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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 192)

China’s Doctors, Fighting the Coronavirus, Beg for Masks

WUHAN, China — In the hospital where Yu Yajie works, nurses, doctors and other medical professionals fighting the new coronavirus have also been fighting dire shortages. They have used tape to patch up battered protective masks, repeatedly reused goggles meant for one-time use, and wrapped their shoes in plastic bags for lack of specialized coverings.

Ms. Yu is now lying at home, feverish and fearful that she has been infected with the virus. She and other employees at the hospital said a lack of effective protective wear had left medical workers like her vulnerable in Wuhan, the central Chinese city at the heart of the epidemic that has engulfed this region.

“There are risks — there simply aren’t enough resources,” Ms. Yu, an administrator at Wuhan Central Hospital, said in a brief telephone interview, adding that she was too weak to speak at length.

Chinese medical workers at the forefront of the fight against the coronavirus epidemic are often becoming its victims, in part because of government missteps and logistical hurdles.

After the virus emerged in Wuhan late last year, city leaders played down its risks, so doctors didn’t take precautions. When the outbreak could no longer be ignored, officials imposed a lockdown on Wuhan that expanded across the surrounding Hubei Province and then swathes of China. The vast travel cordons may have slowed the epidemic, but they have also slowed deliveries into Hubei, leaving medical workers short of protective wear.

On Friday, the Chinese government for the first time disclosed the toll the outbreak was taking on hospital employees. An official said 1,716 medical workers had contracted the virus, including 1,502 in Wuhan, and six of them had died. He did not share the names of the dead.

The strength — or vulnerability — of China’s medical workers could shape how well the Communist Party weathers its worst political crisis in years. Li Wenliang, a doctor, died from the coronavirus last week, after he had been punished by the police for warning friends of the outbreak. His death ignited a wave of fury in China, where he was lionized as a medical martyr to officials who put political control ahead of health.

“Of course I’m nervous about getting infected,” said Cai Yi, head of the division of pain management at Wuhan Central Hospital, the same hospital where Dr. Li had worked. “But if we let ourselves be nervous, then what would happen to the people?”

China’s president and Communist Party leader, Xi Jinping, has praised hospital workers in Hubei as heroes, and mobilized the mighty power of the country in a “people’s war” against the coronavirus. But hospital workers in Wuhan said they often felt frustrated and alone in their fight.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

Some have scrambled to buy protective gear with their own money, begged from friends, or relied on donations from other parts of China and abroad. Others have avoided eating and drinking for long stretches because going to the toilet meant removing and discarding safety gowns that they would not be able to replace. Younger staff are assigned to the more critical cases, with the expectation that if they get sick they would be more likely to recover.

Even as Chinese officials disclosed how many medical workers have been sickened and killed by the virus, key questions remain unanswered, experts said, including how the workers became infected and whether the rate of transmission was slowing. Such omissions could make it more difficult for other countries to assess and reduce their own risks.

“Clearly it would have been useful for other parts of China who are beginning to struggle with this outbreak as well for the rest of the world to have these types of data as soon as possible,” said Malik Peiris, a virologist at the University of Hong Kong.

Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the World Health Organization, said it is seeking more information about the time period and circumstances surrounding the infections of health care workers.

“This is a critical piece of information, because health workers are the glue that holds the health system and outbreak response together,” Dr. Tedros said.

Westlake Legal Group china-wuhan-coronavirus-maps-promo-articleLarge-v25 China’s Doctors, Fighting the Coronavirus, Beg for Masks Wuhan (China) Viruses Shortages Protective Clothing and Gear Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Communist Party of China China

Coronavirus Map: Tracking the Spread of the Outbreak

The virus has sickened more than 64,400 people in China and 24 other countries.

Doctors and other hospital workers have also come under pressure not to speak out. But many do, out of desperation.

“For the first time, I felt helpless confronting the system,” Chang Le, a doctor at Hankou Hospital in Wuhan, said in an online message pleading for more medical masks. His plea was deleted by the censors. “It’s only today that I’ve grasped just how hard it is for us front line medical workers.”

The Chinese government has acknowledged problems in medical supplies for Hubei, and repeatedly promised to speed up deliveries.

Strains in medical supplies may have been unavoidable as the virus spread with a fury that seemed to catch the government off guard. But the sweeping restrictions across China to contain the virus also slowed production and delivery of much-needed medical equipment, said doctors, factory managers, and aid workers.

Pervasive road checks and travel restrictions have held up shipments. Factories have faced difficulty ramping up production because workers and raw materials have been blocked by lockdowns. Local governments have hoarded supplies. China’s state-controlled Red Cross has dominated distribution of donations, creating a bottleneck that infuriated hospital employees.

With medical supplies so scarce, many health care workers in Wuhan also said they had to accept substandard gowns, gloves and masks. Outside the Wuhan Fourth Hospital, medical workers waited near a truck as a delivery man in a full-body medical suit handed down boxes of masks and gowns. One hospital worker explained that the gowns were not of a high enough grade to withstand a viral contagion.

“But this is all we could get,” she said. She declined to give her name. “We just have to accept what they send us.”

