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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 172)

PG&E Bankruptcy Judge Gives Outside Group’s Plan a Chance

Pacific Gas & Electric, California’s largest utility, suffered a setback in bankruptcy court on Wednesday that could alter the course of a corporate restructuring that promises to have far-reaching consequences for millions of customers.

Dennis Montali, a federal bankruptcy judge, ruled that PG&E no longer had the sole right to shape the terms of its reorganization, opening a path in court for backers of a rival proposal. The competing plan was devised by a group of PG&E creditors that includes prominent hedge funds, and it is supported by individuals with claims against PG&E for wildfire damages.

The company sought bankruptcy protection in January, saying it faced an estimated $30 billion or more in liabilities related to wildfires that caused widespread property damage and killed dozens of people.

The judge’s ruling, after a contentious court hearing on Monday, came as hundreds of thousands of PG&E customers were without electricity. The company shut off power on Wednesday in wide areas of its territory, including much of the Bay Area, to reduce fire hazards posed by gusty winds after months of dry weather.

Losing the exclusive right to put forward restructuring terms is a huge blow to PG&E’s management and its largest shareholders, which also include hedge funds. The ruling, issued after regular market hours, sent the company’s stock down nearly 30 percent in extended trading.

The creditors’ plan, drawn up by a group of PG&E bondholders that include Elliott Management, an activist hedge fund, would leave the current shareholders with a tiny stake in PG&E once it emerges from bankruptcy.

Westlake Legal Group merlin_128591912_d9019b08-645c-4598-bfff-fac05b99b9a4-articleLarge PG&E Bankruptcy Judge Gives Outside Group’s Plan a Chance Wildfires Suits and Litigation (Civil) Pacific Gas and Electric Co Electric Light and Power Credit and Debt California Bankruptcies

California Wildfires: How PG&E Ignored Risks in Favor of Profits

Pacific Gas & Electric, California’s largest utility, has been responsible for wildfires in recent years that destroyed hundreds of thousands of acres. Several proved fatal.

In making his decision, Judge Montali seemed to be encouraging an accord between the parties. “A dual-track plan course going forward may facilitate negotiations for a global resolution and narrow the issues which are in legitimate dispute,” he wrote.

Sympathy for the wildfire victims also seemed to play a role in the decision. The judge wrote that “the parties most deserving of consideration” had spoken through the group representing the wildfire claimants.

Frank Pitre, a lawyer for wildfire victims, said, “We are extremely pleased that the court has opened the process to promote competition over the best plan for this company to emerge from bankruptcy, showing due concern for ensuring fair compensation to fire victims.”

PG&E opposes the bondholders’ plan because, in its view, it allows them to acquire a large stake in the company on the cheap. “We are disappointed that the bankruptcy court has opened the door to consideration of a plan designed to unjustly enrich Elliott and the other ad hoc bondholders and seize control of PG&E at a substantial discount,” James Noonan, a PG&E spokesman, said in an emailed statement. He added that PG&E was working toward a “fair resolution of all remaining individual wildfire claims.”

PG&E’s plan would pay $8.4 billion to wildfire victims, while the bondholders are offering up to $14.5 billion.

The bankruptcy battle has repercussions in PG&E’s service area, which encompasses most of Northern and Central California. The state’s goal is for the company to emerge with the financial wherewithal to undertake measures intended to head off wildfires caused by PG&E’s power lines.

In addition, under a law enacted this year, the bankruptcy must be completed by June for the company to tap a new state fund being set up to help pay for the catastrophic costs of future wildfires.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

PG&E Bankruptcy Judge Gives Outside Group’s Plan a Chance

Pacific Gas & Electric, California’s largest utility, suffered a setback in bankruptcy court on Wednesday that could alter the course of a corporate restructuring that promises to have far-reaching consequences for millions of customers.

Dennis Montali, a federal bankruptcy judge, ruled that PG&E no longer had the sole right to shape the terms of its reorganization, opening a path in court for backers of a rival proposal. The competing plan was devised by a group of PG&E creditors that includes prominent hedge funds, and it is supported by individuals with claims against PG&E for wildfire damages.

