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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 188)

Want Your Personal Data? Hand Over More

Westlake Legal Group 00datarequests2-facebookJumbo Want Your Personal Data? Hand Over More Science and Technology Privacy Law and Legislation General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) Data Storage California

The new year ushered in a landmark California privacy law that gives residents more control over how their digital data is used. The Golden State isn’t the only beneficiary, though, because many companies are extending the protections — the most important being the right to see and delete the personal data a company has — to all their customers in the United States.

In the fall, I took the right of access for a test drive, asking companies in the business of profiling and scoring consumers for their files on me. One of the companies, Sift, which assesses a user’s trustworthiness, sent me a 400-page file that contained years’ worth of my Airbnb messages, Yelp orders and Coinbase activity. Soon after my article was published, Sift was deluged with over 16,000 requests, forcing it to hire a vendor to deal with the crush.

That vendor, Berbix, helped verify the identity of people requesting data by asking them to upload photos of their government ID and to take a selfie. It then asked them to take a second selfie while following instructions. “Make sure you are looking happy or joyful and try again” was one such command.

Many people who read the article about my experience were alarmed by the information that Berbix asked for — and the need to smile for their secret file.

“This is a nightmare future where I can’t request my data from a creepy shadow credit bureau without putting on a smile for them, and it’s completely insane,” Jack Phelps, a software engineer in New York City, said in an email.

“It just seems wrong that we have to give up even more personal information,” wrote another reader, Barbara Clancy, a retired professor of neuroscience in Arkansas.

That’s the unpleasant reality: To get your personal data, you may have to give up more personal data. It seems awful at first. Alistair Barr of Bloomberg called it “the new privacy circle of hell.”

But there’s a good reason for this. Companies don’t want to give your data away to the wrong person, which has happened in the past. In 2018, Amazon sent 1,700 audio files of a customer talking to his Alexa to a stranger.

The right to have access to personal data is enshrined in the new California Consumer Privacy Act. The law is modeled in part on privacy regulations in Europe, known as the General Data Protection Regulation, or G.D.P.R. Soon after Europe’s law went into effect, in May 2018, a hacker gained access to the Spotify account of Jean Yang, a tech executive, and successfully filed a data request to download her home address, credit card information and a history of the music she had listened to.

Since then, two groups of researchers have demonstrated that it’s possible to fool the systems created to comply with G.D.P.R. to get someone else’s personal information.

One of the researchers, James Pavur, 24, a doctoral student at Oxford University, filed data requests on behalf of his research partner and wife, Casey Knerr, at 150 companies using information that was easily found for her online, such as her mailing address, email address and phone number. To make the requests, he created an email address that was a variation on Ms. Knerr’s name. A quarter of the companies sent him her file.

“I got her Social Security number, high school grades, a good chunk of information about her credit card,” Mr. Pavur said. “A threat intelligence company sent me all her user names and passwords that had been leaked.”

Mariano Di Martino and Pieter Robyns, computer science researchers at Hasselt University in Belgium, had the same success rate when they approached 55 financial, entertainment and news companies. They requested each other’s data, using more advanced techniques than those of Mr. Pavur, such as photoshopping each other’s government ID. In one case, Mr. Di Martino received the data file of a complete stranger whose name was similar to that of Mr. Robyns.

Both sets of researchers thought the new law giving the right to data was worthwhile. But they said companies needed to improve their security practices to avoid compromising customers’ privacy further.

“Companies are rushing to solutions that lead to insecure practices,” Mr. Robyns said.

Companies employ different techniques for verifying identity. Many simply ask for a photo of a driver’s license. Retail Equation, a company that decides whether a consumer can make returns at retailers like Best Buy and Victoria’s Secret, asks only for a name and driver’s license number.

The wide array of companies now required to hand over data, from Baskin Robbins to The New York Times, have varying levels of security expertise and experience in providing data to consumers.

Companies such as Apple, Amazon and Twitter can ask users to verify their identity by logging into their platforms. All three give a heads-up via email after data is requested, which can help warn people if a hacker got access to their account. An Apple spokesman said that after a request is made, the company uses additional methods to verify the person’s identity, though the company said it couldn’t disclose those methods for security reasons.

