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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 188)

Donald Trump impeachment inquiry: White House says ‘no’ to Nancy Pelosi. China says ‘no’ to Joe Biden probe

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Donald Trump impeachment inquiry: White House says 'no' to Nancy Pelosi. China says 'no' to Joe Biden probe

Donald Trump intensifies his fight with Congress over the Democrats’ impeachment investigation, as the administration blocks a US diplomat from testifying about Ukraine. AP Washington Bureau Chief Julie Pace analyzes the day’s developments. (Oct. 8) AP, AP

WASHINGTON — The U.S. State Department told a key witness not to appear before Congress, a senator called for Rudy Giuliani to testify and the White House told House Speaker Nancy Pelosi there would be no cooperation in what it called a “partisan” impeachment investigation against President Donald Trump.

All of this, and more, happened on Tuesday.

It all stems from the July 25 phone call in which Trump asked Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky to look into former Vice President Joe Biden and his son.whistleblower complaint alleges Trump pressured Zelensky and also raised concerns about U.S. monetary aid that was delayed to Ukraine.

We’ve rounded up the most important developments from today on impeachment:

Sondland subpoenaed after Trump blocked him from appearing before Congress

Trump and the State Department blocked European Union Ambassador Gordon Sondland from appearing before a trio of congressional committees to answer questions about his role in pushing Ukraine’s president to investigate Biden.

In response, House Democrats issued a subpoena, demanding he hand over key documents by Oct. 14 and appear before the panels on Oct. 16.

Sondland’s attorney Robert Luskin said the State Department directed him not to cooperate with the probe or appear before lawmakers. 

“Early this morning, the U.S. Department of State directed Ambassador Gordon Sondland not to appear today for his scheduled transcribed interview before the U.S. House of Representatives Joint Committee,” Luskin said. He had originally said Sondland agreed to “appear voluntarily”.

Trump defended the decision to prevent Sondland’s testimony, saying the Democrats’ inquiry is illegitimate, claiming he would love “to send Ambassador Sondland” to testify, but he unfortunately “would be testifying before a totally compromised kangaroo court.”  

Read more:

White House tells Pelosi that Trump will not participate in inquiry 

In a letter released Tuesday, Trump and his team told Pelosi and other Democratic leaders that they will not provide documents or witnesses to House impeachment investigators because they consider the investigation to be unfair and illegitimate.

“You have designed and implemented your inquiry in a manner that violates fundamental fairness and constitutionally mandated due process,” White House Counsel Pat Cipollone wrote in a blistering eight-page letter to Pelosi and the chairmen of three key House committees.

“President Trump cannot permit his Administration to participate in this partisan inquiry under these circumstances,” Cipollone added, reiterating the GOP talking point that democrats are just seeking “to overturn the results of the 2016 election.”

Some Democrats scoffed at Trump’s objections and indicated they may go to court to try and enforce subpoenas and document requests.

House Democratic investigators subpoenaed Sondland minutes after the White House letter.

Pelosi released a statement, responding to Trump’s letter: “The White House should be warned that continued efforts to hide the truth of the President’s abuse of power from the American people will be regarded as further evidence of obstruction.”  

“Mr. President, you are not above the law.  You will be held accountable,” she concluded.

Read more:

Giuliani called to testify by Graham

Trump’s personal lawyer, Giuliani, was invited by Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., to discuss what he learned during his investigation into Ukraine.

“Given the House of Representatives’ behavior, it is time for the Senate to inquire about corruption and other improprieties involving Ukraine,” Graham tweeted. “Therefore I will offer to Mr. Giuliani the opportunity to come before the Senate Judiciary Committee to inform the Committee of his concerns.”

California Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the ranking Democrat on the committee, embraced hearing from Giuliani, saying in a statement that she welcomes “the opportunity to question Rudy Giuliani under oath about his role in seeking the Ukrainian government’s assistance to investigate one of the president’s political rivals.”

Giuliani told The Washington Post he was “very interested” in Graham’s offer, but “there are a lot of legal issues to consider.” 

