of U.K. Parliament Is Illegal

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1164613876_wide-347e87e1e558a6721c29863d19391f5dcea3489b-s1100-c15 Scottish Court Says Johnson's Suspension Of U.K. Parliament Is Illegal

Member of Parliament Joanna Cherry and dozens of allies won a decision from Scotland’s Court of Session, which ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s suspension of Parliament is illegal. Cherry is seen here outside the court last month. Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Scottish Court Says Johnson's Suspension Of U.K. Parliament Is Illegal

Member of Parliament Joanna Cherry and dozens of allies won a decision from Scotland’s Court of Session, which ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s suspension of Parliament is illegal. Cherry is seen here outside the court last month.

Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images

Scotland’s highest appeals court has ruled that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s suspension of Parliament is illegal, saying the prorogation “was unlawful because it had the purpose of stymying Parliament” ahead of the Oct. 31 Brexit deadline.

The decision by a three-judge panel on the Court of Session will not immediately force the government to allow lawmakers to reconvene — their suspension officially began on Tuesday, and they’re not slated to meet again until Oct. 14.

But the court’s ruling is a victory for Member of Parliament Joanna Cherry of Edinburgh South West, who led the case, and nearly 80 lawmakers who joined her. And it’s a turnabout from last week, when a single judge — a lord ordinary, in the Scottish system — dismissed Cherry’s original petition.

After the decision was announced, Cherry called for Parliament to be recalled, saying, “now, for every moment Parliament remains prorogued, the British government are breaking the law.”

Noting that the decision was unanimous, Cherry said that in last week’s hearings, she detected “a whiff of bad faith on behalf of Boris Johnson and the British government.”

A central question in the case was whether courts have the ability to review advice that the prime minister gives to the queen — as Johnson did, in asking Queen Elizabeth II to prorogue Parliament. While they seemed to stop short of claiming that power, the Court of Session judges said they can still rule on the advice’s effect.

“The Lord President, Lord Carloway, decided that although advice to HM the Queen on the exercise of the royal prerogative of prorogating Parliament was not reviewable on the normal grounds of judicial review, it would nevertheless be unlawful if its purpose was to stymie parliamentary scrutiny of the executive,” the Judiciary of Scotland said in its summary of the opinion.

In response to the ruling, Scottish First Minister Nicole Sturgeon said, “Today’s Court of Session judgment is of huge constitutional significance — but the immediate political implications are clear. Court says prorogation was unlawful and null and void – so Parliament must be recalled immediately to allow the essential work of scrutiny to continue.”

The judges ruled that from the evidence presented, the long duration of the suspension could only be explained by Johnson’s desire to avoid legislative scrutiny. That contradicts the prime minister’s stated motive for the move — saying that his new government needs the time to lay out its agenda in a speech in the middle of next month.

“Although Johnson claimed he was shutting down Parliament for five weeks to work on his legislative agenda,” NPR’s Frank Langfitt reports from London, “most political observers think he was trying to sideline legislators so they couldn’t block his plan to crash the U.K. out of the European Union without a withdrawal agreement.”

Langfitt adds, “The ruling is yet another blow to Johnson, who has lost every vote he’s called in Parliament.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Biden tried to buy Putin’s support for Iraq war with promise of oil money

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085134544001_6085133532001-vs Biden tried to buy Putin’s support for Iraq war with promise of oil money Washington Free Beacon fnc/politics fnc Brent Scher b6031c2d-26c1-5f97-8b55-ded25c27cb6e article

Joe Biden sought out Russian president Vladimir Putin before the 2003 invasion of Iraq to propose a deal in which Russia would be given the oil profits from the war if they entered alongside the United States.

Biden told of his attempt at “creative diplomacy” during a July 2004 event at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library. Biden, then the ranking member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, was joined on stage by former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright for a discussion on foreign policy in the upcoming presidential election.

One of Biden’s main criticisms of former President George W. Bush during the event was his failure to unite “nations of the world in a common cause” after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Among the nations Biden had an engagement plan for was Putin’s Russia.

Biden said during the event that he, along with a Republican senator he chose not to name, asked for a meeting with Putin and proposed a deal where all proceeds from seized Iraqi oil would initially go to cash-strapped Russia. Biden viewed it as an offer Putin wouldn’t be able to refuse and was disappointed the Bush administration didn’t consider it.

Click here for more from The Washington Free Beacon. 