If consumers can’t verify their identity by logging into an existing account, Mr. Di Martino and Mr. Robyns recommend that companies email them, call them or ask them for information that only they should know, such as the invoice number on a recent bill.

“Regulators need to think more about the unintended consequences of empowering individuals to access and delete their data,” said Steve Kirkham, who worked on Airbnb’s trust and safety team for five years, before founding Berbix in 2018. “We want to prevent fraudulent requests and let the good ones go through.”

It is on regulators’ minds. The California law requires businesses to “verify the identity of the consumer making the request to a reasonable degree of certainty” and to have a more stringent verification process for “sensitive or valuable personal information.”

Mr. Kirkham said Berbix requested the first selfie to test whether a person’s face matched their ID; the second selfie, with a smile or some other facial expression, ensures that someone isn’t simply holding a photo up to the camera. Mr. Kirkham said Berbix ultimately deleted the data collected within seven days to a year, depending on the retention period requested by the company that hires the firm. (Sift deletes its data after two weeks.)

“It’s a new threat vector companies should consider,” said Blake Brannon, vice president of product at OneTrust, another company that helps businesses comply with the new data privacy laws. OneTrust offers the 4,500 organizations using its service the option to create several levels of identity verification, such as sending a token to someone’s phone or verifying ownership of an email address.

“If I’m requesting something simple or lightweight, the verification is minimal, versus a deletion request,” Mr. Brannon said. “That will require more levels of verification.”

Mr. Kirkham of Berbix said the verification process discouraged some people from making the data request at all.

“A lot of people don’t want to give more information,” Mr. Kirkham said. “Their assumption is that you will do something nefarious with it.”

He added: “But that’s the irony here. We require additional information from people to protect them. We want to make sure you are who you say you are.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

What to Expect from the House and Senate on Trump’s Impeachment

Westlake Legal Group 15dc-whattowatch-facebookJumbo What to Expect from the House and Senate on Trump's Impeachment Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Senate Pelosi, Nancy McConnell, Mitch impeachment House of Representatives

After a monthlong delay, the House is expected to vote on Wednesday to send two articles of impeachment to the Senate, setting in motion only the third presidential impeachment trial in American history.

The day will be filled with pomp and circumstance, including a vote on the House floor, a formal “engrossment” ceremony of the impeachment articles and a procession through the Capitol Rotunda to formally deliver the charges to the Senate.

What we’re expecting to see: Speaker Nancy Pelosi plans to reveal whom she has chosen to serve as the impeachment managers to prosecute the case against President Trump in the Senate, and the House will vote to formally appoint them and transmit the articles of impeachment to the Senate.

When we’re likely to see it: Ms. Pelosi is scheduled to announce her choice of impeachment managers at a news conference at 10 a.m. on Wednesday. The House is scheduled to vote on the managers from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m., after a 10-minute debate. Ms. Pelosi and the managers will hold the engrossment ceremony at 5 p.m., and the managers will immediately march across the Capitol to deliver the charges.

How to follow it: The New York Times congressional team will be following all of the developments on Capitol Hill and reporters at the White House will get the latest on the next steps for President Trump and his allies. Come to nytimes.com throughout the day for live coverage.

Wednesday’s formalities will largely bring to a conclusion the House’s constitutional role in filing impeachment charges against the president, and ends the frosty standoff between Ms. Pelosi and Senator Mitch McConnell, the Republican leader, over the outlines of the Senate trial.

Ms. Pelosi had hoped to force Mr. McConnell to commit to calling witnesses and allowing additional documentary evidence by withholding the two impeachment articles for several weeks. But the tactic largely failed after a handful of moderate Republican senators agreed with Mr. McConnell to delay the decision about witnesses and documents until after both sides presented their arguments and senators had an opportunity to ask questions. That could take two weeks or more.

The last time such a handoff took place, during President Bill Clinton’s impeachment trial in 1999, senators struck a bipartisan agreement on the trial rules, voting 100 to 0 to approve them. No such effort is being made this year; Mr. McConnell has said in recent days that he expects all 53 Republican senators to back a trial resolution that could pass without Democratic support.

