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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 181)

Hollywood Legend Kirk Douglas Dies At 103

Legendary actor Kirk Douglas died on Wednesday at the age of 103. 

His family confirmed his death with People.

“It is with tremendous sadness that my brothers and I announce that Kirk Douglas left us today at the age of 103,” his oldest son, actor-producer Michael Douglas, said in a statement. “To the world, he was a legend, an actor from the golden age of movies who lived well into his golden years, a humanitarian whose commitment to justice and the causes he believed in set a standard for all of us to aspire to.”

Westlake Legal Group 56a7a4411a00001001ab1542 Hollywood Legend Kirk Douglas Dies At 103

Archive Photos via Getty Images Kirk Douglas as Spartacus, his most famous role.

Over his six-decade career, Douglas starred in multiple classic films, including “Spartacus,” “Paths of Glory” and “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.” The dynamic actor with the dimpled chin appeared in more than 80 movies, racking up three Academy Award nominations and one honorary Oscar. 

He said it was the birth of first son Michael in 1944 that sent him to Hollywood.

“I never wanted to be a movie actor,” Kirk Douglas told Esquire in 2001. “I started out on the stage. The first time I was invited out here, I turned it down. Then Michael was born and I needed money, so I came. Sometimes, the thing that ties you down sets you free.”

Westlake Legal Group 56a7a4e52a00006e00031484 Hollywood Legend Kirk Douglas Dies At 103

Michael Buckner via Getty Images Kirk Douglas and his oldest son, Michael, in October 2011.

Douglas was a tough guy both on and off the screen.

In his defining role, he played the title character Spartacus, an enslaved gladiator-turned-doomed rebel leader, in the 1960 movie directed by Stanley Kubrick. “Spartacus” received four Academy Awards and six nominations.

As executive producer of the film, Douglas hired the screenwriter Dalton Trumbo, then on Sen. Joseph McCarthy’s infamous “Hollywood blacklist.” The public crediting of Trumbo for his script is considered a key moment in the ending of the blacklist, and in later years, Douglas would repeatedly speak about the “guts” it took to hire him. (Like many stories out of Hollywood, the truth of the matter is a bit more complicated, and Trumbo’s family has long claimed that Douglas’ version exaggerated his own role.)

In real life, the actor proved to be just as defiant in the face of age and infirmity. He suffered a heart attack in 1986 and had a pacemaker for the rest of his life. In 1991, he was in a helicopter that crashed into a plane above a Ventura County, California, airport. Two people died in the crash and Douglas’ injuries, including a compressed spine, left him three inches shorter. A near-fatal stroke in 1996 caused severe speech impairment; with therapy, however, he regained the ability to speak.

At the age of 88, Douglas had a double knee replacement. A few years later, he broke his foot. But at age 94, he walked onstage at the 2011 Academy Awards and charmed the audience while presenting the award for Best Supporting Actress. At the age of 101, he appeared at the 2018 Golden Globes ceremony with his son Michael’s wife, the actress Catherine Zeta-Jones.

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Born on Dec. 9, 1916, in Amsterdam, New York, he was named Issur Danielovitch, but went by the shorter Izzy Demsky throughout childhood. The only son of Jewish immigrants from Belarus, he grew up poor ― “The Ragman’s Son,” as he titled the first of his memoirs. His family spoke Yiddish. In his later decades, he would have a second bar mitzvah at age 83 and engage in weekly Torah study.

According to the actor, he held more than 40 different jobs over the course of his life. He studied acting at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York and legally changed his name to Kirk Douglas following his first job in summer stock theater. He joined the U.S. Navy to fight in World War II.

Douglas married his first wife, actress Diana Dill, in 1943. They had two sons, Michael and Joel, before they divorced eight years later. In 1954, he married producer Anne Buydens, with whom he had two more sons, Peter and Eric (who died in 2004).

His storied film career began in 1946 with a role in “The Strange Love of Martha Ivers.” Lauren Bacall had suggested Douglas, her former acting academy classmate, to producer Hal B. Wallis. Within the next decade, Douglas would earn his three Academy Award nominations ― for Best Actor in “Champion” (1949), “The Bad and the Beautiful” (1952) and “Lust for Life” (1956). He won the Golden Globe for his portrayal of Vincent van Gogh in “Lust for Life.” He also received the Golden Globes’ Cecil B. DeMille Award for Lifetime Achievement in 1968 and the honorary Oscar for “50 years as a creative and moral force” in 1996.

Douglas starred alongside Burt Lancaster in seven movies, including “Gunfight at the O.K. Corral” (1957), “Seven Days in May” (1964) and “Tough Guys” (1987). The two had a complicated friendship. Douglas, who reportedly stood 5 feet, 9 inches tall, wore stacked shoes to boost his height in movies. Lancaster, who was over 6 feet tall, would steal the specialized footwear. They had a love-hate relationship until Lancaster’s death in 1994.

Westlake Legal Group 5b6b4cac2000007a03379416 Hollywood Legend Kirk Douglas Dies At 103

Hulton Archive via Getty Images Douglas on the set of “Ace in the Hole,” a 1951 film directed by Billy Wilder, in which Douglas played a cynical reporter.

In more recent years, Douglas took up blogging, becoming MySpace’s “oldest celebrity blogger.” He had more than 4,000 friends on the social network. In 2012, he began writing for The Huffington Post and continued submitting articles into 2016. Douglas also wrote a dozen books, including the retrospective “I Am Spartacus!” in 2012.

