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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 176)

Record Turnout in Hong Kong Vote After Months of Protests and Rising Violence

Westlake Legal Group 24hk-elect1-facebookJumbo Record Turnout in Hong Kong Vote After Months of Protests and Rising Violence Politics and Government Hong Kong Protests (2019) Hong Kong elections Demonstrations, Protests and Riots China

HONG KONG — After months of antigovernment protests in Hong Kong, voters on Sunday had a chance to voice their opinion on the city’s future — and they turned out in droves, shattering the city’s records for turnout.

The election on Sunday was for district council members, one of the lowest rungs of Hong Kong’s elected offices. District councils mainly deal with noise complaints, bus stop locations and neighborhood beautification projects. Elections for them are usually quiet affairs focused on community issues.

But in the midst of the increasingly violent protests that have divided the city, the race took on outsize significance. The vote was the first test of whether the protests could transform public anger that has led millions to take to the streets into actual votes, or whether the populace had grown weary of acts of civil disobedience that have snarled transportation and forced the closing of schools and businesses.

The results are expected hours after the polls closed at around 10:30 p.m. in Hong Kong. The election drew record-setting throngs of voters to polling places on Sunday. Through it all, the city was calm, as democracy advocates appeared to focus on participating in one of the few elections that Beijing allows in the territory under its sovereignty.

“Politically speaking, the battle of the district councils as a whole is a crucial battle in taking control,” said Eddie Chu, a pro-democracy legislator who is also running for district council.

Here’s a look at the race and what is at stake:

More than 69 percent of voters had hit the polls with around an hour left to go before the election closed. Those numbers surpassed the 47 percent turnout in the entire election four years ago. Back then, it had already set a record, lifted by an awakening of political interest that accompanied the Umbrella Movement a year earlier.

Before voting began on Sunday morning, the government had strongly denied a persistent rumor on social media that the polls might close after the first several hours, instead of being open for the scheduled 15 hours.

That rumor gave both sides in the election an incentive to urge their voters to show up early. Four times as many people voted in the first hour of polling as did in the 2015 district council elections.

“I haven’t been voting for a while — this time is very important,” Ada Chan, a 30-year-old office worker, said as she left a polling place after casting her ballot early.

Lines quickly became so long on Sunday morning that Patrick Nip, the territory’s secretary for constitutional and mainland affairs, appealed to the public to have more confidence that the polls would stay open.

“The voting time is very abundant, so you don’t have to concentrate on voting at the same time,” he said.

By late afternoon, lines had disappeared at some locations. The voters had dwindled to a trickle at the Yau Ma Tei Community Center polling station, nestled between the city’s famous street market for jade and the graceful banyan trees of an ancient temple.

A call to expand Hong Kong’s limited democracy is one of the demands of the protest movement, which began in June over a now-withdrawn proposal that would have allowed extraditions to mainland China.

Protesters have called for direct elections for the entire legislature, where currently only 40 of the 70 seats are selected by popular vote. They have also called for the chief executive, who is selected by a largely pro-Beijing election committee, to instead be chosen by voters.

The district councils have no lawmaking power. They control small amounts of public funds for simple infrastructure, like rain shelters. They lodge concerns with government departments over noise, traffic, sanitation and other issues. (Of the 479 district council seats, 452 are directly elected.)

The district council members do have a modest role in choosing the chief executive, Hong Kong’s highest official. Whichever side wins a majority of the seats controls 117 votes in the 1,200-member chief executive election committee.

That election committee is dominated by pro-establishment corporate interests, and the chief executives they have selected have always been loyal to Beijing. But a win would give the overall pro-democracy camp control of an additional 10 percent of the votes, and put it close to the 150 votes necessary to nominate a candidate.

The brochures of district council candidates typically show neighborhood concerns they pledge to fix: trash-filled alleys, air-conditioners dripping on sidewalks and streets lined with illegally parked cars.

This year, several pro-democracy candidates have included protest slogans on their materials. Law Cheuk-yung, 22, said he was inspired to run for district council because of recent social movements. He said he would demand answers from the police after residents complained of possible testing of tear gas in his district, Tuen Mun.

“I want to imagine local government being more responsive,” he said. “At the moment the district council is just a rubber stamp. They do whatever the government wants.”

For such candidates, it is more about playing to the sentiment of the protests rather than taking action. They would not have much of a role in addressing protesters’ demands, which include an investigation into the police’s use of force, offering amnesty to those arrested in the protests and expanding direct elections.

“They are all trying to capitalize on public anger,” said Suzanne Pepper, a scholar of Chinese politics who lives in Hong Kong.

Establishment parties have long had an advantage in these races, in part because they are much better funded, with backing from businesses. Currently the pro-Beijing camp holds 327 district council seats versus 124 for the pro-democracy group.

Rising interest in the election has meant that pro-democracy candidates are participating in every race, unlike previous years, when some establishment district council members ran unopposed. And after worries about disqualifications, only one of the camp’s candidates, the prominent activist Joshua Wong, was barred from running this year for political reasons. An election officer ruled that Mr. Wong could not uphold Hong Kong law because his political organization viewed independence from China as a possible goal for the city.

A string of violent attacks on election candidates has hung over the race. Twelve opposition figures, including prominent politicians and activists as well as first-time candidates, have been ambushed and bloodied by gangs of masked men or attacked while canvassing for votes.

“We can see Hong Kong isn’t as free and as civilized as we’d previously imagined,” said Jannelle Leung, a 25-year-old accountant who was struck in the back of her head with a hard object in early October the day she announced she was officially running. She also said she received sexually harassing phone calls before the attack.

Jocelyn Chau, a first-time candidate like Ms. Leung who received similar lurid calls before being punched by a man while canvassing last month in the pro-Beijing neighborhood of North Point, criticized the government for not condemning the attacks on pro-democracy figures. “Not even superficial gestures,” said Ms. Chau, 23.

The polarizing pro-Beijing lawmaker Junius Ho was injured in a knife attack this month and his offices were vandalized. He called the attack “a dark day for the district council election,” adding that the “orderly election had been completely obliterated.”

