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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 171)

Facebook Calls Truce With Publishers as It Unveils Facebook News

Westlake Legal Group 25facebook1-facebookJumbo Facebook Calls Truce With Publishers as It Unveils Facebook News Zuckerberg, Mark E Social Media Online Advertising Newspapers News Corporation News and News Media Mobile Applications Facebook Inc Computers and the Internet Advertising and Marketing

SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook and the publishing industry have long been frenemies: Occasionally they teamed up, but mostly they competed.

Now the two sides have formed an uneasy truce.

Facebook on Friday unveiled Facebook News, its latest foray into digital publishing. The product is a new section of the social network’s mobile app that is dedicated entirely to news content, which the company is betting will bring users back to the site regularly to consume news on sports, entertainment, politics and tech.

Facebook News will offer stories from a mix of publications, including The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post, as well as digital-only outlets like BuzzFeed and Business Insider. Some stories will be chosen by a team of professional journalists, while others will be tailored to readers’ interests over time using Facebook’s machine-learning technology. The New York Times will also work with Facebook to offer its articles in Facebook News.

“We feel acute responsibility because there’s obviously an awareness that the internet has disrupted the news industry business model,” Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, said in an interview. “We’ve figured out a different way to do this that we think is going to be better and more sustainable.”

Facebook will pay for a range of content from dozens of publishers — including striking some deals well into the millions of dollars — and get local news from smaller publishers in metropolitan markets like Dallas-Fort Worth, Miami and Atlanta.

“Mark Zuckerberg seems personally and professionally committed to ensuring that high-quality journalism has a viable, valued future,” Robert Thomson, chief executive of News Corporation, said in a statement. “It is absolutely appropriate that premium journalism is recognized and rewarded.“

The relationship between Facebook and publishers has been strained. Because Facebook and Google dominate the online advertising market, taking in together as much as 80 percent of the revenue, publishers have viewed the tech giants as stymieing their digital expansions.

Facebook has over the years courted publishers for different journalism initiatives, like Instant Articles — a product in which publishers provided articles that appeared entirely within Facebook — and Facebook Live, which paid newsrooms to hire teams of journalists to use and promote Facebook’s live video products.

But those relationships soured as Facebook often shifted its strategy, leaving publishers feeling abused when the social network abandoned its original plans. After heavily promoting partnerships for video projects, for instance, Facebook decided not to renew some video deals with publishers — with catastrophic effects. Mic, a digital publisher aimed at targeting news-hungry millennials, was forced to sell itself at a deeply discounted valuation after its video content deals were not renewed by Facebook.

Mr. Zuckerberg acknowledged the tension between Facebook and publishers, and he said past experiences informed his current approach.

“It’s not a one-time thing,” he said of the new partnerships with publishers. “That’s why the deals we are structuring are long-term commitments, not two months, not one year, but multiple years.”

He added, “We think we’ve worked out the formula through all these conversations where we now can sustainably pay for content.”

The new Facebook News effort is being led by Campbell Brown, a veteran television journalist who covered politics for NBC and CNN before joining Facebook as head of news partnerships.

Most of the publishing industry’s recent financial struggles can be traced to a shift toward digital ad revenue, which has not compensated for the loss of print ad revenue. Though the tech giants are not the only reason that publishers’ revenues have eroded, even small tweaks in Facebook’s algorithms have an outsize effect on publishers’ web traffic. So when publishers designed their corporate strategies around the whims of the Facebook News Feed, their traffic sometimes plummeted when Facebook changed tack.

Facebook is not alone in now choosing to elevate original reporting. Last month, Google announced that it would give priority to articles that broke news or that had invested considerable resources into reporting over imitative aggregation. Google made clear that the decision was not purely altruistic. Highlighting original reporting, an executive suggested, would make users more likely to trust Google and keep going back to the search goliath.

In March, Apple also introduced a paid news subscription product, Apple News Plus, which provides articles from an array of publishers and costs $10 a month. But many publishers balked at Apple’s terms when it asked for a 50 percent cut of all subscription revenue earned. Though News Corporation joined Apple’s product, other companies — including The Times and The Washington Post — did not.

With Facebook News, the social network said it wanted to avoid some missteps of past news products, which relied heavily on algorithmically generated suggestions without any selection from professional journalists.

“People want and benefit from personalized experiences on Facebook, but we know there is reporting that transcends individual experience,” Ms. Brown said in a blog post. “We want to support both.”

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Kellyanne Conway’s Threatening Phone Call With Reporter Sets Twitter Ablaze

Westlake Legal Group 5db2bb96210000842a34b05b Kellyanne Conway’s Threatening Phone Call With Reporter Sets Twitter Ablaze

Twitter users poured scorn on White House counselor Kellyanne Conway after she threatened a reporter for the conservative Washington Examiner newspaper in a telephone call.

Conway warned Yilek that “if you’re going to cover my personal life, then we’re welcome to do the same around here.” She also claimed her attorney husband “gets his power through me, if you haven’t noticed. Not the other way around.”

“Kellyanne really covering herself in glory here,” one Twitter user responded to the exchange. Others described it as “very disturbing” and “mostly embarrassing and sad.”

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Marc Thiessen: Democrats not serious about Trump impeachment – Inquiry is all about politics

Westlake Legal Group Pelosi-Trump-Schiff_AP Marc Thiessen: Democrats not serious about Trump impeachment – Inquiry is all about politics the washington post Marc Thiessen fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article aa4a5a34-c1c3-52c9-85f6-2971c7bf3c78

After dozens of House Republicans demanded access to a secure facility in the Capitol on Wednesday where House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., was preparing to depose a Pentagon official, Democrats expressed outrage at the breach of protocol.