Douglas persevered by carving his own path. Film critic Roger Ebert, who interviewed him in 1969, quoted the actor as saying:

I don’t need a critic to tell me I’m an actor. I make my own way. Nobody’s my boss. Nobody’s ever been my boss. Your only security is in your talent. I didn’t get into this business as a pretty boy. I’ve made good pictures, bad pictures. I’ve been a maverick. I’ve never been under contract, except for one year at Warner’s after “Champion” ― l’ve made my own way!

Westlake Legal Group kirkdouglasjumping Hollywood Legend Kirk Douglas Dies At 103

Among his many other accolades, the American Film Institute in 1999 named Douglas the 17th greatest American male screen legend. (Lancaster was 19th.)  He became a goodwill ambassador for the U.S. State Department in 1963 and received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1981 from President Jimmy Carter.

On his 97th birthday, Douglas published a HuffPost article titled “My Birthday Wishes.” An excerpt:

So I asked myself, what do I want for my birthday? There’s nothing I need, other than good health for my wife and my family.

Suddenly it occurred to me that I knew exactly what I wanted ― a better world for my grandchildren.

But have you ever tried to put 97 candles on a cake? You can’t. So I put 10 candles to represent the 10 decades of my life. Here are my birthday wishes:

  • A world where weapons, big and small, are symbols of weakness, not strength
  • A world where religion informs values, not governments
  • A world where the air is breathable, the water drinkable and the food is healthy and plentiful
  • A world where poor people are the smallest percentage of the population
  • A world where education and health care are available to everyone
  • A world where prejudice based on race, religion and nationality is non-existent
  • A world where smoking tobacco is considered a ridiculous practice from a bygone era
  • A world where all diseases are curable and physical pain is no longer a part of life
  • A world where we control technology, not the other way around
  • A world where greed is never considered good

Excuse me ― I have a lot of candles to blow out.

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Dana Perino: Pelosi ripping up Trump’s speech may be her ‘final act’ as House Speaker

Westlake Legal Group Pelosi-Speech-Rip-Perino-Getty-FOX Dana Perino: Pelosi ripping up Trump's speech may be her 'final act' as House Speaker Yael Halon fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 28fa438e-5ca1-5c10-829e-bfba3f3f636d

“The Five” hosts responded Wednesday to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi‘s dramatic display of disdain for President Trump after she ripped up her copy of the State of the Union address hours before the Senate voted to acquit him of both articles of impeachment.

“I think it was a perfect ending,” co-host Greg Gutfeld said. “It’s like the climax of a movie where the villain gets beaten and she throws her hat on the ground.”

PELOSI THROWS SHADE AT TRUMP THROUGHOUT SOTU ADDRESS, RIPS UP SPEECH

The tension between Trump and Pelosi was visible during his third State of the Union address Tuesday night, starting with Trump appearing to ignore an offer for a handshake from the speaker. As the president concluded his address, Pelosi stood and ripped up the pages of his speech, sparking questions of whether the meltdown was planned or simply her emotional reaction to the president’s words.

“Nancy Pelosi and Trump have not spoken since October … so that relationship is quite broken, and I think that is part of it,” co-host Dana Perino said.

“If she did it spontaneously,” Perino continued, “it’s like, sometimes you do get so mad and frustrated you want to rip something, … or it was planned all along and she knew she was going to do it and she did it on purpose…she wanted to make a statement.”

TRUMP TAKES ON ‘RADICAL LEFT’ IN DEFIANT AND DRAMATIC STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS; PELOSI RIPS UP SPEECH

Jesse Watters echoed Perino’s theory, adding that he believes it was Pelosi’s attempt to gain “street cred” among the progressive members of her party.

“My theory was that she wanted to show AOC [Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez] and that wing that she hated Trump just as much as they did and she wanted a little street cred and to say, ‘I’m one of you.”‘

“I think she knows that this is probably her last State of the Union where she sits there.”

— Dana Perino, ‘The Five’

Gutfeld applauded the president for his speech but said he underestimated the effect it would have on the House Speaker.

“For me, personally, it affected me in that it made me realize the speech was way better and more powerful than I thought because you could see the frustration build up in her and I thought, ‘It was a pretty good speech…’ and then I go, ‘Maybe it really hit her where it hurts. ‘”

BEN SHAPIRO MOCKS PELOSI, RIPS UP DEM TALKING POINTS

Katie Pavlich criticized Pelosi for remaining seated as Trump touted the country’s economy, saying “she essentially wrote a campaign ad for him and for every single Republican running in the House to take back the power.”

Juan Williams differed from the opinions of his co-hosts, calling Pelosi’s reaction a “successful gesture” that garnered a “standing ovation from her Democratic base.”

“I think she knows that this is probably her last State of the Union where she sits there,” Perino responded.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Her final act as Speaker at the State of the Union was to rip up the president’s speech. I think this will be the second paragraph in all the literature that is written about her in the future.”