The attacks on candidates and vandalism had stirred worries that the election might be postponed. Some pro-democracy figures had said that a delay could harm their strength at the polls.

Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s chief executive, said the government would do its best to ensure the election would go on as scheduled. The government posted riot police officers near polling places across the city, though outside the zones marked with yellow tape where only voters could go.

The city had been convulsed by two weeks of intense protest, including on several campuses. At Chinese University of Hong Kong, protesters clashed with the police and occupied the college for five days. At Hong Kong Polytechnic University, more than 1,000 people at one point were trapped by a police siege.

Patrick Nip, the secretary for constitutional and mainland affairs, warned Monday that further unrest would reduce the chances of the election’s being held as scheduled. He called for an end to violence “and all kinds of duress.”

In the past few days, protests have ebbed drastically, however, as the city prepared to take its conflicts to the polls.

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Congo plane crashes into homes in African town leaving at least 17 dead

A plane carrying at least 17 passengers crashed into homes shortly after takeoff Sunday in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, killing everyone aboard and likely more people on the ground, authorities said.

The small aircraft, reportedly a Dornier-228 twin-turboprop, plunged into two neighboring houses near the city of Goma’s airport in the central African country, North Kivu provincial Minister of Health Moise Kanyere said.

SOUTH AFRICA PILOT DIES AFTER PLANE CRASHES INTO HOME; POLICE INVESTIGATING AS ‘CULPABLE HOMICIDE’

Nzanzu Kasivita Carly, the regional governor, said in a statement that preliminary information indicated the plane carried 17 passengers when it failed to take off. It was unclear how many crew members were aboard.

Westlake Legal Group congo-crash-1 Congo plane crashes into homes in African town leaving at least 17 dead Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/world/disasters/transportation fox news fnc/world fnc article 2f8552c1-b3b4-5894-a56e-c0cfbe2c6a32

Rescuers and onlookers gather amidst the debris of an aircraft that crashed in Goma, Congo on Sunday. (AP Photo/Justin Kabumba)

While the exact number of dead has not been confirmed, it is believed that victims included residents on the ground, including a family of four, local officials told the BBC.

Images from the scene showed black smoke rising from the charred wreckage of the aircraft as residents gathered around the destroyed homes.

Rescuers were seen digging through the debris and removing bodies as they searched for survivors. Residents of the neighborhood packed the narrow streets and looked on.

AUSTRALIAN TOURIST, 35, TIED UP AND BEATEN BY INDIAN MOB HAD ALLEGEDLY ‘MISBEHAVED’ AROUND VILLAGE WOMEN

Kanyere said investigators are “looking for and collecting all of the necessary information” to identify the victims.

Westlake Legal Group congo-crash-2 Congo plane crashes into homes in African town leaving at least 17 dead Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/world/disasters/transportation fox news fnc/world fnc article 2f8552c1-b3b4-5894-a56e-c0cfbe2c6a32

Rescuers remove bodies from the debris of an aircraft that crashed into two residential homes. (AP Photo/Justin Kabumba)

The aircraft was owned by private carrier Busy Bee and was headed to Beni, about 220 miles north of Goma in the same province.

While the cause of the crash has not been confirmed, the plane may have experienced engine failure about a minute after takeoff, the BBC reported, citing sources.

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Air accidents are frequent in the Congo because of poor maintenance and relaxed air safety standards.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group congo-crash-1 Congo plane crashes into homes in African town leaving at least 17 dead Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/world/disasters/transportation fox news fnc/world fnc article 2f8552c1-b3b4-5894-a56e-c0cfbe2c6a32   Westlake Legal Group congo-crash-1 Congo plane crashes into homes in African town leaving at least 17 dead Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/world/disasters/transportation fox news fnc/world fnc article 2f8552c1-b3b4-5894-a56e-c0cfbe2c6a32

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Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg Is Running For President

Westlake Legal Group ap_19161781280080-89a72a924f1e8c8fe7f72d9a3daf09d623500d02-s800-c15 Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg Is Running For President

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is making a late entry into the Democratic presidential primary, less than three months before voters begin to cast ballots. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg Is Running For President

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is making a late entry into the Democratic presidential primary, less than three months before voters begin to cast ballots.

John Locher/AP

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is making a late entry into the presidential race, a move that could upend the Democratic nominating contest this spring.

He had initially ruled out a presidential run in March, saying that while he believed that he would defeat President Trump in a general election, that he was “clear-eyed about the difficulty of winning the Democratic nomination in such a crowded field.”

His decision to join the race less than three months before voters start to cast ballots is a reflection of his view that the current field of Democratic candidates was not positioned to defeat Trump in a general election, and that a candidate with his experience and centrist politics would have a better chance of doing so.

Bloomberg is one of the world’s richest men, and will enter the campaign with unparalleled financial resources to tap. Yet, he will be self-funding a presidential bid at a time when many in the party have shown skepticism to self-funding candidates. Another billionaire and deep-pocketed donor to Democratic causes, Tom Steyer, entered the race in July.

Bloomberg had been actively preparing to launch a presidential bid for some time, and in recent weeks had filed to appear on ballots in several states, raising speculation that he would indeed join the race. His advisers have said he plans to skip the first four nominating contests in Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada, and will instead focus on the delegate-rich states on Super Tuesday.

He was first elected mayor as a Republican in 2001, and was a Republican for much of his political career. Bloomberg registered as an independent in 2007 and rejoined the Democratic party in October 2018.

Bloomberg is the latest Democrat to make a late entry to the race. Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick joined the race in November and is also charting a centrist bid.

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Time to call out and remove Putin’s propagandists

Westlake Legal Group FlogKtxrkLFz7rPlhDYgnaqfMpp3Uebaq67tM8X5vUU Time to call out and remove Putin’s propagandists r/politics

“Republicans are not “merely” violating their oaths of office for failing to support impeachment of a president who arguably has committed more serious “high Crimes and Misdemeanors” and acts of bribery than all his predecessors combined. None of them sacrificed national security to obtain a political advantage. President Trump has been disloyal to the United States, not only in giving Russia a leg up in its war against Ukraine, but also in broadcasting his propaganda. And for that, Republicans are just as guilty.

