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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 189)

Dem field gets less diverse

WASHINGTON – The 2020 Democratic presidential field has been heralded as the most diverse in history.

It at times has included a Latino man, an Asian American man, a Samoan American woman, three black men and one black woman. In addition to its racial and ethnic diversity, the field also included a gay man and a record number of women.

But less than three weeks before the first votes are cast in Iowa — and after Sen. Cory Booker dropped out Monday — only three non-white Democratic presidential candidates remain: former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard and entrepreneur Andrew Yang.

“The Democratic Party tried to evolve … this year. It still has some work to do,’’ said Keneshia Grant, a political scientist at Howard University and author of an upcoming book, “The Great Migration and the Democratic Party.”

“It has to figure out how it can be a party that makes space for people who look like their most important constituency to hold the big offices or even having a chance to hold the big offices,” she said. “It’s a sad day, a day that we saw coming, but sad no less that we didn’t end up with a candidate of color in the party that is home to people of color.”

Monmouth Iowa Poll: Joe Biden in the lead ahead of Iowa caucuses, but many may still change their minds

Black, Latino and Asian American voters are key to Democratic electoral victories and overwhelmingly vote Democratic.

In 2018, 90% of black voters said they voted for Democratic candidate in the race of the House of Representatives, according to Pew Research Center. Among Asian voters, 77% said they voted for the Democrat, while 69% of Hispanic voters said they went for the Democratic candidate. 

2020 candidates on the issues: Here’s where they stand on immigration, gun control, health care and more

Westlake Legal Group 38f201b7-79b9-43e3-879b-0dfe5469bd37-191102-Booker_Yang-002 Dem field gets less diverse

Fundraising woes plague candidates of color

Booker, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro and Sen. Kamala Harris all cited fundraising issues when they ended their campaigns. 

“Our campaign has reached the point where we need more money to scale up and continue building a campaign that can win — money we don’t have, and money that is harder to raise because I won’t be on the next debate stage,” Booker wrote in an email to supporters Monday.

Harris in an email to supporters when she dropped out last month said her “campaign for president simply doesn’t have the financial resources we need to continue.” 

“I’m not a billionaire,” Harris said in the email. “I can’t fund my own campaign. And as the campaign has gone on, it’s become harder and harder to raise the money we need to compete.”

Grant said another challenge for the party is holding the early primaries in states like Iowa and New Hampshire. Castro in November made the lack of diversity of the two early voting states a key part of his pitch to voters, saying they’re “not reflective of the diversity of our country, and certainly not reflective of the diversity of the Democratic Party.”

MSNBC national correspondent Joy Reid hinted at some of those same sentiments Monday.

“At some point shouldn’t the Democratic Party — which is the party preference or lean of most people of color — figure out a way to not let state voting order and money reduce the options its voters have for president?” she wrote on Twitter shortly after Booker announced he was ending his campaign.

Grant also pointed to the debate thresholds in particular as a factor for candidates of color. 

Despite meeting the donation threshold necessary, Booker and Castro both failed to qualify for December Democratic debate due to low poll numbers. Harris did make it to the December debate stage, but dropped out about two weeks before. 

Some candidates of color tried to fight back against the criteria.

‘This is a last look’: From Iowa stage, Democratic presidential candidates make their pitches to nation

Yang was the only non-white candidate to make it to the debate stage in December. Last month, he called on the Democratic National Committee to commission additional polls in an effort to make the debate stage more diverse.

“With the upcoming holidays and meager number of polls currently out in the field, a diverse set of candidates might be absent from the stage in Des Moines for reasons out of anyone’s control,” Yang wrote to DNC Chairman Tom Perez in a letter dated Dec. 21.

The DNC denied to commission polls, saying it has been “more than inclusive throughout this entire process.” Yang didn’t make the polling mark for the debate. Every candidate on the debate stage Tuesday is white.

Who is getting the support of voters of color?

Despite the historic diversity among the candidates, voters of color largely have not flocked to candidates of the same race or ethnicity.

Among black voters, Booker was netted 4% in a recent Washington Post-Ipsos poll. Former Vice President Joe Biden led with black voters in that poll, earning 48% support, followed by Sen. Bernie Sanders with 20%. Warren trailed at 9%, according to the poll.

When Harris was still in the race, she also struggled to gain traction with black voters. Some progressives criticized Harris for her record as California attorney general, arguing she was part of an era of “tough on crime” Democrats. 

And Castro struggled to gain support from Latino voters. Only 2% of Hispanic Democratic voters said they support Castro, according to a Noticias Telemundo poll conducted in late October. Biden led with 26%, followed by Sanders at 18% and Warren at 10%.

More: What you need to know before you vote in 2020

Grant said some black voters are making a calculation that they want to win above anything else, which means supporting candidates like Biden. Biden has touted his role as vice president to President Barack Obama, who is still widely popular among black voters. Grant said Biden is seen by many black voters as the “pragmatic choice.’’

And unlike Obama, she said, Booker and Harris lacked the resources and ground game to pull off a win in Iowa. 