The company sought bankruptcy protection in January, saying it faced an estimated $30 billion or more in liabilities related to wildfires that caused widespread property damage and killed dozens of people.

The judge’s ruling, after a contentious court hearing on Monday, came as hundreds of thousands of PG&E customers were without electricity. The company shut off power on Wednesday in wide areas of its territory, including much of the Bay Area, to reduce fire hazards posed by gusty winds after months of dry weather.

Losing the exclusive right to put forward restructuring terms is a huge blow to PG&E’s management and its largest shareholders, which also include hedge funds. The ruling, issued after regular market hours, sent the company’s stock down nearly 30 percent in extended trading.

The creditors’ plan, drawn up by a group of PG&E bondholders that include Elliott Management, an activist hedge fund, would leave the current shareholders with a tiny stake in PG&E once it emerges from bankruptcy.

Westlake Legal Group merlin_128591912_d9019b08-645c-4598-bfff-fac05b99b9a4-articleLarge PG&E Bankruptcy Judge Gives Outside Group’s Plan a Chance Wildfires Suits and Litigation (Civil) Pacific Gas and Electric Co Electric Light and Power Credit and Debt California Bankruptcies

California Wildfires: How PG&E Ignored Risks in Favor of Profits

Pacific Gas & Electric, California’s largest utility, has been responsible for wildfires in recent years that destroyed hundreds of thousands of acres. Several proved fatal.

In making his decision, Judge Montali seemed to be encouraging an accord between the parties. “A dual-track plan course going forward may facilitate negotiations for a global resolution and narrow the issues which are in legitimate dispute,” he wrote.

Sympathy for the wildfire victims also seemed to play a role in the decision. The judge wrote that “the parties most deserving of consideration” had spoken through the group representing the wildfire claimants.

Frank Pitre, a lawyer for wildfire victims, said, “We are extremely pleased that the court has opened the process to promote competition over the best plan for this company to emerge from bankruptcy, showing due concern for ensuring fair compensation to fire victims.”

PG&E opposes the bondholders’ plan because, in its view, it allows them to acquire a large stake in the company on the cheap. “We are disappointed that the bankruptcy court has opened the door to consideration of a plan designed to unjustly enrich Elliott and the other ad hoc bondholders and seize control of PG&E at a substantial discount,” James Noonan, a PG&E spokesman, said in an emailed statement. He added that PG&E was working toward a “fair resolution of all remaining individual wildfire claims.”

PG&E’s plan would pay $8.4 billion to wildfire victims, while the bondholders are offering up to $14.5 billion.

The bankruptcy battle has repercussions in PG&E’s service area, which encompasses most of Northern and Central California. The state’s goal is for the company to emerge with the financial wherewithal to undertake measures intended to head off wildfires caused by PG&E’s power lines.

In addition, under a law enacted this year, the bankruptcy must be completed by June for the company to tap a new state fund being set up to help pay for the catastrophic costs of future wildfires.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Lawmakers: NBA Should Have ‘Courage’ To Stand Up To China

Westlake Legal Group 5d9e649320000069054ff206 Lawmakers: NBA Should Have ‘Courage’ To Stand Up To China

A bipartisan group of lawmakers said Wednesday they were deeply concerned that the NBA had kowtowed to China after the organization apologized for an executive’s comments supporting protestors in Hong Kong.

“It is outrageous that the NBA has caved to Chinese government demands for contrition,” the group, which included Rep. Tom Malinowski (D-N.J.), Rep. Mike Gallagher (R-Wis.), Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) and Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), wrote in a letter addressed to NBA Commissioner Adam Silver. “NBA players have a rich history of speaking out on sensitive topics of social justice and human rights inside the United States, and the NBA takes pride in defending their right to do so.”

“Yet while it is easy to defend freedom of speech when it costs you nothing, equivocating when profits are at stake is a betrayal of fundamental American values.”

The letter was also signed by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), Rep. Jim Banks (R-Ind.), Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas).

The lawmakers’ statement comes less than a week after the Houston Rockets’ general manager, Daryl Morey, posted a tweet in support of the democracy protests in Hong Kong, reading: “Fight for freedom, stand with Hong Kong.” The short-lived note prompted widespread anger in mainland China, where Communist Party leaders have ignited nationalist sentiment to encourage opposition to demonstrations related to Hong Kong’s autonomy.