The New York Times reports that “Fiona Hill, a respected Russia scholar and former senior White House official, added a harsh critique during testimony on Thursday. She told some of Mr. Trump’s fiercest defenders in Congress that they were repeating ‘a fictional narrative.’ She said that it likely came from a disinformation campaign by Russian security services, which also propagated it.” While that did not slow Republicans one bit, we now know that they are neither dupes nor Fox News pawns; they are deliberately assisting in a Russian propaganda operation:

In a briefing that closely aligned with Dr. Hill’s testimony, American intelligence officials informed senators and their aides in recent weeks that Russia had engaged in a yearslong campaign to essentially frame Ukraine as responsible for Moscow’s own hacking of the 2016 election, according to three American officials. The briefing came as Republicans stepped up their defenses of Mr. Trump in the Ukraine affair. If congressional Republicans have evidence our intelligence community is wrong, they need to present it. Otherwise, they need to be called out for deliberately assisting a hostile foreign power. It is up to mainstream media interviewers and every Democrat on the ballot in 2020 to directly challenge Republicans who, yes, engage in un-American activity.

In the case of Trump, he not only picks up the propaganda from domestic sources carrying Russian President Vladimir Putin’s water, which “worked its way into American information ecosystems, sloshing around until parts of it reached Mr. Trump”; he was duped right from the source speaking “with Mr. Putin about allegations of Ukrainian interference.” Whether the president is being blackmailed is unknown; what we do know is that he is a malleable puppet whose strings are pulled in the Kremlin.

Ironically, it was Republicans during the Cold War who routinely and falsely accused every liberal of aiding communists. Now, we have a case in which the “useful idiots” are in the White House and Congress, spreading Putin’s lies far more effectively than the Russian leader could do on his own.

The Post reports that a forthcoming inspector general’s report will affirm that the FISA application submitted for surveillance of Carter Page “had a proper legal and factual basis, and, more broadly, that FBI officials did not act improperly in opening the Russia investigation,” although a low-level employee “inappropriately altered a document that was used during the process” to renew a FISA warrant. In other words: Russia did it. Period. The impeachment inquiry into President Trump has exposed troubling cracks in the political system. (Video: Joy Sharon Yi, Kate Woodsome/Photo: Danielle Kunitz/The Washington Post) Fortunately, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.) has already called for a hearing on the report. Perfect. Let the committee members draw out from Justice Department inspector general Michael Horowitz, FBI Director Christopher A. Wray and any number of national security officials in Trump’s own administration the obvious conclusions: 1. Russia did it to help Trump; 2. Ukraine had no such plan to “interfere” in our election on behalf of Hillary Clinton or anyone else (“The accusations of a Ukrainian influence campaign center on actions by a handful of Ukrainians who openly criticized or sought to damage Mr. Trump’s candidacy in 2016. They were scattershot efforts that were far from a replica of Moscow’s interference”); 3. Intentionally repeating a falsehood, that Ukraine interfered with our election, is aiding and abetting a hostile power that attacked our election system in 2016.

Republicans must bear full responsibility for raising a specious defense of Trump that aids Russia, and the president should be held responsible for his inability to defend our national security by virtue of his susceptibility to Russian propaganda. The former, presumably, have not lost their powers of reason, and therefore, must be denounced and voted out of office for perpetuating known propaganda from a hostile power. As for Trump, there are plenty of grounds for impeachment, but let’s not forget a big one: He is intellectually incapable of recognizing reality. He cannot carry out the responsibilities of commander in chief.”

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Justin Haskins: Elizabeth Warren is a socialist – if she’s the Dem nominee, THIS happens in 2020

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6104771638001_6104770786001-vs Justin Haskins: Elizabeth Warren is a socialist – if she's the Dem nominee, THIS happens in 2020 Justin Haskins fox-news/politics/socialism fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 239c2626-6b73-5585-8dbe-b1bd95542424

Halloween is long past, but Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts – a leading contender for the Democratic presidential nomination – stubbornly continues to masquerade as a capitalist.

In fact, Warren’s extensive record of supporting radical policies shows beyond all doubt that she is a far-left, off-her-rocker, dyed-in-the-wool socialist.

Warren can call herself anything she wants, of course, but that doesn’t make her claim true. She is no more a capitalist than she is a Native American – another false claim she made about herself for years.

KIMBERLEY STRASSEL: ELIZABETH WARREN ADMITS TO A COLOSSAL CAMPAIGN ERROR. THIS IS WHAT SHE DID NEXT

Why is Warren hiding her socialism? Because she’s not stupid. She knows that being honest and admitting she is a socialist will scare off millions of voters – making it difficult to win the Democratic presidential nomination and likely impossible to defeat President Trump a year from now in the general election.

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According to a new Heartland Institute-Rasmussen Reports survey of 1,000 likely voters, only 26 percent of Americans say they would “vote for a presidential candidate who identifies himself or herself as a socialist.” And only 12 percent said they think socialism is a “better … economic system” than a free-market system. The survey was conducted Nov. 13 and 14.

Even more devastating for socialist presidential candidates like Warren and Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, the survey found that half of independents and nearly one in three Democrats (31 percent) said they would not vote for a socialist presidential candidate.

Perhaps most interesting, 19 percent of those with a “very favorable” view of Warren and 20 percent of those with a “very favorable” view of Sanders – who proudly calls himself a democratic socialist – said they would not vote for a socialist in 2020.

While I disagree with Sanders on just about all issues of public policy, I give him credit for admitting he’s a socialist. However, his honesty about this one issue will likely doom his presidential candidacy.

In Warren’s America, taxpayers would pay for convicted murderers and rapists to go to college (for example) and they’d be required to pay for the food, health care and education of a potentially endless stream of illegal immigrants, including people who have never worked for a single day in the United States and have contributed absolutely no tax revenue into the system. 

When Sanders likely withdraws from the nominating race, most of his supporters will probably throw their backing to Warren, because the two candidates hold similar positions on most issues. That may be enough to make Warren the Democratic presidential nominee next year – a prospect that must delight Trump.