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085134544001_6085133532001-vs Biden tried to buy Putin’s support for Iraq war with promise of oil money Washington Free Beacon fnc/politics fnc Brent Scher b6031c2d-26c1-5f97-8b55-ded25c27cb6e article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085134544001_6085133532001-vs Biden tried to buy Putin’s support for Iraq war with promise of oil money Washington Free Beacon fnc/politics fnc Brent Scher b6031c2d-26c1-5f97-8b55-ded25c27cb6e article

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‘My bad bro:’ Hit and run driver leaves note on NHL star Tyler Seguin’s Ferrari

Well, it is the thought that counts.

Westlake Legal Group tyler 'My bad bro:' Hit and run driver leaves note on NHL star Tyler Seguin's Ferrari Gary Gastelu fox-news/sports/nhl fox-news/auto/make/ferrari fox-news/auto/attributes/maintenance fox news fnc/auto fnc b50bad50-ed54-5c74-b8cc-11f933eb46a2 article

(Glenn James/NHLI via Getty Images)

Dallas Stars player Tyler Seguin had one of those Mondays this week when he found a note on his Ferrari from someone who’d just crashed into it.

CLASSIC FERRARI WORTH MILLIONS STOLEN ON TEST DRIVE

Seguin posted a photo of the handwritten message on Instagram, which said, “Sorry I just hitted your car My bad bro. I don’t have money to pay”

Seguin didn’t add any comment beyond the word “Monday” and a face palm emoji, so it’s not known how bad the damage was or where the incident occurred.

KTSA reported that the car was a Ferrari 458 Spider, which went out of production in 2015. The car cost around $240,000 when it was new and could be worth around $210,000 today, according to NADA Guides.

Well, maybe not today.

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Nevertheless, the five-time All-Star signed an eight-year contract extension with the Stars last year for $78.8 million so the extra depreciation probably won’t sting too much.

Westlake Legal Group tyler 'My bad bro:' Hit and run driver leaves note on NHL star Tyler Seguin's Ferrari Gary Gastelu fox-news/sports/nhl fox-news/auto/make/ferrari fox-news/auto/attributes/maintenance fox news fnc/auto fnc b50bad50-ed54-5c74-b8cc-11f933eb46a2 article   Westlake Legal Group tyler 'My bad bro:' Hit and run driver leaves note on NHL star Tyler Seguin's Ferrari Gary Gastelu fox-news/sports/nhl fox-news/auto/make/ferrari fox-news/auto/attributes/maintenance fox news fnc/auto fnc b50bad50-ed54-5c74-b8cc-11f933eb46a2 article

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Jerry Springer says Trump ‘took my show and brought it to the White House’

Westlake Legal Group QgM7JNRjA9_iyUsFpDZDz2Hs4_zj_SxBnVKGuCcjrgc Jerry Springer says Trump 'took my show and brought it to the White House' r/politics

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9/11 documentary ‘What Happened on September 11’ made to help kids understand terror attack

For students from elementary to high school, the Sept. 11 terrorist attack isn’t a memory. It’s history. A new HBO documentary that debuts on the event’s 18th anniversary treats it that way.

The necessity of her project, “What Happened on September 11,” struck filmmaker Amy Schatz when a third grade girl told her about a playdate where she and a friend Googled “Sept. 11 attacks.”

“When a child does that, what he or she finds are some pretty horrific images that are not necessarily appropriate for kids,” Schatz said on Tuesday. “So I felt a responsibility to try to fill that void and try to give kids something that isn’t horrifying and kind of fills in the gap.”

HARROWING NEW ACCOUNT RECALLS FINAL MOMENTS OF 9/11 FLIGHT 93

Westlake Legal Group Sept11091119 9/11 documentary 'What Happened on September 11' made to help kids understand terror attack fox-news/us/terror/september-11 fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/political fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc f39b0a61-d025-55f6-a9db-28b003386f2f Associated Press article

FILE – In this Sept. 11, 2001, file photo, smoke rises from the burning twin towers of the World Trade Center after hijacked planes crashed into the towers in New York City. Sept. 11 victims’ relatives are greeting the news of President Donald Trump’s now-canceled plan for secret talks with Afghanistan’s Taliban insurgents with mixed feelings. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File) (AP)

MAN WHO LOST WIFE IN 9/11 RECALLS FIGHT TO SUPPORT VICTIMS, SURVIVORS

The half-hour film debuts Wednesday at 6 p.m. A companion piece, focusing on the memories of former students at a high school near Ground Zero, premieres three hours later.

