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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 179)

Cal Thomas: Unilateral withdrawal isn’t the way Trump wins in Afghanistan — Victory is

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6084657976001_6084652377001-vs Cal Thomas: Unilateral withdrawal isn't the way Trump wins in Afghanistan -- Victory is Tribune Media Services fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/us/terror/al-qaeda fox-news/us/terror fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc ebfab444-87db-50c2-91f9-95c0a47a6664 Cal Thomas article

President Trump was right to cancel a “secret” meeting with leaders of the Taliban and the Afghan government following two bomb attacks by the terrorist group that killed 10 civilians, an American soldier and a Romanian service member in heavily fortified Kabul.

The president is eager to fulfill a desire to withdraw remaining American forces in what has been one of America’s longest wars. Who isn’t?

Unfortunately, terrorism does not fall under a single umbrella. It is not just  Al Qaeda, though all Islamist terrorist groups appear to have the same objective: Kill Americans, weaken the United States, subjugate women, eliminate Israel and impose its version of Sharia law across the globe.

TALIBAN TALKS DEAD: WHAT COMES NEXT FOR THE US IN AFGHANISTAN?

The prospect of a peace agreement would normally be cause for celebration, except in this case U.S. negotiators don’t appear to know who and what they are dealing with. As he ended American involvement in the Vietnam War with the Paris Peace Accords, President Nixon declared “peace with honor.” It wasn’t long before the communist North’s takeover of South Vietnam and their murder of “collaborators.”

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A premature U.S. pullout from Afghanistan will fulfill the late Usama bin Laden’s prophecy, which he based on America’s Vietnam experience, that the U.S. has no staying power and all the terrorists have to do is wait us out.

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A Taliban spokesman confirmed this in a statement to the London Times, declaring the group’s unwillingness to even agree to a cease-fire, much less a peace deal. “It is not possible for us,” he said. “We will fight. We have fought for 18 years and we will fight for a hundred years. We will continue our ‘jihad.’”

There is something else the secular West doesn’t, or worse, refuses to understand. As with some liberal Western leaders who thought promises from communists could be believed, radical Islamists are taught to lie to “infidels,” if it advances the cause of Islam.

From Raymond Ibrahim, writing for Middle East Forum, the Philadelphia-based conservative think tank, “According to Sharia (law), in certain situations, deception — also known as “taqiyya,” based on Quranic terminology — is not only permitted but sometimes obligatory. For instance, contrary to early Christian history, Muslims who must choose between either recanting Islam or being put to death are not only permitted to lie by pretending to have apostatized, but many jurists have decreed that, according to Quran 4:29, Muslims are obligated to lie in such instances.”

The Taliban leadership can be counted on to say to the West whatever it takes to regain power and to possibly again create a haven for terrorists to plot their next attack on the United States.

The West should never compromise when it comes to the Taliban’s attitude toward women and its desire to return to the days of their complete subjugation to men. Some years ago I met with a group of Afghan women in New York, who had managed to escape their country when the Taliban ruled. They included teachers, lawyers and businesswomen. These women told horrific stories of life under the Taliban. They were forced to paint over the windows of their homes, forbidden to leave home unless accompanied by a male relative, required to wear burqas in public and should they take a bus anywhere, a male relative had to take the coin from their hands and deposit it in the collection box.

There is no reform movement among the Taliban, so why doubt the group will return to practicing their interpretation of Islamic law should they have the opportunity?

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One hopes the U.S. will not consider anything resembling unilateral withdrawal, which is not the way to end a war; victory is.

The “war on terrorism” is unique because it is based on religious extremism and its accompanying ideology and a willingness — even eagerness — to die for their cause and their god. Should a peace deal eventually be reached without protections that preserve U.S. interests (and American lives), it will only ensure more trouble for the years ahead.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY CAL THOMAS

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6084657976001_6084652377001-vs Cal Thomas: Unilateral withdrawal isn't the way Trump wins in Afghanistan -- Victory is Tribune Media Services fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/us/terror/al-qaeda fox-news/us/terror fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc ebfab444-87db-50c2-91f9-95c0a47a6664 Cal Thomas article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6084657976001_6084652377001-vs Cal Thomas: Unilateral withdrawal isn't the way Trump wins in Afghanistan -- Victory is Tribune Media Services fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/us/terror/al-qaeda fox-news/us/terror fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc ebfab444-87db-50c2-91f9-95c0a47a6664 Cal Thomas article

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Trump Administration Leading ‘Brazen’ Public Land Liquidation In Alaska, Analysis Finds

If the Trump administration gets its way, approximately 28.3 million acres of federal land across Alaska could be transferred, sold or opened up to extractive development, according to a new Center for American Progress analysis of the federal government’s land management actions in the state.