You can count on the president to label whoever the Democrats nominate to run against him as a wild-eyed socialist with crazy and dangerous ideas. In Warren’s case – just as in the case of Sanders – this description is absolutely accurate.

Warren supports nearly every high-profile, far-left policy embraced by Sanders and other socialist radicals like Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y. These policies include a nationwide single-payer health care scheme (throwing more than 150 million Americans off their private health insurance plans), “free” college, cancellation of college debt, and the extraordinarily expensive Green New Deal that would wreck our economy send energy prices soaring.

Warren has also endorsed Ocasio-Cortez’s “Just Society” plan. Among other completely insane parts of the Just Society is a provision that would prevent government agencies from barring convicted criminals and illegal immigrants from accessing federal welfare, health, disability, education, and other government social and welfare benefits.

In Warren and AOC’s America, taxpayers would pay for convicted murderers and rapists to go to college (for example) and they’d be required to pay for the food, health care and education of a potentially endless stream of illegal immigrants, including people who have never worked for a single day in the United States and have contributed absolutely no tax revenue into the system.

All these pie-in-the-sky schemes would cost trillions of dollars to actually implement. Even if a President Warren were to confiscate everything the richest Americans owned and left them penniless and homeless, she would still have to raise taxes on the rest of us to fund her massively expensive government expansion.

Unfortunately for Comrades Bernie and Elizabeth, the Heartland-Rasmussen survey shows that despite the mountains of positive media coverage socialism and socialist candidates have received in the past year, Americans still aren’t buying the idea that centrally planned, collective economic systems work better than free markets. And there are good reasons for that, too.

Socialist and communist parties killed, exiled or imprisoned more than 167 million people in the 20th century. The recent chaos in countries like Venezuela – where there are shortages of all sorts of consumer goods and some people have resorted to eating zoo animals to survive – has served as a reminder that whenever socialism is attempted, it inevitably results in bloodshed and economic collapse.

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Meanwhile, market-based capitalist reforms in India have liberated hundreds of millions of people from extreme poverty in just the past few decades alone.

And although America’s market economy is far from perfect – due in large part to arrangements made by corrupt governments and massive corporations – it has still created a higher quality of life than anything human beings have ever experienced.

The poorest among us today live better, longer, healthier lives than billions of people around the world – including hundreds of millions living in current or former socialist nations.

Most Americans know socialism doesn’t work.

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But many don’t understand that what Elizabeth Warren and others are selling is – despite many the promises to the contrary – the same destructive, dangerous, disastrous ideas socialists have been peddling for more than 100 years.

If Americans figure that out, it would spell disaster for Warren, Sanders and their Democratic congressional comrades trying to keep control of the House and seize power in the Senate.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY JUSTIN HASKINS  

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6104771638001_6104770786001-vs Justin Haskins: Elizabeth Warren is a socialist – if she's the Dem nominee, THIS happens in 2020 Justin Haskins fox-news/politics/socialism fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 239c2626-6b73-5585-8dbe-b1bd95542424   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6104771638001_6104770786001-vs Justin Haskins: Elizabeth Warren is a socialist – if she's the Dem nominee, THIS happens in 2020 Justin Haskins fox-news/politics/socialism fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 239c2626-6b73-5585-8dbe-b1bd95542424

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Alaska man arrested after allegedly smuggling $400G in drugs — stuffed in rotting goat intestines — at airport, officials say

A 71-year-old Alaska man was arrested after he was allegedly found with $400,000 worth of drugs — hidden inside rotting goat intestines — at an airport, authorities said.

Cenen Placencia was taken into custody Wednesday at Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport, months after officials opened an investigation to try to find a source of narcotics in Kodiak.

FLORIDA MAN HAD METH ‘WEDGED DEEP WITHIN’ BELLY BUTTON, COPS SAY

At the airport last week, investigators with Alaska State Troopers searched a large box that Placencia checked as luggage after he consented to a search, an affidavit filed with the charges stated.

Westlake Legal Group goat-police-istock Alaska man arrested after allegedly smuggling $400G in drugs — stuffed in rotting goat intestines — at airport, officials say Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/west/alaska fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/us fnc article a6023cb0-6211-5cef-b829-148d96a66d59

Authorities said Cenen Placencia, 71, was arrested after he was allegedly caught with rotting goat intestines, that were apparently stuffed with drugs, at Anchorage, Alaska’s international airport on Wednesday. (iStock)

The box contained loosely wrapped frozen meat, with multiple small pieces of meat frozen together, and Placencia approved letting it thaw so authorities could further investigate. As the frozen items thawed, officials said they smelled rotting meat — that apparently turned out to be goat intestines — and a police dog detected drugs.

OHIO MOM WHO SAYS SHE SOLD METH TO PUT KID THROUGH COLLEGE IS SENTENCED

Placencia withdrew his consent to search the meat before it finished thawing, investigators said, prompting them to obtain a search warrant.

Once their search resumed, authorities found packages wrapped in plastic that contained about 740 grams of heroin and 389 grams of methamphetamine, the state’s Department of Public Safety said in a news release.

Placencia had been heading back to Kodiak when he was arrested, initially booking a morning flight and later rebooking for a late afternoon flight. Before that flight departed, Placencia agreed to be interviewed, and told investigators he packed the bag himself and denied knowing about the drugs.

The 71-year-old told investigators he bought the goat intestines for $140 from a California rancher for his own consumption, the affidavit states.

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Placencia was taken into custody at the Anchorage jail, troopers said. He was arraigned Friday on a charge of possession with intent to distribute controlled substances.