While Ms. Pelosi will have no formal role in the trial, her hand-selected managers will be front and center, presenting the charges that Mr. Trump pressured the president of Ukraine to announce investigations of his political rivals, and then obstructed congressional investigations of his actions.

The delivery of the impeachment articles sets in motion several weeks of uncertainty for the Senate.

The general outlines of the trial are clear: The House managers will present the case against Mr. Trump over several days, a team of White House lawyers will then present the president’s defense during an equal period of time, and then senators will be allowed to submit questions in writing to the chief justice.

But the details are still fuzzy — even to the senators themselves. The amount of time each side will get, when opening statements will start and how they will address the question of witnesses is not yet clear.

Mr. McConnell said on Tuesday that some of the answers could come early next week, when the Senate convenes the trial and votes on a Republican organizing resolution. But several Republican senators said that they still had not seen a draft of the resolution.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Smile for Your Data File!

Westlake Legal Group 00datarequests2-facebookJumbo Smile for Your Data File! Science and Technology Privacy Law and Legislation General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) Data Storage California

The new year ushered in a landmark California privacy law that gives residents more control over how their digital data is used. The Golden State isn’t the only beneficiary, though, because many companies are extending the protections — the most important being the right to see and delete the personal data a company has — to all their customers in the United States.

In the fall, I took the right of access for a test drive, asking companies in the business of profiling and scoring consumers for their files on me. One of the companies, Sift, which assesses a user’s trustworthiness, sent me a 400-page file that contained years’ worth of my Airbnb messages, Yelp orders and Coinbase activity. Soon after my article was published, Sift was deluged with over 16,000 requests, forcing it to hire a vendor to deal with the crush.

That vendor, Berbix, helped verify the identity of people requesting data by asking them to upload photos of their government ID and to take a selfie. It then asked them to take a second selfie while following instructions. “Make sure you are looking happy or joyful and try again” was one such command.

Many people who read the article about my experience were alarmed by the information that Berbix asked for — and the need to smile for their secret file.

“This is a nightmare future where I can’t request my data from a creepy shadow credit bureau without putting on a smile for them, and it’s completely insane,” Jack Phelps, a software engineer in New York City, said in an email.

“It just seems wrong that we have to give up even more personal information,” wrote another reader, Barbara Clancy, a retired professor of neuroscience in Arkansas.

That’s the unpleasant reality: To get your personal data, you may have to give up more personal data. It seems awful at first. Alistair Barr of Bloomberg called it “the new privacy circle of hell.”

But there’s a good reason for this. Companies don’t want to give your data away to the wrong person, which has happened in the past. In 2018, Amazon sent 1,700 audio files of a customer talking to his Alexa to a stranger.

The right to have access to personal data is enshrined in the new California Consumer Privacy Act. The law is modeled in part on privacy regulations in Europe, known as the General Data Protection Regulation, or G.D.P.R. Soon after Europe’s law went into effect, in May 2018, a hacker gained access to the Spotify account of Jean Yang, a tech executive, and successfully filed a data request to download her home address, credit card information and a history of the music she had listened to.

Since then, two groups of researchers have demonstrated that it’s possible to fool the systems created to comply with G.D.P.R. to get someone else’s personal information.

One of the researchers, James Pavur, 24, a doctoral student at Oxford University, filed data requests on behalf of his research partner and wife, Casey Knerr, at 150 companies using information that was easily found for her online, such as her mailing address, email address and phone number. To make the requests, he created an email address that was a variation on Ms. Knerr’s name. A quarter of the companies sent him her file.

“I got her Social Security number, high school grades, a good chunk of information about her credit card,” Mr. Pavur said. “A threat intelligence company sent me all her user names and passwords that had been leaked.”

Mariano Di Martino and Pieter Robyns, computer science researchers at Hasselt University in Belgium, had the same success rate when they approached 55 financial, entertainment and news companies. They requested each other’s data, using more advanced techniques than those of Mr. Pavur, such as photoshopping each other’s government ID. In one case, Mr. Di Martino received the data file of a complete stranger whose name was similar to that of Mr. Robyns.