The administration’s agenda in Alaska amounts to “one of the most brazen public land liquidation efforts in U.S. history,” the left-leaning think tank writes in its report.

The analysis highlights nine separate actions that put protected public land on the chopping block. Those include President Donald Trump’s well-documented rush to open the 1.5 million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling and his directive last month to allow logging and other potential development in more than 9 million acres of Tongass National Forest, the largest remaining intact temperate rainforest on the planet. 

It also includes several lesser-known initiatives, including revoking a pair of land withdrawals, a move that could ultimately open 1.3 million acres to future development; a land exchange that would allow for a road to be built through the 417,000-acre Izembek National Wildlife Refuge; and an ongoing rewrite of an Obama-era management plan that protected more than 13 million acres of Alaska’s National Petroleum Reserve from oil exploration. 

Kate Kelly, CAP’s public lands director and a co-author of the report, said public lands in Alaska are facing a “perfect storm” as the state’s Republican delegation and the Trump administration have partnered to push pro-extraction policies. 

“The size and scope is simply staggering,” said Kelly, who also served as a senior adviser at the Interior Department during the Obama administration. “We are talking about nearly 30 million acres, [an area] approximately the size of Georgia, that are at risk of being sold out or transferred. These are lands that belong to all Americans.”

The Interior Department did not respond to HuffPost’s request for comment.

Westlake Legal Group 5d76c07e3b0000a984d0c3ee Trump Administration Leading ‘Brazen’ Public Land Liquidation In Alaska, Analysis Finds

wanderluster via Getty Images Signage to John Muir’s cabin in Alaska’s Tongass National Forest.

CAP’s analysis comes as the Trump administration faces backlash over the recent appointment of William Perry Pendley, a conservative lawyer who has spent decades campaigning for the sale and transfer of federal lands, as acting director of the federal Bureau of Land Management, an agency of the Interior Department. In that role he now oversees 245 million acres of public land

Pendley, who once wrote that the “Founding Fathers intended all lands owned by the federal government to be sold,” spent his first few weeks on the job trying to repair his image, as E&E News reported. In an op-ed in The Denver Post, he swung back at what he described as “attacks on my character and misrepresentations of my past.”

Pendley’s appointment added to conservationists’ fears that it is only a matter of time before the Trump administration embraces transferring control of federal lands to states, as the Republican platform calls for. The administration maintains that it “adamantly opposes the wholesale sale or transfer of public lands,” an Interior Department spokesperson recently told The Washington Post.

Yet it continues to slash environmental protections and open up millions of additional acres of land and offshore waters to logging, mining and drilling. 

Nowhere is more emblematic of Trump’s exploitation-first mindset for America’s public lands than Alaska, Kelly said. And she sees the administration’s efforts there as “doubly problematic” because of their potential to further drive global climate change. 

“This plan would log America’s largest old-growth forest and at the same time lock our nation into fossil fuel emissions that we can’t afford,” she said.

The United Nations warned in a report last month that deforestation and other unsustainable land use has helped drive atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations to their highest levels in human history. And scientists the world over agree that preventing cataclysmic warming requires world governments to rapidly phase out fossil fuels.

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Oregon’s Mount Hood active volcano lacks adequate monitoring, scientists say

Westlake Legal Group fseprd579305 Oregon's Mount Hood active volcano lacks adequate monitoring, scientists say fox news fnc/science fnc Danielle Wallace article 912a90c7-e6f5-57b1-9aaa-3df4612ae648

Scientists warn that Mount Hood, an active volcano outside Portland, Ore., lacks adequate monitoring equipment and bureaucratic red tape has left them blind to detect future eruptions, which could lead to deadly consequences, according to a report.

Efforts to install equipment on Mount Hood that would allow scientists to detect the early signs of an eruption have been largely slowed by federal policies designed to help preserve the wilderness, the New York Times reported.

EXTINCT VOLCANO COULD WAKE UP AND ERUPT AT ANY MOMENT: SCIENTISTS

Dr. Seth Moran and his team at the federal Cascades Volcano Observatory submitted a proposal to the Forest Service in 2014, requesting to build three seismometers to measure earthquakes, three GPS instruments to chart ground deformation and one instrument to monitor gas emissions at four different locations on the mountain.

“The name of the game is to be able to detect and correctly interpret these warning signs as soon as possible — to give society as much time as possible to get ready,” Moran told the Times.

Moran’s proposal was initially delayed because it violated the Wilderness Act, which prevents structures and anything that might cause noise pollution from being built in federal wilderness areas. Moran’s plan was finally approved by the Forest Service in August, but his team anticipates further litigation aimed at halting the project.