Authorities said they began investigating Placencia in February, and in March served search warrants on his home, where they seized roughly 247 grams of heroin, 13 grams of crystal methamphetamine and nearly $2,280 in suspected drug proceeds, investigators said. Assistant U.S. Attorney Christian Sherman said those drugs are not included in the current charges.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group goat-police-istock Alaska man arrested after allegedly smuggling $400G in drugs — stuffed in rotting goat intestines — at airport, officials say Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/west/alaska fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/us fnc article a6023cb0-6211-5cef-b829-148d96a66d59   Westlake Legal Group goat-police-istock Alaska man arrested after allegedly smuggling $400G in drugs — stuffed in rotting goat intestines — at airport, officials say Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/west/alaska fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/us fnc article a6023cb0-6211-5cef-b829-148d96a66d59

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The Powerlessness Of Nigeria’s Tech Startups

Westlake Legal Group power_plant-1_custom-6a0ac814fc9e2da419347522545a31e72d733a59-s1100-c15 The Powerlessness Of Nigeria's Tech Startups

An employee walks past a power plant’s electricity pylons in Lagos, Nigeria. Power shortages are particularly a problem for Nigeria’s booming tech industry, which accounts for nearly 14% of the country’s GDP. Georgie Osodi/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Georgie Osodi/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The Powerlessness Of Nigeria's Tech Startups

An employee walks past a power plant’s electricity pylons in Lagos, Nigeria. Power shortages are particularly a problem for Nigeria’s booming tech industry, which accounts for nearly 14% of the country’s GDP.

Georgie Osodi/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Chris Oyeniyi runs a small tech startup in Lagos, Nigeria. It’s a smartphone app called KariGO that he says is “like Uber but for trucks.” Businesses or factories can use it to hire big semitrucks to move their products around the country. He started it in 2016 and now has 11 office staff members, and he owns a few dozen trucks.

But unlike Uber, which operates 24/7, Oyeniyi says the app is limited to normal business hours. He wants to keep it open around the clock but faces what has so far been an insurmountable obstacle. It’s not a staff shortages, government regulations or software glitches.

“One thing will not allow us to do that,” he says. “Electricity.”

Oyeniyi says he pays about $800 every month to keep the lights and computers on in his small office. The reason for the high cost? Power from the government-run electrical grid is cheap but goes out so often — multiple times a day, every day — that he is forced to rely on a loud, fume-belching, diesel-sucking generator. It’s too expensive to fuel and maintain beyond the bare minimum number of hours.

If the government power grid worked all the time, he says, his electrical bill would be closer to $100.

Power shortages are common in many low- and middle-income countries. A United Nations report this fall found that 840 million people live without access to reliable electricity. Most of them are in Africa, and most live in rural areas, beyond the reach of the grid.

But the problem of power outages strikes cities as well — and can take an especially harsh toll on the economy, cutting off the productivity of businesses and government agencies alike, and forcing entrepreneurs like Oyeniyi to pour capital into backup generators instead of investing in staff or equipment. In Lagos, the grid is so unreliable that most homes and businesses have a generator, and the city is constantly filled with the noise and pollution from millions of people creating their own power.

Power shortages are particularly a problem for Nigeria’s booming tech industry, which is the biggest on the continent and accounts for nearly 14% of the country’s GDP, according to a survey of 93 Nigerian tech startups released this month by the Center for Global Development. The survey found that 57% of startups, most with fewer than 10 employees, find electricity problems to be a “major” or “very severe” obstacle to their business, beating out other challenges such as corruption, taxes and government red tape. (Access to finance and political instability were also top-ranking obstacles.)

Vijaya Ramachandran, the center’s research manager and lead author of the report, says the electricity problem is kneecapping a sector that offers perhaps the most promising opportunity to create skilled, high-paying jobs for young people and diversify the country’s volatile economy away from its traditional reliance on oil and gas.

“This is a very significant burden for the local tech sector,” she says. “It’s a very basic business environment problem that needs to be fixed.”

It’s not just the cost: Many startups face the constant risk of a blackout suddenly wiping out important digital work, interrupting critical software updates, simply wasting employees’ time or forcing them to work without air conditioning in the sweltering Lagos heat.

“If there’s no power, you can’t do work,” says Tomiwa Aladekomo, editor of the Nigerian industry journal TechCabal. “Even if you have a backup system, it’s a demoralizer for employees and a pretty big productivity tax.”

Jonathan Phillips, director of the Energy Access Project at Duke University, who was not involved in the survey, says Nigeria’s power problems date back decades to the country’s early days of independence, when the government set up a heavily subsidized electrical grid. The energy system was often a prime target for corruption, he says, and has never been able to generate enough profit to offset the massive cost needed to build enough new power plants and distribution lines to keep up with the country’s rapidly growing population. As a result, he says, Nigeria has one-fifth the total power supply of North Carolina, with a population of 200 million people, 20 times the state’s — and blows through up to $8 billion per year on diesel fuel for generators.

“Nigeria is the poster child on how power access, especially in the business area, is just such a mega-constraint to growth,” he says. Especially for startups, he says, “they’ve got 99 problems and they just don’t need electricity to be one of them.”

For some startups, one solution is WeWork-style co-working spaces that allow them to pool their energy bills. Tunde McIver runs a tech co-working space in Lagos and says many of his clients come to him because they need to pass off the headache of dealing with electricity to someone else. But even a co-working space can’t fully surmount the generator cost.

“Tech is an around-the-clock business,” he says. “But [because of the high cost of power] you can’t keep the office open 24 hours. You just can’t. So it’s an inhibition [for business growth], definitely.”

Solar power is another potential solution and is increasingly common on residential rooftops in the city. But McIver says it can’t provide enough juice to power a whole office of computers, lights and air conditioners. So ultimately, the problem comes down to money: Either pay the generator bill or collapse.

But the struggle for power is worth it, he says. About 122 million of Nigeria’s 200 million people have access to the Internet, accounting for one-fifth of all Internet users in Africa. That’s a lot of potential customers for Web-based services.

“Nigeria is the land of opportunity,” he says. “Once you master the energy challenge, there’s a very large market, and you’ll be able to make money.”

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A President Openly Susceptible to Blackmail Cannot Serve

Westlake Legal Group Ef4mJOuTWrjumCB3v0ZMQH-1OIL87MPtJP6EN3fw2Uk A President Openly Susceptible to Blackmail Cannot Serve r/politics

Putin, Giuliani, Turkey, MBS, his accountants, his employees, his lenders, his business partners, his mistresses…

Every time he tells a lie to the American people, and someone has proof it’s a lie, he’s more and more compromised and subject to blackmail.