“They’re doing this because this is what the guilty do,” said Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif. “Innocent people cooperate with investigations. Innocent people follow the rules of the House.”

Well, people engaged in impartial investigations aimed at finding the truth don’t violate every precedent and standard of due process set during previous presidential impeachments.

Contrast today’s partisan inquiry with the Nixon impeachment. As American Enterprise Institute President Robert Doar has pointed out, the inquiry into President Richard Nixon was a model of bipartisan cooperation.

DAVID BOSSIE: IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY? NO, AMERICANS ARE WITNESSING AN IMPEACHMENT CONCLUSION

The Democratic chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, Rep. Peter Rodino of New Jersey,  assembled a unified staff (including Doar’s father, John, a Republican whom Rodino appointed as special counsel).

The full House voted on authorizing the Nixon impeachment inquiry. The minority was given joint subpoena power. The president’s counsel was allowed to be present during depositions, given access to all of the documents and materials presented to the committee, allowed to cross-examine witnesses, and even permitted to call witnesses of his own.

Most importantly, the committee did not leak or release selective documents cherry-picked to make the president look bad.

The same was true during the impeachment inquiry dealing with President Bill Clinton. As former House Speaker Newt Gingrich explained in a recent interview, Republicans “adopted every single rule that Rodino had used in 1973.” Yet today, Rodino’s party is systematically undermining every principle of fairness and due process he put in place in 1973.

The partisan nature of the Democrats’ inquiry will backfire in a number of ways.

Take this week’s testimony by acting ambassador William Taylor, who alleged that President Trump made U.S. aid contingent on “investigations.” He was deposed inside a Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility (SCIF) in the Capitol, a room that is designed to protect the government’s most highly classified information.

Cellphones are not permitted inside a SCIF. Yet somehow what appear to be cellphone photos of his prepared statement were leaked to the news media.

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But the full transcript of Taylor’s – including his answers to questions from Republicans challenging his accusations – remains under lock and key in that SCIF. The president’s counsel is not allowed to see it, much less be present at the deposition to cross-examine the witness.

So, Democrats are leaking derogatory information about the president, while restricting public access to potentially exculpatory information, all while denying him the right to see or challenge testimony against him.

More from Opinion

Moreover, they are abusing the system to do it. One of the charges Democrats have leveled against Trump is that the White House improperly put the transcript of his call with the Ukrainian president on a special server used to protect highly classified information.

Yet Democrats are doing the very same thing, conducting impeachment depositions inside a SCIF, improperly using a classified system to restrict access to non-classified information not just to the public but to members of Congress. Talk about hypocrisy.

Let’s be clear: There is nothing wrong with holding hearings behind closed doors as long as there is due process. But secrecy and fairness go hand in hand. One without the other is corrupt.

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The partisan nature of the Democrats’ inquiry will backfire in a number of ways. For one thing, it allows Republicans to make the case to the American people that the process is unfair. If the facts are on the Democrats’ side, they have nothing to fear from transparency and due process.

Second, the partisan behavior of Democrats has given the president justification to refuse to cooperate with the investigation, just as President Dwight Eisenhower refused to cooperate with the Army-McCarthy hearings in 1954.

And finally, Democratic partisanship has made it easier for congressional Republicans to rally around the president. Right now, Republicans are more torn about Trump’s Syria policy than they are about his impeachment inquiry. By failing to show even a modicum of fairness, Democrats have turned impeachment into a game of shirts vs. skins.

The Democrats’ conduct shows that they are not serious, and that the entire impeachment inquiry is a blatantly political exercise.

Given the Constitution’s requirement of a supermajority in the Senate to remove the president, it is impossible for one party to remove the president of another party from office without buy-in from the other side. Yet Democrats are making no effort to win over Republicans, much less make a vote against impeachment difficult. And that means they’ll have a hard time getting buy-in from the American people.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY MARC THIESSEN

Westlake Legal Group Pelosi-Trump-Schiff_AP Marc Thiessen: Democrats not serious about Trump impeachment – Inquiry is all about politics the washington post Marc Thiessen fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article aa4a5a34-c1c3-52c9-85f6-2971c7bf3c78   Westlake Legal Group Pelosi-Trump-Schiff_AP Marc Thiessen: Democrats not serious about Trump impeachment – Inquiry is all about politics the washington post Marc Thiessen fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article aa4a5a34-c1c3-52c9-85f6-2971c7bf3c78

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House Democrats say the Justice Department is orchestrating ‘political revenge’ for Trump amid reports it is opening a criminal investigation into the Mueller probe

Westlake Legal Group DX0s1zc3eBq0lp8zPw9Df19vAegAUy3_tYB_AgxeGUM House Democrats say the Justice Department is orchestrating 'political revenge' for Trump amid reports it is opening a criminal investigation into the Mueller probe r/politics

A few of Barr’s previous employers are connected to key subjects in the Mueller probe.

His financial ties to companies linked to aspects of the Russia investigation raise questions about whether he should—like his predecessor, Jeff Sessions—recuse himself.

This much is known: On Barr’s public financial disclosure report, he admits to working for a law firm that represented Russia’s Alfa Bank and for a company whose co-founders allegedly have long-standing business ties to Russia. What’s more, he received dividends from Vector Group, a holding company with deep financial ties to Russia.

Alfa Bank is controlled by the Kremlin and powerful oligarchs.