Mount Hood has not erupted since the 1780s, and Moran warns that leaving the active volcano undetected for this long poses a risk to those who live nearby. There are 161 active volcanos in the United States, many of which line the west coast through California, Oregon, Washington and Alaska in the Cascade Range.  

Erik Klemetti, a volcanologist at Denison University in Ohio, told the Times that the United States lacks proper monitoring equipment in this region compared to countries like Japan, Iceland and Chile where equipment lines the mount sides of active volcano sites.

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Moran added that scientists usually can detect an eruption when volcanos tremble, deform or belch volcanic gases. He pointed to experts at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, who were able to use equipment on the mountainside to detect such warning signs at the Kilauea volcano in 2018. Though about 700 homes were destroyed, scientists accurately predicted where the magma would flow in order to evacuate residents in time. No one died.

“Without those instruments, we would have been blind,” Tina Neal, the scientist-in-charge at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, told the Times. “While we would have known something was happening, we would have been less able to give guidance about where and what was likely to happen.”

Westlake Legal Group fseprd579305 Oregon's Mount Hood active volcano lacks adequate monitoring, scientists say fox news fnc/science fnc Danielle Wallace article 912a90c7-e6f5-57b1-9aaa-3df4612ae648   Westlake Legal Group fseprd579305 Oregon's Mount Hood active volcano lacks adequate monitoring, scientists say fox news fnc/science fnc Danielle Wallace article 912a90c7-e6f5-57b1-9aaa-3df4612ae648

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California closer to letting college athletes make money

Westlake Legal Group ncaa-basketball-ncaa-tournament-fir-7ef46993ac8ea510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ California closer to letting college athletes make money fox-news/sports/ncaa/usc-trojans fox-news/sports/ncaa/ucla-bruins fox-news/sports/ncaa/stanford-cardinal fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa-bk fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc feb8a0e8-a275-50c1-b808-eac6be61930e Associated Press article

The California Assembly has passed legislation to let college athletes make money, setting up a confrontation with the NCAA that could jeopardize the athletic futures of programs at USC, UCLA and Stanford.

The bill would let college athletes hire agents and be paid for the use of their name, image or likeness. And it would stop universities and the NCAA from banning athletes who take the money.

The Assembly passed the bill 66-0 on Monday, a few days after the bill got an endorsement from NBA superstar LeBron James, who did not go to college.

Universities oppose the bill, and the NCAA has warned the bill could mean California universities would be ineligible for national championships.

The California Senate must take a final vote on the bill by Friday

Westlake Legal Group ncaa-basketball-ncaa-tournament-fir-7ef46993ac8ea510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ California closer to letting college athletes make money fox-news/sports/ncaa/usc-trojans fox-news/sports/ncaa/ucla-bruins fox-news/sports/ncaa/stanford-cardinal fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa-bk fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc feb8a0e8-a275-50c1-b808-eac6be61930e Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ncaa-basketball-ncaa-tournament-fir-7ef46993ac8ea510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ California closer to letting college athletes make money fox-news/sports/ncaa/usc-trojans fox-news/sports/ncaa/ucla-bruins fox-news/sports/ncaa/stanford-cardinal fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa-bk fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc feb8a0e8-a275-50c1-b808-eac6be61930e Associated Press article

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Turkey, Long a Haven for Syrian Refugees, Is Sending Them Home

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160356114_274c0c12-78c2-4b29-8dea-2bd7ceabadb0-articleLarge Turkey, Long a Haven for Syrian Refugees, Is Sending Them Home Turkey Syria Refugees and Displaced Persons Gaziantep (Turkey) Erdogan, Recep Tayyip

Images of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey at a refugee camp for Syrians on the outskirts of Kahramanmaras, in southeastern Turkey.CreditMauricio Lima for The New York Times

GAZIANTEP, Turkey — Turkey, which for eight years has welcomed millions of Syrian refugees, has reversed course, forcing thousands to leave its major cities in recent weeks and ferrying many of them to its border with Syria in white buses and police vans.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is pushing a radical solution — resettling refugees in a swath of Syrian territory controlled by the United States and its Kurdish allies. If that does not happen, he is threatening to send a flood of Syrian migrants to Europe.

Mr. Erdogan has long demanded a buffer zone along Turkey’s border with Syria to keep out Kurdish forces, whom he considers a security threat.

But he has repackaged the idea for the zone as a refuge for Syrians fleeing the war — acting as resentment against Syrians in Turkey has increased, and a Syrian and Russian offensive in Syria has sent hundreds of thousands more refugees fleeing toward the Turkish border.