Life has become a scramble, many said: treating patients for much of the day; hunting for protective gear for the rest. The shortage has forced employees, like Dr. Chang, from the city’s hospitals to appeal for donations of N95 masks — a type of respirator best suited to guarding against viruses — and other personal protective equipment on Chinese social media sites.

Dr. Peng Zhiyong, 53, head of the department of critical care medicine at Wuhan University’s Zhongnan Hospital, said in an interview this week that his team was running dangerously low on full-body medical suits and masks. We can only get one break during the entire day,” he said. “Just one, to drink water and eat. Because if you leave, you don’t have any new suits to get back into.”

The first time the authorities publicly acknowledged a problem with medical workers catching the virus was on Jan. 20, when an official expert revealed that 14 had been infected by a single patient. Until the government released details on Friday, details were scattershot, emerging in studies and news reports.

Dr. Peng and other researchers wrote that 40 health care professionals at his hospital had been infected with the virus in January, a third of the cases included in a study published last week in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

A 61-year-old doctor died nine days after contracting the virus from a patient, according to a report by the newspaper China Philanthropy Times.

Another doctor had started to show symptoms of the coronavirus early last month, before medical professionals knew to take extra precautions, according to the state-run Health Times newspaper. He died this past Monday.

During the severe acute respiratory syndrome or SARS outbreak of 2002-2003, infections of medical workers became a source of anger after the government suppressed information about the virus for months. These workers made up 15 percent of confirmed cases, according to an expert, Xu Dezhong, quoted by Xinhua, China’s official news agency. About 1 percent of the medical workers infected with SARS died.

The pleas from hospitals across Hubei have inspired an outpouring of donations from Chinese businesses, workers and charities. But the surge in demand for medical equipment has been hard for suppliers to meet, especially under the lockdown.

Officials in the city of Xiantao in Hubei at first told some companies making protective medical clothing and masks that their factories could not reopen until Feb. 14. An outcry followed, and the city’s officials relented on Monday, saying that 73 of the companies could resume operations.

The roads to Hubei are also full of hurdles. In theory, the government has created “green channels” to speed through trucks carrying masks, gowns and equipment. In practice, local officials and police can hold up journeys.

One truck driver recounted being stopped 14 times for body temperature checks when he set out from Wuhan to pick up medical supplies, The Beijing News, a state-run Chinese newspaper, reported.

Guo Fei, a 27-year-old entrepreneur who has been helping to buy and deliver supplies to hospitals in Xiaogan, a city in Hubei, said his team was held by the police for around eight hours in a neighboring province, Jiangxi, when they went there to pick up an order of hygienic gloves. The police seemed to be acting for local officials who wanted to retain the supplies for their area, he said.

“I can accept government controls,” he said, “but not local protectionism.”

Doctors also criticized bureaucracy for clogging up distribution. Many donations of medical supplies must be funneled through the Red Cross, and the organization — understaffed and overwhelmed — has struggled.

In a furious social media post, Dr. Chang, the doctor at the Hankou Hospital, described his experience trying to get 10,000 N95 masks from the Red Cross. He was eventually given more than 9,000 masks of inferior quality, he said.

“I just wanted to cry,” he said at the end of his video message.

Premier Li Keqiang, who oversees a policy team for the crisis, said in early February that “unified national management” would help overcome the shortages

Just a week later, China’s Politburo Standing Committee, the Communist Party’s top most council, said problems with insufficient beds, medical personnel and other medical resources persisted across Hubei. According to official data from the province, deliveries of high-quality masks and other items have accelerated in recent days.

Until conditions markedly improve, medical workers will still be forced to make hard adjustments. Dr. Cai, from Wuhan Central Hospital, said he has assigned younger medical workers to treat coronavirus patients to avoid endangering more seasoned employees. “To be honest, if older doctors get infected, their immune system is much weaker,” he said.

Dr. Peng of Zhongnan Hospital said more attention had to be paid to the fate of medical workers. “Because when the country doesn’t have any more medical workers, then what hope is there left?”

Sui-Lee Wee reported from Singapore. Elsie Chen contributed research from Wuhan. Roni Caryn Rabin contributed reporting from New York. Amber Wang, Wang Yiwei and Zoe Mou contributed research from Beijing.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Coronavirus Live Updates: Beijing Sets Stringent New Quarantine Rules

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group 14china-briefing6-articleLarge Coronavirus Live Updates: Beijing Sets Stringent New Quarantine Rules Tests (Medical) Quarantines Hubei Province (China) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

A checkpoint outside an office building in Beijing. Even before the capital issued its new rules, local committees had been playing an increasingly assertive role across China.Credit…Gilles Sabrie for The New York Times

Chinese state-run television announced on its website on Friday evening that everyone returning to Beijing would be required to isolate themselves for 14 days.

Anyone who does not comply “shall be held accountable according to law,” according to a text of the order released by state television. The order was issued by a Communist Party “leading group” at the municipal level, not the national Communist Party.

It was the latest sign that China’s leaders were still struggling to set the right balance between restarting the economy and continuing to fight the coronavirus outbreak.

On Tuesday and Wednesday, the country’s top officials met and issued orders that included a mandate to help people to return to workplaces from their hometowns. Tens of millions had gone home to celebrate Lunar New Year holidays before the government acknowledged the seriousness of the epidemic. They have faced local government checkpoints on the way back to work and then lengthy quarantines upon their return to big cities.