Both sets of researchers thought the new law giving the right to data was worthwhile. But they said companies needed to improve their security practices to avoid compromising customers’ privacy further.

“Companies are rushing to solutions that lead to insecure practices,” Mr. Robyns said.

Companies employ different techniques for verifying identity. Many simply ask for a photo of a driver’s license. Retail Equation, a company that decides whether a consumer can make returns at retailers like Best Buy and Victoria’s Secret, asks only for a name and driver’s license number.

The wide array of companies now required to hand over data, from Baskin Robbins to The New York Times, have varying levels of security expertise and experience in providing data to consumers.

Companies such as Apple, Amazon and Twitter can ask users to verify their identity by logging into their platforms. All three give a heads-up via email after data is requested, which can help warn people if a hacker got access to their account. An Apple spokesman said that after a request is made, the company uses additional methods to verify the person’s identity, though the company said it couldn’t disclose those methods for security reasons.

If consumers can’t verify their identity by logging into an existing account, Mr. Di Martino and Mr. Robyns recommend that companies email them, call them or ask them for information that only they should know, such as the invoice number on a recent bill.

“Regulators need to think more about the unintended consequences of empowering individuals to access and delete their data,” said Steve Kirkham, who worked on Airbnb’s trust and safety team for five years, before founding Berbix in 2018. “We want to prevent fraudulent requests and let the good ones go through.”

It is on regulators’ minds. The California law requires businesses to “verify the identity of the consumer making the request to a reasonable degree of certainty” and to have a more stringent verification process for “sensitive or valuable personal information.”

Mr. Kirkham said Berbix requested the first selfie to test whether a person’s face matched their ID; the second selfie, with a smile or some other facial expression, ensures that someone isn’t simply holding a photo up to the camera. Mr. Kirkham said Berbix ultimately deleted the data collected within seven days to a year, depending on the retention period requested by the company that hires the firm. (Sift deletes its data after two weeks.)

“It’s a new threat vector companies should consider,” said Blake Brannon, vice president of product at OneTrust, another company that helps businesses comply with the new data privacy laws. OneTrust offers the 4,500 organizations using its service the option to create several levels of identity verification, such as sending a token to someone’s phone or verifying ownership of an email address.

“If I’m requesting something simple or lightweight, the verification is minimal, versus a deletion request,” Mr. Brannon said. “That will require more levels of verification.”

Mr. Kirkham of Berbix said the verification process discouraged some people from making the data request at all.

“A lot of people don’t want to give more information,” Mr. Kirkham said. “Their assumption is that you will do something nefarious with it.”

He added: “But that’s the irony here. We require additional information from people to protect them. We want to make sure you are who you say you are.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘The Conners’ stars Michael Fishman, Laurie Metcalf talk upcoming live political episode

Westlake Legal Group Michael-Fishman-Laurie-Metcalf 'The Conners' stars Michael Fishman, Laurie Metcalf talk upcoming live political episode Nate Day fox-news/person/roseanne-barr fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/comedy fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 67bd1765-ae83-567a-8645-b2f5b3103786

The cast of ABC’s “The Conners” has a storied history with politics, and it looks like they have no plans to change that.

The show, which focuses on a conservative-leaning working-class family, is a spin-off of “Roseanne.” (The original series was canceled after the show’s star, Roseanne Barr, sent a racist tweet about Valerie Jarrett — a former aide to then-President Barack Obama — in 2018.)

Now, “The Conners” is set to air a live episode of the show on Tuesday, Feb. 11 — the night of the New Hampshire primary that kicks off the 2020 political season.

MARTIN SHEEN SAYS HE SUPPORTS ELIZABETH WARREN’S POLICIES

Star Michael Fishman hopes the politically-charged episode will inspire democratic action.

“In our country, voting is such a powerful thing and I don’t know that we always spend the time to encourage people to vote,” Fishman, 38, recently told Fox News at the ABC portion of the Television Critics Association (TCA) event in Pasadena, Calif. “So my hope is that what we do is we can show what real-life issues kind of revolve around some of the things that are going on in the debates and other things.”

Fishman said that in the show, people will see “how a family comes together and maybe disagrees about certain things, but that we all encourage people to vote and we can do something positive and bring some humor.”