“Our goal is to settle at least one million Syrian brothers and sisters in our country in this safe zone,” Mr. Erdogan told leaders of his Justice and Development Party in Ankara on Thursday. “If needed, with support from our friends, we can build new cities there and make it habitable for our Syrian siblings.”

Part of the 500-mile long border wall in Akçakale, in southeastern Turkey, with the Syrian city of Tal Abyad in the background.CreditMauricio Lima for The New York Times
Syrian refugees waiting to return legally to their country through the border crossing in Kilis, southeastern Turkey.CreditMauricio Lima for The New York Times

None of the other powers involved in the war in Syria has wholly agreed to the idea, but Mr. Erdogan is demanding immediate access to the territory or threatening to take it himself. If not, he said, he would “open the gates” for large numbers of refugees to head into Europe as they did in 2015.

The European Union has given Turkey about $6.7 billion since 2015 to help control the flow of migrants. But Turkey, which has given sanctuary to 3.6 million Syrians, says the migrant problem is growing exponentially.

“If there is no safe zone we can’t overcome this,” Mr. Erdogan said on Saturday.

Syrians have already turned their sights on Europe again. Turkish and international refugee officials have reported an increase in migrants and refugees trying to cross by boat into Europe from Turkey, many of them Syrians leaving Istanbul since the police crackdown. Over 500 refugees arrived by boat in the Greek island of Lesbos a week ago.

Mr. Erdogan was long seen as a champion for Syrian refugees. His tougher policy on them comes after his party suffered a humiliating defeat in the election for mayor of Istanbul in June, and as a deepening recession, soaring unemployment and inflation have stoked anti-Syrian feeling among Turks.

Officials are cracking down on Syrians working illegally or without residence papers, fining employers and forcing factories and workshops to close. Pro-government media have grown more critical of Syrians, landlords are raising their rents, and social media is bursting with anti-Syrian comments.

An entrance to the bazaar area of the old city of Gaziantep. Syrians now make up 20 percent of the population in the town.CreditMauricio Lima for The New York Times
Mohammad al-Azouar, whose family operated a well-known pastry shop in Aleppo, dutifully covered up a verse by the poet Rumi on the wall inside his shop in Gaziantep.CreditMauricio Lima for The New York Times

Local officials, many from Mr. Erdogan’s party, deny the government is deporting refugees but support the crackdown, saying Syrians must live within the law.

The change is evident in places like Esenyurt, a working-class district of Istanbul. A district spokesman, Fatih Yilmaz, said the municipality was providing buses for around 100 people a week to return to Syria. He said the departures had pleased Turkish citizens, even if factory owners complained they had lost workers and landlords had lost tenants.

For Syrians living in Turkey, the shift in policy and attitude is a painful shock.

“It’s a disaster for Syrian people,” said Mohanned Ghabash, an activist who works for a nongovernmental organization in the southern town of Gaziantep, near the Syrian border.

Syrian workers were being told to acquire work permits and pay social security, he said, but many say they cannot afford the extra costs, and even if they can, they fear more rules will be enforced, including one that demands five Turkish citizens have to be employed for every Syrian in a company.

Police officers in Gaziantep visited a street of Syrian grocery and pastry shops and told store owners to remove the Arabic lettering from their shop signs or face a fine, enforcing a local law that had been ignored for eight years. The Syrians complied, painting out the Arabic and hanging Turkish flags in solidarity, but some said they were angry since it would cost them business.

Mohammad al-Azouar, whose family operated a well-known pastry shop in Aleppo, Syria, dutifully covered up a verse by the poet Rumi on the wall inside his shop.

“One fine from the police would finish me,” he said. “I am no burden. I came with my own money, just don’t squeeze us by the neck, let us survive.”

Syrians, who now make up 20 percent of the population in Gaziantep, have transformed the city, investing capital, and bringing business skills and cheap labor.

Most of them come from Aleppo, Syria’s second largest city and formerly a sophisticated cultural trading center. They have built a neighborhood of textile factories in Gaziantep, where Turkish and Syrian companies share buildings and workers. Hundreds of cafes, restaurants and pastry shops there cater to Syrians.

A Syrian refugee tending to his potted garden outside his home on the outskirts of Kahramanmaras in southeastern Turkey, where he lives with his family.CreditMauricio Lima for The New York Times
Ibrahim Nahlas, left, a renowned master craftsman from Aleppo, said he had longstanding business ties with Turkish craftsmen. “You have to have respect, then you will not have any problem,” he said.CreditMauricio Lima for The New York Times

In the old city, Syrian stone masons have restored some of the crumbling monuments and skilled Syrian coppersmiths from Aleppo have found a place alongside Turkish craftsmen, beating intricate designs into copper jugs and platters in tiny workshops.