But while national leaders may be worried that travel restrictions and quarantines may be preventing companies from finding enough workers to resume full production, that did not stop Beijing municipal leaders from further tightening controls on Friday evening in the city.

The policy may reduce the chances that people returning from the hinterlands could infect the country’s elite.

The new rules also require those returning to the city to give advance warning of their arrival to the authorities in their residential area. China maintained extensive controls on citizens’ movements under Mao, and some of the institutions and rules from that period have been re-emerging lately.

Even before Beijing issued its new rules, so-called neighborhood committees had been playing an increasingly assertive role across the country, including in Shanghai. They have been demanding that recent returnees isolate themselves for 14 days upon arrival, venturing out for little except food.

For more than a month, medical workers in Hubei, the province at the center of the coronavirus outbreak, have been working nearly nonstop even as they struggled with a shortage of personal protective equipment such as masks, gowns and safety goggles.

For the first time on Friday, China disclosed figures that drove home the risks faced by those on the front line: 1,716 medical workers have contracted the virus and six of them have died. Of those people, 1,502 were in Hubei Province, with 1,102 of them in Wuhan, the provincial capital and the center of the outbreak.

The announcement was the first official confirmation about the number of infected medical workers, and is likely to ratchet up fears about the spread of the virus.

“I think it’s quite concerning,” said Benjamin Cowling, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Hong Kong. “Health care workers face the challenge of caring for a substantial number of patients in Wuhan. It’s worrying to discover that a number of them have been infected.”

Zeng Yixin, deputy director of the National Health Commission, said the numbers of infected workers represented 3.8 percent of China’s overall confirmed infections as of Feb. 11.

He added that further research was needed to ascertain whether the infections spread throughout the hospital or within the community.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

Medical workers, struggling to both treat patients and keep themselves safe, have resorted to begging from friends, putting out frequent calls for donations, and using tape to patch up torn masks and gowns.

Many doctors and nurses there say they eat just one meal a day because going to the restroom means removing and discarding safety gowns that they would not be able to replace.

During the SARS outbreak of 2002-3, 961 medical workers were infected, representing 18 percent of all infections, according to government data. About 1 percent of the medical workers infected with SARS died, a medical expert, Xu Dezhong, told Xinhua, China’s official news agency.

Westlake Legal Group china-wuhan-coronavirus-maps-promo-articleLarge-v25 Coronavirus Live Updates: Beijing Sets Stringent New Quarantine Rules Tests (Medical) Quarantines Hubei Province (China) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

Coronavirus Map: Tracking the Spread of the Outbreak

The virus has sickened more than 64,400 people in China and 24 other countries.

A senior health official in Wuhan, China, the center of the outbreak, has called on residents who have recovered from the coronavirus to donate blood plasma, believing their naturally produced antibodies could be used to treat patients who are still sick.

Dr. Zhang Dingyu, the director of the Jinyintan Hospital in Wuhan, made his appeal on Thursday after Chinese researchers said they believed that such antibody treatments could help people recover from the virus.

The search for a drug capable of treating or curing the virus has frustrated researchers, as rates of infection and deaths continue to mount.

The government is currently prescribing a combination of antiviral drugs and traditional Chinese medicine. But on Thursday, China National Biotec Group, a state-owned company under the Ministry of Health, said it had found that administering a round of human antibodies from the survivors to more than 10 critically ill patients caused inflammation levels to drop significantly after 12 to 24 hours of treatment.

The company called the use of plasma “the most effective method, which can significantly reduce the mortality of critically ill patients.”

Benjamin Cowling, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Hong Kong, said the use of antibodies to treat the coronavirus was “a really good idea,” noting that it had been used before in influenza pandemics. But he cautioned that it needed to be proven in a controlled trial.

“It’s basically transferring immunity from a patient who has recovered to a patient still fighting the infection, and then helping them to recover,” he said.

Numbers continued to climb after the government changed the criteria by which it tracks confirmed cases. China on Friday reported 5,090 new coronavirus cases and 121 new deaths in the previous 24 hours.

The authorities said a total of 63,851 people had been infected by the coronavirus and at least 1,380 had been killed by the disease. Most of the cases occurred in Hubei Province, the center of the outbreak, which recorded 4,823 new cases and 116 deaths over the same period.

The tally in Hubei jumped most drastically on Thursday after the authorities changed the diagnostic criteria for counting new cases. The government now takes into account cases diagnosed in clinical settings, including the use of CT scans, and not just those confirmed with specialized testing kits.

A Hong Kong clinic designated to treat suspected coronavirus cases suffered a second arson attack early Friday, officials said.

Hong Kong’s Hospital Authority said it “seriously condemned” the attack, against an outpatient clinic in the New Territories district of Tsuen Wan. A police spokeswoman said it had occurred overnight and left a door charred. The first attack, on Saturday afternoon, damaged an air-conditioner. No one was wounded in either attack.

The clinic is about four miles from an apartment building where dozens of residents were evacuated this week after two residents on different floors were found to be infected, raising fresh fears about how the virus spreads. (Officials said an unsealed pipe might be to blame.)