Read more:

China tells Trump ‘no’ to investigating Biden

After Trump publicly said China should also investigate Biden and reports swirled that the political prospects of Biden and Sen. Elizabeth Warren were mentioned in a phone call between Trump and President Xi, China said: no.

Last week, Trump told reporters on the White House South Lawn, “By the way, likewise, China should start an investigation into the Bidens because what happened in China is just about as bad as what happened with Ukraine.”

“We have no intention of intervening in the domestic affairs of the United States. Our position is consistent and clear,” China foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said in a report in the South China Morning Post, the main English-language newspaper in Hong Kong.

Read more:

Senate report concludes Russia helped Trump in 2016, calls for action for 2020

new report released by the Senate Intelligence Committee on Russian interference in the 2016 election has concluded that Russia acted to boost Trump at the expense of Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

Among other controversial issues, Russia attempted to inflame tensions around race and “targeted African-Americans more than any other group or demographic,” and according to the committee, the election interference efforts did not end with the 2016 election. 

The report delivers a call for future action to prevent foreign election interference, saying that “the Executive Branch should, in the run up to the 2020 election, reinforce with the public the danger of attempted foreign interference in the 2020 election.”

They also recommend the creation of an interagency task force to combat misinformation efforts and a public information campaign against foreign interference. 

The report comes in the midst of Trump asking Ukraine and China to help him investigate, as well as previous reports that Trump asked multiple countries, including Australia, to help  Attorney General William Barr’s ongoing inquiry into the origins of special counsel Robert Mueller’s examination of Russian interference in the 2016 election investigation.

Read more:

What’s next?

The House Foreign Affairs, Intelligence and Oversight committees scheduled a deposition with Lev Parnas, a Ukrainian-born businessman who helped introduce Giuliani to a Ukrainian prosecutor who reportedly sought to provide dirt on Biden for Thursday.

On Friday, the three committees scheduled a deposition with Igor Fruman, a Ukrainian-born business partner who helped introduce Giuliani to the Ukrainian prosecutor and Marie Yovanovitch, a career diplomat and former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine. Trump called Yovanovitch “bad news” in his phone call with the Ukrainian president.

More: Trump impeachment investigation: Here is what’s going on this week

Contributing: Bart Jansen, John Fritze, Michael Collins, David Jackson, Christal Hayes, Nicholas Wu, Jeanine Santucci, Deirdre Shesgreen, Kevin Johnson and Kristine Phillips, USA TODAY.

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/10/08/donald-trump-impeachment-inquiry-rudy-giuliani-gordon-sondland-testify/3914217002/

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Bella Thorne celebrates 22nd birthday with bikini photos: ‘It’s my birthday b—h’

Westlake Legal Group Bella-Thorne-THUMB Bella Thorne celebrates 22nd birthday with bikini photos: 'It's my birthday b---h' Mariah Haas fox-news/person/bella-thorne fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 5d1f9cf7-292c-5d2f-853f-e1d956f77610

Bella Thorne is ringing in her 22nd birthday with throwback beach photos.

On Tuesday, the former Disney Channel star shared several old pictures of herself rocking a hot pink-colored bikini with an animal print pattern as she smiled for the camera.

“ITS MY BIRTHDAY B—H,” Thorne captioned the series of photos on Instagram. The snaps caught the attention of Thorne’s fans and her celeb pals, including “Mom” star Anna Faris, who wrote in the comments section: “Ahhhhhh you sexy beautiful babe.”

It appears the actress is celebrating her special day at an amusement park in Los Angeles. “Shutting down six flags,” she wrote of Six Flags Magic Mountain on her Instagram Story. “I’m so hyped,” Thorne added.

BELLA THORNE TO RECEIVE AWARD FOR PORN DIRECTORIAL DEBUT

In a separate Instagram post, the actress shared a few close-up selfies, writing candidly in the caption: “This is me at 22, no filters no edits, the usual.”

She continued: “I found myself confidence this year, 22 has in store for me beauty, laughter, lots of tears, and work work work and more work.”

Thorne is slated to receive an award on Friday from the adult film streaming service Pornhub for her recently released directorial debut “Her & Him.”

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According to the Hollywood Reporter, she will be honored with a Vision Award at the second annual Pornhub Awards Show on Oct. 11 at the Orpheum Theatre in Los Angeles.