Westlake Legal Group Pelosi-Speech-Rip-Perino-Getty-FOX Dana Perino: Pelosi ripping up Trump's speech may be her 'final act' as House Speaker Yael Halon fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 28fa438e-5ca1-5c10-829e-bfba3f3f636d   Westlake Legal Group Pelosi-Speech-Rip-Perino-Getty-FOX Dana Perino: Pelosi ripping up Trump's speech may be her 'final act' as House Speaker Yael Halon fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 28fa438e-5ca1-5c10-829e-bfba3f3f636d

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Megathread: United States Senate Votes to Acquit President Trump on Both Articles of Impeachment | Part 2

Westlake Legal Group 0gho-z3ojkSno1io64sps3xSO6qrcigGa1igv0npNPA Megathread: United States Senate Votes to Acquit President Trump on Both Articles of Impeachment | Part 2 r/politics

If Trump would shoot someone dead in cold-blood, in the front porch of the White House and it was broadcasted live… I would honestly still not be surprised to see McConnell rationalizing his actions and blaming democrats for it.

This sham trial in which no evidences were examined and no witnesses were listened had already a publicly admitted conclusion by its “juror” before it even started.

It’s the most a shameful legal procedure this country has ever witnessed.

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Will Mitt Romney Face Punishment For Having A Conscience?

WASHINGTON ― With Sen. Mitt Romney’s (R-Utah) somewhat surprising announcement Wednesday that he would vote with Democrats to convict President Donald Trump over abuse of power in the Senate impeachment trial, the rest of the Senate GOP is confronting a new question: Should they do something about Romney?

It’s a slightly ridiculous question ― all Romney was doing was voting his conscience ― but in the current GOP, where being a Republican means supporting Trump, senators all have to consider what they now say and do about their colleague.

Except for the president’s adult son, who said Romney should be expelled from the party, Republicans were mostly evasive about Romney Wednesday.

“It’s a personal decision,” Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) said. “I don’t agree with it, but I respect his right to vote the way he sees fit.”

“Who can answer that question, ‘What’s the future of another senator?’ I mean, that’s for him to determine with Utah,” Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) told HuffPost. 

Romney said he fully anticipated all kinds of recrimination from the president’s supporters. 

“I’m aware there are people in my party and in my state who will strenuously disapprove of my decision and in some quarters I will be vehemently denounced,” Romney said on the Senate floor during his emotional statement. “I’m sure to hear abuse from the president and his supporters.”

Westlake Legal Group 5e3b4119210000be04e1c959 Will Mitt Romney Face Punishment For Having A Conscience?

Handout via Getty Images In this screengrab taken from a Senate Television webcast, Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) speaks during impeachment proceedings against U.S. President Donald Trump in the Senate on Feb. 5, 2020, in Washington, D.C. 

Romney said his willingness to face the abuse shows how strongly he feels he made the right choice to vote for the first of Democrats’ articles of impeachment. (He voted against the second.) 

“Does anyone seriously believe that I would consent to these consequences other than from an inescapable conviction that my oath before God demanded of me?” he said.

There are plenty of ways for the GOP to potentially punish Romney. Some are as simple ― and petty ― as no longer inviting him to the weekly Republican lunches. Some involve stripping him of committee assignments, or making sure he gets less enviable assignments in the future. And some consequences are less direct; Romney will long be a pariah in this GOP. 

But the most extreme punishment would be expelling him from the conference.

That retribution cuts both ways. For Republicans, it might be satisfying to formally ostracize Romney from the party. But then Republicans have one less Republican in the chamber, even if Romney votes with them the vast majority of the time. For purposes of controlling the Senate, even for purposes of unanimous consent requests ― a standard procedure where the Senate suspends certain rules with no objection ― all that could be jeopardized by punishing Romney.

Republicans could be well-served to just try and forget Romney breaking ranks. Focusing on Romney’s decision will only draw more attention to the president’s actions.

That is probably the smartest advice, but it would be unsatisfying to the most bloodthirsty Republicans, particularly when being a Republican in this day and age generally just means supporting Trump.

One of the House GOP impeachment surrogates, Rep. Debbie Lesko (R-Ariz.), inadvertently made it clear how she views membership to her party when she argued that Romney was the only Republican to support impeachment. While that statement is true, that’s partially because Rep. Justin Amash (I-Mich.) left the party over Trump.

“He’s definitely not a Republican,” Lesko said of Amash, who has one of the most ideologically conservative voting records in Congress.

Lesko did say she didn’t think punishing Romney was a good idea. “I would just, like, leave it alone,” she said. “He’s one person and, you know, so what?”

But some Republicans are already calling for retribution. Donald Trump Jr. repeatedly affixed the hashtag “ExpelMitt” to tweets Wednesday, and he said the 2012 Republican presidential nominee was “forever bitter” that he’d never be president. 

“He was too weak to beat the Democrats then so he’s joining them now,” Trump Jr. tweeted. “He’s now officially a member of the resistance & should be expelled from the @GOP.”

White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham already issued a statement Wednesday after the impeachment vote where she referred to Romney as a “failed Republican presidential candidate.”

While Senate Republicans didn’t initially seem overly eager about expelling Romney on Wednesday, that could quickly change if President Trump got behind the idea. 

If Trump began tweeting similar sentiments as his son, many Republicans would instantly be put in a difficult position: They’ve defined their conservatism by their support for Trump, so splitting from the president, particularly in the more Republican states, could be perilous.

The question now is: How much ire will Romney draw?

The Utah Senator seems at peace with his decision, and at 71 years old, he may not be thinking of running for reelection in 2024. 

But if the past is any indication, Trump is not going to stay silent about Romney. He will look for some way to exact his own retribution. And senators will have to decide, once again, between doing what is right, and doing what Trump wants.