There were 56 confirmed cases in the city as of Friday. Fearing a wider outbreak, residents have been staging small-scale protests at several clinics assigned to treat people with mild symptoms of the virus. Late last month, the government shelved a plan to turn an unoccupied housing project into a quarantine facility after protesters set a fire in the lobby.

As public anger and anxiety mount, the Beijing-backed government has been accused by many residents of not doing enough to contain the spread of the virus, including the refusal to quickly order a complete shutdown of the border with mainland China. The authorities have gradually restricted arrivals from mainland China over the past few weeks.

Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s chief executive, said on Friday that her administration would do its best to repatriate more than 2,000 of the city’s residents stranded in Hubei province and aboard the Diamond Princess, the cruise ship quarantined off Japan’s coast.

The Hong Kong government has received more than 1,000 requests for help from over 300 cities across Hubei, including from Wuhan, Mrs. Lam said. Ten people from Hong Kong in the region were confirmed to have been infected.

Some 330 Hong Kong residents remain stuck on the cruise ship in Japan, and 11 of them were infected, officials said. The Hong Kong authorities are pressing their Japanese counterparts to consider allowing its citizens to be quarantined onshore and to get tested for the virus as soon as possible, said John Lee, the city’s security minister, on Friday.

The coronavirus has killed more than 1,300 and infected tens of thousands in China. Those are alarming statistics, but a much more common illness, influenza, kills about 400,000 every year, including 34,200 Americans last flu season and 61,099 the year before.

There remains deep uncertainty about the new coronavirus’s mortality rate, with the high-end estimate that it is up to 20 times that of the flu, but some estimates go as low as 0.16 percent for those affected outside of China’s overwhelmed Hubei Province. That’s about on par with the flu.

While the metrics of public health might put the flu alongside or even ahead of the new coronavirus for sheer deadliness, the mind has its own ways of measuring danger.

Experts used to believe that people gauged risk like actuaries, parsing out cost-benefit analyses every time a merging car came too close or local crime rates spiked. But a wave of psychological experiments in the 1980s upended this thinking.

Researchers instead found that people use a set of mental shortcuts for measuring danger. And they tend to do it unconsciously, meaning that instinct can play a large role.

The coronavirus, which has created a wave of fear, may be a case in point.

“This hits all the hot buttons that lead to heightened risk perception,” said Paul Slovic, a University of Oregon psychologist who helped pioneer modern risk psychology.

At least five people fled coronavirus quarantine across Russia, local news media reported on Friday, citing frustration, erratic and inconsistent government policies, and bad conditions in the hospitals where they were held.

Alla Ilyina, 32, a woman from St. Petersburg, had enough patience to stay for only one day at a hospital in Russia’s second-largest city. She detailed how she had broken a lock in her room and sneaked away while doctors were distracted by another patient.

“I am a reasonable person, if someone told me that there was a suspicion, if doctors didn’t tell me that I was healthy, if I had not done three tests in separate hospitals, I would sit there,” Ms. Ilyina told reporters in an interview, broadcast on Russian television. “I don’t want to infect my relatives or threaten anybody, but I just don’t understand why an absolutely healthy person should be held somewhere.”

Three more people escaped quarantine in the same hospital, Fontanka.ru reported on Friday.

In the city of Samara, Guzel Neder, 34, escaped through the window of another hospital. After staying in quarantine for four days, Mrs. Neder called a testing center and a specialist said if she hadn’t received a positive result within two hours, “then you should be fine.”

“My son already felt well, he didn’t have any fever symptoms, but doctors deliberately made us stay for longer, so that we wouldn’t leave, to ‘fulfill the order’ of isolating people, coming from China,” she said. She described conditions at the hospital, where doctors didn’t wear any protective gear.

Only two confirmed cases of coronavirus have been reported in Russia so far. Hundreds of Russian and Chinese nationals have been quarantined across the country for the 14-day period, following recommendations from the World Health Organization.

Lee Hsien Loong, the prime minister of Singapore, said on Friday that it was possible the city-state could fall into recession as the coronavirus spreads.

“I think the impact will be significant at least in the next couple of quarters,” said Mr. Lee, in a video posted on his Facebook page.

At Singapore Changi Airport, the number of flights has fallen by a third and travelers who have recently visited mainland China are not allowed to disembark.

“It’s a very intense outbreak,” said Mr. Lee, who visited the airport to show his support for the workers there. “It is already much more than SARS, and economies of the region are much more interlinked together.”

Singapore, whose economy is particularly sensitive to global fluctuations, has already seen a slowdown in growth. The economy is estimated to have expanded by 0.7 percent in 2019, compared to 3.1 percent the year before, according to government statistics.

“China particularly is a much bigger factor in the region and therefore I can’t say whether we’ll have a recession or not,” Mr. Lee added. “It’s possible, but definitely our economy will take a hit.”

The Chinese government failed to sound a public warning in the early days of the outbreak even though scientists were aware of human-to-human transmission, a doctor from Wuhan wrote in a paper published by The Lancet this week.