Ibrahim Nahlas, 55, a renowned master craftsman from Aleppo who sells his wares across the Middle East, said he had longstanding business ties with Turkish craftsmen. “You have to have respect, then you will not have any problem,” he said.

Nour Mousilly, a textile manufacturer who lost a $12 million factory in Aleppo in the war, brought trained workers with him as well as a customer base in the Middle East when he started anew in Gaziantep, making men’s underwear.

“We already had our international partners so you could throw us anywhere and we can work,” he said, making his business a net benefit to Turkey’s economy.

Syrian big business owners said if you followed the rules you could still work in Turkey even if the profit margins were down. But smaller businesses and laborers expressed concern at the changing atmosphere and crippling fines that have already forced factory closings.

“The factories laid us off because we have no work permits,” Ahmed Atalai, 24, said as he waited with a group to cross the border into Syria. He left Istanbul, but after a month looking for work in southern Turkey where he was registered, was leaving the country. ”There’s no work.”

Mayor Fatma Sahin, a senior official in Mr. Erdogan’s party, has been a strong supporter of Syrian refugees for the economic boost they have brought the city but says they have to obey Turkey’s laws.

“What we say to the Syrians is there are rules to live here, so you have to obey those rules,” she said.

But Syrians see the new policies are aimed at making them leave. “They need to make us think it is better to go back to the safe zone,” said Abdulkarim Alrahmon, who runs a branch of a well known Syrian perfumery in Gaziantep.

The vans and buses of Syrian refugees arrive almost hourly at the border crossing near the town of Kilis, adjoining a Turkish-controlled area of northwestern Syria. Syrians living nearby said the police were depositing unregistered refugees directly across the border.

The Syrians being deported represent only a fraction of the Syrian refugees in Turkey. But the deportations send a sharp message to Mr. Erdogan’s political opponents that he is taking action to reduce the number of refugees, and signal to Europe and the United States that he needs a new solution.

In Gaziantep, Mayor Sahin said she supported the plan for a safe zone in Syria and expected half of the 500,000 Syrian refugees in her province would move there.

“Half of them will go, if opportunities are met and schools start to operate, she said. “They have to feel safe.”

A textile factory that hires Syrian refugees in Gaziantep.CreditMauricio Lima for The New York Times
Turkish workers, some of them craftsmen of copper jugs and platters, taking a break at a tea shop in the bazaar area of the old city of Gaziantep.CreditMauricio Lima for The New York Times

The United States and Turkey agreed in principle last month to establish a jointly patrolled zone for refugees along the border but they are still negotiating the details and major differences remain.

Mr. Erdogan wants the zone to be 20 miles deep and run for 300 miles along the Turkish-Syrian border east of the Euphrates. The United States has limited Turkey’s access to a few miles.

American and Turkish troops conducted their first joint patrol of a small zone on Sunday.

But Syria has already called the plan a violation of its sovereignty and Russia emphasized the need to preserve Syria’s territorial integrity. The Kurds oppose the deal but have reportedly pulled back heavy weaponry from part of the border area.

American officials are focused on preventing clashes between Turkish and Kurdish forces.

“Present conditions are not conducive to organized returns and repatriation of Syrian refugees in safety and dignity,” Lanna Walsh, spokeswoman for the International Organization of Migration, said. But she added that the group, in line with the United Nations, recognized that “not all areas inside Syria are unstable” and “recognizes the right for people to return.”

Syrian refugees remain circumspect about the safe zone. Some oppose any Turkish military expansion into Syria, but many still see Turkey as their best ally and a Turkish-controlled safe zone preferable to Syrian government or Kurdish control.

“Our people have had enough of displacement,” said Hisham el-Skeif, a former civilian opposition leader from Aleppo, who now lives in Gaziantep. “They need to go back to their lands.”

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‘Nola No-call’ lawsuit is no more; fan drops his fight

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Nickell-Robey-Coleman 'Nola No-call' lawsuit is no more; fan drops his fight fox-news/sports/nfl/new-orleans-saints fox-news/sports/nfl/los-angeles-rams fox-news/sports/nfl fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 1ff9d970-8117-56a4-ab41-aa19c3b3af8f

An attorney and New Orleans Saints fan said Monday he will go no further with his court fight against the NFL over game officials’ failure to call an obvious penalty at a crucial point in a January playoff game.

The no-call helped the Los Angeles Rams beat the Saints and advance to the Super Bowl.