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Kirk Douglas, Hollywood Tough Guy And ‘Spartacus’ Superstar, Dies At 103

Kirk Douglas, the self-described “ragman’s son” who became a global Hollywood superstar in the 1950s and ’60s, died on Wednesday. He was 103. Douglas was often cast as a troubled tough guy in films, most famously as a rebellious Roman slave named Spartacus. Off-screen, he was devoted to family and to humanitarian causes.

His son Michael Douglas announced the actor’s death: “To the world he was a legend. … But to me and my brothers Joel and Peter he was simply Dad.”

“Kirk’s life was well lived, and he leaves a legacy in film that will endure for generations to come, and a history as a renowned philanthropist who worked to aid the public and bring peace to the planet,” Michael Douglas wrote.

Kirk Douglas was a classic Hollywood alpha male, with his cleft chin, gritty voice and a set to his jaw that made him seem to be talking through clenched teeth. He made a conscious choice to go his own way by playing men who went theirs. In Stanley Kubrick’s World War I epic Paths of Glory, Douglas played the principled Colonel Dax, stepping into an iconic role of the good man fighting the establishment.

But Douglas seemed almost more comfortable playing what he liked to call “tough sons of bitches,” or flawed men who were, one way or another, gaming the system. Two of his earliest title roles, as the backstabbing boxer in Champion and the self-destructive cornetist in Young Man With a Horn, portrayed stars who turn into heels just as the public embraces them.

Before long, Douglas had developed that reputation himself. Looking back in his memoirs, Douglas describes his younger self as “egotistical and ambitious” and claims not to like him very much. But his best performances, such as his portrayal of an abrasive but driven Vincent van Gogh in Lust for Life, were memorably electric.

For more than two decades in Hollywood, Douglas “cast a giant shadow,” as one of his titles proclaimed, playing two or even three starring roles each year. When he was not cast for Ben-Hur, losing the role to Charlton Heston, Douglas countered the loss months later with his own Roman epic, Spartacus. Douglas produced the film and starred as the title character who famously revolted against his Roman captors.

Westlake Legal Group ap473792375813_custom-acb72078992cab7aae298f6b9f83f9f6519193cc-s1100-c15 Kirk Douglas, Hollywood Tough Guy And 'Spartacus' Superstar, Dies At 103

Douglas poses for a portrait in Beverly Hills, Calif., in December 2014. Matt Sayles/Invision/AP hide caption

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Matt Sayles/Invision/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Kirk Douglas, Hollywood Tough Guy And 'Spartacus' Superstar, Dies At 103

Douglas poses for a portrait in Beverly Hills, Calif., in December 2014.

Matt Sayles/Invision/AP

Off-screen, Douglas also led an open revolt, against Hollywood’s blacklist. The communist witch hunts of the 1950s had destroyed many careers, including that of Spartacus screenwriter Dalton Trumbo, who had written for years under an alias. Douglas was disgusted by this hypocrisy and saying “To hell with it,” put Trumbo’s real name in the film credits.

When Spartacus became a hit, the blacklist was effectively finished. More than three decades later, speaking with NPR’s Susan Stamberg, Douglas reflected upon this impulsive but life-defining decision: “Sometimes I often think that if I were much older, would I still have done it? Anyhow, I did it. It was an impulsive thing. I’m proud of it. I think it’s one of the good things that I’ve done in life.”

Douglas the bold blacklist-breaker had come a long way, and from very humble beginnings. Born Issur Danielovitch in New York to illiterate, desperately poor Russian Jewish parents, he was the only boy among seven siblings. He would later tell his own children that they didn’t have his “advantage of being born into abject poverty.”

From an early age, that “advantage” forced Douglas to put himself out there with the public, and he worked odd jobs, scrounged for food and talked his way into college and loans. Acting school and a stint in the Navy followed college, as well as minor success on Broadway using the new stage name that he would keep for the rest of his career. Then Hollywood beckoned, and within four years, Douglas had made eight films, had established his persona as a tough guy and had earned the first of his three Oscar nominations as a barrel-chested prizefighter in Champion.

True to the roles he liked to play, success did not make Douglas a “nice guy.” Though married, he had affairs with actresses Rita Hayworth, Marlene Dietrich and Ava Gardner. He was mostly an absentee father to his first two sons; frequently he broke studio contracts and feuded with directors. In 1964, he said, “I am probably the most disliked actor in Hollywood, and I feel pretty good about it, because that’s me.”

Westlake Legal Group 1858205_custom-499444bd3d8040fa62af69a2bd43d92723d2e7ad-s800-c15 Kirk Douglas, Hollywood Tough Guy And 'Spartacus' Superstar, Dies At 103

Douglas, with his eldest sons Joel (center) and Michael, circa 1956. Arnold M. Johnson/Hulton Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Arnold M. Johnson/Hulton Archives/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Kirk Douglas, Hollywood Tough Guy And 'Spartacus' Superstar, Dies At 103

Douglas, with his eldest sons Joel (center) and Michael, circa 1956.

Arnold M. Johnson/Hulton Archives/Getty Images

The 1960s were his glory days as he starred in hit after hit. Douglas battled a presidential overthrow in Seven Days in May and was torn between Faye Dunaway and Deborah Kerr in The Arrangement. He played gunslingers, lawyers, admirals, doctors and con men, and he worked steadily through the next two decades.