Dr. Zhang Hong of Zhongnan Hospital wrote that the local authorities had allowed more than five million people to leave Wuhan to travel for the Lunar New Year holiday despite warnings from Chinese scientists.

“Early detection and early reporting were delayed,” Dr. Zhang wrote.

The paper was a rare instance of a medical professional criticizing the government, especially at a time when doctors and nurses have come under pressure not to speak out. Dr. Zhang also wrote that doctors did not understand the severity and contagiousness of the new coronavirus early on, and that medical workers failed to fully protect themselves as a result.

He wrote that the supplies of protective equipment in hospitals were severely insufficient and were worsened by the implementation of traffic controls after the government sealed off cities across China. He called on the government to “pay attention to the front-line doctors and provide adequate protective equipment to reduce their risk of infection.”

Overstretched hospitals were forced to turn patients away as the virus spread, “inevitably increasing morbidity and mortality,” he added.

The authorities in Wuhan have admitted that public announcements about the virus were delayed. In late January, when the outbreak was spreading through Wuhan, the city’s mayor, Zhou Xianwang, acknowledged that the disclosures had not been timely, but said his hands were tied because he could only publicize it “in accordance with the law.”

Reporting and research was contributed by Keith Bradsher, Ivan Nechepurenko, Sui-Lee Wee, Choe Sang-Hun, Richard C. Paddock, Elaine Yu, Motoko Rich, Lin Qiqing, Karen Zraick, Amie Tsang, Amber Wang, Zoe Mou, Albee Zhang, Yiwei Wang, and Claire Fu.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Ivanka Trump debuts new hair color

Blondes have more fun!

White House senior adviser Ivanka Trump debuted a new look on Wednesday morning with chunky blonde highlights in her already golden hair.

The president’s oldest daughter unveiled the new ‘do at a State Department anniversary event in Washington, D.C. for the Women’s Global Development and Prosperity (W-GDP) Initiative she spearheaded last year.

Westlake Legal Group ivanka-trump-getty Ivanka Trump debuts new hair color Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/politics/executive/first-family fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc efe8d5f3-d291-5342-95b4-251546f54e3e article

Ivanka Trump hosts an event to mark the first anniversary of her Women’s Global Development Prosperity Initiative in the Franklin Room at the State Department February 12, 2020 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Looking ahead, style blog Who What Wear predicts that chunky highlights popularized in the 90s will make a comeback in 2020. Unlike the dramatic, high-contrast highlights of days past, however, the new take on the trend will reportedly incorporate balayage and face-framing coloring techniques.

POLITICIAN BLASTS ‘EVERYDAY SEXISM’ AFTER BEING TROLLED FOR OFF-THE-SHOULDER DRESS

This isn’t the first time in recent months that Trump switched up her look. In September 2019, the White House senior adviser made headlines when she lobbed off her long locks into a trendy bob, debuting the new hairstyle while visiting Colombia to advocate for female entrepreneurs.

At the Wednesday W-GDP event, Trump revealed that a bipartisan pair of senators are working for the global women’s initiative to be written into law. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., will take on the effort.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1200234708 Ivanka Trump debuts new hair color Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/politics/executive/first-family fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc efe8d5f3-d291-5342-95b4-251546f54e3e article

The proposed legislation would establish an Office of Women’s Empowerment at the State Department and make the economic empowerment of women across the globe a mainstay in U.S. foreign policy, beyond the Trump administration.(Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images)

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS

The proposed legislation would establish an Office of Women’s Empowerment at the State Department and make the economic empowerment of women across the globe a mainstay in U.S. foreign policy, beyond her father’s administration.

The first daughter called the legislation a “long overdue goal.”

In February of last year, the Women’s Global Development and Prosperity Initiative (W-GDP) aimed to “help 50 million women in developing countries realize their economic potential by 2025,” according to an op-ed she penned for The Wall Street Journal.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Fox News’ Morgan Phillips contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1200234708 Ivanka Trump debuts new hair color Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/politics/executive/first-family fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc efe8d5f3-d291-5342-95b4-251546f54e3e article   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1200234708 Ivanka Trump debuts new hair color Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/politics/executive/first-family fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc efe8d5f3-d291-5342-95b4-251546f54e3e article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Indians starter Mike Clevinger to have left knee surgery

Westlake Legal Group Mike-Clevinger Indians starter Mike Clevinger to have left knee surgery fox-news/sports/mlb/cleveland-indians fox-news/sports/mlb fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 9d7e3d19-d191-5f63-a77c-80caf16cc03e

Indians starting pitcher Mike Clevinger will have left knee surgery after an injury during a spring training workout.

Clevinger went 13-4 last season and the Indians are counting on him to help fill some of the void after they traded two-time Cy Young winner Corey Kluber to the Texas Ranger this winter.

Clevinger sustained a partial cartilage tear Wednesday at the team’s complex in Goodyear, Arizona, the team said Friday. The right-hander will have surgery in nearby Avondale, and a timetable for his return will be set after the operation. But it’s safe to assume he will miss at least several weeks.

Clevinger has won 38 games over the past three seasons. He made 21 starts in 2019, but missed time early in the year with a strained back muscle. The 29-year-old had a 2.71 ERA last season.