Morey quickly deleted the message and issued an apology, but within days China’s state broadcaster said it would stop showing Rockets games in the country and sponsors began suspending their contracts with the NBA. The team has been wildly popular in China, in large part because it drafted Yao Ming in 2002. The Washington Post noted that the NBA has since become the country’s most popular sports league.

The NBA, which makes hundreds of millions of dollars in annual revenue in China, scrambled to contain the fallout. In a statement, the league said it recognized “that the views expressed by Houston Rockets General Manager Daryl Morey have deeply offended many of our friends and fans in China, which is regrettable.”

A separate message in Chinese went further, saying the NBA was “extremely disappointed” in Morey’s “inappropriate remarks.”

The response prompted its own backlash in the U.S., and lawmakers quickly lambasted the NBA for failing to defend free speech. Many called out Silver, the league’s commissioner, for trying to have it both ways while attempting to batten down the organization’s business interests.

The lawmakers on Wednesday urged the NBA to take action to defend the rights of its players and staff, including steps to support their ability to express their opinions “no matter the economic consequences.” They also urged Silver to call China’s bluff and refuse to air NBA activities in the country until government-owned broadcasters end their own boycott.

“Your statements come at a time when we would hope to see Americans standing up and speaking out in defense of the rights of the people of Hong Kong,” the lawmakers wrote. “You have more power to take a stand than most of the Chinese government’s targets and should have the courage and integrity to use it.”

Read the full letter below:

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As White House Counsel, Pat Cipollone Builds Case for Defiance on Impeachment

WASHINGTON — As a lawyer in private practice, Pat A. Cipollone, now President Trump’s White House counsel, told colleagues that there were two approaches to legal fights.

One, he said, was like the Department of State, when the two sides would try to work out a deal to avoid painful and expensive litigation. The other, when the first failed, was the Department of War.

As of this week, Mr. Cipollone has put himself squarely in the war camp when it comes to Mr. Trump’s defense against the House impeachment inquiry. After earlier advocating that the president adopt a policy of transparency by releasing the document at the heart of the impeachment debate — the reconstructed transcript of Mr. Trump’s call with his Ukrainian counterpart — Mr. Cipollone has shifted course and is now leading a no-cooperation strategy that holds substantial political risks but also seems to suit his combative client in the Oval Office.

It is a role that has pushed Mr. Cipollone, 53, to the center of a battle that could determine the course of Mr. Trump’s presidency and potentially lead to a constitutional battle with far-reaching ramifications. In building an argument that Mr. Trump has no obligation to respond to demands for information from Congress, Mr. Cipollone, in a letter sent Tuesday to House Democratic leaders, laid out an extraordinarily broad view of executive authority that, if maintained, seems likely to be viewed skeptically by the courts.

“Pat’s taking a leading role in this proceeding because of the institutional interests that are at stake,” said Jay Sekulow, Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer. “He’s the right man for the task. He has the right temperament and disposition.”

Rudolph W. Giuliani, another of Mr. Trump’s lawyers and a key player in the Ukraine affair, heaped praise on Mr. Cipollone. “From a lawyer’s point of view, the letter is close to brilliant,” he said.

But to critics of Mr. Trump, Mr. Cipollone is seeking to twist the law and stonewall an entirely legitimate inquiry from a coequal branch of government and undercut the ability of Congress to pursue its constitutionally mandated remedy of impeachment.

“I cannot fathom how any self-respecting member of the bar could affix his name to this letter,” George Conway, a constitutional lawyer and the husband of Kellyanne Conway, a top aide to Mr. Trump, said on Twitter. “It’s pure hackery, and it disgraces the profession.”

Mr. Cipollone’s defiant posture toward Congress, Democrats said, was more about political positioning than a serious effort to articulate a legal and constitutional defense for Mr. Trump.

“They’re taking a position that seems to me to be quite frivolous: that Congress doesn’t have any power to investigate most of what they’re investigating,” said Neil Eggleston, who was the White House counsel in the Clinton and Obama administrations. “It’s sort of a last refuge.”