Westlake Legal Group Bella-Thorne-THUMB Bella Thorne celebrates 22nd birthday with bikini photos: 'It's my birthday b---h' Mariah Haas fox-news/person/bella-thorne fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 5d1f9cf7-292c-5d2f-853f-e1d956f77610   Westlake Legal Group Bella-Thorne-THUMB Bella Thorne celebrates 22nd birthday with bikini photos: 'It's my birthday b---h' Mariah Haas fox-news/person/bella-thorne fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 5d1f9cf7-292c-5d2f-853f-e1d956f77610

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McSally hopes Trump’s Syria troop withdrawal is ‘reconsidered,’ says US should stand with Kurds

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093288028001_6093286040001-vs McSally hopes Trump's Syria troop withdrawal is 'reconsidered,' says US should stand with Kurds Victor Garcia fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 75396d16-dad4-5200-8c52-270d15e2c76c

Sen. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., voiced her concerns with President Trump‘s decision to withdraw troops from the northern Syrian border, saying she hopes “it’s reconsidered.”

“I agree with President Trump’s objective to not be bogged down in the Middle East, to bring our men and women home, and we really need to be looking at the rising threat of China,” McSally said on “The Story with Martha MacCallum” Tuesday.

“However, we have a generational struggle and fight against Islamic terrorism.”

Trump on Monday defended his decision to withdraw U.S. troops from northern Syria ahead of planned action of the region by Turkey, even as his Republican allies in both the Senate and House vehemently criticized the move.

TURKEY’S SYRIA INCURSION MAY ALLOW ISIS TO ATTEMPT MASS PRISON BREAK AMID US WITHDRAWAL, KURDISH FIGHTERS WARN

McSallly, an Air Force veteran who was deployed six times to the Middle East and Afghanistan, praised Trump for his work there before making her case for why his plan for withdrawal was a bad idea.

“We cannot tolerate a NATO ally now coming in and mowing them down. That is just not the right message,” McSally said.

“It’s not good for the safety of America, so I really hope it’s reconsidered.”

The Republican senator said she believed the United States needed to stand with the Kurds, who have aided the U.S. against the Islamic State.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Turkey needs to be deterred, [Turkish President Recep Tayyip] Erdogan needs to change his course right now,” McSally said. “I think we need to stand with the Kurds with our amount of capability that we’ve had, which has been very limited, but not turn our backs on them.”

Fox News’ Martha MacCallum and Andrew O’Reilly contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093288028001_6093286040001-vs McSally hopes Trump's Syria troop withdrawal is 'reconsidered,' says US should stand with Kurds Victor Garcia fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 75396d16-dad4-5200-8c52-270d15e2c76c   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093288028001_6093286040001-vs McSally hopes Trump's Syria troop withdrawal is 'reconsidered,' says US should stand with Kurds Victor Garcia fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 75396d16-dad4-5200-8c52-270d15e2c76c

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McSally hopes Trump’s Syria troop withdrawal is ‘reconsidered,’ says US should stand with Kurds

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093288028001_6093286040001-vs McSally hopes Trump's Syria troop withdrawal is 'reconsidered,' says US should stand with Kurds Victor Garcia fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 75396d16-dad4-5200-8c52-270d15e2c76c

Sen. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., voiced her concerns with President Trump‘s decision to withdraw troops from the northern Syrian border, saying she hopes “it’s reconsidered.”

“I agree with President Trump’s objective to not be bogged down in the Middle East, to bring our men and women home, and we really need to be looking at the rising threat of China,” McSally said on “The Story with Martha MacCallum” Tuesday.

“However, we have a generational struggle and fight against Islamic terrorism.”

Trump on Monday defended his decision to withdraw U.S. troops from northern Syria ahead of planned action of the region by Turkey, even as his Republican allies in both the Senate and House vehemently criticized the move.

TURKEY’S SYRIA INCURSION MAY ALLOW ISIS TO ATTEMPT MASS PRISON BREAK AMID US WITHDRAWAL, KURDISH FIGHTERS WARN

McSallly, an Air Force veteran who was deployed six times to the Middle East and Afghanistan, praised Trump for his work there before making her case for why his plan for withdrawal was a bad idea.