Clevinger avoided salary arbitration by signing a $4.1 million contract for this season. He’s been outspoken about the Houston Astros’ sign-stealing scandal.

Also, the Indians signed free-agent outfielder Domingo Santana to a contract for 2020. He played for Seattle last season, batting .253 with 21 homers and 69 RBIs in 121 games. The 27-year-old Santana missed 24 games in August and September with an injured right elbow.

Westlake Legal Group Mike-Clevinger Indians starter Mike Clevinger to have left knee surgery fox-news/sports/mlb/cleveland-indians fox-news/sports/mlb fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 9d7e3d19-d191-5f63-a77c-80caf16cc03e   Westlake Legal Group Mike-Clevinger Indians starter Mike Clevinger to have left knee surgery fox-news/sports/mlb/cleveland-indians fox-news/sports/mlb fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 9d7e3d19-d191-5f63-a77c-80caf16cc03e

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Twitter praises couple’s unique marijuana-themed baby names: ‘Kept with the theme’

Westlake Legal Group iStock-471523365 Twitter praises couple's unique marijuana-themed baby names: 'Kept with the theme' fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article Alexandra Deabler 478142f8-d8f4-5717-a748-b1bc5b0d2ba2

This weed-loving couple got more creative than the typical “Mary Jane” moniker marijuana aficionados have used in the past and instead opted to name their daughters SaTiva and Indica – two types of cannabis plant.

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In a post that has racked up nearly 18K retweets and 95K likes, Twitter user Fred Lee shared the news that he had become an uncle for the second time and that his brother had chosen to stick with the marijuana theme he and his partner chose for their first daughter.

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“UPDATE: My brother is excited to announce the birth of his 2nd daughter!” Lee wrote in the post, before following it up with a “…and before you ask, yes, her name is exactly what you think it is.”

Attached to the February 2020 post was a tweet Lee had shared in 2018 announcing the birth of his first niece, who was named “SaTiva,” a play on the sativa plant, which is known as more of a head high, whereas indica is a body high.

“My first niece is named SaTiva…I just…” the uncle posted.

The proud uncle was impressed that his brother “kept with the theme.”

Those on Twitter had a field day with the comments, suggesting other options if the family continues to expand.

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But most were surprised by how much they liked the unusual names.

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Hopefully, the little ones will grow up to appreciate their unique monikers as much as social media does.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-471523365 Twitter praises couple's unique marijuana-themed baby names: 'Kept with the theme' fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article Alexandra Deabler 478142f8-d8f4-5717-a748-b1bc5b0d2ba2   Westlake Legal Group iStock-471523365 Twitter praises couple's unique marijuana-themed baby names: 'Kept with the theme' fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article Alexandra Deabler 478142f8-d8f4-5717-a748-b1bc5b0d2ba2

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‘Stranger Things’ Teaser Confirms ‘Dead’ Character Is Coming Back

Westlake Legal Group 5e46bde91e00002e009896a5 ‘Stranger Things’ Teaser Confirms ‘Dead’ Character Is Coming Back

In a new Season 4 promo for “Stranger Things,” Netflix is Russian to get some news out.

Hop is alive! And he’s looking very Mr. Clean.

Season 3 of the hit series ended with Chief Jim Hopper (David Harbour) missing and presumed dead after Joyce (Winona Ryder) and all the “Stranger” kids helped stop the Mind Flayer and the Russians’ secret operation at the Starcourt Mall. (Yeah, the third season had a lot going on.)

Though Hopper was gone, he wasn’t forgotten, and fan theories went wild claiming he was the mysterious “American” being held by the Russians at the end of the season.

The promo and a message from show creators The Duffer Brothers confirm that:

We’re excited to officially confirm that production on Stranger Things 4 is now underway ― and even more excited to announce the return of Hopper! Although it’s not all good news for our “American”; he is imprisoned far from home in the snowy wasteland of Kamchatka, where he will face dangers both human…and other. Meanwhile, back in the states, a new horror is beginning to surface, something long buried, something that connects everything….Season 4 is shaping up to be the biggest and most frightening season yet, and we cannot wait for everyone to see more. In the meantime ― pray for the American.

From Russia with love,

The Duffer Brothers

The news made plenty of fans on Twitter emotional.

What exactly “connects everything” remains to be seen. But for now, Hopper is alive! Feel free to do your happy dance.

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Macron ally quits Paris mayoral race after sexually explicit images surface

French President Emmanuel Macron’s preferred candidate in the Paris mayoral race dropped out Friday amid allegations that he sent sexual images to a woman who isn’t his wife.

Benjamin Griveaux, a former government spokesperson and member of Macron’s centrist La République En Marche party, quit after images surfaced Thursday of an online chat that included a video of a man’s genitals, Reuters reports. He has not disputed that he participated in the conversation.

“I have decided to withdraw my candidacy from the municipal election,” Griveaux said in a video message, adding that websites and social media are “carrying ignoble attacks about my private life.”

FRANCE SEES RASH OF ANTI-CHRISTIAN ACTS WHILE ANTI-SEMITISM RISES, OFFICIALS SAY

The leaker who reportedly revealed the images, Russian performance artist Pyotr Pavlensky, is known for actions such as nailing his scrotum to Moscow’s Red Square in protest of the former Soviet country “becoming a police state.”