“They couldn’t fight back against this idea of pragmatism or Joe Biden being the only pragmatic (candidate) because they didn’t have the money to play the game,’’ she said.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Bloomberg campaign raises eyebrows with a meatball featuring the candidate’s face

Westlake Legal Group Bloomberg-Tweet-AP Bloomberg campaign raises eyebrows with a meatball featuring the candidate's face Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 8794909d-f66c-5e2d-baf8-4e441c721e0d

The Bloomberg campaign raised eyebrows Tuesday evening over a bizarre tweet featuring the face of former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg on a meatball.

Bloomberg may not have been participating in the Democratic debate in Iowa among the other top tier candidates, but his social media team was busy with an image of meatballs, although one of them certainly did not look like the others.

“Test your political knowledge: SPOT THE MEATBALL THAT LOOKS LIKE MIKE,” Team Bloomberg challenged Twitter users.

BLOOMBERG UNWITTINGLY ‘EXPLOITED’ PRISONERS TO MAKE PHONE CALLS ON BEHALF OF 2020 CAMPAIGN: REPORT

The tweet caught the attention of many on social media.

“The social media team for Bloomberg has been…interesting,” journalist Yashar Ali tweeted. “Like I have to wonder if this is some sort of insane strategy to get attention?”

“They went all in to take away media coverage of tonight’s debate since he isn’t on stage.” political strategist Seth Weathers agreed.

“Billionaire stop-and-frisking reactionary Bloomberg’s presidential campaign is going so badly, after many millions flushed down the drain on awful annoying ads, that they are already in the terminal ‘meatball lookalike’ stage,” progressive journalist Ben Norton reacted.

The Bloomberg campaign responded to one of its critics who claimed that “the left can’t meme.”

“Not all meatballs that look like Michael Bloomberg are memes,” Team Bloomberg shot back.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Team Bloomberg was so confident in its post,  it temporarily even changed it’s Twitter profile picture with the image of Meatball Mike.

The account was sending rapid-fire tweets while Bloomberg’s competitors were clashing on the debate stage, offering wacky “fun facts,” cracking jokes, and running Twitter polls like “what is the part of the body to get a Bloomberg 2020 tattoo?”

Westlake Legal Group Bloomberg-Tweet-AP Bloomberg campaign raises eyebrows with a meatball featuring the candidate's face Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 8794909d-f66c-5e2d-baf8-4e441c721e0d   Westlake Legal Group Bloomberg-Tweet-AP Bloomberg campaign raises eyebrows with a meatball featuring the candidate's face Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 8794909d-f66c-5e2d-baf8-4e441c721e0d

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Klobuchar compares Trump to Joseph McCarthy

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6117235697001_6117232612001-vs Klobuchar compares Trump to Joseph McCarthy Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox news fnc/politics fnc b6ef017f-5b43-5e45-9d45-a40c0dedd3c7 article

Presidential candidate Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., likened President Trump to the infamous ringleader of the 1950’s ‘Red Scare,’ Joseph McCarthy, in an answer during Tuesday’s Democratic debate.

After being asked whether or not she was concerned Trump would be “emboldened” by a Senate acquittal now that House Speaker Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., is set to transmit the articles of impeachment to the upper chamber, Klobuchar replied that she was not, saying members of Congress needed to do their constitutional duty and check the executive.

“I think the best way to think about this trial and what we’re facing in this election is a story of a man from Primghar, Iowa,” she said, giving a shout-out to the debate’s host state, which also will hold the first-in-the-nation caucuses on Feb. 3. “He came from humble beginnings, the son of immigrants. He became the Army Counsel, and he was the one who went to the Joseph McCarthy hearings and …  said, ‘Have you no sense of decency, sir?’ Have you no sense of decency?”

AT FINAL DEBATE BEFORE IOWA CAUCUSES, IT’S ‘DO OR DIE’ FOR 2020 DEMS

Klobuchar was referencing former U.S. Army Counsel Joseph Welch, who asked, “At long last, have you left no sense of decency?” to McCarthy in a hearing for the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. That moment is widely considered to be the beginning of the end of the Red Scare and the start of McCarthy’s downfall. McCarthy would use false information and conspiracy theories to stoke Americans’ paranoia about communist subversion and the Soviet Union, putting many Americans on blacklists for their alleged communist beliefs.

“This is a patriotism check,” Klobuchar said. “Not only is this trial that, but also this election. And no matter if you agree with everyone here on this stage, I say this to Americans, you know this is a decency check on this president.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Klobuchar, who has polled in the middle-single-digits in Iowa, came into Tuesday’s debate needing to make a splash with four of the candidates on the stage significantly ahead of her. Tuesday is the last time voters will see the top candidates on a stage at the same time before the Iowa caucuses, which can make or break presidential primary campaigns.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6117235697001_6117232612001-vs Klobuchar compares Trump to Joseph McCarthy Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox news fnc/politics fnc b6ef017f-5b43-5e45-9d45-a40c0dedd3c7 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6117235697001_6117232612001-vs Klobuchar compares Trump to Joseph McCarthy Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox news fnc/politics fnc b6ef017f-5b43-5e45-9d45-a40c0dedd3c7 article

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Warren appears to snub Sanders’ handshake after debate

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122597678001_6122601921001-vs Warren appears to snub Sanders' handshake after debate Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc article 2a4071c9-2ee6-56e9-9a3d-7304427d0cfa

Presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., seemed to reject Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., as he offered a handshake following Tuesday’s Democratic presidential debate in Iowa.