“We cannot tolerate a NATO ally now coming in and mowing them down. That is just not the right message,” McSally said.

“It’s not good for the safety of America, so I really hope it’s reconsidered.”

The Republican senator said she believed the United States needed to stand with the Kurds, who have aided the U.S. against the Islamic State.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Turkey needs to be deterred, [Turkish President Recep Tayyip] Erdogan needs to change his course right now,” McSally said. “I think we need to stand with the Kurds with our amount of capability that we’ve had, which has been very limited, but not turn our backs on them.”

Fox News’ Martha MacCallum and Andrew O’Reilly contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093288028001_6093286040001-vs McSally hopes Trump's Syria troop withdrawal is 'reconsidered,' says US should stand with Kurds Victor Garcia fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 75396d16-dad4-5200-8c52-270d15e2c76c   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093288028001_6093286040001-vs McSally hopes Trump's Syria troop withdrawal is 'reconsidered,' says US should stand with Kurds Victor Garcia fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 75396d16-dad4-5200-8c52-270d15e2c76c

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Lights out? PG&E plans to shut off power for more than 800K customers in California to reduce wildfire risk

More than 800,000 subscribers in California will be left in the dark for days as the state’s leading utility shuts off power to parts of 34 counties to reduce the risk of wildfires in dry and windy conditions.

Pacific Gas and Electric said blackouts across parts of northern, central and coastal California would start early Wednesday morning shortly after midnight in the largest preventive outage in state history.

Because every customer account could represent service to multiple residents or employees in a business, the number of people affected by the outages could be in the millions.

With winds between 40 mph and 70 mph expected Wednesday and Thursday, PG&E is trying to avoid downed power lines or contact with vegetation setting off fires. Some of California’s most destructive blazes in recent years were started by PG&E power lines. 

Nearly all nine counties in the San Francisco Bay Area could be subjected to the shutdowns, the only exception being the city and county of San Francisco.

In addition, Southern California Edison said more than 100,000 customers could face power cuts in eight counties it serves, including more than 30,000 in Los Angeles County.

Class-action lawsuit: Was California wildfire caused by Pacific Gas & Electric?

Michael Lewis, senior vice president of PG&E’s electric operations, said it could take “several days to fully restore power after the weather passes and safety inspections are completed.”

The beleaguered utility, which filed for bankruptcy earlier this year after a series of wildfires left it with billions of dollars in liabilities, further incurred its customers’ wrath when its website crashed amid heavy traffic, preventing subscribers from finding information about the blackouts. 

Westlake Legal Group  Lights out? PG&E plans to shut off power for more than 800K customers in California to reduce wildfire risk

“This is shaping up to be one of the most severe dry wind events we’ve seen in our territory in recent years,” PG&E said in a statement. “We want our customers to be prepared for an extended outage that may last several days.”

AccuWeather noted that while some Santa Ana wind events usher in hot and arid air, the winds affecting most of California this week should bring in somewhat cooler air that could ease the threat of a major wildfire outbreak.

“However, the combination of dry air, dry brush and gusty winds will significantly raise the chance of wildfire ignition,” AccuWeather senior meteorologist Alex Sosnowski said.

PG&E’s meteorological and operations teams were monitoring the “evolving situation” and were working with state and local agencies to prepare the public, Lewis said. 

He warned that customers may be affected by a power shutoff even if they are not experiencing extreme weather conditions in their specific location because of the way power lines work in unison across cities, counties and regions.

Transportation officials also prepared for a possible full closure of the San Francisco Bay Area’s Caldecott Tunnel, which more than 160,000 commuters use daily, because of the shutoff. While CalTrans is working with PG&E to provide emergency power to the tunnel, the agency said it may close as soon as Tuesday evening and remain blocked for up to five days. The Tom Lantos Tunnel in Pacifica may also be temporarily closed to traffic, CalTrans said. 

Residents of the Golden State lined up at gas stations and headed to stores to buy generators, flashlights, batteries and non-perishable food.