Westlake Legal Group Benjamin-Griveaux Macron ally quits Paris mayoral race after sexually explicit images surface Greg Norman fox-news/world/world-regions/france fox-news/world/world-politics fox-news/person/emmanuel-macron fox news fnc/world fnc article 4872aac3-a4da-5b92-a289-6b7d85840f1c

Paris mayoral candidate Benjamin Griveaux has dropped out of the upcoming Paris mayoral elections. (AP)

The newspaper Liberation said Pavlensky called Thursday night to disclose that he obtained the video from an unnamed source who had a relationship with Griveaux.

Liberation quoted Pavlensky as saying that he wanted to denounce Griveaux’s “hypocrisy.”

“He is someone who is always playing up family values, who says he wants to be the mayor of families and always cites as examples his wife and children. But he does the opposite,” Pavlensky reportedly told the newspaper.

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Yet expressions of support are coming in for Griveaux, even from political rivals.

Politicians warned that people will no longer want to stand for elected office if they run the risk of their private affairs becoming public and that the leaking of sexually explicit material to take Griveaux out of the municipal elections was a threat to France’s democratic traditions.

“We’re not trying to elect saints,” said Sebastien Chenu, a spokesman for the far-right National Rally party, normally an unforgiving political opponent of Griveaux’s centrist camp.

On the far-left, former presidential candidate Jean-Luc Melenchon also expressed support, saying Griveaux was the victim of score-settling and that French public life must not become prey to voyeurism.

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“The publication of intimate images to destroy an adversary is odious,” Melenchon tweeted.

Griveaux’s sudden withdrawal from the mayoral race leaves Macron’s party without a candidate for the elections next month.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Benjamin-Griveaux Macron ally quits Paris mayoral race after sexually explicit images surface Greg Norman fox-news/world/world-regions/france fox-news/world/world-politics fox-news/person/emmanuel-macron fox news fnc/world fnc article 4872aac3-a4da-5b92-a289-6b7d85840f1c   Westlake Legal Group Benjamin-Griveaux Macron ally quits Paris mayoral race after sexually explicit images surface Greg Norman fox-news/world/world-regions/france fox-news/world/world-politics fox-news/person/emmanuel-macron fox news fnc/world fnc article 4872aac3-a4da-5b92-a289-6b7d85840f1c

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Trump Claims ‘Legal Right’ to Interfere in Justice Dept. Cases

Westlake Legal Group 14dc-trump-facebookJumbo Trump Claims ‘Legal Right’ to Interfere in Justice Dept. Cases United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Stone, Roger J Jr Justice Department Barr, William P

WASHINGTON — President Trump asserted Friday that he had the legal right to intervene in federal criminal cases, a day after Attorney General William P. Barr publicly rebuked him for attacks on Justice Department prosecutors and others involved in the case of Roger J. Stone Jr., the president’s longtime friend.

In a morning tweet, Mr. Trump quoted Mr. Barr saying that the president “has never asked me to do anything in a criminal case.” The president said he had “so far chosen” not to interfere in a criminal case even though he insisted that he was not legally bound to do so.

“This doesn’t mean that I do not have, as President, the legal right to do so, I do, but I have so far chosen not to!” he said.

Though he and Mr. Barr both said the president has not directly asked for any specific inquiries, Mr. Trump has long pressured law enforcement officials both publicly and privately to open investigations into political rivals and to drop inquiries. Mr. Trump also pressed former Attorney General Jeff Sessions to retake control of the Russia investigation after he recused himself.

The assertion by the president, which implicitly rejected a request by Mr. Barr to stop tweeting about the department’s cases, adds to the mounting controversy over the decision by senior Justice Department officials to overrule prosecutors who had recommended a seven to nine year sentence for Mr. Stone, who was convicted of seven felonies in a bid to obstruct a congressional investigation that threatened the president.

That recommendation infuriated Mr. Trump, who called the department’s handling of the case “a disgrace” and later praised Mr. Barr after his top officials intervened to recommend a lighter sentence for Mr. Stone. The four prosecutors who were overruled resigned from the case in protest; one quit the department entirely.

Seeking to calm the upheaval in his department, Mr. Barr on Thursday issued a pointed denunciation of Mr. Trump’s tweets, which included criticism of the federal judge overseeing the Stone case and even the jury forewoman. Mr. Barr said the commentary from the president made it “impossible for me to do my job” and insisted that “I’m not going to be bullied or influenced by anybody.”

“I cannot do my job here at the department with a constant background commentary that undercuts me,” said Mr. Barr, who has been one of Mr. Trump’s closest and most reliable allies since taking over at the Justice Department.

Past presidents in both parties have respected long standing traditions that are aimed at preventing political influence from the White House on Justice Department investigations, especially criminal inquiries that involved administration officials or friends of the president. The rules have been in place since the Watergate investigation, in which former President Richard Nixon sought to pressure the F.B.I.

Mr. Trump has repeatedly ignored those traditions, making contact with F.B.I. officials and communicating with top Justice Department officials through Twitter and in person. His claim in Friday’s tweet that he has “so far chosen” not to interfere in criminal cases is contradicted by a record of his actions during the his three years in office.

Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel in the Russian election interference inquiry, documented numerous instances in which the president sought to obstruct justice as federal investigators examined the activities of Mr. Trump’s White House advisers and former campaign aides. In his final report, Mr. Mueller said that Justice Department rules did not allow sitting presidents to be indicted.

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Royal Caribbean cancels 18 cruises in Asia amid coronavirus outbreak

Bon voyage, Royal Caribbean.

Royal Caribbean International has canceled 18 cruises in Asia amid the ongoing coronavirus outbreak.

On Thursday, Reuters reports, the Miami-based cruise line announced that 18 upcoming cruises in Southeast Asia have been canceled as officials struggle to contain the viral disease, which is officially known as COVID-19.

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“It is important that every organization acts responsibly, and we have already taken aggressive steps to minimize risk through boarding restrictions and itinerary changes,” Chief Executive Officer Richard Fain said in a statement shared with Bloomberg. “Our focus on public health is unwavering.”

Westlake Legal Group anthem-of-the-seas Royal Caribbean cancels 18 cruises in Asia amid coronavirus outbreak Janine Puhak fox-news/travel/general/cruises fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/travel fnc b92c400d-faba-589a-bcf3-f0a0aebd3da5 article

Royal Caribbean International has canceled 18 cruises in Asia amid the continuing COVID-19 outbreak, formerly known as the novel coronavirus. (iStock)

Royal Caribbean also described recent demand for bookings as “softer” COVID-19 anxieties spread beyond Asia.

“While the early impact due to concerns about the coronavirus is mainly related to Asia, recent bookings for our broader business have also been softer,” the company revealed.

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Looking ahead, Royal Caribbean has not yet canceled its remaining departures across Asia through the end of April.

A spokesperson for the cruise company was not immediately available to offer further comment on the news.

As of Friday morning, the viral outbreak that began in China has reportedly infected over 64,000 people globally and claimed the lives of at least 1,383.

Last week, Royal Caribbean canceled eight cruises from China through early March as a precautionary measure for the safety of guests and staff.

A spokesperson for the cruise company was not immediately available to offer further comment.

On Monday, Royal Caribbean’s Anthem of the Seas ship finally departed a New Jersey port after docking last week to screen dozens of passengers for the novel coronavirus.

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Westlake Legal Group royal-caribbean-Anthem-of-the-Seas Royal Caribbean cancels 18 cruises in Asia amid coronavirus outbreak Janine Puhak fox-news/travel/general/cruises fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/travel fnc b92c400d-faba-589a-bcf3-f0a0aebd3da5 article   Westlake Legal Group royal-caribbean-Anthem-of-the-Seas Royal Caribbean cancels 18 cruises in Asia amid coronavirus outbreak Janine Puhak fox-news/travel/general/cruises fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/travel fnc b92c400d-faba-589a-bcf3-f0a0aebd3da5 article

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What’s the romantic vehicle? Probably not the Chevrolet LUV

The Chevrolet LUV is adorable, but its name isn’t exactly what it seems.

Westlake Legal Group luv What's the romantic vehicle? Probably not the Chevrolet LUV Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/style/pickups fox-news/auto/make/chevrolet fox-news/auto/attributes/collector-cars fox news fnc/auto fnc fa09d4ae-0623-5e73-bc47-dc02c44c1ba3 article

The economy pickup was a rebadged Isuzu compact launched in 1972 to help Chevy compete with the wave of small, affordable import trucks hitting the market.

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According to Hemmings, the starting price was $2,200, or about 15 percent less than a full-size Chevrolet C-10 pickup. The tiny truck was powered by a 1.8-liter four-cylinder engine with just 75 hp, but its efficiency helped build sales through the gas crises and Malaise Era, which peaked at over 100,000 in 1979. It’s affordability and available 4×4 drivetrain made it popular among off-roaders.

Westlake Legal Group luv-3 What's the romantic vehicle? Probably not the Chevrolet LUV Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/style/pickups fox-news/auto/make/chevrolet fox-news/auto/attributes/collector-cars fox news fnc/auto fnc fa09d4ae-0623-5e73-bc47-dc02c44c1ba3 article

The LUV was often used as an off-road racing truck. (Eric Rickman/The Enthusiast Network via Getty Images/Getty Images))

The LUV was updated a year later and sold in the U.S. through 1982, when Chevy finally got around to building its own small truck, the S-10, to replace it.

As for the name, while it spawned plenty of plays on words about how much people LUVed their trucks, it was actually an acronym for Light Utility Vehicle, which is really about as cold and descriptive as names get.

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Westlake Legal Group luv What's the romantic vehicle? Probably not the Chevrolet LUV Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/style/pickups fox-news/auto/make/chevrolet fox-news/auto/attributes/collector-cars fox news fnc/auto fnc fa09d4ae-0623-5e73-bc47-dc02c44c1ba3 article   Westlake Legal Group luv What's the romantic vehicle? Probably not the Chevrolet LUV Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/style/pickups fox-news/auto/make/chevrolet fox-news/auto/attributes/collector-cars fox news fnc/auto fnc fa09d4ae-0623-5e73-bc47-dc02c44c1ba3 article

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