A well-known figure in Washington’s community of Catholic conservatives and anti-abortion activists, Mr. Cipollone came to the White House late last year after earlier having helped prepare Mr. Trump for the presidential debates in 2016 and advised his legal team during the special counsel’s investigation into Russian interference in the campaign.

But Mr. Cipollone generally keeps such a low public profile that even those who have known him for years differ on how to pronounce his last name (it is sip-uh-LOAN-ee). He drives a pickup truck and a Honda Pilot, into which he loaded a beloved desk chair for the move to the White House after his appointment last December.

He has contributed substantially to Catholic charities and causes, but his political work has been largely behind the scenes, including his former law firm’s defense of former Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin in a campaign finance case.

Westlake Legal Group white-house-letter-impeachment-promo-1570570699708-articleLarge As White House Counsel, Pat Cipollone Builds Case for Defiance on Impeachment United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Sekulow, Jay Alan Legal Profession Law and Legislation Ingraham, Laura A Cipollone, Pat A Bronx (NYC) Barr, William P

Read the White House Letter in Response to the Impeachment Inquiry

In a letter to House Democratic leaders, the White House counsel called the House’s impeachment inquiry illegitimate.

The son of an Italian-born factory worker and homemaker, Mr. Cipollone spent much of his childhood in the Bronx. After his father was transferred to Kentucky, Mr. Cipollone attended Covington Catholic High School before returning to New York to attend Fordham University.

A debate champion and intramural athlete, he worked days in Fordham’s computer center and summers in construction, factory and clerical jobs. He was the class of 1988’s valedictorian, graduating first in a class of 650 with a degree in economics and political philosophy. Already interested in constitutional law, he wrote a senior thesis on “Substantive Due Process and the 14th Amendment.”

Mr. Cipollone won a full academic scholarship to attend the University of Chicago Law School. There, he sank deep conservative roots, helping lead a student chapter of the Federalist Society.

Mr. Cipollone served a clerkship with Judge Danny Julian Boggs, a Reagan appointee, on the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals.

As part of the interview process, Mr. Cipollone took the judge’s famously difficult “general knowledge” quiz, which he used to gauge knowledge beyond the law. In Mr. Cipollone’s year, potential clerks had to answer 64 questions, including, “What was the Trail of Tears?” “What did the battles of Actius, Lepanto and Salamis have in common?” and “When and what was the Edict of Nantes?” (Judge Boggs said he had looked back in his files and could not find Mr. Cipollone’s score.)

Judge Boggs recently had lunch with Mr. Cipollone in the White House mess. “I complimented him on not seeing his name in the paper,” the judge said, “which means he’s doing a good job.”

Mr. Cipollone went from Judge Boggs’s chambers in Louisville to Washington, and a speechwriting job with William P. Barr, who was attorney general in the George Bush administration and was named attorney general by Mr. Trump a few months after Mr. Cipollone arrived at the White House.

A fellow clerk, Jennifer Hall, recalled sitting in Judge Boggs’s bookshelf-lined chambers between Mr. Cipollone and another clerk, Stephen Vaughn, now a trade lawyer in Washington. “They would yell at each other over me,” she recalled, “listening to Rush Limbaugh.”

Mr. Cipollone and his wife, Rebecca Cipollone, have 10 children. The youngest is a 10-year-old son and the oldest a 26-year-old daughter, who works at Fox News for Laura Ingraham, the conservative commentator, who was introduced to Catholicism by Mr. Cipollone.

Mr. Cipollone is a founder of the National Prayer Breakfast, participates in the anti-abortion March for Life, and events that draw Washington’s Catholic elite, like the Red Mass, celebrated each year at St. Matthew’s Cathedral on the Sunday before the Supreme Court session begins. (Mr. Cipollone was absent when the event was held this past weekend.)

After his stint with Mr. Barr, Mr. Cipollone joined the law firm Kirkland & Ellis in Washington. In the mid-1990s, he moved his family to Connecticut and took a job as general counsel for a Kirkland & Ellis client, the Knights of Columbus, a Catholic fraternal organization and multibillion dollar insurance company. He later rejoined the firm, then left for a partnership at Stein, Mitchell, Cipollone, Beato & Missner, where he worked on Mr. Walker’s case, among others.