Schatz has made a specialty of creating films that seek to explain the inexplicable, with “The Number on Great-Grandpa’s Arm” tackling the Holocaust and another on the Parkland shooting. “I’m really desperate for some more lightness very soon,” she said.

WHERE WERE YOU ON SEPT. 11, 2001, WHEN THE WORLD CHANGED FOREVER?

In this case, she worked with the Sept. 11 remembrance museum on the story, filming two men who work there giving presentations to third graders. Stephen Kern, who worked on the 62nd floor of the World Trade Center’s North Tower, talks about being evacuated. Matthew Crawford, whose father was a firefighter who died that day, discusses his experience. She also found a middle school in Secaucus, New Jersey, that teaches history through art and poetry, helping students process the emotions of what they learned.

9/11: IMAGES OF THE ATTACK THAT CHANGED THE WORLD

9/11 ANNIVERSARY: REMEMBERING THE BEST OF HUMANITY ON AMERICA’S DARKEST DAY

Short history lessons are sprinkled throughout the film, about New York and the World Trade Center, the one-time tallest towers in the world. Construction began in 1968.

“One of the biggest questions the kids have is ’why? ‘Why would somebody do that? Why would there be such cruelty?’” she said. “That’s a very difficult thing to grapple with and answer so that was the trickiest part of the project.”

A STORY OF A  FAITH TRANSFORMED IN THE 9/11 TERROR ATTACKS

The film tells of Usama bin Laden and his activism that started with the Soviet Union’s invasion of Afghanistan. But it never truly answers the whys. Maybe no one can.

Schatz doesn’t avoid some of the terrible images of the day: the second plane striking the World Trade Center and resultant fireball, the collapse of each tower and the giant clouds of debris that billowed through the canyons of city streets. Schatz didn’t want to avoid those clips, since kids know that planes crashed into the buildings, but she opted not to spend much time on them “so that we didn’t create too many lingering after-images in people’s minds.”

TATTOO HELPS 9/11 SURVIVOR’S EMOTIONAL WOUNDS HEAL

Westlake Legal Group 911-documentary-kids-hbo-ap 9/11 documentary 'What Happened on September 11' made to help kids understand terror attack fox-news/us/terror/september-11 fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/political fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc f39b0a61-d025-55f6-a9db-28b003386f2f Associated Press article

This image released by HBO shows a New York City Fireman speaking to children in a scene from the documentary “What Happened on September 11,” a short film aimed at young people to explain to them what happened on Sept. 11, 2001. The program debuts on Wednesday. (AP)

NEW YORK GOV. ANDREW CUOMO SIGNS BILL REQUIRING MOMENT OF SILENCE IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS ON 9/11

As part of her research, Schatz interviewed alumni of Stuyvesant High School near the World Trade Center site. But the memories of what they saw, heard and smelled that day — and the uncertainty of how they would get home from school — proved too raw. That’s why “In the Shadow of the Towers: Stuyvesant High on 9/11” is a separate film that premieres on HBO three hours after the first one.

WOUNDED WARRIOR JOHN ‘JOEY’ JONES SAYS 9/11 UNITED AMERICA

Schatz said a school curriculum is being developed for teaching children about the tragedy, and “What Happened on September 11” will be made available to schools for free. The film is aimed generally at children ages 7 to 12.

Throughout her work, Schatz kept returning to the memory of the youngster searching for details about Sept. 11 on the internet.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“You can’t protect kids from what they’re going to come across,” she said. “It seemed to me there was an opportunity to put something out there that is age-appropriate and not too scary and give them the tools they need to understand the world around them.”

Westlake Legal Group 911-documentary-kids-hbo-ap 9/11 documentary 'What Happened on September 11' made to help kids understand terror attack fox-news/us/terror/september-11 fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/political fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc f39b0a61-d025-55f6-a9db-28b003386f2f Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group 911-documentary-kids-hbo-ap 9/11 documentary 'What Happened on September 11' made to help kids understand terror attack fox-news/us/terror/september-11 fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/political fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc f39b0a61-d025-55f6-a9db-28b003386f2f Associated Press article

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Iran To U.S. After John Bolton Exit: ‘Put Warmongers Aside’

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran’s president urged the U.S. on Wednesday to “put warmongers aside” as tensions roil the Persian Gulf amid an escalating crisis between Washington and Tehran in the wake of the collapsing nuclear deal with world powers.