In 1995, the Soviet Union collapsed. In the vacuum of leadership – of policy – of governmental order, a few hungry souls made a mad grab for state resources. They were the original seven oligarchs, called “The Magnificient Seven.” And they were all bankers.

One of these first seven bankers, Mikhail Fridman – the founder of ALFABANK, is Semion Mogilevich’s partner.

Remember the suspicious server pings going from trump tower to Alfa Bank?

Examining records for the Trump domain, Max’s group discovered D.N.S. lookups from a pair of servers owned by Alfa Bank, one of the largest banks in Russia. Alfa Bank’s computers were looking up the address of the Trump server nearly every day. There were dozens of lookups on some days and far fewer on others, but the total number was notable: between May and September, Alfa Bank looked up the Trump Organization’s domain more than two thousand times.

And it didn’t stop there, Alfa Bank was looking for a way to establish a back channel between trump and the Kremlin.

A few weeks before Donald Trump became president, Russian banker Petr Aven, a billionaire oligarch with Moscow’s Alfa Bank, pulled aside Washington lobbyist Richard Burt at a corporate meeting in Luxembourg with a sensitive request.

Aven told Burt that “someone high in the Russian government” wanted “a communications channel between the Kremlin and the Trump Transition Team,” according to Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s recently released report. Aven wanted Burt, a former ambassador who had helped Trump’s campaign, to work on setting it up.

Barr might be deeper in this than we know.

The Special Counsel investigation was an investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 United States elections and suspicious links between Trump associates and Russian officials.

Why is Barr now determined to discredit the whole investigation?

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Texas man allegedly rapes dancer at strip club, report says

A Texas man was arrested on Wednesday after he allegedly raped a dancer at a Taylor County strip club after asking for a private dance, a report said.

Police were able to track down Zachary Lee Johnson, 28, after they were given his phone number from another dancer, the Dallas Morning News reported.

Westlake Legal Group IOOVC57BTJH7JCRMJILHBE3BAA Texas man allegedly rapes dancer at strip club, report says fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 78ffd6b4-f1cb-5c56-9301-ef04289f292a

Zachary Lee Johnson (Taylor County Sheriff’s Office)

The alleged incident occurred at Cloud 9 in the early morning hours on Wednesday. He is accused to repeatedly raping the woman in one of the club’s rooms, the report said. Police said the woman was eventually able to flee.

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He was charged with one count of sexual assault and released on $30,000 bond, the report said. It is not clear if he has a lawyer.

Westlake Legal Group IOOVC57BTJH7JCRMJILHBE3BAA Texas man allegedly rapes dancer at strip club, report says fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 78ffd6b4-f1cb-5c56-9301-ef04289f292a   Westlake Legal Group IOOVC57BTJH7JCRMJILHBE3BAA Texas man allegedly rapes dancer at strip club, report says fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 78ffd6b4-f1cb-5c56-9301-ef04289f292a

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AOC derides GOP deposition-secrecy protest as ‘little flash mob’ of ‘entitlement and privilege’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093112843001_6093115713001-vs AOC derides GOP deposition-secrecy protest as ‘little flash mob’ of ‘entitlement and privilege’ fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 2cfb247d-d7e3-5c0e-aba6-f2061b858bbd

When a group of Republicans stormed into a Democrat-led closed-door deposition Wednesday afternoon, claiming a lack of transparency in the Trump impeachment inquiry process, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez was apparently not impressed.

In a Twitter message Thursday, the New York Democrat specifically said she objected to reports that some Republicans had asked to be arrested as part of their demonstration.

“There have been many aspects of the GOP’s little flash mob that have relied on mountains of entitlement and privilege, but them *asking* the police to be arrested is just… ” she wrote, without finishing the sentence.

AOC SAYS TRUMP CALLED IMPEACHMENT ‘LYNCHING’ TO ‘DELIBERATELY’ RILE DEMOCRATS, FIRE UP GOP BASE

Fox News’ Chad Pergram had reported Wednesday that some members of the GOP were hoping to be “frog marched” out of the Capitol as a result of their action, thinking the images of them being taken into custody “would help w/GOP narrative of Dem process abuse.”

But Ocasio-Cortez found that idea difficult to fathom.

“Well, let’s just say my community would find it hard to understand why *anyone* would ask to be arrested,” she wrote.

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Entitlement and privilege seem to be on Ocasio-Cortez’s mind lately. In a tweet earlier this month, the congresswoman appeared to sympathize with Meghan Markle, who confessed in a recent documentary that she was struggling with some aspects of life as a duchess.

“Sudden prominence is a very dehumanizing experience,” Ocasio-Cortez agreed. “There’s a part of your life that you lose, & it later dawns on you that you’ll never get it back.”

The duchess of Sussex, meanwhile, was later criticized by her half-sister Samantha.

“I think it’s really ludicrous that someone who’s escorted around the world by millions of dollars’ worth of security on private jets, as a millionaire, could ever complain about anything,” she said.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093112843001_6093115713001-vs AOC derides GOP deposition-secrecy protest as ‘little flash mob’ of ‘entitlement and privilege’ fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 2cfb247d-d7e3-5c0e-aba6-f2061b858bbd   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093112843001_6093115713001-vs AOC derides GOP deposition-secrecy protest as ‘little flash mob’ of ‘entitlement and privilege’ fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 2cfb247d-d7e3-5c0e-aba6-f2061b858bbd

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Notre Dame and Michigan aim to resume rivalry after a break

Notre Dame and Michigan will meet under the lights shining on their cool helmets and storied programs.

The Fighting Irish and Wolverines have been playing football against each other since 1887 and yet they will meet for just the 45th time.