Melanie Sloan, a law school classmate who works with the liberal watchdog organization American Oversight, said she called Mr. Cipollone for help in a complicated legal matter after classmates recommended him. “He was kind and happy to help me,” she said. “I don’t feel like too many people in Washington would take a call from somebody they haven’t been in touch with 20 years and be right there to help. And I never got a bill.”

Mr. Cipollone earned nearly $7 million at Stein Mitchell in 2017 and 2018, according to his White House financial disclosure report.

“With every client, with everybody he sat in front of, he used the term ‘off ramps,’” says Jonathan Missner, a partner of Mr. Cipollone’s at the firm. “That’s Pat. He looks for off ramps, and he’s good at it.”

It is also true, he said, that Mr. Cipollone “can be a pit bull — and that’s the Department of War.”

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Pence, Pompeo and Barr deserve to be impeached, too

Westlake Legal Group E0ndOlL3bW5VPZT0d-Uuc1Yw0rYVBTF2f0_6MN9sDz4 Pence, Pompeo and Barr deserve to be impeached, too r/politics

What are Trump’s defenses? Refusing subpoenas. Mitch McConnell has been begging him to resign for over a week. So today he bowed out of another treaty. Giving more power to Russia. And giving the medal of freedom to Ed Meese? He is thumbing his nose to America. He doesn’t care about any sex scandal- Hell, his first lady was a nude model. He has bragged about grabbing women by the pussy.

Trump immediately threw Pence under the bus. So now the Senate can’t impeach without making Nancy Pelosi President.

What is going to happen? Another National Emergency? Sending Congress home? Invalidating everything they do? Declaring martial law?

Moscow Mitch has got to convince Trump to resign to save the Republican party.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Fox News poll: 51 percent favor Trump’s impeachment and removal from office

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Fox News poll: 51 percent favor Trump's impeachment and removal from office

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden said Wednesday for the first time that President Donald Trump must be impeached for alleged abuses of the powers of his office to help his own reelection. (Oct. 9) AP, AP

A new poll released Wednesday by Fox News shows that just more than half of all registered voters support President Trump’s impeachment and removal from office.

Those surveyed said 51% to 43% that Trump should be impeached and removed from office. Four percent said he should be impeached but not removed from office, and 40% said he should not be impeached at all.

The poll also showed a clear partisan divide. Of Democrats surveyed, 85% said Trump should be impeached and removed, as did 13% of Republicans. Those opposed to impeachment and removal included 9% of Democrats and 82% of Republicans.

This poll is among the first to show that roughly half of Americans support impeachment and removal from office. It lines up with a Politico/Morning Consult survey also released Wednesday that said support for removal was at 50%.

Latest on impeachment: White House says ‘no’ to Nancy Pelosi. China says ‘no’ to Joe Biden probe

The Fox survey was conducted between Oct. 6 and Oct. 8, as the White House has been pushing back on House Democrat requests for documents and testimony related to Trump’s dealings with Ukraine. 

Trump is currently facing an impeachment inquiry from the House after news came out of a whistleblower complaint alleging Trump pressured Ukraine’s president to conduct an investigation into political rival former Vice President Joe Biden.

Explainer: Biden, allies pushed out Ukrainian prosecutor because he didn’t pursue corruption cases

Fox survey respondents were asked what they thought about the contents with a July 25 phone call between Trump and Ukraine’s leader. Forty-three percent said what Trump said was an impeachable offense, 27% said it was inappropriate but not impeachable and 17% said it was appropriate.

Previously, polls have suggested about equal number of voters supported the impeachment and removal of Trump, but support for impeachment has grown over the past few weeks. 

Poll: A majority of Americans think House Democrats right to open Trump impeachment inquiry

Trump tweeted on Wednesday ahead of the release of the Fox News poll, claiming support for impeachment was only at 25% without citing a pollster.