Hassan Rouhani’s remarks signaled approval of President Donald Trump’s abrupt dismissal of John Bolton as national security adviser, a man routinely pilloried by Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif as part of a “B Team” that targeted Iran.

Bolton had for years been critical of Tehran and once promised before an Iranian exile group that they’d be celebrating the overthrow of Iran’s government this year.

Bolton’s departure also comes amid speculation about Trump potentially meeting Rouhani during the upcoming U.N. General Assembly this month in New York. Whether such a meeting materializes, however, remains in question, though Iranian comments Wednesday seemed to suggest Tehran would be willing to pin hostilities on the departing Bolton rather than Trump himself.

Rouhani spoke after a Cabinet meeting Wednesday, a day that saw all major newspapers in Iran cover Bolton’s departure. The pro-reform Shargh daily newspaper had one large headline that read: “Bolton: A scapegoat for Iran?”

“Americans have to realize that warmongering and warmongers are not to their benefit,” the Iranian president said in televised remarks. “They should not only abandon warmongering but also abandon their maximum pressure policy.”

Westlake Legal Group 5d78e068240000d32677cc10 Iran To U.S. After John Bolton Exit: ‘Put Warmongers Aside’

ASSOCIATED PRESS John Bolton listens as President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Romanian President Klaus Iohannis in the Oval Office of the White House, Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Ali Rabiei, a government spokesman, said after the meeting that Bolton’s dismissal may help the U.S. have a “less biased” attitude toward Iran.

Though he stressed the dismissal was an internal U.S. issue, Rabiei called Bolton “the symbol of America’s hawkish policies and its animosity toward Iran.”

For his part, Zarif again used Twitter to write about what he calls the #B_Team, which included Bolton, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, all hawks on Iran.

Zarif said “the world — minus 3 or 2 panicked cohorts — was breathing a sigh of relief” after Bolton’s ouster. “Thirst for war — maximum pressure — should go with the warmonger-in-chief,” Zarif wrote.

Hard-liners, however, urged caution.

Gen. Mohsen Rezaee, a commander in the powerful Revolutionary Guard and its former chief, said in a tweet: “We will not be deceived by the sacrificing of Bolton.”

Bolton was critical of any potential talks between Trump and leaders of Iran and had persuaded Trump to keep U.S. forces in Syria to counter the Iranian influence in the region.

Last year, Trump pulled the U.S. out of the landmark 2015 nuclear deal that lifted sanction on Iran in exchange for caps on Iran’s nuclear program. The U.S. administration later also intensified sanctions on Iran, slashing its sales of crude oil abroad and sending the country’s economy into freefall.

In response, Iran has in recent months crept past the limits the nuclear deal imposed on uranium enrichment and its uranium stockpile. And over the weekend, Tehran announced it would use advanced centrifuges prohibited under the deal.

Meanwhile, mysterious attacks on oil tankers near the Strait of Hormuz, the downing of a U.S. military surveillance drone by Iran and other incidents across the wider Middle East have exacerbated the crisis in the region as Tehran tries to pressure Europe to find a way to sell crude oil abroad despite U.S. sanctions.

Rouhani has called the use of faster centrifuges Iran’s “third step” away from the nuclear deal. On Wednesday, he said that “if necessary, we will take other steps in future.”

For his part, Bolton was a longtime hard-liner on Iran who favored regime change and took money for speaking engagements from an Iranian exile group reviled by Tehran called the Mujahedeen-e-Khalq, or MEK. Bolton famously wrote in 2015, before Iran’s nuclear deal was struck, an op-ed in The New York Times headlined: “To Stop Iran’s Bomb, Bomb Iran.”

“The declared policy of the United States of America should be the overthrow of the mullahs’ regime in Tehran,” Bolton told a cheering crowd of MEK supporters in March 2018. “The behaviors and the objectives of the regime are not going to change, and therefore, the only solution is to change the regime itself. And that’s why, before 2019, we here will celebrate in Tehran!”

Bolton would become Trump’s third national security adviser a month later.

“I don’t back away from any of it. Those are positions I took as a private citizen,” Bolton said when journalists asked him during a visit to Abu Dhabi in May about his prior remarks to the MEK. “Right now I’m a government official. I advise the president. I’m the national security adviser, not the national security decision-maker. It’s up to him (Trump) to make those decisions.”

Trump’s decision Tuesday was to fire Bolton. What happens next remains unclear.

Associated Press writer Jon Gambrell in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, contributed to this report.

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