When the tough guy schtick got old, Douglas turned to comedy and mocked it in a film called Tough Guys, in which he starred with his friend and frequent co-star Burt Lancaster. Not even a helicopter crash in 1991, when he was 74, slowed Douglas down — though the fact that a pilot and another passenger had died, he told NPR, did change his worldview. “It makes you think about other people,” Douglas said. “I think that you have to — as you get old in life and as you mature — you have to be aware more of the outside world and other people.”

Just a year after that 1994 interview, a stroke left him almost entirely unable to speak. He had thoughts of suicide. He wrote: “What does an actor do who can’t talk? … Wait for silent pictures to come back?”

Douglas’ book My Stroke of Luck describes how he recovered by reaching out to others and by rediscovering the Judaism he’d been neglecting for 60 years.

Douglas and his wife Anne would spend the next decade and millions of dollars fixing up playgrounds in California — more than 400 altogether. Every time he reopened one, he slid down its slide, joking after one such slide at age 92: “Every dedication I risk my life.”

In between the odd acting jobs that came his way, Douglas found time to write memoirs, novels and children’s books. He also became one of the world’s oldest bloggers at 92. And at 94, he returned to the stage, delighting audiences at Culver City’s Kirk Douglas Theatre with an autobiographical solo show called Before I Forget.

Douglas was the last great movie star of his generation. He outlived the likes of John Wayne, Gary Cooper, Henry Fonda, Cary Grant, Charlton Heston and his buddy Burt Lancaster — and younger audiences probably know him better as Michael Douglas’ father than as a star in his own right. But he was a star and, for a long time, among the brightest in the Hollywood firmament.

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Pete Buttigieg Adviser’s Tweet Sure Looks Like A Coordinating Message To Outside Groups

Westlake Legal Group 5e3b4b7c210000d302e1c95d Pete Buttigieg Adviser’s Tweet Sure Looks Like A Coordinating Message To Outside Groups

A Pete Buttigieg adviser tweeted Wednesday the importance of getting the former South Bend, Indiana, mayor’s record in the military out to the people of Nevada, and the message looked an awful lot like he was trying to get around federal anti-coordination rules that prevent campaigns from sharing strategy and messaging with outside groups.

Michael Halle, who is a strategist for Buttigieg’s Democratic presidential campaign, tweeted publicly that it was “critical” Buttigieg’s military experience is seen in Nevada “on the air through the caucus,” which is Feb. 22. 

To be clear, this tweet does not break the law. Though campaign finance rules prohibit coordination between campaigns and outside groups, there’s an exception: “if the information material to the creation, production, or distribution of the communication was obtained from a publicly available source,” the Federal Election Commission states. 

In other words, it’s perfectly legal to put an idea out in the open, like on Twitter, and hope the group you want to act on it runs with the idea. Democrats and Republicans have been doing this for years. Halle and the Buttigieg campaign did not respond to a request for comment on the intentions of the tweet.

But Halle’s message goes to show just how blurry some of campaign finance rules can be.

Competing presidential campaigns have already reacted to the message. Roger Lau, Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s campaign manager, asked whether Halle meant to send the tweet over a private message to an outside group (that would be illegal). 

“It’s a slap in the face of campaign finance law to so brazenly and unethically direct a Super PAC how to spend on his behalf — all while leaving New Hampshire to do big-money New York fundraisers,” Adam Green, the co-founder of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee, which is associated with the Warren campaign, said in a statement. “Donald Trump would call him part of the corrupt swamp if he were ever the nominee.”  

Businessman Andrew Yang’s campaign manager simply responded with “Yikes.”

This practice isn’t new. Democratic and Republican party committees have set up Twitter accounts in the past to release polling data and share information about advertising buys. In 2016, The Washington Post reported how Sen. Marco Rubio’s Republican presidential campaign would put out messages online that would then be picked up by his super PAC.

And it’s been acknowledged by even those on the FEC. In 2014, Ann Ravel, then a FEC commissioner, admitted that technology made the rules “murky.”

Buttgieg’s campaign dissolved his super PAC, Hitting Home PAC, in May, as he joined his Democratic rivals in eschewing dark money in politics. 

But one group — VoteVets.org, a political action committee dedicated to veterans — has already spent $610,441 as an independent expenditure. Ironically, Buttigieg’s campaign sent out an email to supporters hitting the Bernie Sanders campaign for embracing support from outside groups after a coalition of progressive groups formed an independent expenditure in support of the Vermont senator.

Buttigieg has had to defend his campaign’s financial strategy repeatedly on the national stage after Warren attacked him at a debate for fundraising with millionaires in Napa Valley “wine caves.” He argued that big money in politics isn’t necessarily corrupting.

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Gutfeld on the acquittal

Westlake Legal Group image Gutfeld on the acquittal Greg Gutfeld fox-news/shows/the-five/transcript/gregs-monologue fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/person/aaron-donald fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 42492e08-d539-5ca7-be5d-3c42438731d2

Impeachment is over, at least for now.

You’ve heard the definition of crazy before. It’s doing the same thing over and over again while expecting a different result. Well, Democrats invented a new kind of crazy: knowing the outcome of an event well in advance, and still expecting a different result.

That was impeachment, the worst-planned adventure since the Donner party. Democrats blew all their energy on a loser’s bet, one that made the Iowa mess possible. Instead of wowing America, they fell flat on their faces because they were distracted.