The two candidates, who are competing for the most progressive voters in the Democratic Party, had seen their apparent nonaggression pact fray in recent days — seemingly culminating in Warren spurning Sanders’ gesture on national television. She shook former Vice President Joe Biden’s hand just moments before.

The rift between the senators was accelerated by a story, first reported by CNN, that Sanders had told Warren in late 2018 he did not think a woman could win a presidential election.

WARREN HITS BACK AS SANDERS DENIES SYING A WOMAN CAN’T WIN PRESIDENCY

“Well, as a matter of fact, I didn’t say it,” Sanders said Tuesday evening in response to a question from the CNN moderators asking him why he had made that statement to his fellow senator. “Anybody who knows me knows that it’s incomprehensible that I would think that a woman could not be President of the United States.”

That answer did not appear to satisfy Warren, however, who responded, “I disagreed,” when CNN moderators asked her what she thought, “when Senator Sanders told you a woman could not win the election.”

Warren went on to point out that she and Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Mass., had won every single election they had ever run in, a feat none of the men on the stage could claim.

‘Look at the men on this stage. Collectively, they have lost 10 elections. The only people on this stage who have won every single election that they have been in are the women ⁠— Amy [Klobuchar] and me.’

— Elizabeth Warren

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Can a woman beat Donald Trump?” Warren asked. “Look at the men on this stage. Collectively, they have lost 10 elections. The only people on this stage who have won every single election that they have been in are the women ⁠— Amy [Klobuchar] and me.

“And the only person on this stage who has beaten an incumbent Republican any time in the past 30 years is me,” she continued, referencing her 2012 victory over former Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass.

Tuesday’s debate was the final chance voters will get to see all the top candidates on the same stage before the first-in-the-nation Iowa caucuses, which can make or break presidential primary campaigns.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122597678001_6122601921001-vs Warren appears to snub Sanders' handshake after debate Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc article 2a4071c9-2ee6-56e9-9a3d-7304427d0cfa   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122597678001_6122601921001-vs Warren appears to snub Sanders' handshake after debate Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc article 2a4071c9-2ee6-56e9-9a3d-7304427d0cfa

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Leading Liberals Have a Public Fight Over Private Remark

Westlake Legal Group 14debate-assess-facebookJumbo Leading Liberals Have a Public Fight Over Private Remark Voting and Voters Sanders, Bernard Presidential Election of 2020 DES MOINES, Iowa Democratic Party Debates (Political)

DES MOINES — After nearly an hour, the question that progressives had been fearing finally arrived. Senator Bernie Sanders laughed. Senator Elizabeth Warren did not.

“I didn’t say it,” Mr. Sanders insisted, with Ms. Warren turning his way, as he denied her explosive account that he told her privately in 2018 that a woman could not win the presidency.

“Bernie is my friend,” Ms. Warren replied firmly, disputing his memory, “and I am not here to try and fight with Bernie. But, look, this question about whether or not a woman can be president has been raised and it’s time for us to attack it head-on.”

All through this Democratic primary, voters have worried aloud about the thorny subject of electability, wondering if a woman — even a woman they might support — would be able to defeat President Trump.

In her exchange with Mr. Sanders on Tuesday, Ms. Warren hoped to turn the issue on its head, noting that of all those onstage, only the women, Ms. Warren and Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, had won all of their major elections and later observing that the party’s success in the 2018 midterms was powered largely by female candidates and voters.

She also made it known that no one else here had defeated a Republican incumbent in the last three decades, a statistic Mr. Sanders moved to rebut, citing his House victory in 1990.

“Wasn’t that 30 years ago?” she asked, turning to the crowd like an actor breaking the fourth wall in a sitcom.

“I beat an incumbent Republican congressman,” Mr. Sanders repeated, emphasizing that 1990 was indeed 30 years ago.

“I don’t know if that’s the major issue of the day,” he concluded.

But the context was.

In seeking to defuse any concerns about a potential female nominee, Ms. Warren appeared to see no option but to extend, if not expand, a feud her advisers claim she never wanted.

Since the beginning of the primary campaign, Mr. Sanders and Ms. Warren have proceeded with a patina of comity, focusing on their mostly shared policy goals and reminding anyone who would listen about their ostensibly genuine mutual admiration.

“Bernie and I have been friends for a long, long time,” Ms. Warren said last month in Ottumwa.

“Elizabeth Warren is a very good friend of mine,” Mr. Sanders told reporters last weekend in Iowa City.

But competitive campaigns tend to test the definition of the word.

Perhaps this moment, or something like it, was always going to come — the natural consequence of a contest with these stakes, of two candidates fighting for so many of the same voters.

It was easy enough to project friendship and allegiance all last year as dual progressive dreamers, tag-teaming to make the case against the more incremental politics of a front-runner like former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. It is quite another thing to see the current state of the primary — with wide-open races in Iowa and New Hampshire and, in theory, room enough for only one liberal standard-bearer as the calendar turns — and maintain a fully united front.

Sunday was fraught: Ms. Warren said she was “disappointed” in Mr. Sanders amid reports that his campaign had distributed a script to volunteers instructing them to depict Ms. Warren as out of touch.