They haven’t played more because breaks have been sprinkled throughout the history of the series.

And, another one is coming up.

No. 8 Notre Dame (5-1) and No. 19 Michigan (5-2) are not scheduled to play again after Saturday night. Even though both athletic directors want to resume the rivalry, it may take about a decade to get them on the field again.

Michigan athletic director Warde Manuel acknowledged future schedules for each school may push the next meeting to 2028 or later.

“We’re talking that far away unless something changes for both of us,” Manuel told The Associated Press. “We have been in conversations about looking down the road to add another series of games to keep the rivalry moving forward.

“We’re both committed to a resolution for our schools, our fans and college football.”

Notre Dame athletic director Jack Swarbrick said he has no doubt the programs will play again after they walk off the field this weekend.

“We are committed to playing working together to continue the rivalry,” Swarbrick told the AP.

Here are some things to watch when Michigan hosts Notre Dame at the Big House:

HOME COOKING

The Wolverines have won every home game since closing the 2017 regular season with a loss to Ohio State.

SILENCE WASN’T GOLDEN

Notre Dame will play its first road game since Sept. 21, when it lost 23-17 at then-No. 3 Georgia.

During that visit, the Irish were penalized 12 times, including six times for false starts when Irish players jumped before the snap in the noisy atmosphere created by a large and loud crowd.

Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly shouldered the blame for his team’s inability to get off plays using its silent cadence.

“I’m sick about it,” Kelly said. “I made a terrible miscalculation in that I felt like our quarterback was prepared, but he wasn’t. That falls on me. We’ll make sure that never happens again.”

ANSWERING THE BELL

Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh and many of his players offered their support for receiver Ronnie Bell, who dropped a pass in the end zone trailing by seven points late in last week’s loss at Penn State.

“We would take as many Ronnie Bells as we could possibly get on this team,” Harbaugh said. “Mentally, he’s as tough as anyone we got and physically the same.”

SHARING THE LOAD

Notre Dame senior running back Tony Jones Jr. enters the game with three straight 100-yard performances and four this season. He is averaging nearly seven yards a carry, ranking among the nation’s best.

Jones, though, was limited to 21 yards on nine carries when the Irish threw the ball 47 times in the loss at Georgia.

Jones and Jafar Armstrong were expected to rotate in the backfield this season, but the speedier Armstrong suffered a torn abdominal muscle in the first series against Louisville. Armstrong had surgery and returned to play on a limited basis in last week’s win over USC.

“Jafar is going to be an important part of our game plan,” Kelly said.

TOP-10 SLUMP

Michigan has lost eight straight games against top-10 teams, dating to a win over Wisconsin three years ago, and is 1-10 in four-plus seasons under Harbaugh.

Even if the Wolverines beat Notre Dame, it won’t help them reach a goal of winning a Big Ten title for the first time since 2004, because they’ve already lost two conference games.

“We’re not going to just sit here and be like, ‘All right, we’re done and coast the rest of the season,'” Michigan defensive tackle Carlo Kemp said.

Westlake Legal Group CFB-ND-Linemen Notre Dame and Michigan aim to resume rivalry after a break fox-news/sports/ncaa/notre-dame-fighting-irish fox-news/sports/ncaa/michigan-wolverines fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 28f8f581-1222-5e6b-bb52-83cd37ac2490   Westlake Legal Group CFB-ND-Linemen Notre Dame and Michigan aim to resume rivalry after a break fox-news/sports/ncaa/notre-dame-fighting-irish fox-news/sports/ncaa/michigan-wolverines fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 28f8f581-1222-5e6b-bb52-83cd37ac2490

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Pentagon Pushes Tech Industry to Help U.S. Retain Military Edge

Westlake Legal Group 00pentagonchip-facebookJumbo Pentagon Pushes Tech Industry to Help U.S. Retain Military Edge United States Defense and Military Forces Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company Ltd Politics and Government Mobile Applications GlobalFoundries Factories and Manufacturing Defense Department Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Computers and the Internet Computer Chips

SAN FRANCISCO — Pentagon officials have been holding private discussions with tech industry executives to wrestle with a key question: how to ensure future supplies of the advanced computer chips needed to retain America’s military edge.

The talks, some of which predate the Trump administration, recently took on an increased urgency, according to people who were involved or briefed on the discussions. Pentagon officials encouraged chip executives to consider new production lines for semiconductors in the United States, said the people, who declined to be identified because the talks were confidential.

The discussions are being driven by the Pentagon’s increased dependence on chips made abroad, especially in Taiwan, as well as recent tensions with China, these people said.

One chip maker, the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, better known as TSMC, plays a particularly crucial role producing commercial chips that also have applications for aircraft, satellites, drones and wireless communications. And because of unrest over the past few months in the semiautonomous Chinese territory of Hong Kong, some Pentagon officials and chip executives have wondered about situations that could force suppliers in Taiwan to limit or cut off silicon shipments, the people said.

Mark Liu, the chairman of TSMC, said he had recently discussed options for a new factory in the United States with the Commerce Department. The stumbling block was money; major subsidies would be required, he said, as it is more expensive to operate in America than Taiwan.

“It is all up to when we can close the cost gap,” he said in an interview.

The conversations are a sign of how federal agencies are grappling with a deep-rooted technology conundrum. The United States has long fielded the most advanced weaponry by exploiting electronic components once exclusively produced in the country. Chips help tanks, aircraft, rockets and ships navigate, communicate with one another and engage enemy targets.