“Only 25 percent want the President Impeached, which is pretty low considering the volume of Fake News coverage, but pretty high considering the fact that I did NOTHING wrong,” Trump said. “It is all just a continuation of the greatest Scam and Witch Hunt in the history of our Country!”

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/10/09/trump-impeachment-new-fox-news-poll-shows-half-support-inquiry-removal/3925094002/

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Turkey’s Syria invasion: Member of US Special Forces says, ‘I am ashamed for the first time in my career’

Westlake Legal Group us-syria Turkey's Syria invasion: Member of US Special Forces says, 'I am ashamed for the first time in my career' Melissa Leon Jennifer Griffin fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/world fnc ca65e2e9-7477-5c32-9fc7-13c30e96c9ab article

A member of U.S. Special Forces serving alongside the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) in Syria told Fox News’ Jennifer Griffin on Wednesday they were witnessing Turkish atrocities on the frontlines.

“I am ashamed for the first time in my career,” said the distraught soldier, who has been involved in the training of indigenous forces on multiple continents. The service member, whom Griffin described as “hardened,” is among the 1,000 or so U.S. troops who remain in Syria.

“Turkey is not doing what it agreed to. It’s horrible,” this military source on the ground told Griffin. “We met every single security agreement. The Kurds met every single agreement [with the Turks]. There was no threat to the Turks — none — from this side of the border.”

TURKEY SAYS GROUND FORCES HAVE INVADED NORTHERN SYRIA; MULTIPLE CIVILIANS REPORTED DEAD

President Trump said the U.S. would pull its troops from northeast Syria on Sunday, a move considered a blow to the U.S.-backed Kurds by many analysts and political observers. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan later announced a military operation in the region that he said was to “neutralize terror threats” and establish a “safe zone.”

At least seven civilians have been killed in strikes in northeastern Syria since the assault began on Wednesday, according to activists and a war monitor. Turkey later announced that its ground forces had invaded the region to fight the Kurds.

“This is insanity,” the concerned U.S. service member said. “I don’t know what they call atrocities, but they are happening.”

Griffin called it one of the hardest phone calls she has ever taken.

U.S. military officials told Fox News the president ordered the military not to get involved in the Turkish strikes, after the Kurds requested air support.

Kurdish forces in northeastern Syria are guarding thousands of captured Islamic State (ISIS) fighters, now without the help of the U.S. in the area.

TRUMP ‘WENT OFF SCRIPT’ DURING CALL WITH ERDOGAN, SENIOR MILITARY SOURCE REVEALS

The Special Forces member said the Kurds have not left their positions guarding detainees. In fact, “they prevented a prison break last night without us,” the military source on the front line said. “They are not abandoning our side [yet].”

“The Turks are hitting outside the security mechanism,” according to the source, who said the Kurds are “pleading for our support.”

The American troops are doing “nothing,” the source lamented. “Just sitting by and watching it unfold.”

Troops on the ground in Syria and their commanders were “surprised” by Trump’s withdrawal decision Sunday night.

Of the president’s decision, the source said: “He doesn’t understand the problem. He doesn’t understand the repercussions of this. Erdogan is an Islamist, not a level-headed actor.”

TRUMP PULLS BACK TROOPS FROM NORTHERN SYRIA AHEAD OF TURKISH ASSAULT, PENTAGON OFFICIALS ‘BLINDSIDED’

“The Kurds are as close to Western thinking in the Middle East as anyone,” said the longtime member of Special Forces. “It’s a shame. We are just watching. It’s horrible.”

“This is not helping the ISIS fight,” the military source said.

Many of the ISIS prisoners “will be free in the coming days and weeks,” he predicted.

Trump told reporters Wednesday afternoon that the captured terrorists were “really bad people who should go back to Europe.”

“We said to various countries, we’d like you to take your people back. Nobody wants them, they’re bad,” Trump said, saying that “maybe the Kurds […] if not them, Turkey” would deal with the ISIS fighters.

TRUMP CALLS TURKEY ASSAULT ON SYRIA A ‘BAD IDEA’ AS KURDS REPORT CIVILIAN DEATHS

“The Kurds are sticking by us,” the Special Forces source stressed to Fox News. “No other partner I have ever dealt with would stand by us.”