Monday was worse: CNN reported that Mr. Sanders told Ms. Warren during a private meeting in 2018 that a woman could not win the presidency. Mr. Sanders forcefully denied having made the remarks. Ms. Warren said that Mr. Sanders had in fact raised doubts about a woman’s electoral viability.

“I thought a woman could win; he disagreed,” she said in a statement on Monday. “I have no interest in discussing this private meeting any further because Bernie and I have far more in common than our differences on punditry.”

Entering Tuesday’s debate, progressive groups had spent the preceding 48 hours in something approaching full-scale panic, alarmed that a skirmish between two largely like-minded candidates would serve only to benefit more moderate alternatives like Mr. Biden and former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind.

The question of whether a woman can defeat Mr. Trump has been the long-whispered soundtrack of much of this Democratic primary, invoked constantly in voter interviews among even supporters of candidates like Ms. Warren and Ms. Klobuchar.

Ms. Warren had not directly addressed gender as forcefully as she did Tuesday night, when she vowed, in her closing statement, to become “the first woman president of the United States of America.”

She has more frequently talked about Aunt Bea — a wonder woman in her life — who made an appearance in an exchange about child care.

It was a story she has told many times before, but the circumstances on Tuesday made it newly resonant.

“If I hadn’t been saved by my Aunt Bea, I was ready to quit my job,” Ms. Warren said. “And I think about how many women of my generation just got knocked off the track and never got back on.”

As late as last week, it seemed as if the debate was shaping up primarily as a clash between Mr. Sanders and Mr. Biden. Since an American airstrike killed Iran’s top military commander, the two men have been sparring over foreign policy. Mr. Biden has seized on the escalating tension to highlight his experience while Mr. Sanders has used it as grounds to promote his longtime focus on international diplomacy. Mr. Sanders, a vocal opponent of the war in Iraq, has also repeatedly and aggressively hit Mr. Biden on his vote to authorize it.

The sparring over foreign policy has delighted Mr. Sanders’s advisers, who have long ached for direct conflict with Mr. Biden: Not only is he a moderate foil to Mr. Sanders’s democratic socialism, but he also in many ways represents the establishment Washington that Mr. Sanders loathes.

Mr. Biden was bracing for the fight. But when it came time for Mr. Sanders to go on offense, he settled occasionally for jokes.

“I would not meet with — absent preconditions — I would not meet with the, quote, ‘supreme leader,’ who said ‘Joe Biden is a rabid dog, he should be beaten to death with a stick,” Mr. Biden said about the leader of North Korea.

Mr. Sanders butted in: “Other than that, you like him?”

“Other than that, I like him,” Mr. Biden confirmed.

As ever on Tuesday, Mr. Biden presented himself as the candidate Mr. Trump fears most. “I’ve been the object of his affection now more than anybody else in this stage,” he said.

While Mr. Biden is not an enviable debater on his best day, he seemed to largely survive the evening without a significant misstep — no small thing as he continues to lead most national polls and edges into contention in surveys of Iowa and New Hampshire, where he has long struggled.

That no candidate has yet emerged as a decisive front-runner in Iowa has made voters’ decisions here all the more complicated as they strain to identify someone who can defeat Mr. Trump. Only 40 percent of likely Democratic caucusgoers have made up their minds, according to a Des Moines Register poll released last week; nearly half said they could be persuaded to support another candidate, and 13 percent said they did not have a first choice.

Of course, the locals have also found excitement in the stress, making the proceedings on Tuesday the hottest ticket in a cold town. Leaving a restaurant on Sunday, several Iowans asked a Buttigieg campaign official if he could help them get into the event hall. The official demurred.

The debate on Tuesday went forward against the relentless din of Washington news, from the Iran affair to a looming Senate impeachment trial that could sideline half of the candidates onstage. (The forum also excluded the Democrat most ubiquitous in television advertising: Michael R. Bloomberg, the billionaire former New York City mayor who is not competing in the early-voting states.)

The candidates and moderators did not wind toward Mr. Trump’s congressional fate until nearly the end. There was talk of the Constitution. There was talk about duty. “Some things,” Ms. Warren said, “are more important than politics.”

And some seemingly unimportant actions can appear politically meaningful.

At the end of the evening, as the candidates wrapped up more than two hours of televised talking with several minutes of televised farewells, Mr. Sanders extended his hand to Ms. Warren. She did not reciprocate, beginning a brief conversation that ended without a handshake. Mr. Sanders raised two open palms — as if to say: enough of this — and walked off.

Sydney Ember reported from Des Moines, and Matt Flegenheimer from New York.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Leading Liberals Have a Public Fight Over Private Remark

Westlake Legal Group 14debate-assess-facebookJumbo Leading Liberals Have a Public Fight Over Private Remark Voting and Voters Sanders, Bernard Presidential Election of 2020 DES MOINES, Iowa Democratic Party Debates (Political)

DES MOINES — After nearly an hour, the question that progressives had been fearing finally arrived. Senator Bernie Sanders laughed. Senator Elizabeth Warren did not.

“I didn’t say it,” Mr. Sanders insisted, with Ms. Warren turning his way, as he denied her explosive account that he told her privately in 2018 that a woman could not win the presidency.

“Bernie is my friend,” Ms. Warren replied firmly, disputing his memory, “and I am not here to try and fight with Bernie. But, look, this question about whether or not a woman can be president has been raised and it’s time for us to attack it head-on.”