But domestic production lines of many chips have long since moved overseas, raising questions about supply interruptions in the event of political or military crises abroad. Those fears have been exacerbated by the increasing importance of particular components — such as programmable chips that figure prominently in the F-35 fighter jet, which are designed by the Silicon Valley company Xilinx and mainly fabricated in Taiwan.

Some chips, such as the wireless baseband processors needed for new 5G communications abilities that Pentagon officials covet, require advanced manufacturing technology that has become a key selling point of TSMC.

“We in the Defense Department cannot afford to be shut out of all of those capabilities,” said Lisa Porter, deputy under secretary for research and engineering, in remarks at an event in July that were later widely circulated among chip makers.

Dr. Porter, at a technology event in Los Angeles on Wednesday, said secure supply chains for both essential components and software were a “macro” issue that the Pentagon and the tech industry had to collaborate on. She declined to discuss specific efforts to bolster American chip production. A Defense Department spokesman also declined to comment.

In another sign of action, Skywater Technology, a Minnesota chip manufacturing service, said this week that the Defense Department would invest up to $170 million to increase its production and enhance technologies, such as the ability to produce chips that can withstand radiation in space.

The Skywater investment illustrates how the Pentagon is also wrestling with how to upgrade aging technology at domestic companies that make small volumes of classified chips tailored for the military. Such “trusted” factories, as they are called, operate under Pentagon rules aimed at preventing sabotage or data theft.

Dr. Porter and other Pentagon officials have pushed for new technical safeguards besides guards and employee background checks to keep sensitive chip designs secure, a strategy that would help the Defense Department use more advanced commercial factories. She called the idea a “zero-trust” philosophy.

TSMC, which dominates the build-to-order services called foundries, recently took the lead from Intel in shrinking chip circuitry to give chips greater capability. Its production edge is one reason the company has continued to win business from big American chip designers such as Apple, Qualcomm and Nvidia, whose chips have become increasingly important for defense as well as civilian applications.

The United States remains the leading supplier and innovator in most chip technologies, including the processors that Intel sells for nearly all personal computers and server systems. But the Pentagon’s research arm — DARPA, for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency — has been trying since 2017 to spur chip innovations under a $1.5 billion Electronics Resurgence Initiative.

Its goals include finding alternatives to silicon for manufacturing and packaging small “chiplets” together instead of making big monolithic chips.

“We have vulnerabilities we really need to address, but we are still the dominant producer of electronics in the world,” said Mark Rosker, the director of DARPA’s microsystems technology office. He said questions about the American semiconductor industry called for “a graceful and considered kind of panic.”

Much of the recent urgency stems from China’s growing stature as a chip innovator. Designers there have developed chips for sensitive applications such as supercomputers. Many of the designers — including Huawei, a key target of the Trump administration in the trade war — also rely on TSMC for manufacturing.

Another impetus for action stems from a recent pullback by GlobalFoundries. The chip maker, owned by investors in Abu Dhabi, has spent around $12 billion on a sophisticated factory in Malta, N.Y. But it announced last year that it would stop trying to create smaller circuitry than that on its existing production processes.

GlobalFoundries now produces classified chips under the trusted foundry rules in two former IBM factories it took over in 2015. Company executives believe the technology in its Malta facility remains advanced enough to also serve military needs for years, and it is negotiating with officials to handle future classified work through proposed modifications to the government’s trusted foundry regulations. It recently filed a lawsuit accusing TSMC of patent infringement, an action that it said was aimed partly at protecting the American manufacturing base.

The company, which announced plans for a $10 billion factory in China in 2017, is also rethinking that project as the promised demand from customers there now seems uncertain, said Thomas Caufield, the chief executive of GlobalFoundries.

Influencing the chip industry used to be easier when the Defense Department accounted for a major portion of chip sales. Now defense applications are dwarfed by civilian uses, such as smartphones and personal computers. More of the Pentagon’s budget now goes to chips like memory and processors whose designs are shaped by commercial needs.

At a recent panel of semiconductor industry veterans in Silicon Valley, the concern about an overreliance on TSMC was evident.

“What will happen when China makes its drive toward Taiwan? What will happen to TSMC?” asked Diane Bryant, a former Intel executive who is now a technology investor. “What is our way out of this pickle?”

The panelists suggested that the federal government should subsidize more domestic chip production. But advanced commercial factories can cost as much as $15 billion, plus the additional recurring costs to run, staff and supply such facilities.

“It’s a big dilemma,” said Handel Jones, a semiconductor consultant with International Business Strategies. “Our assessment was you have to spend big money.”

Dr. Liu of TSMC dismissed fears about Taiwan’s continued autonomy. He said he was weighing the pros and cons of a new American factory, though it was too early for a decision. If the financial challenges are overcome, he said, any new facility is likely to be smaller than TSMC’s massive plants in Taiwan and built near a factory it operates in Camas, Wash.

“We want to do what makes the best sense for our customers to help them to be competitive, and also deal with national-security concerns,” Dr. Liu said.

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The C.E.O. Taking On the Gun Lobby

Ed Stack didn’t set out to be an activist.

The chief executive of Dick’s Sporting Goods, Mr. Stack spent his career selling fishing rods, camping gear and athletic equipment at big-box stores around the country.

Dick’s was founded by Mr. Stack’s father in upstate New York. As a young man, Mr. Stack worked for the family business. But he didn’t enjoy the experience. His father was a divisive boss who couldn’t manage a supply chain, and was especially hard on his son.

Hoping to chart his own course, Mr. Stack went to work at a law firm. But when his father fell ill, Mr. Stack came back to help run the company. He soon grew to love the retail business and eventually bought the company from his father in 1984.