‘JEOPARDY!’ CONTESTANT KEN JENNINGS ON ALEX TREBEK, JOINING ‘GREATEST OF ALL TIME’

Also present at the event was Laurie Metcalf, who starred in “Roseanne” and now in “The Conners” as Jackie Harris.

Metcalf, 64, revealed that her Tony Award-winning theater background won’t be much help for the special live episode.

“My stage background will not help at all, because even though stage is live, I’ve rehearsed the hell out of it and I know what I’m doing,” the actress said. “So in a live show, it’s going to have some wiggle room either the improv or, you know, something’s going to not stick to the script. That scares the s–t out of me.”

Metcalf also said that she’s putting “extra pressure” on herself for the important episode.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

At the TCA event, ABC announced that the episode will incorporate real-time election results into the plot, which will follow the Conners as they discuss the right to vote.

Westlake Legal Group Michael-Fishman-Laurie-Metcalf 'The Conners' stars Michael Fishman, Laurie Metcalf talk upcoming live political episode Nate Day fox-news/person/roseanne-barr fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/comedy fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 67bd1765-ae83-567a-8645-b2f5b3103786   Westlake Legal Group Michael-Fishman-Laurie-Metcalf 'The Conners' stars Michael Fishman, Laurie Metcalf talk upcoming live political episode Nate Day fox-news/person/roseanne-barr fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/comedy fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 67bd1765-ae83-567a-8645-b2f5b3103786

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

What to Expect from the House and Senate on Trump’s Impeachment

Westlake Legal Group 15dc-whattowatch-facebookJumbo What to Expect from the House and Senate on Trump's Impeachment Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Senate Pelosi, Nancy McConnell, Mitch impeachment House of Representatives

After a monthlong delay, the House is expected to vote on Wednesday to send two articles of impeachment to the Senate, setting in motion only the third presidential impeachment trial in American history.

The day will be filled with pomp and circumstance, including a vote on the House floor, a formal “engrossment” ceremony of the impeachment articles and a procession through the Capitol Rotunda to formally deliver the charges to the Senate.

What we’re expecting to see: Speaker Nancy Pelosi plans to reveal whom she has chosen to serve as the impeachment managers to prosecute the case against President Trump in the Senate, and the House will vote to formally appoint them and transmit the articles of impeachment to the Senate.

When we’re likely to see it: Ms. Pelosi is scheduled to announce her choice of impeachment managers at a news conference at 10 a.m. on Wednesday. The House is scheduled to vote on the managers from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m., after a 10-minute debate. Ms. Pelosi and the managers will hold the engrossment ceremony at 5 p.m., and the managers will immediately march across the Capitol to deliver the charges.

How to follow it: The New York Times congressional team will be following all of the developments on Capitol Hill and reporters at the White House will get the latest on the next steps for President Trump and his allies. Come to nytimes.com throughout the day for live coverage.

Wednesday’s formalities will largely bring to a conclusion the House’s constitutional role in filing impeachment charges against the president, and ends the frosty standoff between Ms. Pelosi and Senator Mitch McConnell, the Republican leader, over the outlines of the Senate trial.

Ms. Pelosi had hoped to force Mr. McConnell to commit to calling witnesses and allowing additional documentary evidence by withholding the two impeachment articles for several weeks. But the tactic largely failed after a handful of moderate Republican senators agreed with Mr. McConnell to delay the decision about witnesses and documents until after both sides presented their arguments and senators had an opportunity to ask questions. That could take two weeks or more.

The last time such a handoff took place, during President Bill Clinton’s impeachment trial in 1999, senators struck a bipartisan agreement on the trial rules, voting 100 to 0 to approve them. No such effort is being made this year; Mr. McConnell has said in recent days that he expects all 53 Republican senators to back a trial resolution that could pass without Democratic support.

While Ms. Pelosi will have no formal role in the trial, her hand-selected managers will be front and center, presenting the charges that Mr. Trump pressured the president of Ukraine to announce investigations of his political rivals, and then obstructed congressional investigations of his actions.

The delivery of the impeachment articles sets in motion several weeks of uncertainty for the Senate.