All through this Democratic primary, voters have worried aloud about the thorny subject of electability, wondering if a woman — even a woman they might support — would be able to defeat President Trump.

In her exchange with Mr. Sanders on Tuesday, Ms. Warren hoped to turn the issue on its head, noting that of all those onstage, only the women, Ms. Warren and Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, had won all of their major elections and later observing that the party’s success in the 2018 midterms was powered largely by female candidates and voters.

She also made it known that no one else here had defeated a Republican incumbent in the last three decades, a statistic Mr. Sanders moved to rebut, citing his House victory in 1990.

“Wasn’t that 30 years ago?” she asked, turning to the crowd like an actor breaking the fourth wall in a sitcom.

“I beat an incumbent Republican congressman,” Mr. Sanders repeated, emphasizing that 1990 was indeed 30 years ago.

“I don’t know if that’s the major issue of the day,” he concluded.

But the context was.

In seeking to defuse any concerns about a potential female nominee, Ms. Warren appeared to see no option but to extend, if not expand, a feud her advisers claim she never wanted.

Since the beginning of the primary campaign, Mr. Sanders and Ms. Warren have proceeded with a patina of comity, focusing on their mostly shared policy goals and reminding anyone who would listen about their ostensibly genuine mutual admiration.

“Bernie and I have been friends for a long, long time,” Ms. Warren said last month in Ottumwa.

“Elizabeth Warren is a very good friend of mine,” Mr. Sanders told reporters last weekend in Iowa City.

But competitive campaigns tend to test the definition of the word.

Perhaps this moment, or something like it, was always going to come — the natural consequence of a contest with these stakes, of two candidates fighting for so many of the same voters.

It was easy enough to project friendship and allegiance all last year as dual progressive dreamers, tag-teaming to make the case against the more incremental politics of a front-runner like former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. It is quite another thing to see the current state of the primary — with wide-open races in Iowa and New Hampshire and, in theory, room enough for only one liberal standard-bearer as the calendar turns — and maintain a fully united front.

Sunday was fraught: Ms. Warren said she was “disappointed” in Mr. Sanders amid reports that his campaign had distributed a script to volunteers instructing them to depict Ms. Warren as out of touch.

Monday was worse: CNN reported that Mr. Sanders told Ms. Warren during a private meeting in 2018 that a woman could not win the presidency. Mr. Sanders forcefully denied having made the remarks. Ms. Warren said that Mr. Sanders had in fact raised doubts about a woman’s electoral viability.

“I thought a woman could win; he disagreed,” she said in a statement on Monday. “I have no interest in discussing this private meeting any further because Bernie and I have far more in common than our differences on punditry.”

Entering Tuesday’s debate, progressive groups had spent the preceding 48 hours in something approaching full-scale panic, alarmed that a skirmish between two largely like-minded candidates would serve only to benefit more moderate alternatives like Mr. Biden and former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind.

The question of whether a woman can defeat Mr. Trump has been the long-whispered soundtrack of much of this Democratic primary, invoked constantly in voter interviews among even supporters of candidates like Ms. Warren and Ms. Klobuchar.

Ms. Warren had not directly addressed gender as forcefully as she did Tuesday night, when she vowed, in her closing statement, to become “the first woman president of the United States of America.”

She has more frequently talked about Aunt Bea — a wonder woman in her life — who made an appearance in an exchange about child care.

It was a story she has told many times before, but the circumstances on Tuesday made it newly resonant.

“If I hadn’t been saved by my Aunt Bea, I was ready to quit my job,” Ms. Warren said. “And I think about how many women of my generation just got knocked off the track and never got back on.”

As late as last week, it seemed as if the debate was shaping up primarily as a clash between Mr. Sanders and Mr. Biden. Since an American airstrike killed Iran’s top military commander, the two men have been sparring over foreign policy. Mr. Biden has seized on the escalating tension to highlight his experience while Mr. Sanders has used it as grounds to promote his longtime focus on international diplomacy. Mr. Sanders, a vocal opponent of the war in Iraq, has also repeatedly and aggressively hit Mr. Biden on his vote to authorize it.

The sparring over foreign policy has delighted Mr. Sanders’s advisers, who have long ached for direct conflict with Mr. Biden: Not only is he a moderate foil to Mr. Sanders’s democratic socialism, but he also in many ways represents the establishment Washington that Mr. Sanders loathes.

Mr. Biden was bracing for the fight. But when it came time for Mr. Sanders to go on offense, he settled occasionally for jokes.

“I would not meet with — absent preconditions — I would not meet with the, quote, ‘supreme leader,’ who said ‘Joe Biden is a rabid dog, he should be beaten to death with a stick,” Mr. Biden said about the leader of North Korea.

Mr. Sanders butted in: “Other than that, you like him?”

“Other than that, I like him,” Mr. Biden confirmed.

As ever on Tuesday, Mr. Biden presented himself as the candidate Mr. Trump fears most. “I’ve been the object of his affection now more than anybody else in this stage,” he said.

While Mr. Biden is not an enviable debater on his best day, he seemed to largely survive the evening without a significant misstep — no small thing as he continues to lead most national polls and edges into contention in surveys of Iowa and New Hampshire, where he has long struggled.