This is the best argument for voting in people of high moral integrity.

A POTUS acting with integrity in all aspects of their life is a matter of national security.

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Outnumbered And Scared, These Kurdish Americans Are Fighting Trump’s Syria Policy

On a Sunday night in early October, 24-year-old Sherin Zadah was working on her graduate school application at her San Diego home when her father, who had been watching the nightly news, called out: “Oh, my God, what is Trump doing?”

The White House had just announced a pullout of U.S. troops from northern Syria in anticipation of a long-planned military operation by Turkey into the area. As Kurdish Americans, Zadah and her father knew this meant imminent humanitarian disaster for Syrian Kurds. Just last year, their relatives had fled their homes in northern Syria ahead of Turkish artillery attacks.

Paralyzed with anxiety, they stayed close to the television. The following morning, Zadah’s father tried calling his aunt who lives with her three children in Kobani, near the Turkey-Syria border, but he couldn’t reach them.

By Wednesday, Turkey started firing shells into northern Syria. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said he was launching an operation to “neutralize terror threats” against Turkey. Amnesty International has since accused Turkish forces of “indiscriminate attacks in residential areas.” Thursday, Zadah and her family had heard of a Kurdish man in their San Diego community who lost his 7-year-old cousin to mortar fire in the northeastern city of Qamishli.

Zadah’s father was still unable to reach his aunt or cousins. He lost his appetite and ability to sleep through the night. He would later admit to Zadah at dinner, over a barely touched plate of chicken tikka masala, that he suspected he was depressed. “That’s a significant confession from someone raised in a culture that heavily stigmatizes mental health issues,” Zadah said. (Her father has still not managed to contact his relatives.)

In those trying days, Zadah picked up her phone to call her close friend, an 18-year-old Kurdish American named Yara Ismael. The two started planning demonstrations in Southern California.

Though Kurds make up .01% of the American population ― 40,000, by best estimates ― Zadah and Ismael were able to organize protests in San Diego and Los Angeles by posting fliers and circulating them on social media. They also reached out to other concerned Kurdish Americans to ask them to get the word out.

Hundreds of people showed up at the protests in both cities, waving signs, marching and chanting, “Stand with Kurds!”

In Nashville, which houses the largest number of Kurdish Americans anywhere in the U.S., hundreds came out to protest the White House decision. In Boston, Dallas, Washington, Las Vegas, Seattle and other cities, small groups of Kurdish Americans took to the streets. When President Donald Trump visited Dallas for a campaign rally, he was met by hundreds of demonstrators from the local Kurdish community.

Eloquent and assertive, Zadah got in front of news cameras to speak out on behalf of Kurds at one such rally in San Diego. “We feel betrayed,” she said to a local news reporter. “We feel angry that for five years the Kurds have fought side-by-side with Americans to fight the world’s greatest terrorist threat, ISIS, and they’ve essentially been abandoned.”

Westlake Legal Group 5dd857f9210000a87e34dcf9 Outnumbered And Scared, These Kurdish Americans Are Fighting Trump’s Syria Policy

Sara Terry for HuffPost Sherin Zadah organized a phone bank on Oct. 31 with students from Claremont McKenna College to call members of Congress to express their concerns and urge their support for sanctions on Turkey.

A second-generation Kurdish American whose parents came from northeastern Syria, Zadah had always kept one eye on the Kurdistan region. Two years ago, she organized a memorial to the Anfal genocide of the late 1980s, in which more than 180,000 Iraqi Kurds died. In late September, when Zadah went to see Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) at a presidential campaign event in San Diego, she shook her hand, looked her in the eye and said: “Please don’t forget about the Kurds.”

But she’s also a full-time educational consultant, and it was college admissions season ― her busiest time of the year. So Zadah became overloaded with studying for the Graduate Record Examinations, college admission deadlines, a despondent family and round-the-clock political activism. “If I wasn’t talking on the phone, writing an email, debriefing with Yara, talking to my manager, I was falling asleep,” Zadah recalled.

When the first wave of protests died down, Zadah turned her attention to lobbying. She and Ismael started a running list of lawmakers to contact about potential congressional votes on Turkey and Syria.

Zadah stopped studying for the GREs, Ismael dropped a college course and the two started scaling back on sleep. Still, they said they’ve never been more fulfilled.

“I have more purpose than I have ever felt before in my life,” Zadah told me on a night she looked particularly exhausted. “We don’t care if we’re not sleeping,” Ismael added. “So long as it’s for this cause.”

They called each member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee to ask where they stood on their support for the Kurds. “We are Kurdish Americans and we’re concerned with the ethnic cleansing happening in northeastern Syria,” they told congressional staffers. They scheduled phone calls with congressional aides, and Ismael caught a flight to Washington to meet a few in person. They developed relationships with close to a dozen legislative staffers and began checking in with them regularly.

A week after Turkey started launching airstrikes, after Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) didn’t vote to condemn Trump’s troop withdrawal, Zadah and Ismael began communicating directly with Omar’s foreign policy aide. They sent a list of their concerns to the congresswoman’s office before a hearing on the U.S. troop withdrawal in the House Foreign Affairs Committee, and they were ecstatic when they saw Omar bring up one of their first major concerns: allegations of Turkey using chemical weapons in Syria. “It felt like our voices were being heard,” Ismael told me.

When Omar opted not to vote on recognizing the Armenian genocide and then voted against sanctioning Turkey, Zadah and Ismael immediately called Omar’s foreign affairs aide to express their anger. “As Kurdish Muslim-Americans, watching the first Muslim get elected along with Rashida [Tlaib], wearing a hijab, this representative who is supposed to present the ideas of democracy and feminism and human rights,” Zadah said over the phone to the legislative aide. “She herself is a refugee. But in regards to the largest ethnic minority in the world, she’s doing nothing to stop them from getting killed.”

Omar’s foreign policy aide told them the congresswoman would be willing to offer special visas to Kurds fleeing northern Syria. He shared that she’d also be open to a resolution banning weapon sales or security aid to Turkey. But she wouldn’t be supporting sanctions against Turkey, he said. They asked for a stronger condemnation against the Turkish president. He said he’d suggest it. “Please let us know what we can do for you,” Zadah said at the end of the phone call. “We’re here, and we want to help the situation.” 