American troops were disappointed in the decisions being handed down by senior leaders, the source on the ground added.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Westlake Legal Group us-syria Turkey's Syria invasion: Member of US Special Forces says, 'I am ashamed for the first time in my career' Melissa Leon Jennifer Griffin fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/world fnc ca65e2e9-7477-5c32-9fc7-13c30e96c9ab article   Westlake Legal Group us-syria Turkey's Syria invasion: Member of US Special Forces says, 'I am ashamed for the first time in my career' Melissa Leon Jennifer Griffin fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/world fnc ca65e2e9-7477-5c32-9fc7-13c30e96c9ab article

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Bipartisan Group Of Lawmakers Blasts NBA For Caving To China

Westlake Legal Group 5d9e649320000069054ff206 Bipartisan Group Of Lawmakers Blasts NBA For Caving To China

A bipartisan group of lawmakers said Wednesday they were deeply concerned that the NBA had kowtowed to China after the organization apologized for an executive’s comments supporting protestors in Hong Kong.

“It is outrageous that the NBA has caved to Chinese government demands for contrition,” the group, which included Rep. Tom Malinowski (D-N.J.), Rep. Mike Gallagher (R-Wis.), Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) and Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), wrote in a letter addressed to NBA Commissioner Adam Silver. “NBA players have a rich history of speaking out on sensitive topics of social justice and human rights inside the United States, and the NBA takes pride in defending their right to do so.”

“Yet while it is easy to defend freedom of speech when it costs you nothing, equivocating when profits are at stake is a betrayal of fundamental American values.”

The letter was also signed by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), Rep. Jim Banks (R-Ind.), Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas).

The lawmakers’ statement comes less than a week after the Houston Rockets’ general manager, Daryl Morey, posted a tweet in support of the democracy protests in Hong Kong, reading: “Fight for freedom, stand with Hong Kong.” The short-lived note prompted widespread anger in mainland China, where Communist Party leaders have ignited nationalist sentiment to encourage opposition to demonstrations related to Hong Kong’s autonomy.

Morey quickly deleted the message and issued an apology, but within days China’s state broadcaster said it would stop showing Rockets games in the country and sponsors began suspending their contracts with the NBA. The team has been wildly popular in China, in large part because it drafted Yao Ming in 2002. The Washington Post noted that the NBA has since become the country’s most popular sports league.

The NBA, which makes hundreds of millions of dollars in annual revenue in China, scrambled to contain the fallout. In a statement, the league said it recognized “that the views expressed by Houston Rockets General Manager Daryl Morey have deeply offended many of our friends and fans in China, which is regrettable.”

A separate message in Chinese went further, saying the NBA was “extremely disappointed” in Morey’s “inappropriate remarks.”

The response prompted its own backlash in the U.S., and lawmakers quickly lambasted the NBA for failing to defend free speech. Many called out Silver, the league’s commissioner, for trying to have it both ways while attempting to batten down the organization’s business interests.

The lawmakers on Wednesday urged the NBA to take action to defend the rights of its players and staff, including steps to support their ability to express their opinions “no matter the economic consequences.” They also urged Silver to call China’s bluff and refuse to air NBA activities in the country until government-owned broadcasters end their own boycott.

“Your statements come at a time when we would hope to see Americans standing up and speaking out in defense of the rights of the people of Hong Kong,” the lawmakers wrote. “You have more power to take a stand than most of the Chinese government’s targets and should have the courage and integrity to use it.”

Read the full letter below:

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Lauren Conrad welcomes second child

Westlake Legal Group Lauren-Conrad-e1449101232595-aba51a1b96761510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ Lauren Conrad welcomes second child New York Post Jaclyn Hendricks fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/events/babies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc article a28417cd-46e9-5fe4-8dbf-4fed25c0175e

Lauren Conrad is a mother of two.

On Wednesday, the former MTV personality announced she and husband William Tell had welcomed their second son.

“Our sweet baby boy, Charlie Wolf Tell, has arrived!” she wrote on Instagram.