That no candidate has yet emerged as a decisive front-runner in Iowa has made voters’ decisions here all the more complicated as they strain to identify someone who can defeat Mr. Trump. Only 40 percent of likely Democratic caucusgoers have made up their minds, according to a Des Moines Register poll released last week; nearly half said they could be persuaded to support another candidate, and 13 percent said they did not have a first choice.

Of course, the locals have also found excitement in the stress, making the proceedings on Tuesday the hottest ticket in a cold town. Leaving a restaurant on Sunday, several Iowans asked a Buttigieg campaign official if he could help them get into the event hall. The official demurred.

The debate on Tuesday went forward against the relentless din of Washington news, from the Iran affair to a looming Senate impeachment trial that could sideline half of the candidates onstage. (The forum also excluded the Democrat most ubiquitous in television advertising: Michael R. Bloomberg, the billionaire former New York City mayor who is not competing in the early-voting states.)

The candidates and moderators did not wind toward Mr. Trump’s congressional fate until nearly the end. There was talk of the Constitution. There was talk about duty. “Some things,” Ms. Warren said, “are more important than politics.”

And some seemingly unimportant actions can appear politically meaningful.

At the end of the evening, as the candidates wrapped up more than two hours of televised talking with several minutes of televised farewells, Mr. Sanders extended his hand to Ms. Warren. She did not reciprocate, beginning a brief conversation that ended without a handshake. Mr. Sanders raised two open palms — as if to say: enough of this — and walked off.

Sydney Ember reported from Des Moines, and Matt Flegenheimer from New York.

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Federal judge rules in favor of Trump administration in family separation case

San Diego judge ruled Monday that the Trump administration was acting within the law in separating more than 900 children at the border based on their parents being deemed unfit or dangerous.

U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw previously ruled the administration must locate and reunite children separated from their parents after the controversial “zero-tolerance” policy was first announced in the spring of 2018.

The American Civil Liberties Union had argued that the allegations against parents were dubious and based on minor offenses and asked Sabraw in July to rule on the legality of separating 911 children since he halted the practice in 2018.

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION ASKS SUPREME COURT TO ALLOW RULE RESTRICTING GREEN CARDS FOR IMMIGRANTS ON WELFARE

Westlake Legal Group AP20014024076808 Federal judge rules in favor of Trump administration in family separation case fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 9bd1276a-ed8f-55ce-81c7-5c23b2f2794c

FILE – In this July 17, 2019, file photo, migrant children sleep on a mattress on the floor of the AMAR migrant shelter in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte, File)

“It is an invitation that is potentially massive in scope, invades an area that is particularly within the province of the executive branch to secure the nation’s border, and goes beyond this court’s class certification and preliminary injunction orders, which were focused on the administration’s practice of separating families at the border for the purpose of deterring immigration, and failing to reunify those families,” Sabraw wrote in a 26-page decision.

He said he didn’t find any evidence the administration was abusing its power.

Under zero-tolerance, the administration began prosecuting all those suspected of crossing the border illegally, resulting in children being separated from their detained parents.

However, Sabraw said a 90-minute DNA test must be used when there is doubt the adult is the child’s parent.

ACLU attorney Lee Gelernt said in a statement after the ruling, “The court strongly reaffirmed that the Trump administration bears the burden if it attempts to separate families based on an accusation that the adult is not the child’s parent. We are evaluating the decision to determine next steps on how to ensure that children are not separated from their parents based on minor infractions.”

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The Justice Department has not yet commented on the ruling.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group AP20014024076808 Federal judge rules in favor of Trump administration in family separation case fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 9bd1276a-ed8f-55ce-81c7-5c23b2f2794c   Westlake Legal Group AP20014024076808 Federal judge rules in favor of Trump administration in family separation case fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 9bd1276a-ed8f-55ce-81c7-5c23b2f2794c

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Connecticut high school’s ‘Redmen’ mascot reinstated after GOP gains control of board

Less than a year after a school board in Connecticut removed a high school’s “Redmen” mascot, arguing it was racist, it voted last week to restore the mascot, according to reports.

The reversal in a 5-4 party-line vote followed last November’s election, in which the school board in Killingly changed from a Democrat majority to a Republican majority, The Hartford Courant reported.

MAINE BANS NATIVE AMERICAN MASCOTS IN ALL STATE SCHOOLS

The Republican candidates had promised during the election to restore the mascot, according to the newspaper.

Westlake Legal Group 374b22a6-kill99 Connecticut high school’s ‘Redmen’ mascot reinstated after GOP gains control of board fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/connecticut fox-news/us/education/high-school fox-news/us/education fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 4e2d47c2-690c-5428-835b-92ae995a031b

Killingly High School in Connecticut. (Facebook)

The vote left the high school’s athletic director in disbelief.

“You are pulling the rug right from beneath us,” Kevin Marcoux said at last week’s board meeting. “Everywhere we go, we are the laughingstock of the state.”

Prior to the election, board members voted last July to remove the “Redmen” name and then a few months later approved the new name “Red Hawks.”

After the GOP majority took control, many students, faculty and members of Native American groups asked the board not to go through with the reinstatement of “Redmen,” the Courant reported.

But the Republicans argued that those who preferred the name “Redmen” deserved to have their opinions respected as well.