Mr. Stack set about expanding across the country, at times moving too aggressively. Overextended, the company flirted with bankruptcy. But Mr. Stack stabilized the business, and in 2002, took Dick’s public. Since then, he has managed to keep the company competitive in the age of Walmart, Amazon and e-commerce.

With all of that accomplished and retirement in sight, Mr. Stack wasn’t looking for attention. Then in February 2018, a gunman opened fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., killing 17 people. As Mr. Stack watched the news, he decided to drastically curtail Dick’s gun sales.

Days after the shooting, Dick’s said that it would immediately stop selling all assault-style rifles, no longer sell high-capacity magazines and require any gun buyer to be at least 21, regardless of local laws.

Dick’s was not alone. Walmart also tightened its gun sales policies after the shooting in Parkland, and companies including Delta Air Lines and MetLife moved to distance themselves from the National Rifle Association.

But for gun rights activists, Mr. Stack’s deeply personal engagement with the issue struck a nerve. The N.R.A. came after Dick’s, and calls for a boycott sprung up on social media.

Mr. Stack was unbowed. He announced that Dick’s would destroy the assault-style rifles and accessories on its shelves instead of returning them to manufacturers.

More than a year and a half after the Parkland shooting, Mr. Stack continues his campaign for stricter gun control, calling on lawmakers to introduce legislation and detailing his journey from businessman to activist in a new book, “It’s How We Play the Game.” He is reportedly exploring a run for president.

This interview, which was condensed and edited for clarity and occurred before any presidential musings, was conducted in New York.


Had you confronted the guns issue before Parkland?

Our journey with guns has been a long one. Around 1999, some kids broke into our store in Rochester, N.Y., and stole a bunch of handguns. A few days later, the cops found these kids, and a couple of them were dead.

I said, “I don’t want to be in this business.” So we stopped selling handguns. We were small at the time, with just six stores, and nobody noticed. We took a little bit of guff from it, but nobody knew who Dick’s Sporting Goods was really at the time.

Who did you take guff from? The National Rifle Association?

No, it was customers asking, “Why aren’t you selling handguns anymore?” Then we opened in Texas and put some handguns back because it just felt that was what the customer wanted. With the assault weapons ban from 1994, we hadn’t been selling assault rifles. But then, probably a year before Sandy Hook, merchants came and said, “To be competitive in the gun business, you got to have assault rifles. This is what’s selling.” So we put them back in.

Then Parkland happened, and you decided to significantly curtail your gun sales.

When Parkland happened — watching those kids, listening to those parents — it had a profound effect on me. It was at that point I said, “I just don’t want to sell these guns, period.”

I’m a pretty stoic guy. But I sat there hearing about the kids who were killed, and I hadn’t cried that much since my mother passed away. We need to do something. This has got to stop.

I came to our management team on that Monday, and started to read a statement I had written. I got emotional, and I couldn’t get through it. Our chief of staff had to actually take the piece of paper from my hand and finish reading it.

You’ve done more than just take guns out of the stores though.

We called on Congress to come together with the intent to actually solve this problem. I’ve spent a fair amount of time in Washington, and it was pretty clear that nothing was going to get done, and nothing has gotten done.

I don’t know how, at least, we can’t get universal background checks done. For the life of me, I cannot understand how people can see that having universal background checks or red-flag laws really violates anybody’s Second Amendment rights.

You also went down to Florida.

The families from Parkland asked me to come down and talk to them. So I went down and sat with many of the families who lost somebody in Parkland. It was probably the hardest day of my life, to listen to those parents talk about their kids and what happened to them.

One woman said it had been a month since her son was killed. She said, “I go into his room every night, I sit on his bed and I talk to him.” As a parent, you can’t imagine putting yourself in that position. This whole thing still gets to me.

But what I found surprising of those families, not one of them said we need to ban all guns, that guns have to go away. What they said was we need to find common-sense changes to our gun laws so what happened to our family doesn’t happen anyplace else. If those families feel that way, I have no idea how the guys in Washington can’t come together and find a solution to this problem.

How do you respond to your critics?

People have said, “You know Stack, if we do what you want and ban assault-style rifles, ban high-capacity magazines and don’t sell a gun to anyone under 21 years old, it won’t eliminate mass shootings.” You know what, they’re probably right. But there will be less loss of life if an assault-style rifle isn’t used. And if we do all those things and we save one life, in my mind it’s all worth it.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_162912600_1b91ae60-983d-4e49-bdc3-bf4f379ce014-articleLarge The C.E.O. Taking On the Gun Lobby Sporting Goods and Equipment Parkland, Fla, Shooting (2018) mass shootings gun control Dick's Sporting Goods Inc

“I’ve spent a fair amount of time in Washington, and it was pretty clear that nothing was going to get done, and nothing has gotten done,” Mr. Stack said.Credit…Guerin Blask for The New York Times

What do you say to other business leaders who don’t want to get political?

If you have ideas about how to solve certain problems, I think it’s your responsibility as business leaders to speak up. This country is craving for leadership today, and the leadership is not coming out of Washington. So the leadership has to come from someplace else. Right now, the private sector is the place that it’s going to have to come from.

We have an expertise from a gun standpoint. We see the holes in the system. We found out that a couple months before the shooter in Parkland did what he did, we sold that kid a shotgun. The background system should have flagged this kid. He should not have been able to buy a gun.

Tell me about your dad, who started the company.

He was a complicated guy. He had a great heart, but he always had a bit of an inferiority complex. He always had something to prove. I think his fear of failure is what really drove him. He was a really tough, old-school guy. This was a time that you just never told your kids you love them. His view was, “We’ll make a man out of you.”