Jennifer Siemens, whose home burnt down in a devastating fire in the Northern California town of Paradise that was blamed on PG&E transmission lines, said she’s now renting in nearby Oroville and is preparing for her third power shutdown in a month.

Siemens said the outages scare her children, who were traumatized during the massive Paradise blaze, and also affect the family’s cleaning business.

“What’s wrong with the power lines that they have to do this so much?” asked Siemens. “We don’t want any more fires, obviously, but I feel like they are going a little overboard.”

PG&E ordered a much smaller power cutoff in June involving thousands of customers in the Northern California counties of Napa, Solano and Yolo.

The utility has drawn blame for igniting several wildfires caused by downed power lines that killed dozens and destroyed thousands of homes. In June, PG&E agreed to pay $1 billion in damages to local governments.

More than half the settlement was related to the Camp Fire, which killed 85 people and destroyed more than 13,000 homes while nearly wiping out Paradise.

Contributing: Kristin Lam, USA TODAY; Gabrielle Paluch, Palm Springs Desert Sun; The Associated Press

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California governor signs large-scale law capping rent increases

Westlake Legal Group AP19281858168136 California governor signs large-scale law capping rent increases Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/economy/housing fox-news/politics/state-and-local/governors fox-news/politics/state-and-local/controversies fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/politics fnc article 648b9d70-5e77-53a2-9b42-06a359b15452 /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE

California will limit how much landlords can increase rents over the next decade as the state continues to grapple with a housing crisis that has exacerbated its homelessness epidemic.

Democratic Gov. Gavin Newson signed the law Tuesday in Oakland, a city that has seen a 43 percent increase in homelessness in recent years. President Trump highlighted the issue last month, saying California cities continue to “destroy themselves” by not addresses the homeless crisis.

“We have people living in our … best highways, our best streets, our best entrances to buildings … where people in those buildings pay tremendous taxes, where they went to those locations because of the prestige,” Trump told reporters.

SAN FRANCISCO’S MOST EXPENSIVE LISTING GETS $4.5-MILLION CUT FROM $45 MILLION ASKING PRICE

Speaking in Oakland to a crowd of housing advocates, Newsom said Trump “wasn’t wrong to highlight a vulnerability.”

In June, the governor authorized $2.4 billion in spending to address the state’s housing and homelessness crisis, including millions of dollars to build shelters. Affordable housing advocates have long urged lawmakers to make residential development easier to increase the state’s housing stock.

The law signed by Newsom limits year-over-year rent increases to five percent plus inflation until Jan.1, 2030. Landlords are also barred from evicting tenants without just cause, a provision meant to curb evictions just to raise rents.

The law doesn’t take effect until Jan. 1 but retroactively applies to rent increases on or after March 15 of this year to prevent landlords raising rents before the cap goes into effect.

Democratic Assemblyman David Chiu, who authored the bill, estimates the law will apply to 8 million of the state’s 17 million renters. It would not apply to housing built within the last 15 years, single-family homes except those owned by corporations or real estate investment trusts, or those living in rent-controlled units. Duplexes where the owner lives in one of the units also are not affected by the new law.

LOS ANGELES OFFICIALS PRESSURING NEWSOM TO DECLARE STATE OF EMERGENCY AMID HOMELESS CRISIS

Russell Lowery, executive director of the California Rental Housing Association, said the law adds another layer of red tape to the eviction process.

“It adds unnecessary expenses to all rental home providers and makes it more difficult to sever a relationship with a problem tenant,” he said.

Housing advocates are hopeful the law will spur more development in a state that desperately needs it. Housing costs have become a major issue in California, as many residents continue to be priced out of desirable neighborhoods.

In Los Angeles County, the shortage of affordable homes and apartments has spurred people to move further away from the coast into the desert east of the city. In the San Francisco area, the median price for a home is around $1.5 million.

Last year, voters rejected a statewide rent control ballot measure. Los Angeles, San Francisco and Oakland already have some form of rent control, but a 1995 law bans new rent control policies.

Without rent control, landlords in most cities across the state can raise rents at will as long as they give advanced notice.