“If we’re going to talk about respecting our students and protecting our students and doing what’s best for our students, we need to respect the opinion of all of our students, not just the ones we agree with,” said Jason Muscara, a Republican member of the school board.

Prior to the election, Muscara had told the Courant that the campaign to replace the old mascot had been part of a “radical left agenda” of local Democrats.

Another Republican board member, Karen Fremuth, argued that the name “Redmen” was never intended to disrespect Native Americans.

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One Democrat argued that times had changed and that the school board needed to change with them.

“History and facts change as we get more information,” Lydia Rivera-Abrams, said, adding that the school board should pursue policies that promote “respect for everyone.”

Click here for more from The Hartford Courant.

Westlake Legal Group kill99 Connecticut high school’s ‘Redmen’ mascot reinstated after GOP gains control of board fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/connecticut fox-news/us/education/high-school fox-news/us/education fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 4e2d47c2-690c-5428-835b-92ae995a031b   Westlake Legal Group kill99 Connecticut high school’s ‘Redmen’ mascot reinstated after GOP gains control of board fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/connecticut fox-news/us/education/high-school fox-news/us/education fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 4e2d47c2-690c-5428-835b-92ae995a031b

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4 Takeaways From The Democratic Presidential Debate In Iowa

Westlake Legal Group 5e1e9a4422000051003f7298 4 Takeaways From The Democratic Presidential Debate In Iowa

The theoretical stakes for Tuesday night’s Democratic presidential debate, sponsored by CNN and The Des Moines Register, were gigantic. Four candidates, locked in what polling indicates is a four-way tie, were debating in Iowa’s capital just weeks before the state’s first-in-the-nation caucuses.

But the eventual debate saw little in the way of new dividing lines between the candidates and nothing that was likely to dramatically change voters’ minds. Here are four takeaways from the Democratic presidential debate, and they’re more about what didn’t happen than what did.

The Candidates Are (Mostly) OK With The Race’s Status Quo

Many of the prior debates featured sharp exchanges between a leading candidate and a candidate hoping to take their place in the top tier ― think back to former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris’s clash in the first round of debates, or the battles between Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg in October. But the small debate stage ― just six candidates managed to qualify ― meant that only those who felt good about their standing on the race were participating.

It’s potentially a rational decision: Public polling indicates Biden, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Buttigieg and Warren (D-Mass.) are all in position to win Iowa, or at least to finish strong enough to continue campaigning. Businessman Tom Steyer, who is polling strong in Nevada and South Carolina, is self-funding his campaign and will be able to continue running even with a weak finish.

The one candidate who needs to win Iowa, and isn’t in a position to do so, is Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), who had some clashes with Warren and Sanders and overall turned in a strong performance. But she didn’t generate a clear game-changing moment. The same could be said of Buttigieg, whose numbers in the state have slipped in some recent public polling. 

Warren And Sanders Survive Their Beef, For Now

Tensions between Warren and Sanders were running high before the debate following a CNN report that Sanders had told Warren during a 2018 meeting that a woman could not win the presidential election. Both candidates’ campaigns, and much of the broader progressive infrastructure, signaled that they wanted a de-escalation. 

When CNN brought up its own reporting, Sanders repeated his denial ― and Warren turned in what’s likely going to be the signature moment of the debate. 

“Can a woman beat Donald Trump?” she asked. “Look at the men on this stage. Collectively, they have lost 10 elections. The only people on this stage who have won every single election that they’ve been in are the women.” Her response won laughter and applause from the debate audience.

Though some events after the debate indicate the tension hasn’t totally dissipated, it’s likely both campaigns will try to move on from the fight for now. 

Missing Candidates Mean Missing Issues

Repeat debate viewers might have missed some old friends, including every candidate or former candidate of color in the race: Harris, Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, entrepreneur Andrew Yang and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii).

Issues championed by those candidates were missing from the debate stage. Save for a mention by Warren of how her child care plan would help Black and Latino women who work, there was little direct discussion of how any candidate’s plans would specifically help racial minorities. (There was also no mention of the deadly earthquakes that have rocked Puerto Rico in recent days.) 

And while Booker and former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas) had emphasized combating gun violence in their campaigns, there was no discussion of the issue on Tuesday night, even though public polling shows it’s a top issue for primary voters. Castro’s emphasis and willingness to press the other candidates on immigration reform was also absent, as was Gabbard’s willingness to challenge the other candidates with her unorthodox foreign policy views and Yang’s focus on the future of the workforce.

Biden Slides By

Though Biden isn’t the clear front-runner in Iowa, he is the clear leader nationally, thanks to his strength with Black voters and the primary electorate’s broad belief that he’d be the strongest candidate against Trump. And it’s not clear that a victory by another candidate in Iowa would change that. 

So it was somewhat surprising Biden did not face more attacks from the other candidates. Sanders, in particular, had signaled he wanted to challenge Biden on his vote for the Iraq War and his past support for cutting Social Security. The Social Security topic never came up in the debate, and Sanders did not force the issue. And though Biden and Sanders did clash over the war, a lack of pointed follow-ups from the moderators allowed each candidate to mostly repeat their standard talking points.

 “Joe and I listened to what Dick Cheney and George Bush and Rumsfeld had to say,” Sanders said. “I thought they were lying. I didn’t believe them for a moment. I took to the floor. I did everything I could to prevent that war. Joe saw it differently.”