I didn’t want to work for my dad. I wanted to go out and do my own thing. But when I was 13, I went to work. We’re this really small, family, little corner sporting goods store. The family went and worked and tried to help out.

What did your dad do wrong as a businessman?

My dad never had a plan. He ran the business by the seat of his pants. His idea around buying was, “You got a hunch, you buy a bunch.” We were always close to going out of business. He always owed the bank money. He always owed the vendors money. He always paid them, but he was always in debt. Our garage would be filled with excess merchandise: Coleman coolers, propane fuel, white gas.

His management style was as haphazard as his buying habits. He played people one off the other. You can’t do that. You have to have specific roles and functions. And if you pick somebody who’s going to be your right-hand guy, then that’s the guy.

How did you take control of Dick’s?

I fell in love with the business, but my father still owned the company. He was a tough taskmaster, and at times unfair. It was just his way of kind of making a man out of you. I didn’t particularly like working for my father.

We got into a spirited conversation one day, and he stuck his finger in my face and said, “If you think you’re such a smart goddamn son of a bitch, go down to the bank, get your own line of credit and buy me out.” So that’s what I did. I went down to the bank, got it put together, came back and said, “We’re ready to go.”

What don’t people understand about growing a business?

It’s not a straight line. You’re going to have ups and downs. You’re going to have those quiet introspective moments where you go, “What am I doing?” You’re going to have those days of self-doubt. And you’ve got to just power through them. But we almost went out of business.



How did you go from being a local retailer to a big-box store?

We built a bigger store. The first store my father built was 5,000 square feet. The second store was 2,800 square feet. Then we went to Syracuse and did a 20,000-square-foot store. That was a huge, huge difference. We were just shocked at how much business we did. The guys from Nike said, “Hey Dick, you’ve got to be really proud of these kids. They’re doing a lot of business.”

My father, who could never really quite give you a compliment, looked at them and said, “You’re right, they did a lot of business. They did 25 percent more business than they thought they would the first month. So they’re not really as smart as they think they are.” That was him to a tee.

So we built this store, did really well, and then we just started opening these 20,000- and 25,000-square-foot stores.

How did you almost go out of business?

The business outstripped our management’s ability, including my own, to run the business. We finally talked to G.E. Capital in New York, which was the lender of last resort before you called Tony Soprano. And I didn’t want to call Tony Soprano.

I’d never been in a building like G.E. Capital’s: big conference room, 10 people firing questions at us, saying, “Why did you do this? How did this happen?” This is like our last resort. If this doesn’t work, there’s talk about filing for bankruptcy or selling the company.

They fired questions at us left and right, and we answered them, and I finally said, “Let me tell you something. This is what happened, this is why it happened, this is what we’ve done about it and this is why it’s never going to happen again.”

There was a guy sitting over in the corner, and I didn’t pay any attention to him. He never asked a question, was never involved in the meeting. After the meeting, he came over and sat down, looked at me and said, “What’s it going to take for you to shake my hand right now that we’ll agent your loan?”

The lesson I learned is the guy in the room who’s not saying anything, he’s the decision maker. Beware of the guy in the room who sits in the corner and doesn’t say anything. I told him how much money we needed and when we needed it by. He looked at me and shook my hand and said, “We’ll make this happen.” That saved the company.

What did you learn from that experience?

You look into the halls of hell, and near-death experience changes you. We slowed the growth down. We said, “We’re not going to open any stores for the next couple of years.” We got our inventory under control, we got our expenses under control and we learned from our mistakes.

The experience is on the list of mistakes I made. I wouldn’t say it’s a regret, because we learned a lot from it. One of the reasons we’re in the position we’re in right now is because of it. One of the things I learned from that is I don’t want to have debt; I don’t want to owe anybody any money.

What’s the difference between a mistake and a regret?

A regret is something that you wish you could take back. You go, “If I had to do it all over again, I wouldn’t do it because it didn’t turn out very well.” A mistake is something that you did that you learned from, that at the end of the day it helped make you who you are today.

I’ve made a lot of mistakes. I don’t have a lot of regrets.

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Jackie Kennedy Onassis once shared ‘a magical evening’ with Alec Baldwin in disguise, Carly Simon says

Jackie Kennedy Onassis had an unforgettable night with Alec Baldwin.

The former first lady’s pal Carly Simon released a new memoir on Tuesday titled “Touched by the Sun: My Friendship with Jackie,” which details Onassis’ thoughts about both of her husbands — President John F. Kennedy and Aristotle Onassis — as well as her two children.

But the celebrated singer also made a revelation about one night to remember involving the Hollywood actor and the former first lady.

In the book, the 74-year-old recalled when she and then-husband James Hart were joined by Onassis and her unlikely date. People magazine reported on Tuesday that according to Simon, Baldwin ended up as a last-minute plus-one for Onassis when her partner Maurice Tempelsman was out of town.

CARLY SIMON RECALLS SAYING GOODBYE TO JACKIE KENNEDY ONASSIS ON HER DEATHBED: ‘IT WAS SURREAL’

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-585797865_1 Jackie Kennedy Onassis once shared ‘a magical evening’ with Alec Baldwin in disguise, Carly Simon says Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/alec-baldwin fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 743b88c5-699b-597b-a58b-1863f71e9343

Good friends Carly Simon and Jackie Onassis pose for a picture at Bunch of Grapes Bookstore on Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, 9/2/89. (Photo by Stephen Rose/Getty Images)

CARLY SIMON’S PAL JACKIE KENNEDY ONASSIS SAID JFK MADE ‘STUPID MISTAKES,’ ARISTOTLE ONASSIS WAS ‘VERY SEXY’

The outlet shared both Ken Burns and media exec Joe Armstrong passed up on the opportunity. However, Baldwin, now 61, had no qualms about being third in line. In fact, he happily joined the group to attend “Dancing at Lughnasa” on Broadway.