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Bay Area resident Sasha Graham told The Associated Press her rent went up 150 percent in 2014. She paid on time and in full but was evicted anyway. She was homeless for the next three years, drifting between the homes of friends and strangers.

“Sometimes I lived with no lights, sometimes I lived with no water, depending on who I was living with [because] they were also struggling,” she said. “Sometimes I just had to use my money to go to a hotel room so I could finish my homework.”

In June, officials in Los Angeles County announced that homelessness had jumped 12 percent over the past year despite $619 million in spending.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19281858168136 California governor signs large-scale law capping rent increases Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/economy/housing fox-news/politics/state-and-local/governors fox-news/politics/state-and-local/controversies fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/politics fnc article 648b9d70-5e77-53a2-9b42-06a359b15452 /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE   Westlake Legal Group AP19281858168136 California governor signs large-scale law capping rent increases Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/economy/housing fox-news/politics/state-and-local/governors fox-news/politics/state-and-local/controversies fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/politics fnc article 648b9d70-5e77-53a2-9b42-06a359b15452 /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE

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Arnold Schwarzenegger says he ‘could’ vote for this Democrat in 2020

Westlake Legal Group AP19199695707471 Arnold Schwarzenegger says he 'could' vote for this Democrat in 2020 Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/arnold-schwarzenegger fox news fnc/media fnc fb5180a5-29c6-5254-af1e-ff736c06c100 article

Actor and former California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger said Monday that “I could” vote for Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. in the 2020 presidential election.

“I would just have to see what her program is, what her vision is for the future of America because I think the most important thing is we keep America number one,” Schwarzenegger told “The Howard Stern Show,” according to The Hill.

ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER BELIEVES DONALD TRUMP IS ‘IN LOVE’ WITH HIM: ‘HE WANTS TO BE ME’

When asked whether he would support President Trump’s re-election in 2020, Schwarzenegger laughed and said: “I doubt it.”

“I will find out what is happening on the Democratic side because I mean there’s a lot of weird stuff going on there,” the Austria-born actor added.

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The 72-year-old Schwarzenegger has engaged in a long-standing feud with Trump, who Schwarzenegger replaced as host of NBC’s “The Celebrity Apprentice” in 2015. Last month, Schwarzenegger said that Trump wanted to be him and was “in love” with the former “Terminator” star.

“I don’t think he fears me,” he said during an interview. “But I remember that in the old days when we went to the wrestling matches, the way he admired people with bodies, and the way they would jump around in the ring, and to perform physical stunts and stuff like that — he had great admiration for that.”

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Trump previously bashed Schwarzenegger for his performance on the reality show.

“Arnold Schwarzenegger isn’t voluntarily leaving the Apprentice, he was fired by his bad [pathetic] ratings, not by me. Sad end to great show,” Trump tweeted in 2017. In that same year, Schwarzenegger said he wanted to “smash” Trump’s “face.”

Fox News’ Jessica Napoli contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19199695707471 Arnold Schwarzenegger says he 'could' vote for this Democrat in 2020 Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/arnold-schwarzenegger fox news fnc/media fnc fb5180a5-29c6-5254-af1e-ff736c06c100 article   Westlake Legal Group AP19199695707471 Arnold Schwarzenegger says he 'could' vote for this Democrat in 2020 Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/arnold-schwarzenegger fox news fnc/media fnc fb5180a5-29c6-5254-af1e-ff736c06c100 article

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‘A historic day’: Montgomery, Alabama, elects its first African-American mayor

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close ‘A historic day’: Montgomery, Alabama, elects its first African-American mayor

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MONTGOMERY, Ala. – Montgomery, a city where more than half the population is black and known as the birthplace of the civil rights movement, elected an African American to the highest position in municipal government for the first time in its 200-year history.

Steven Reed, the Montgomery County probate judge, on Tuesday beat television station owner David Woods in a runoff, gaining 32,511 votes to Woods’ 15,891 with 46 precincts of 47 precincts reporting, according to incomplete, unofficial returns. He will be sworn into office Nov. 12 at Montgomery City Hall.

Reed was the first African American elected as the county’s probate judge in 2012. In 2015, he was the first probate judge in Alabama to issue same-sex marriage licenses.