“I was asked to bring 156,000 troops home from that war, which I did,” Biden responded, referring to his time as Barack Obama’s vice president. “I led that effort. It was a mistake to trust that they weren’t going to go to war. They said they were not going to go to war.”

Warren, who last week released a plan to reverse the bankruptcy law that Biden pushed into law in 2005, did not confront him about that issue either. And during the exchange over the ability of a woman to win the presidency, no candidate or moderator mentioned Biden’s recent suggestion that it would be harder for Trump to attack him because he’s a man. 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

4 Takeaways From The Democratic Presidential Debate In Iowa

Westlake Legal Group 5e1e9a4422000051003f7298 4 Takeaways From The Democratic Presidential Debate In Iowa

The theoretical stakes for Tuesday night’s Democratic presidential debate, sponsored by CNN and The Des Moines Register, were gigantic. Four candidates, locked in what polling indicates is a four-way tie, were debating in Iowa’s capital just weeks before the state’s first-in-the-nation caucuses.

But the eventual debate saw little in the way of new dividing lines between the candidates and nothing that was likely to dramatically change voters’ minds. Here are four takeaways from the Democratic presidential debate, and they’re more about what didn’t happen than what did.

The Candidates Are (Mostly) OK With The Race’s Status Quo

Many of the prior debates featured sharp exchanges between a leading candidate and a candidate hoping to take their place in the top tier ― think back to former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris’s clash in the first round of debates, or the battles between Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg in October. But the small debate stage ― just six candidates managed to qualify ― meant that only those who felt good about their standing on the race were participating.

It’s potentially a rational decision: Public polling indicates Biden, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Buttigieg and Warren (D-Mass.) are all in position to win Iowa, or at least to finish strong enough to continue campaigning. Businessman Tom Steyer, who is polling strong in Nevada and South Carolina, is self-funding his campaign and will be able to continue running even with a weak finish.

The one candidate who needs to win Iowa, and isn’t in a position to do so, is Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), who had some clashes with Warren and Sanders and overall turned in a strong performance. But she didn’t generate a clear game-changing moment. The same could be said of Buttigieg, whose numbers in the state have slipped in some recent public polling. 

Warren And Sanders Survive Their Beef, For Now

Tensions between Warren and Sanders were running high before the debate following a CNN report that Sanders had told Warren during a 2018 meeting that a woman could not win the presidential election. Both candidates’ campaigns, and much of the broader progressive infrastructure, signaled that they wanted a de-escalation. 

When CNN brought up its own reporting, Sanders repeated his denial ― and Warren turned in what’s likely going to be the signature moment of the debate. 

“Can a woman beat Donald Trump?” she asked. “Look at the men on this stage. Collectively, they have lost 10 elections. The only people on this stage who have won every single election that they’ve been in are the women.” Her response won laughter and applause from the debate audience.

Though some events after the debate indicate the tension hasn’t totally dissipated, it’s likely both campaigns will try to move on from the fight for now. 

Missing Candidates Mean Missing Issues

Repeat debate viewers might have missed some old friends, including every candidate or former candidate of color in the race: Harris, Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, entrepreneur Andrew Yang and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii).

Issues championed by those candidates were missing from the debate stage. Save for a mention by Warren of how her child care plan would help Black and Latino women who work, there was little direct discussion of how any candidate’s plans would specifically help racial minorities. (There was also no mention of the deadly earthquakes that have rocked Puerto Rico in recent days.) 

And while Booker and former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas) had emphasized combating gun violence in their campaigns, there was no discussion of the issue on Tuesday night, even though public polling shows it’s a top issue for primary voters. Castro’s emphasis and willingness to press the other candidates on immigration reform was also absent, as was Gabbard’s willingness to challenge the other candidates with her unorthodox foreign policy views and Yang’s focus on the future of the workforce.

Biden Slides By

Though Biden isn’t the clear front-runner in Iowa, he is the clear leader nationally, thanks to his strength with Black voters and the primary electorate’s broad belief that he’d be the strongest candidate against Trump. And it’s not clear that a victory by another candidate in Iowa would change that. 

So it was somewhat surprising Biden did not face more attacks from the other candidates. Sanders, in particular, had signaled he wanted to challenge Biden on his vote for the Iraq War and his past support for cutting Social Security. The Social Security topic never came up in the debate, and Sanders did not force the issue. And though Biden and Sanders did clash over the war, a lack of pointed follow-ups from the moderators allowed each candidate to mostly repeat their standard talking points.

 “Joe and I listened to what Dick Cheney and George Bush and Rumsfeld had to say,” Sanders said. “I thought they were lying. I didn’t believe them for a moment. I took to the floor. I did everything I could to prevent that war. Joe saw it differently.”

“I was asked to bring 156,000 troops home from that war, which I did,” Biden responded, referring to his time as Barack Obama’s vice president. “I led that effort. It was a mistake to trust that they weren’t going to go to war. They said they were not going to go to war.”

Warren, who last week released a plan to reverse the bankruptcy law that Biden pushed into law in 2005, did not confront him about that issue either. And during the exchange over the ability of a woman to win the presidency, no candidate or moderator mentioned Biden’s recent suggestion that it would be harder for Trump to attack him because he’s a man. 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com