“Alec, who had never met Jackie, was in a state of hyper-disbelief,” wrote Simon, as the outlet shared. “’Jackie Kennedy wants to go on a date with me?’ he said. ‘Are you kidding?’ Alec’s incredulity gradually gave way to ‘What should I wear?’”

However, the group knew that the night out would cause mayhem among paparazzi. So, they decided to keep their identities a secret during the night by wearing wigs Simon had on hand.

“Jim, brave-faced and laughing, was the first to put his on, a long, curly, Eddie Van Halen wig that prompted a chorus of laughter,” recalled Simon. “Alec chose a short, brown one; mine was comely, blond, and Grand Ole Opry-esque, and Jackie reached impulsively for the one befitting Madame de Pompadour.”

CARLY SIMON SHARES STUNNING JACKIE KENNEDY ONASSIS DETAILS, INCLUDING VISIT TO HER DEATHBED

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-106859614 Jackie Kennedy Onassis once shared ‘a magical evening’ with Alec Baldwin in disguise, Carly Simon says Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/alec-baldwin fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 743b88c5-699b-597b-a58b-1863f71e9343

Alec Baldwin during “The Spirit of Liberty” Awards Dinner & the 10th Anniversary Celebration of People for the American Way at Waldorf Hotel in New York City, New York, United States. (Photo by Ron Galella/Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images)

JACKIE KENNEDY ONASSIS ENDURED ARISTOTLE ONASSIS FLAUNTING HIS AFFAIR WITH MARIA CALLAS, CARLY SIMON CLAIMS

Simon shared that Onassis was “at peace” that night.

“As anticipated, Jackie doted on Alec, and Alec, despite his been-there, seen-everything show business poise, occasionally revealed the lightest possible slick of sweat on his brow.

“First thing next morning, Jackie called to tell me what a magical evening it was, how divine Alec was, and how important she felt it was to think and act and cavort like a child now and again,” continued Simon.

Back in 2017, Hart told Fox News it was Onassis who made the special request to spend a night out with Baldwin for her 62nd birthday.

CARLY SIMON’S EX-HUSBAND JAMES HART TELLS ALL IN NEW MEMOIR

Westlake Legal Group jackie20kennedy20onassis20197520getty Jackie Kennedy Onassis once shared ‘a magical evening’ with Alec Baldwin in disguise, Carly Simon says Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/alec-baldwin fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 743b88c5-699b-597b-a58b-1863f71e9343

Jackie Kennedy Onassis in 1975. (Getty)

CARLY SIMON REVEALS SEAN CONNERY ASKED FOR MÉNAGE-À-TROIS WITH HER SISTER

“We told her, ‘Look, we don’t want to do the usual dumb thing. What would you like for your birthday?’” he said. “And a couple of days later, she called Carly and said, ‘Is Jim friends with Alec Baldwin? Is that true?’ Carly said ‘yes’ and she said, ‘Do you think Alec would be my date for my birthday?’ I called Alec and he said, ‘Absolutely! I’m there!’ And so, we went to the theater. He was more of her escort than a date. But it was such a fun evening.”

According to Simon, it was Onassis’ son John F. Kennedy Jr. who introduced his mother to her on Martha’s Vineyard back in 1983. The two remained close until Onassis’ death in 1994 at age 64.

While Onassis was 16 years older than Simon and notoriously private, it didn’t take long for her to open up to the singer.

Simon said Onassis even talked about President Kennedy’s adultery.

CARLY SIMON REVEALS WHO INSPIRED ‘YOU’RE SO VAIN’

Westlake Legal Group jackie Jackie Kennedy Onassis once shared ‘a magical evening’ with Alec Baldwin in disguise, Carly Simon says Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/alec-baldwin fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 743b88c5-699b-597b-a58b-1863f71e9343

Former United States President John F. Kennedy and first lady Jackie Kennedy attend a dinner in honor of Andre Malraux, minister of state for cultural affairs of France, in Washington, in this handout image taken on May 11, 1962. (Photo by REUTERS/Robert Knudsen/The White House/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library)

LOST MICK JAGGER-CARLY SIMON DUET FOUND AFTER MORE THAN 45 YEARS

“[She] understood that he made some stupid mistakes,” said Simon. However, she told the outlet that Onassis brushed off the affairs because “she knew he loved her more, much more.”

Onassis also got candid about her second husband, Onassis, whom she married in 1968 — five years after Kennedy’s 1963 assassination.

“She said he was very sexy — he would sing to her on his yacht and take her great places to make love,” Simon recalled. “She knew marrying him was the bad-girl move. In a way, I never knew whether she was sticking up for her own decision or whether she really loved him.”

Westlake Legal Group Alec-Baldwin-split Jackie Kennedy Onassis once shared ‘a magical evening’ with Alec Baldwin in disguise, Carly Simon says Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/alec-baldwin fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 743b88c5-699b-597b-a58b-1863f71e9343   Westlake Legal Group Alec-Baldwin-split Jackie Kennedy Onassis once shared ‘a magical evening’ with Alec Baldwin in disguise, Carly Simon says Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/alec-baldwin fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 743b88c5-699b-597b-a58b-1863f71e9343

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