“This will be a historic day in Montgomery,” author and historian Richard Bailey said. “For the first time, the people of this city, especially African Americans, will be able to say that we have someone in the mayor’s office who understands the pulse of the black community.”

Montgomery is one of only three cities in six Deep South states with a population of 100,000 or more that had not previously elected an African American as mayor. Beginning in the late 1960s, the election of first black mayors in Cleveland, Ohio, Newark, New Jersey, Detroit, Michigan, Gary, Indiana, and Los Angeles manifested black power, said Derryn Eroll Moten, chairman of Alabama State University’s Department of History and Political Science.

The city being led by a black mayor is an achievement pushed forward by defining moments during the civil rights movement. The outcome of Tuesday’selection is a product of the key figures who fought for civil rights from Alabama’s capital like the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, E.D. Nixon and Johnnie Carr.

“Civil rights leaders promised that an unencumbered black vote would bring real changes in American society,” Moten said.

Moten said the election of Montgomery’s first black mayor wouldn’t be possible without groups that pushed for African-American participation in local and state politics – the Women’s Political Council, the Dallas County Voters League, Rufus Lewis’ Citizens Club and the Alabama Democratic Conference.

Changes materialized in the South in the wake of the Voting Rights Act in 1965, with the election of Sheriff Lucius Amerson in Alabama and the election of Julian Bond to the Georgia House of Representatives. Both were elected in 1966 and became the first African Americans to hold these offices since Reconstruction.

Montgomery mayor: What you need to know about the runoff election

Some say it’s a paradox that Montgomery is both the birthplace of the civil rights movement and the cradle of the Confederacy. Others say it shows the resilience of African Americans that a city with a history of slavery, lynchings, white supremacy and Jim Crow laws elected its first black mayor Tuesday.

Montgomery is going through a noticeable transformation. Last year, the Equal Justice Initiative opened the National Memorial for Peace and Justice and the Legacy Museum in downtown Montgomery to honor victims of lynching. The memorial is adjacent to the slave market site in Montgomery. It has brought several hundred thousand visitors here, many who wouldn’t have visited the Deep South otherwise.

There are outside investors building downtown hotels for those visitors, and a new whitewater park and outdoor center is planned near downtown. The multimillion-dollar investment is in a near west side neighborhood inhabited predominantly by black families. It’s one of the poorest areas, in need of development but often overlooked.

Before the election results were announced, Bailey predicted the voters would show Montgomery’s progress since those days of racial terror. Reed’s election is the latest example of the city reconciling its past and planning for a better future.

Now, it’s the future that Reed must lead the city into.

Big changes are coming for Montgomery with the election of Reed and new members on the City Council. The last three mayors held office for at least a decade. Mayor Todd Strange did not seek re-election.

Reed said he wants to invest in public transportation and address the issue of brown water and food deserts in some of Montgomery’s communities. He talked about elevating the economy by being more receptive and supportive of young talent and making the off pace city more competitive. He mentioned working with real estate developers so artists can receive discounted rent for work spaces.

He said he was open to an ad valorem tax that would increase the millage rate for public education funds. He’s repeatedly mentioned a full day, universal pre-K program. The program would guarantee children a spot regardless of their family’s income as early childhood education can be expensive for low-income families.

Reed will be charged with overseeing the city’s $260 million budget that was adopted Sept. 17. He’ll deal with continued pressure on the internal service fund used to pay employee medical, dental and retirement benefits. Another issue he will take on is finding funds for salary increases for public safety employees to recruit, retain and address the issue of crime in the city.

Follow Sara MacNeil on Twitter: @sara_macneil

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Oklahoma boy, 3, wows police with his uniform

Westlake Legal Group Coffee-with-a-Cop Oklahoma boy, 3, wows police with his uniform Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc article 58b8c983-d7f1-5142-84ab-9582837f054b

A cute prospective three-year-old police recruit stood tall to meet members of a local police department in Oklahoma City Tuesday and show off his tiny uniform.

Carson impressed local officers from the Edmond Police Department, who were hosting their monthly Coffee with a Cop event, where residents attend to meet law enforcement, ask questions and strengthen community relationships.