The general outlines of the trial are clear: The House managers will present the case against Mr. Trump over several days, a team of White House lawyers will then present the president’s defense during an equal period of time, and then senators will be allowed to submit questions in writing to the chief justice.

But the details are still fuzzy — even to the senators themselves. The amount of time each side will get, when opening statements will start and how they will address the question of witnesses is not yet clear.

Mr. McConnell said on Tuesday that some of the answers could come early next week, when the Senate convenes the trial and votes on a Republican organizing resolution. But several Republican senators said that they still had not seen a draft of the resolution.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Warren appears to refuse Sanders handshake after clashes over sexism in final Dem debate before Iowa caucuses

Good morning and welcome to Fox News First. Here’s what you need to know as you start your Wednesday …

Sanders clashes with Warren – and the moderators – on sexism charge at heated Iowa debate
The final Democratic presidential debate before the pivotal Feb. 3 Iowa caucuses turned tense Tuesday night, as Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren sparred over the disputed reports that Sanders had privately told Warren in December 2018 that a woman could not realistically become president.

“Well, as a matter of fact, I didn’t say it,” Sanders insisted, after one of the CNN debate’s moderators asserted the conversation had occurred. Later, when asked whether he was unequivocally denying that the conversation took place, he said, “That is correct.”  A debate moderator then immediately and matter-of-factly asked Warren, “What did you think when Senator Sanders told you a woman could not win the election?”

That prompted laughter in the debate hall at Drake University in Des Moines, and a bewildered chuckle from Sanders. Some commentators have suggested the CNN report of Warren and Sanders’ alleged 2018 conversation, which cited sources who were not present for Sanders’ alleged remarks, was a leak from the Warren campaign intended to blunt Sanders’ surge in recent polls.

The Sanders-Warren clash smashed the more than yearlong non-aggression pact between the two candidates and was just one of several flashpoints between the two that emerged during the debate. As the event concluded, Warren appeared to ignore Sanders’ invitation for a handshake.

Sanders had a different focus early in the debate, as he challenged former Vice President Joe Biden’s initial support for the Iraq war, which he called “the worst foreign policy blunder in the modern history of this country.” Click here for more on our top story.

Other key Iowa debate developments:

Winners and losers from the Iowa Democratic debate
Bret Baier breaks down Democratic debate key moments
Warren calls on SEC to probe possible illegal trades after Trump reportedly reveals Iran action at Mar-a-Lago
– 2020 Dems excluded from debate turn to commercial breaks to get message out

Westlake Legal Group TedCruzGetty011520 Warren appears to refuse Sanders handshake after clashes over sexism in final Dem debate before Iowa caucuses fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 0b67bdb8-6b98-5249-92ca-958fb439776d

Ted Cruz floats idea of ‘witness reciprocity’ during Trump impeachment trial
Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas and a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, pitched the idea of “witness reciprocity” on Tuesday during a meeting with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and other GOP leaders who convened to discuss strategy for the upcoming impeachment trial that will decide if President Trump is removed from office, Fox News has confirmed.

The idea would mean if Democrats call a witness, such as Trump’s former National Security Adviser John Bolton, Republicans would, in turn, be allowed to call a witness. Likely candidates to be subpoenaed by the GOP include former Vice President Joe Biden, his son Hunter Biden, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff and the unidentified whistleblower who reported a July phone call between President Trump and the leader of Ukraine.

The debate over possible impeachment witnesses comes as the Democrat-controlled House prepares for an imminent vote on advancing articles of impeachment to the Senate. Click here for more.

Westlake Legal Group AP19352614300424 Warren appears to refuse Sanders handshake after clashes over sexism in final Dem debate before Iowa caucuses fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 0b67bdb8-6b98-5249-92ca-958fb439776d

California attorney Michael Avenatti leaves a courthouse in New York following a hearing. Avenatti was arrested Tuesday by IRS agents for alleged violations of his pre-trial release. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

Avenatti arrested by IRS agents during California Bar Association hearing
California attorney Michael Avenatti was arrested by IRS agents Tuesday evening during a break in a disciplinary hearing in Los Angeles over allegations that the high-profile lawyer scammed a client out of $840,000.