Westlake Legal Group 5dd85903210000787e34dcfc Outnumbered And Scared, These Kurdish Americans Are Fighting Trump’s Syria Policy

Sara Terry for HuffPost Sherin Zadah, 24, left, and Yara Ismael, 18, make phone calls last month at Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, California.

As the Turkish offensive wore on, the U.S. House passed a bill, with overwhelming bipartisan approval, to impose sanctions against Turkey. As the bill moved to the upper chamber, Zadah and Ismael wanted to seize on that momentum. They created a flyer for a phone bank and urged others to call their senators and urge them to vote yes on sanctions against Turkey. Ismael reserved a classroom on her college campus for an hour.

Perched over a screen, running on adrenaline and not enough sleep, Zadah and Ismael pulled up a spreadsheet of names that included every U.S. senator minus the bill’s two sponsors. First up on the list was Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Zadah dialed his office and listened for a half-minute. “Mailbox is full,” she said, scowled and hung up. Given his recent skeptical comments to the media about sanctions against Turkey, Zadah knew McConnell was unlikely to support this bill, but she’d wanted to at least leave a message. From across the room, Ismael offered her friend a sympathetic glance and put her phone to her ear to call Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. She found the same: Mailbox is full.

Fighting fatigue, Zadah and Ismael quickly worked down the list, alphabetized by last name: Lamar Alexander. Tammy Baldwin. John Barrasso. A few friends stopped in to help. Together, they managed to call 48 senators, urging their support on a bill to sanction Turkey for its recent invasion into northeastern Syria and attacks on the Kurdish population there.

“This is a humanitarian tragedy, and the House has overwhelmingly supported sanctions against Turkey,” they said firmly to lawmakers’ aides and to voicemails, reading from the scripts they’d prepared the night before in between working and final exams. “As Americans, we hope to see our senators be on the right side of history.”

A bit before 1 p.m., a backpack-clad college student walked into the classroom, signaling the start of the class and an end to their phone banking. Ismael and Zadah smiled and waved goodbye to the computer screen where Shawnam Omar, a Kurdish American woman in Boston, was Skyping in from the phone bank she’d organized.

Elsewhere, a few Kurdish American activists in Nashville, Atlanta and Seattle also called senators, demanding sanctions. Over the course of the day, Zadah and Ismael estimate there were roughly 150 calls placed to senators by a dozen people over an hour. Of course, they would have liked to see more people participate, but “I think it went really well,” Ismael said. They’d had several productive conversations with legislative aides.

Westlake Legal Group 5ddaca19210000927e34de16 Outnumbered And Scared, These Kurdish Americans Are Fighting Trump’s Syria Policy

Sara Terry for HuffPost Zadah, Ismael and others call senators’ offices as part of an hourlong phone bank.

Zadah ultimately decided to postpone taking the GREs. Instead, she and Ismael started planning the beginnings of a Kurdish advocacy organization, coming up with names such as “Friends of Kurds” or “Americans for Kurdistan.” To their knowledge, no such organization broadly representing the interest of Kurdish Americans exists.

In U.S. cities hosting a sizable number of Kurds, there are often smaller, local organizations that function to represent Kurdish interests, such as Nashville’s Tennessee Kurdish Community Council, or the Kurdish Community of Southern California. But “there’s no collective Kurdish diaspora organization that represents the interests of Kurdish Americans,” said activist Dilman Yasin, who began organizing protests and vigils in the Nashville area following the Trump administration’s controversial Oct. 6 announcement. “I think if we had a central organization that would be able to speak on behalf of all of us, it would greatly benefit the diaspora.”

When Zadah received an invitation to speak on a youth panel at the Kurdish National Congress of North America, she was surprised. She’d never before heard of KNCNA.

When she arrived at a large conference room at East Lake University near Ann Arbor, Michigan, the first thing she noticed were rows of empty chairs. She took her seat on the stage with two other panelists and felt her heart sink. KNCNA represents the oldest and largest umbrella organization for Kurds in the United States, yet its annual conference drew sparse attendance. One attendee later told me: “Almost nobody knew about, it and it was extremely out of the way.”

“It’s quite indicative of where the Kurds are in terms of lobbying and organization,” said Bilal Wahad, an Iraqi-Kurdish American and expert in Kurdish politics at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. “When you’re coming from a dictatorial regime, you’re not used to lobbying. It’s about survival.”

“Maybe it’s less true for the second- and third-generation Kurds,” Wahad suggested. “They aren’t just in survival mode, but they appreciate the opportunity and freedom and voice that living in America offers them.”

At the conference, Zadah described her lobbying efforts, particularly the channel of communication she and Ismael established with Omar’s office: “We need to form a more cohesive strategy on how you want to approach this crisis because people are paying attention. We’ve seen tangible results. And if we’ve seen tangible results, then if we all come together, we’ll actually be able to create a difference.”

The small number of attendees rose from their chairs to applaud. Organizers later told her it was the first conference to ever see a standing ovation.

Deborah Bloom is a freelance journalist based in Portland, Oregon. In addition to breaking news coverage, she gravitates toward feature stories about women, culture and the environment. She can be reached on Twitter (@deborahebloom) or at deborahbloom1@gmail.com.

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Dan Gainor: ‘Bombshell’ impeachment hearings a dud — here’s how public reacted

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6108082102001_6108089646001-vs Dan Gainor: 'Bombshell' impeachment hearings a dud — here's how public reacted fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/opinion/media fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc Dan Gainor article 187a6473-6301-58a0-9c3a-e2e8e808c796

The news media were right about the impeachment hearings. They were a “bombshell” or even “explosive.”

And they bombed.

Welcome to the “Media Metaphor Show” starring just about everyone in the press — CNN, MSNBC, PBS, The Washington Post, The New York Times, AP, Politico and pretty much every major media outlet in the Western world.