GREGG JARRETT: TRUMP ACQUITTAL IN IMPEACHMENT TRIAL IS A HUMILIATING DEFEAT FOR PARTISAN DEMOCRATS

I return to Greg’s Rule: Republicans run things. Democrats ruin them. The difference is one letter. It stands for “impeachment.”

So once again, the losers return to their hallucinations. The snakes on the wall? They’re real – if you’re Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif.

Now, Schiff says, President Trump could offer Alaska to the Russians “in exchange for support in the next election.” Alternatively, Schiff said, Trump “could decide to move to Mar-a-Lago permanently and let Jared Kushner run the country.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER

So why cling to these crazy predictions? Because they don’t exist. That means you can’t disprove them. The response will always be, “You just wait.” They’re like imaginary mice, and Schiff’s the crazy coot on the table screaming.

Those mad ravings had us waiting for a stock market crash, tyranny and world war under Trump. They were all paranoid nightmares that never came. Instead, all we got were stock market highs, trade deals, dead terrorists and jobs.

Since those successes were under Trump, the delusions only deepen. Without a real vision beyond anger, the Democrats cling to these mental phantoms.

Early on, we told Democrats impeachment was a dead fish. We said:  Don’t follow Adam! He’s selling you drugs that only end in bad trips.

But did they listen? Nope. To them, bad drugs are better than no drugs. That’s why they’ll be back in the lab coming up with a new paranoia pill.

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But we know not to gulp them. Let Democrats have them all.

We saw it coming. But they had it coming.

Adapted from Greg Gutfeld’s monologue on “The Five” on Feb. 5, 2020.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY GREG GUTFELD

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Gavel to Gavel

It took almost three weeks for the third presidential impeachment trial in the nation’s history to snake through the Senate, arriving at the final day of votes that brought a conclusion that from the beginning seemed foregone.

“Impeachment,” Ken Starr, one of the president’s defenders, had intoned during the trial, “is hell.”

A weary Senate appeared to agree and on Wednesday rendered its verdict, voting to acquit President Trump. Here’s a look at how we got here.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_167197215_0d8d535a-7146-4357-b488-b0d0be1cd68d-articleLarge Gavel to Gavel Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry

The House impeachment managers first passing through Statuary Hall.Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

Ushering in the trial with the pomp and circumstance afforded only to what Alexander Hamilton called a “national inquest into the conduct of public men,” the Democratic impeachment managers marched in a choreographed procession from the House to the Senate to deliver the articles of impeachment.

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. trekked across the street from the Supreme Court to the Capitol to preside over the trial as the White House defense team descended on the Senate, ready to argue its case.

Senator Ted Cruz of Texas speaking to reporters in the Capitol.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times Senator Chuck Schumer, the minority leader, offered several amendments to the impeachment rules.Credit…Calla Kessler/The New York Times

Transforming from a legislative body to a court of impeachment required senators, aides and journalists to adapt to a new status quo, with new hours — usually beginning at 1 p.m. and stretching as late as 2 a.m. — and new rules.

For senators, that meant being stranded without their phones and in sitting silence for hours at a time on the Senate floor, an endeavor they struggled against by doodling, fidget-spinning and whispering or surrendered to sleepily. For journalists, it meant cramming into crowded pens instead of enjoying the usual free-roaming access to lawmakers.

Television cameras and photographers were not allowed inside the chamber, save for one operated by the government, limiting what the public could see and hear.

Among those most inconvenienced by the trial, however, were the Senate Democrats running for president, who found themselves wondering when they would be able to return to Iowa before the nation’s crucial first nominating contest. While Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont made his annoyance clear, most tried to take it in stride.

“I don’t know how many days this is going to last,” Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota said. “I just know that I have a constitutional duty to do my job.”

Reporters broadcast from the Capitol during the trial.Credit…Calla Kessler/The New York Times Staff members waited in cars for the conclusion of the first night of the impeachment trial.Credit…T.J. Kirkpatrick for The New York Times

Before the opening arguments began, Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the Democratic leader, laid an early test for Republicans. Would they vote to hear from additional witnesses and gather more evidence?

In an early sign of where the trial might be heading, Republicans roundly declined — and were left voting down measure after measure introduced by Mr. Schumer to hear more, a vote-a-rama that crawled into the bleary-eyed hours of the next morning.

Beginning the trial in earnest, the impeachment managers, led by Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, laid out the House’s case against Mr. Trump, casting him as a man “who would be a king.”

“President Trump solicited foreign interference in our democratic elections, abusing the power of his office by seeking help from abroad to improve his re-election prospects at home,” Mr. Schiff said. “And when he was caught, he used the powers of that office to obstruct the investigation into his own misconduct.”

Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota finishing a television interview.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times Reporters checking their phones as the trial commenced.Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

Taking to the well of the Senate, Mr. Trump’s defense team furiously rebutted Mr. Schiff’s assertion, denouncing the case against the president as an “unlawful” attempt to deprive him of re-election.

“They’ve come here today and they’ve basically said, ‘Let’s cancel an election over a meeting with the Ukraine,’” said Pat A. Cipollone, the White House counsel. “It would be a completely irresponsible abuse of power to do what they’re asking you to do: to stop an election, to interfere in an election and to remove the president of the United States from the ballot.”