Lawyer Antonio LeMon and three others sued, alleging fraud by the NFL. The case was dismissed Friday by Louisiana’s Supreme Court. A state judge and an appellate court had allowed the suit to proceed over NFL objections. And, for a time, it looked as though Commissioner Roger Goodell and three playoff game officials might have to submit to questions under oath.

“The Louisiana Supreme Court has now spoken,” LeMon said in a prepared statement Monday morning. “Consequently we, the plaintiffs in this lawsuit, are ready to move on and respect the ruling of our State’s highest court.

LeMon nevertheless called Friday’s ruling disappointing.

“By this Supreme Court ruling, the only right given to the purchaser of an NFL ticket, at least in Louisiana, is to get a seat in the stadium,” his statement said. “Once in that seat, the NFL has a license to do whatever it wants to us little ticket-holders, even to commit fraud and deceptive consumer trade practices against us without any civil recourse.”

The NFL declined comment Monday.

Three other lawsuits over the no-call had already died in federal court. At the center of each of them: The lack of a pass interference or roughness penalty after a Rams player’s helmet-to-helmet hit on a Saints receiver with a pass on the way.

Among allegations in LeMon’s lawsuit are claims that fraud and “implicit or unconscious bias” on the part of game officials from the Los Angeles area led to the decision not to flag the penalty.

LeMon did succeed in getting some responses from the NFL to written queries before the state Supreme Court halted action in the case while it was pending. The league acknowledged that video shows that pass interference and unnecessary roughness penalties should have been called. But it also said officials who were in proper position at the time of the play saw it “in real-time at full speed” and did not see the penalties.

“It is for each of us who have viewed the “No Call” play to decide if the NFL and Commissioner Goodell are being truthful and whether these sworn responses are disturbing,” LeMon’s Monday statement said.

In April, NFL owners voted to next season allow pass interference calls and non-calls to be challenged by coaches and reviewed on replay by officials.

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Nickell-Robey-Coleman 'Nola No-call' lawsuit is no more; fan drops his fight fox-news/sports/nfl/new-orleans-saints fox-news/sports/nfl/los-angeles-rams fox-news/sports/nfl fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 1ff9d970-8117-56a4-ab41-aa19c3b3af8f   Westlake Legal Group NFL-Nickell-Robey-Coleman 'Nola No-call' lawsuit is no more; fan drops his fight fox-news/sports/nfl/new-orleans-saints fox-news/sports/nfl/los-angeles-rams fox-news/sports/nfl fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 1ff9d970-8117-56a4-ab41-aa19c3b3af8f

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Health Care: See Where The 2020 Democratic Candidates Stand

Westlake Legal Group 2020-issue-tracker-healthcare-homepage-final-9.6.19_wide-958412858837502c9a16439168953775b12f48cd-s1100-c15 Health Care: See Where The 2020 Democratic Candidates Stand
Photo illustration: Getty Images and Renee Klahr/NPR
Westlake Legal Group  Health Care: See Where The 2020 Democratic Candidates Stand

Photo illustration: Getty Images and Renee Klahr/NPR

Health care helped propel Democrats to victory in a wave of elections in 2018, and it remains a top issue for voters heading into 2020.

But the conversation has changed over two years; while in the last midterms, health care debates revolved around protecting Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, after GOP attempts to repeal it, presidential candidates ahead of 2020 are focusing more on overhauling the entire health care system.

Incorporating a public option, where the government provides a form of insurance coverage the public can buy, was once a relatively progressive position within the party. Now, it has become a relatively moderate position compared to the push for single-payer, government-run health insurance.

That debate has sparked multiple policy questions, like what role private insurance should play. In addition, candidates have been debating other ways to keep costs down, particularly in the area of prescription drugs. Here are where the current Democratic candidates stand across five health care policy areas.

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Congress Considers Gun Control Bills But Asks, ‘What Does Trump Want?’

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1135800401_slide-44f5626192923ec5ca6c1295c1fc1075cefb62c2-s1100-c15 Congress Considers Gun Control Bills But Asks, 'What Does Trump Want?'

A high school student at a gun control rally in front of the U.S. Capitol in March 2019. The U.S. House is taking up gun control measures after recent mass shootings but it’s not clear what the Senate or President Trump will accept. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  Congress Considers Gun Control Bills But Asks, 'What Does Trump Want?'

A high school student at a gun control rally in front of the U.S. Capitol in March 2019. The U.S. House is taking up gun control measures after recent mass shootings but it’s not clear what the Senate or President Trump will accept.

Alex Wong/Getty Images

A House committee will take up legislation on Tuesday aimed at preventing mass shootings, as lawmakers and the White House move to respond to a recent spate of attacks across the country.

The bills being considered by the House Judiciary committee include measures that would limit access to high capacity gun magazines and block any person convicted of a hate crime from obtaining a firearm.