The arrest occurred outside the State Bar Court, where the State Bar of California has initiated proceedings against him. Avenatti is accused of fraud, cheating on his taxes and lying to investigators as federal prosecutors allege that he embezzled funds from clients. The former attorney for porn star Stormy Daniels has pleaded not guilty to all the charges.

Thom Mrozek, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Los Angeles, told Fox News that Avenatti was arrested on suspicion of violating his pre-trial release. Click here for more.
 
CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

TODAY’S MUST-READS
Philippines volcano spews lava half-mile high, threatens to erupt again as flights grounded.
Red Sox and manager Alex Cora part ways after MLB sign-stealing investigation.
‘Jeopardy!’ just crowned this champ the ‘Greatest of All Time.

THE LATEST FROM FOX BUSINESS
Michael Bloomberg is investing in getting rid of President Trump.
Four industries that will benefit most from ‘phase one’ US-China trade deal.
Scotch whisky industry trying to keep Trump tariffs from going higher.
 
#TheFlashback: CLICK HERE to find out what happened on “This Day in History.”
 
SOME PARTING WORDS

Sean Hannity says Democrats have “every reason to be worried” about the 2020 presidential election and that they are in for an Election Day “shock” once again in Trump’s favor.

Not signed up yet for Fox News First? Click here to find out what you’re missing.
 
Fox News First is compiled by Fox News’ Bryan Robinson. Thank you for making us your first choice in the morning! Enjoy your day! We’ll see you in your inbox first thing Thursday morning.

Westlake Legal Group WarrenSandersA_011520 Warren appears to refuse Sanders handshake after clashes over sexism in final Dem debate before Iowa caucuses fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 0b67bdb8-6b98-5249-92ca-958fb439776d   Westlake Legal Group WarrenSandersA_011520 Warren appears to refuse Sanders handshake after clashes over sexism in final Dem debate before Iowa caucuses fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 0b67bdb8-6b98-5249-92ca-958fb439776d

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

What Is A Savage Burn? Mike Bloomberg Torched By ‘Jeopardy’ Great Ken Jennings

Westlake Legal Group 5e1ece1a24000052006c3ca3 What Is A Savage Burn? Mike Bloomberg Torched By ‘Jeopardy’ Great Ken Jennings

Mike Bloomberg might want to think twice about who his campaign name-drops in the future.

Jennings did not appreciate the name-check: 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Florida woman pleads guilty to child neglect after 4-year-old died in hot SUV

A Florida woman accused of leaving her boyfriend’s son in a hot car pleaded guilty Monday to child neglect, court records show.

Mariah Butler, 28, was also facing an aggravated manslaughter charge in relation to the child’s death in 2018, but prosecutors dropped the charge after she agreed to the plea deal.

Logan Starling, 4, was found unconscious in the vehicle with an internal temperature of 108 degrees. He was later pronounced dead at a local area hospital.

FLORIDA WOMAN ALLEGEDLY TRIED TO DETONATE NAIL BOMB INSIDE WALMART, INVESTIGATORS SAY

Butler allegedly drove Starling and four other kids to Elite Preparatory Academy in Orange County, Fla., on Sept 28, 2018, according to the Orlando Sentinel.

She left the children in the car to get a package from her mother, who was also in the parking lot of the private school, the outlet reported.

When Butler returned, she let the children out of the SUV and claimed Starling was part of the group. Video surveillance allegedly showed her walking into the school with only four kids, the Sentinel reported.

Westlake Legal Group Mariah-Butler Florida woman pleads guilty to child neglect after 4-year-old died in hot SUV

Mariah Butler, 28, pleaded guilty Monday to child neglect. (Orange County Sheriff’s Office)

FLORIDA POLICE HAVE SUSPECT AFTER 4 BODIES FOUND IN HOME LINKED TO MISSING FAMILY

More than six hours later, Butler went to check the vehicle after school employees wondered why Starling wasn’t there, the outlet said. When she returned, Butler was reportedly heard screaming for someone to call 911.

She was arrested six months later following an investigation.

During a September hearing, the outlet reported Butler as saying, “I love all my children” and “tried my hardest.”