Mr. Schumer knew the Senate was unlikely to convict Mr. Trump.Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times Senator Mitt Romney of Utah was the only Republican senator vocally calling for witnesses in the impeachment trial.Credit…Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times

Then, one day before the White House team was set to conclude their opening arguments, a bombshell roiled the trial: John R. Bolton, the president’s former national security adviser, wrote in his unpublished manuscript that Mr. Trump told him directly that he wanted to continue freezing military aid to Ukraine until officials there helped with investigations into Democrats — exactly what the articles of impeachment accused the president of doing.

The account, first reported by The New York Times, suddenly created a question: Would the new disclosure prompt a critical mass of Republicans to demand to hear from Mr. Bolton or other witnesses?

After being held hostage for days to the rhetorical whims of the impeachment managers and the president’s defense team, senators seized on the opportunity to pepper each side with questions.

Parsing each question for subtext, an eager press corps eyed each question carefully searching for hidden meaning that might convey what tight-lipped senators might be thinking.

Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky had a question rejected by Chief Justice Roberts. In it, he named a person widely believed to be the whistle-blower whose anonymous complaint sparked the impeachment inquiry.Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times Senators submitted their questions for the House managers and the president’s defense team on special cards.Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times
Senator Roger Wicker Mississippi upending a bag of chips during a break of the trial.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times An aide rests during a session of the trial.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

As the trial crescendoed, inching closer to a vote to hear from witnesses like Mr. Bolton, the pressure on a handful of moderate Republican senators, like Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, who is not running for re-election in 2020, reached a fever pitch. Facing pressure from both their own party to hold the line, and from Democrats who found hope in each vague statement the lawmakers issued, they remained stone-faced.

Senate Republicans leaving the Strom Thurmond room after a meeting to discuss the next steps in the trial.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times Reporters taking note during a news conference.Credit…Alyssa Schukar for The New York Times

But by last Friday night, the outcome had become clear: Senate Republicans would hold together to turn back a plea to hear from Mr. Bolton and other witnesses. With those votes cast, the end of the trial began to neatly fall into place, cemented by a victorious thumbs-up from Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader.

Senator Susan Collins of Maine announced she would vote to acquit in both articles of impeachment before attending the State of the Union.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times At the end of Mr. Trump’s speech, Ms. Pelosi ripped the pages of the State of the Union address and called it a “manifesto of mistruths.”Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

Taking a victory lap in the chamber where it began, Mr. Trump delivered a confident State of the Union address Tuesday night from the House floor, basking in the applause of Republicans — and prompting Speaker Nancy Pelosi to rip up his remarks in a display of defiance.

On Wednesday, Mr. McConnell delivered the president his acquittal, and after three weeks, the trial was over.

Produced by Lance Booth.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Kirk Douglas, actor and Hollywood legend, dead at 103, family says

Kirk Douglas, one of the most famous American leading men of the mid-20th century remembered for his dimpled chin, chiseled features, and virile Hollywood roles, has died at the age of 103, his family said Wednesday.

“It is with tremendous sadness that my brothers and I announce that Kirk Douglas left us today at the age of 103,” Kirk’s son, Michael Douglas, said in a statement obtained by People magazine. “To the world, he was a legend, an actor from the golden age of movies who lived well into his golden years, a humanitarian whose commitment to justice and the causes he believed in set a standard for all of us to aspire to.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-57633079 Kirk Douglas, actor and Hollywood legend, dead at 103, family says Mariah Haas fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc eb288743-ff17-5b0f-8498-9acb44962ef9 article

Kirk Douglas, seen here in the 1950s, has died. (Silver Screen Collection/Hulton Archive/Getty Images, File)

The actor continued: “But to me and my brothers Joel and Peter he was simply Dad, to Catherine, a wonderful father-in-law, to his grandchildren and great grandchild their loving grandfather, and to his wife Anne, a wonderful husband.

“Kirk’s life was well lived, and he leaves a legacy in film that will endure for generations to come, and a history as a renowned philanthropist who worked to aid the public and bring peace to the planet. Let me end with the words I told him on his last birthday and which will always remain true. Dad- I love you so much and I am so proud to be your son,” he added.

This is a breaking news story. Please check back here for updates. 

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-57633079 Kirk Douglas, actor and Hollywood legend, dead at 103, family says Mariah Haas fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc eb288743-ff17-5b0f-8498-9acb44962ef9 article   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-57633079 Kirk Douglas, actor and Hollywood legend, dead at 103, family says Mariah Haas fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc eb288743-ff17-5b0f-8498-9acb44962ef9 article

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Gavel to Gavel

It took almost three weeks for the third presidential impeachment trial in the nation’s history to snake through the Senate, arriving at the final day of votes that brought a conclusion that from the beginning seemed foregone.

“Impeachment,” Ken Starr, one of the president’s defenders, had intoned during the trial, “is hell.”

A weary Senate appeared to agree and on Wednesday rendered its verdict, voting to acquit President Trump. Here’s a look at how we got here.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_167197215_0d8d535a-7146-4357-b488-b0d0be1cd68d-articleLarge Gavel to Gavel Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry

The House impeachment managers first passing through Statuary Hall.Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

Ushering in the trial with the pomp and circumstance afforded only to what Alexander Hamilton called a “national inquest into the conduct of public men,” the Democratic impeachment managers marched in a choreographed procession from the House to the Senate to deliver the articles of impeachment.

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. trekked across the street from the Supreme Court to the Capitol to preside over the trial as the White House defense team descended on the Senate, ready to argue its case.