Another measure under consideration would provide incentives for states to adopt policies for “extreme risk protection orders,” also known as ‘red flag’ laws, to allow the government to temporarily bar someone in crisis from obtaining guns.

While the House is moving forward on these bills, it’s unclear what legislation may come up for a vote in the Republican-controlled Senate. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has made clear that he will not hold any votes on the issue until President Trump outlines what he will support.

So far, Trump has called for action, but has not publicly identified what policies he would back. The absence of created frustration for some of his allies in the Senate.

“The President needs to step up here and set some guidelines for what he would do,” said Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., on NBC’s Meet The Press on Sunday.

The White House has been meeting with members of Congress and those affected by mass shootings to gather feedback on next steps.

“We hope the president can take the lead,” said Tony Montalto, president of Stand with Parkland, which is calling for more to be done to prevent these tragedies.

Montalto’s 14-year-old daughter, Gina, was killed in the 2018 shooting Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. He, and other family members affected by the shooting, visited the White House at the end of August to discuss next steps.

“This is clearly a time for statesmanship not partisanship. We need all our congressional leaders to work together for the good of Americans and help make us safer,” Montalto said.

He said background checks and federal support for ‘red flag’ laws were both discussed during their meeting.

After back to back shootings in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio killed 31 people, Trump called for strong action on expanding background checks.

But, in recent weeks, Trump has talked more about the need to address mental health issues and raised concerns about the effectiveness of universal background checks.

“We have to protect our Second Amendment very strongly,” Trump told reporters on Monday, when asked about gun control.

The White House says that various measures are being weighed at this point.

“It’s a deliberative process,” said White House spokesman Hogan Gidley. “We want do something that will actually help … not just something that will make people feel good.”

Max Schachter attended the August White House meeting. His son, Alex, was killed in the Parkland shooting. He said he was told that the White House wants to do something substantial.

“I’m hoping that really happens,” said Schachter.

Schachter said he supports closing loopholes in background checks for gun buyers and also expediting the death penalty for mass murderers.

Democrats in Congress are saying that they do not plan to give up on pushing for gun control measures.

“We are not taking no for an answer. We are not going away,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., vowed at a press conference on Monday.

She touted recent public opinion polls that indicated overwhelming support for proposals like the House-passed bill requiring background checks for almost all gun sales.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said he’s spoken the president several times in the last month and “he’s all over the lot” on the gun issue. He argued that the public support for new gun control measures means ‘it’s a different era” from previous times when Congress failed to advance any legislation.

NPR congressional editor Deirdre Walsh contributed to this report.

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Oregon chef caters to strippers, dominatrixes with late-night meal service: ‘Options for food shouldn’t just be Taco Bell’

The strippers of Oregon’s biggest city are eating better, thanks in part to Nikeisah Newton.

Newton, 38, has recently started a business that literally caters directly to Portland’s exotic dancers and dominatrixes, who, when ending their shifts, allegedly have few late-night dining options aside from fast food and greasy diners.

“It’s a physically and emotionally demanding job. The options for food shouldn’t just be Taco Bell,” Newton told SWNS.

Westlake Legal Group meals-for-heels-407610 Oregon chef caters to strippers, dominatrixes with late-night meal service: ‘Options for food shouldn’t just be Taco Bell’ Michael Bartiromo fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/food-drink fnc b99161e5-c936-5210-948f-774115192ebd article

Chef Nikeisah Newton started out by dropping off food for an ex-girlfriend who worked as a stripper. She soon realized there was a whole market for her services. (SWNS)

NEBRASKA STRIP CLUB CAUSES CONTROVERSY WITH ‘DISTASTEFUL’ MESSAGE TO MOMS

Newton originally got the idea for her business — which she now calls Meals 4 Heels — in December, after hearing of how her then-girlfriend, a stripper, would complain of having nowhere healthy to eat after her shift was over. Newton then began delivering meals to her friend at the strip club, and soon other dancers started showing interest, Newton said.

“She mentioned that the other dancers were intrigued and impressed by what she was eating at night and that they wanted to eat something similar.”

In January, Newton officially started her business — then called “Meals 4 Six-Inch Heels” — selling her food to Portland’s strippers, bouncers and sex workers, Willamette Week reported.

“The dancers can’t leave the club to get food, and in some clubs they let the cook go early to save money. Nothing is geared towards the women who work there,” Newton told SWNS.