The mother of Starling, 26-year-old Shelby Hester said, “I’m one that has to live without him now for the rest of my life,” according to the Sentinel.

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A sentencing hearing is scheduled for March 24.

Westlake Legal Group Mariah-Butler Florida woman pleads guilty to child neglect after 4-year-old died in hot SUV   Westlake Legal Group Mariah-Butler Florida woman pleads guilty to child neglect after 4-year-old died in hot SUV

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California couple missing after traveling to Mexico to collect rent checks from tenants: reports

A couple based in southern California has been missing since last week after leaving for Mexico to collect rent checks from their tenants at properties they own in Tijuana, according to reports Tuesday.

VIDEO SHOWS MISSING IDAHO MOTHER LORI VALLOW SPEAKING TO POLICE AFTER HUSBAND’S ARIZONA SHOOTING BY BROTHER

Jesus Ruben Lopez Guillen, 70, and his wife Maria Teresa Lopez, 65, left their home in Garden Grove, Calif., in Orange County in their pick-up truck Friday morning, Garden Grove Police Department Lt. Carl Whitney told Los Angeles’ KNBC-TV.  The couple was expected to return to California Friday afternoon. Their daughter reported them missing at about 7:10 p.m.

The daughter told authorities she was tracking her parents using the Find My Phone app. She said the app showed her parents were at one of their properties in Tijuana. Despite this, she said a relative told her over the phone that no one was at that location when the family member went to check on them.

Westlake Legal Group garden-grove-missing-2020 California couple missing after traveling to Mexico to collect rent checks from tenants: reports fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 350d8acc-c0eb-55be-85e5-740217a22434

Maria Teresa Lopez, 65, and Jesus Ruben Lopez Guillen, 70, were reported missing by their daughter in Garden Grove, Calif. (Garden Grove Police Department)

The phone later stopped transmitting a signal. Police in Tijuana found the couple’s vehicle near the property, Whitney said. FBI and Mexican authorities have been notified about the search for the couple.

The couple planned to arrive in Tijuana and first go to the bank to take out cash in pesos, EN24 reported, citing Raul Gutierrez, a spokesman for the Baja California Prosecutor’s Office in Mexico.

The next stop was supposed to be the exchange house, where they were to change the money into U.S. dollars. The couple then planned to visit tenants in several houses in the Obrera neighborhood to collect rent in cash. Mexican authorities are still working to verify if the couple visited these locations, Gutierrez said.

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Garden Grove Police is asking anyone with information to call Detective Richard Desbiens at (714) 741-5810. The Baja California Prosecutor’s Office in Mexico also encourages those with knowledge of the couple’s whereabouts to call (664) 607-7332 and (664) 683-9646.

Westlake Legal Group garden-grove-missing-2020 California couple missing after traveling to Mexico to collect rent checks from tenants: reports fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 350d8acc-c0eb-55be-85e5-740217a22434   Westlake Legal Group garden-grove-missing-2020 California couple missing after traveling to Mexico to collect rent checks from tenants: reports fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 350d8acc-c0eb-55be-85e5-740217a22434

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Late Night Hosts Rip Dem Debate’s All-White Stage: Thought Oscars Was Next Month?

Westlake Legal Group 5e1ec8e124000033006c3c94 Late Night Hosts Rip Dem Debate’s All-White Stage: Thought Oscars Was Next Month?

Tuesday night’s Democratic debate gave late-night television comedians plenty to joke about — with all hosts calling out the all-white stage.

“People who turned on their TVs were like ’wait, I thought the Oscars were next month?” quipped “The Late Late Show” host James Corden.

“The only person happy about this was (teenage climate activist) Greta Thunberg because the stage was so white it reflected sunlight back into the atmosphere,” added Trevor Noah of “The Daily Show.”

Jimmy Kimmel, “The Late Show” host Stephen Colbert and Jimmy Fallon of “The Tonight Show” also riffed on the lack of diversity among the line-up.

Check out Colbert’s take on the debate in Des Moines, Iowa, here:

Trevor Noah’s clip here:

And Jimmy Fallon of “The Tonight Show” here:

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