Senator Ted Cruz of Texas speaking to reporters in the Capitol.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times Senator Chuck Schumer, the minority leader, offered several amendments to the impeachment rules.Credit…Calla Kessler/The New York Times

Transforming from a legislative body to a court of impeachment required senators, aides and journalists to adapt to a new status quo, with new hours — usually beginning at 1 p.m. and stretching as late as 2 a.m. — and new rules.

For senators, that meant being stranded without their phones and in sitting silence for hours at a time on the Senate floor, an endeavor they struggled against by doodling, fidget-spinning and whispering or surrendered to sleepily. For journalists, it meant cramming into crowded pens instead of enjoying the usual free-roaming access to lawmakers.

Television cameras and photographers were not allowed inside the chamber, save for one operated by the government, limiting what the public could see and hear.

Among those most inconvenienced by the trial, however, were the Senate Democrats running for president, who found themselves wondering when they would be able to return to Iowa before the nation’s crucial first nominating contest. While Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont made his annoyance clear, most tried to take it in stride.

“I don’t know how many days this is going to last,” Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota said. “I just know that I have a constitutional duty to do my job.”

Reporters broadcast from the Capitol during the trial.Credit…Calla Kessler/The New York Times Staff members waited in cars for the conclusion of the first night of the impeachment trial.Credit…T.J. Kirkpatrick for The New York Times

Before the opening arguments began, Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the Democratic leader, laid an early test for Republicans. Would they vote to hear from additional witnesses and gather more evidence?

In an early sign of where the trial might be heading, Republicans roundly declined — and were left voting down measure after measure introduced by Mr. Schumer to hear more, a vote-a-rama that crawled into the bleary-eyed hours of the next morning.

Beginning the trial in earnest, the impeachment managers, led by Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, laid out the House’s case against Mr. Trump, casting him as a man “who would be a king.”

“President Trump solicited foreign interference in our democratic elections, abusing the power of his office by seeking help from abroad to improve his re-election prospects at home,” Mr. Schiff said. “And when he was caught, he used the powers of that office to obstruct the investigation into his own misconduct.”

Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota finishing a television interview.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times Reporters checking their phones as the trial commenced.Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

Taking to the well of the Senate, Mr. Trump’s defense team furiously rebutted Mr. Schiff’s assertion, denouncing the case against the president as an “unlawful” attempt to deprive him of re-election.

“They’ve come here today and they’ve basically said, ‘Let’s cancel an election over a meeting with the Ukraine,’” said Pat A. Cipollone, the White House counsel. “It would be a completely irresponsible abuse of power to do what they’re asking you to do: to stop an election, to interfere in an election and to remove the president of the United States from the ballot.”

Mr. Schumer knew the Senate was unlikely to convict Mr. Trump.Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times Senator Mitt Romney of Utah was the only Republican senator vocally calling for witnesses in the impeachment trial.Credit…Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times

Then, one day before the White House team was set to conclude their opening arguments, a bombshell roiled the trial: John R. Bolton, the president’s former national security adviser, wrote in his unpublished manuscript that Mr. Trump told him directly that he wanted to continue freezing military aid to Ukraine until officials there helped with investigations into Democrats — exactly what the articles of impeachment accused the president of doing.

The account, first reported by The New York Times, suddenly created a question: Would the new disclosure prompt a critical mass of Republicans to demand to hear from Mr. Bolton or other witnesses?

After being held hostage for days to the rhetorical whims of the impeachment managers and the president’s defense team, senators seized on the opportunity to pepper each side with questions.

Parsing each question for subtext, an eager press corps eyed each question carefully searching for hidden meaning that might convey what tight-lipped senators might be thinking.

Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky had a question rejected by Chief Justice Roberts. In it, he named a person widely believed to be the whistle-blower whose anonymous complaint sparked the impeachment inquiry.Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times Senators submitted their questions for the House managers and the president’s defense team on special cards.Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times
Senator Roger Wicker Mississippi upending a bag of chips during a break of the trial.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times An aide rests during a session of the trial.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

As the trial crescendoed, inching closer to a vote to hear from witnesses like Mr. Bolton, the pressure on a handful of moderate Republican senators, like Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, who is not running for re-election in 2020, reached a fever pitch. Facing pressure from both their own party to hold the line, and from Democrats who found hope in each vague statement the lawmakers issued, they remained stone-faced.

Senate Republicans leaving the Strom Thurmond room after a meeting to discuss the next steps in the trial.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times Reporters taking note during a news conference.Credit…Alyssa Schukar for The New York Times

But by last Friday night, the outcome had become clear: Senate Republicans would hold together to turn back a plea to hear from Mr. Bolton and other witnesses. With those votes cast, the end of the trial began to neatly fall into place, cemented by a victorious thumbs-up from Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader.

Senator Susan Collins of Maine announced she would vote to acquit in both articles of impeachment before attending the State of the Union.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times At the end of Mr. Trump’s speech, Ms. Pelosi ripped the pages of the State of the Union address and called it a “manifesto of mistruths.”Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

Taking a victory lap in the chamber where it began, Mr. Trump delivered a confident State of the Union address Tuesday night from the House floor, basking in the applause of Republicans — and prompting Speaker Nancy Pelosi to rip up his remarks in a display of defiance.

On Wednesday, Mr. McConnell delivered the president his acquittal, and after three weeks, the trial was over.

Produced by Lance Booth.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com