PAUL BATURA: IMPEACHMENT AND PAUL HARVEY – BROADCAST LEGEND MIGHT SAY THIS IS THE REST OF THE STORY

How else do you package a dull, wonky set of hearings that are so blatantly political that President Trump is rising in the polls as a result? Give it sound and fury.

News outlets did a bang-up job with booming terminology.

PBS “News Hour” anchor Judy Woodruff led off her telecast with, “U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland delivers explosive testimony.” MSNBC’s Ari Melber stuck with the metaphor. “You had this explosive testimony today. You have Trump’s million-dollar donor turned ambassador blowing the lids off everything and saying we do crime,” he told “The Beat with Ari Melber” viewers.

More from Opinion

CNN “journalist” anchor Don Lemon mentioned the diplomat’s “explosive cell phone call” about Ukraine, which sounds painful. Journalists made so many “explosive” mentions that the news should have been sponsored by defense contractors.

Late-night “comedians” were just as bad. “Late Night with Seth Meyers” host Seth Meyers had a blast with metaphors, noting that,“This has been an explosive week of testimony in Washington” and how there was “one bombshell after another.”

“The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” undercut the ominous narrative. Fallon found humor in the endless media outbursts. “All day long people were calling Sondland’s testimony explosive. Explosive. I haven’t heard the word explosive so much since Chipotle started selling queso,” he joked.

Senior political commentator David Gergen said the hearings hurt Wednesday’s Democrat debate and “made tonight seem a little flatter.” Former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe warned, “there is exhaustion with impeachment going on today.”  

It might seem just a standard joke, except it’s what the left and the media fear most of all — that voters realized the hearings were a dud. The most noise they could muster came from an embarrassing on-air moment featuring Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Beano.

Potential voters were making noise, however, walking away from impeachment. Vanity Fair reported that “NEW POLLING SUGGESTS DEMOCRATS’ IMPEACHMENT PUSH COULD ALIENATE KEY VOTERS.” The Hill noted how a “Poll finds sharp swing in opposition to impeachment among independents.”

Even CNN noticed. Senior political commentator David Gergen said the hearings hurt Wednesday’s Democrat debate and “made tonight seem a little flatter.” Former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe warned, “there is exhaustion with impeachment going on today.”

Imagine how voters will feel after months of this.

Those fears didn’t stop the press from acting like idiots. CNN anchor Chris Cuomo (he with the anger management issues) even called on his mommy. Trump had tweeted that others can’t overhear phone calls and dared someone to “Try it live!” Cuomo did, by calling his mom in front of a panel that tried not to laugh at him.

The result was a live TV lesson in why some segments should be taped. Cuomo jammed his phone in the face of chief political correspondent Dana Bash whose facial expressions made this must-watch TV. But the rest of the panel was stone quiet until CNN political commentator David Urban admitted; “I can’t hear your mother, Chris.”

Nice metaphor for the voters and the media’s shrill impeachment antics. Unlike the CNN panel, voters don’t even care to listen.

Lies, Damn Lies and Border Statistics 

Huge news broke last week courtesy of a U.N. report that got instant attention because it made President Trump look bad. According to the report, there are “more than 100,000 children in migration-related detention in the United States of America.”

Reuters, AP, NBC and other outlets raced to cover the crisis.

HuffPost senior politics reporter Jennifer Bendery was one of many to criticize the U.S. “Congratulations America,” she tweeted. “We now have the world’s highest rate of children in detention, per a United Nations study.”

Only one small problem. The data from the report didn’t come from 2019. It came from 2015 when Barack Obama held the White House and 100,000 children were detained.

News outlets ran away from the story like it was radioactive. Agence France-Presse said it was “withdrawing this story.” Bendery pulled her tweet. Several outlets simply deleted their articles. A front-page story went away in a flash … simply because it no longer fit the anti-Trump narrative required of most big news stories. The misreporting led to some embarrassing moments as politicians used the story to attack Trump only to find they were attacking Obama.

Imagine if the press had covered the issue in 2015, not buried it in 2019.

Correction of the Week 

Everyone makes mistakes. I’ve made my share. So have you. Journalism used to stem the tide of errors with brilliant, detail-oriented people called copy editors. Most of those jobs have been eliminated and journalism is worse for it.

Which takes us to GQ. The magazine theoretically for men had an epic fail last week. It ran a typically shrill leftist article bashing Republicans: “Alexander Vindman and a Brief History of the GOP Smearing Veterans.” But there was a bit of an error.

Here’s the correction they didn’t even label as a “correction.” “NOTE: This story has been updated. Alexander Vindman received a Purple Heart after being wounded by an IED, or improvised explosive device, not an IUD, or intrauterine device. We regret the error.”

The jokes write themselves. Think of this as more of that fact-based journalism we always hear about.

Brother Can You Spare … $50 Billion? 

In the Great Depression, the catchphrase was “Brother, can you spare a dime?” The economy is doing well now, but not for journalists who have lost 28,000 jobs since 2008. Factor in inflation and one prominent journalist is calling for a $50 billion payday for the press.

HuffPost editor in chief Lydia Polgreen urged “every major corporation” to set aside a combined $50 billion for “high-quality news” instead of digital advertising on Facebook and Google. Polgreen’s apocalyptic manifesto warned, “The collapse of the information ecosystem poses profound risks for humanity.” Put more simply, “everyone is free to be their own propagandist.”

What she didn’t say is the anti-Trump media like HuffPost are a big cause of this problem. Journalists pick the stories, not readers. We get almost no news now that isn’t obsessed with taking down the president.

One reason “anyone is free to choose their own facts” is because the press spent decades ignoring stories that disagreed with their world view. And now that we have social media to compete with them, journalists like Polgreen want bailouts instead of earning that money with better journalism.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6108082102001_6108089646001-vs Dan Gainor: 'Bombshell' impeachment hearings a dud — here's how public reacted fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/opinion/media fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc Dan Gainor article 187a6473-6301-58a0-9c3a-e2e8e808c796   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6108082102001_6108089646001-vs Dan Gainor: 'Bombshell' impeachment hearings a dud — here's how public reacted fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/opinion/media fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc Dan Gainor article 187a6473-6301-58a0-9c3a-e2e8e808c796

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