The child showed off his uniform to Lt. Paul Phillips who joked, “he outranks me,” after noticing that the toddler had three stars on his jacket.

NATIONAL ‘COFFEE WITH A COP DAY’ AIMS TO BRING COMMUNITIES, POLICE TOGETHER OVER A CUP OF JOE

Carson then proudly blew his police whistle, as Phillips told him “that’s awesome” and that her “liked his outfit.”

Coffee with a Cop takes place on the second Tuesday of every month across Edmond and began in the town in June 2017.

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The initiative was launched in Hawthorne, Calif. in 2011 as a way for officers from the Hawthorne Police Department to establish trust between the community and the police. The program has expanded nationwide and “opens the door for interactions outside of the crisis situations that typically bring law enforcement officers and community members together,” according to the program’s website.

Westlake Legal Group Coffee-with-a-Cop Oklahoma boy, 3, wows police with his uniform Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc article 58b8c983-d7f1-5142-84ab-9582837f054b   Westlake Legal Group Coffee-with-a-Cop Oklahoma boy, 3, wows police with his uniform Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc article 58b8c983-d7f1-5142-84ab-9582837f054b

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Nancy Pelosi Calls Trump’s Bluff: ‘You Are Not Above The Law’

Westlake Legal Group 5d9d2de4210000a807ac8a21 Nancy Pelosi Calls Trump’s Bluff: ‘You Are Not Above The Law’

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) castigated President Donald Trump’s refusal to cooperate with Congress’ impeachment inquiry on Tuesday, saying the White House was trying to make “lawlessness a virtue” and pledging to hold the administration accountable.

“The American people have already heard the President’s own words ― ‘do us a favor, though,’” Pelosi said in a statement, referencing the whistleblower complaint that led her to formally open the impeachment inquiry last month. “The President’s actions threaten our national security, violate our Constitution and undermine the integrity of our elections. The White House letter is only the latest attempt to cover up his betrayal of our democracy, and to insist that the President is above the law.”

Her response came just hours after White House counsel Pat Cipollone sent Pelosi and other top Democrats an eight-page letter accusing them of waging a “partisan and unconstitutional” effort to overturn the 2016 election.

“President Trump and his Administration reject your baseless, unconstitutional efforts to overturn the democratic process. Your unprecedented actions have left the President with no choice,” read the letter addressed to Pelosi, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot Engel (D-N.Y.) and House Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah Cummings (D-Md.). “In order to fulfill his duties to the American people, the Constitution, the Executive Branch, and all future occupants of the Office of the Presidency, President Trump and his Administration cannot participate in your partisan and unconstitutional inquiry under these circumstances.”

Trump and his team have been embroiled in scandal following the whistleblower complaint, which discussed a July phone call in which the president repeatedly pressured Ukrainian leader Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate one of his main political rivals, former Vice President Joe Biden, and his son Hunter Biden. The July call came shortly after Trump ordered his administration to withhold millions of dollars in military funding for Ukraine. Democrats have cast the discussion as a clear demand for a political favor in exchange for that military funding.

Trump has vehemently rejected that characterization, although text messages sent by U.S. officials ― and released by Democrats last week ― appeared to echo the whistleblower complaint and detail concerns within the president’s own administration after the call with Zelensky.

The House has already issued multiple subpoenas as part of its investigations, targeting high-profile officials including Vice President Mike Pence, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani. The White House itself has also been subpoenaed for Ukraine-related documents.

In her statement on Tuesday, Pelosi rejected the White House’s claims that the impeachment inquiry was out of bounds, calling those claims “manifestly wrong” and accusing Trump of “simply another unlawful attempt to hide the facts of the Trump Administration’s brazen efforts to pressure foreign powers to intervene in the 2020 elections.”

“Despite the White House’s stonewalling, we see a growing body of evidence that shows that President Trump abused his office and violated his oath to ‘protect, preserve and defend the Constitution,’” Pelosi said. “The White House should be warned that continued efforts to hide the truth of the President’s abuse of power from the American people will be regarded as further evidence of obstruction.” 

“Mr. President, you are not above the law,” the speaker continued. “You will be held accountable.”

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