Westlake Legal Group meals-for-heels-407608 Oregon chef caters to strippers, dominatrixes with late-night meal service: ‘Options for food shouldn’t just be Taco Bell’ Michael Bartiromo fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/food-drink fnc b99161e5-c936-5210-948f-774115192ebd article

Newton originally got the idea for her business — which she now calls Meals 4 Heels — in December, after hearing of how her then-girlfriend would complain of having nowhere healthy to eat after working at local strip clubs. (SWNS)

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The former chef added that the meals — which all start with a bed of massaged kale before being topped with vegan or vegetarian options — are very friendly to those who need their energy to “climb the pole.”

“If strippers eat my meals, they are not going to be left hungry,” Newton told SWNS. “They will be able to work, climb the pole, swing around and not feel bloated or gassy.”

Westlake Legal Group meals-for-heels-407599 Oregon chef caters to strippers, dominatrixes with late-night meal service: ‘Options for food shouldn’t just be Taco Bell’ Michael Bartiromo fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/food-drink fnc b99161e5-c936-5210-948f-774115192ebd article

“[Strippers] will be able to work, climb the pole, swing around and not feel bloated or gassy,” said Newton. (SWNS)

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Right now, Meals 4 Heels is a one-woman show, with Newton cooking and delivering each of the 20-plus orders she gets weekly, although she says she’s interested in expanding the operation to other states.

“It is a black-owned, female-powered business. This is a one-woman army.  I go to the farmer’s market, cook and prepare the food and I deliver it,” she said.

Newton also hopes to one day be able to give a portion of her revenue back to the community to support the sex workers of Portland, which is often said to have the highest per-capita rate of strip clubs of any U.S. city, according to Time.

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For now, though, she’s at least offering some much-appreciated nourishment in the early hours of the morning.

“When you are eating bad food, you really feel it,” said Julia Flores, a dancer who spoke with SWNS. “It matters what you are putting into your body — this is a very physical job.”

Westlake Legal Group meals-for-heels-407597 Oregon chef caters to strippers, dominatrixes with late-night meal service: ‘Options for food shouldn’t just be Taco Bell’ Michael Bartiromo fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/food-drink fnc b99161e5-c936-5210-948f-774115192ebd article   Westlake Legal Group meals-for-heels-407597 Oregon chef caters to strippers, dominatrixes with late-night meal service: ‘Options for food shouldn’t just be Taco Bell’ Michael Bartiromo fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/food-drink fnc b99161e5-c936-5210-948f-774115192ebd article

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NRA sues San Francisco over ‘domestic terrorist organization’ declaration

Westlake Legal Group NRA-GO-AWAY NRA sues San Francisco over 'domestic terrorist organization' declaration fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/san-francisco fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 7201bc2d-9a5f-55c6-8243-dd4c8f67c31d

The National Rifle Association filed a lawsuit against San Francisco Monday over the city’s recent declaration that the gun-rights lobby is a “domestic terrorist organization.”

The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California against the city and county of San Francisco and the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. It accuses city officials of violating the gun lobby’s free speech rights for political reasons and claims the city is trying to blacklist anyone associated with the NRA from doing business there.

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICIALS BRAND NRA A ‘DOMESTIC TERRORIST ORGANIZATION’

The gun rights lobby asked the court to step in “to instruct elected officials that freedom of speech means you cannot silence or punish those with whom you disagree.”

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors passed a resolution last week that said the U.S. is “plagued by an epidemic of gun violence,” and accused the NRA of using “its considerable wealth and organization strength to promote gun ownership and incite gun owners to acts of violence.” The resolution called on other cities, states and the federal government to follow suit and also declare the NRA a “domestic terrorist organization.”

San Francisco Supervisor Catherine Stefani told the Associated Press she drafted the resolution after a July 28 high profile shooting in Gilroy, Calif., where a gunman entered a festival with an AK-style rifle and killed three people and injured at least 17 more before turning the gun on himself. Gilroy is located about 80 miles southeast of San Francisco.

At least three mass shootings — in El Paso, Texas; Dayton, Ohio; and in the West Texas towns of Odessa and Midland—have occurred since then, and Democrat leaders in Congress Monday urged President Trump to push Republicans to support gun control legislation to expand background checks.

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Corporate America has also taken a political stance on gun control in recent years. Delta Airlines ceased discounts for NRA members, and Walmart, CVS, Walgreens and Albertsons chains have all asked customers to not openly carry firearms into their stores, even in states where it is legal to do so.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group NRA-GO-AWAY NRA sues San Francisco over 'domestic terrorist organization' declaration fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/san-francisco fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 7201bc2d-9a5f-55c6-8243-dd4c8f67c31d   Westlake Legal Group NRA-GO-AWAY NRA sues San Francisco over 'domestic terrorist organization' declaration fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/san-francisco fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 7201bc2d-9a5f-55c6-8243-dd4c8f67c31d

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