RIHANNA SAYS SHE REJECTED SUPER BOWL HALFTIME PERFORMANCE BECAUSE OF COLIN KAEPERNICK: ‘I COULDN’T BE A SELLOUT’

Conrad, 33, revealed in April that she and Tell, 39, were expanding their family.

“It’s been hard to keep this one to myself! Very excited to share that our family will be getting a little bigger this year,” the clothing designer announced on Instagram.

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In September, Conrad gave an update on her pregnancy as she shared a snap of her growing baby bump on social media.

“Currently somewhere between ‘Get this baby out of me!’ and ‘Stay in there kid! We still have so much prep to do!” she quipped. “This counts as a maternity shoot, right?”

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Conrad married Tell in the fall of 2014. She gave birth to the couple’s first child, son Liam James, in July 2017.

This article originally appeared in Page Six.

Westlake Legal Group Lauren-Conrad-e1449101232595-aba51a1b96761510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ Lauren Conrad welcomes second child New York Post Jaclyn Hendricks fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/events/babies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc article a28417cd-46e9-5fe4-8dbf-4fed25c0175e   Westlake Legal Group Lauren-Conrad-e1449101232595-aba51a1b96761510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ Lauren Conrad welcomes second child New York Post Jaclyn Hendricks fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/events/babies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc article a28417cd-46e9-5fe4-8dbf-4fed25c0175e

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Lawmakers Say NBA Should Have ‘Courage’ To Stand Up To China

Westlake Legal Group 5d9e649320000069054ff206 Lawmakers Say NBA Should Have ‘Courage’ To Stand Up To China

A bipartisan group of lawmakers said Wednesday they were deeply concerned that the NBA had kowtowed to China after the organization apologized for an executive’s comments supporting protestors in Hong Kong.

“It is outrageous that the NBA has caved to Chinese government demands for contrition,” the group, which included Rep. Tom Malinowski (D-N.J.), Rep. Mike Gallagher (R-Wis.), Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) and Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), wrote in a letter addressed to NBA Commissioner Adam Silver. “NBA players have a rich history of speaking out on sensitive topics of social justice and human rights inside the United States, and the NBA takes pride in defending their right to do so.”

“Yet while it is easy to defend freedom of speech when it costs you nothing, equivocating when profits are at stake is a betrayal of fundamental American values.”

The letter was also signed by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), Rep. Jim Banks (R-Ind.), Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas).

The lawmakers’ statement comes less than a week after the Houston Rockets’ general manager, Daryl Morey, posted a tweet in support of the democracy protests in Hong Kong, reading: “Fight for freedom, stand with Hong Kong.” The short-lived note prompted widespread anger in mainland China, where Communist Party leaders have ignited nationalist sentiment to encourage opposition to demonstrations related to Hong Kong’s autonomy.

Morey quickly deleted the message and issued an apology, but within days China’s state broadcaster said it would stop showing Rockets games in the country and sponsors began suspending their contracts with the NBA. The team has been wildly popular in China, in large part because it drafted Yao Ming in 2002. The Washington Post noted that the NBA has since become the country’s most popular sports league.

The NBA, which makes hundreds of millions of dollars in annual revenue in China, scrambled to contain the fallout. In a statement, the league said it recognized “that the views expressed by Houston Rockets General Manager Daryl Morey have deeply offended many of our friends and fans in China, which is regrettable.”

A separate message in Chinese went further, saying the NBA was “extremely disappointed” in Morey’s “inappropriate remarks.”

The response prompted its own backlash in the U.S., and lawmakers quickly lambasted the NBA for failing to defend free speech. Many called out Silver, the league’s commissioner, for trying to have it both ways while attempting to batten down the organization’s business interests.

The lawmakers on Wednesday urged the NBA to take action to defend the rights of its players and staff, including steps to support their ability to express their opinions “no matter the economic consequences.” They also urged Silver to call China’s bluff and refuse to air NBA activities in the country until government-owned broadcasters end their own boycott.

“Your statements come at a time when we would hope to see Americans standing up and speaking out in defense of the rights of the people of Hong Kong,” the lawmakers wrote. “You have more power to take a stand than most of the Chinese government’s targets and should have the courage and integrity to use it.”

Read the full letter below:

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